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AROL-219-chapter-III-10

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					        Early Dynastic Period (2900-
The Sumerian city-state 2300 BC)
Economy
Temple economy: economy
  is in the hands of the
  temple. Sumerian city was
  called “temple City”.
Deimel was the first to
  suggest that the Sumerian
  city-state had a temple
  economy, i-e, all arable
  land belonged to the
  temple.
This theory was based on the
  ED III archives of the
  Bawa temple in Girsu.
The situation in Girsu cannot
  be generalized to all city-
        Early Dynastic Period (2900-
The Sumerian city-state 2300 BC)
Economy
This theory was proven
  wrong (Diakonoff):
  private households existed
  in Girsu.
The assumption that
  Mesopotamia was a so-
  called “hydraulic” state
  necessitating a strong
  central government proved
  to be wrong: no
  complicated and
  hierarchical irrigation
  systems in Mesopotamia
  before the first millennium
  BC.
        Early Dynastic Period (2900-
The Sumerian city-state
                        2300 BC)
Household economy: “each
   household is responsible
   for the production of
   goods for their own use,
   storage of raw materials
   and goods, and the
   manufacture of
   indispensable exchange
   goods”
In a large household,
   workforce is specialized
   according to gender and
   age.
Workers receive rations:
   barley, wool, oil.
         Early Dynastic Period (2900-
The Sumerian city-state
They can receive also land.
                            2300 BC)
  This land could not be
  inherited but it usually
  remained in the same
  family for generations.
  Usually given to high
  ranking people. (Akkadian
  ilkum)
These households ventured
  to invest in new
  productions like
  metallurgy and textiles.
To procure raw materials,
  households had to produce
  surpluses for exchange.
Main exchange product:
  textile.

				
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