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ApprenticeshipFoundation Modern Apprenticeship in Hospitality and

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					Apprenticeship/Foundation Modern Apprenticeship in                   Framework Issue Number
Hospitality and Catering                                             8.1

Advanced Apprenticeship/Modern Apprenticeship in                     Framework Issue Number
Hospitality and Catering                                             8.1


                      Framework Code          2      2      0


Date submitted to the
Skills for Business AAG:


Would you like to present the
framework to the SfB AAG
at its next meeting?

Date approved by the
Skills for Business AAG:

Date funding agreed by LSC and
ELWa

Implementation date:
                                          1 January 2009




Revised framework (220 issue 8.1) approved by AAG in December 2008
Effective from: 1 January 2009
                                     Contents

                                                                             Page

Summary of Changes                                                             4

1.        CONTACT DETAILS OF PEOPLE1ST                                          5
1.1       Responsibility for the Framework                                      5

2.        SUMMARY OF MANDATORY OUTCOMES                                         6
2.1       Summary of mandatory outcomes for the
          apprenticeship/foundation modern apprenticeship in Hospitality
          and Catering                                                          6
2.2       Summary of mandatory outcomes for the advanced
          apprenticeship/modern apprenticeship in Hospitality and Catering      8
3.        OVERVIEW OF THE FRAMEWORK                                             9
          Rationale for the Framework
3.1       Why Apprenticeships are important to and appropriate for the          9
          sector
3.2       How Apprenticeships are crucial to addressing workforce
          development issues                                                   10
3.3       Take-up and completion within the sector                             11
3.4       How Apprenticeships sit with and add value to, other
          qualifications and learning opportunities                            13
3.5-3.6   The industries, occupations and career progression addressed by
          the frameworks                                                       14
3.7       The consultation process for the frameworks                          18
3.8       Why has the apprenticeship been reviewed?                            19

4.        CONTENT OF THE FRAMEWORK                                             21

4.1       Competence Based Element                                             21
4.2       Knowledge Based Element                                              22
4.3       Key Skills                                                           26
4.4       Additional Employer Requirements                                     27
4.5       Employment Rights and Responsibilities                               27

5.        IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FRAMEWORK                                      27

5.1       Employed Status                                                      27
5.2       Entry Requirements                                                   27
5.3       Minimum Duration of Training                                         28
5.4       Health and Safety                                                    28
5.5       Equality and Inclusion                                               29
5.6       Transfer Arrangements from the Previous Framework                    30
5.7       Monitoring Arrangements for the Framework                            30

6.        ACHIEVEMENT AND PROGRESSION                                          31

6.1       Certification                                                        31


                                                                                2
6.2       Progression                                                 31

7.        FACTSHEET                                                   35


Annex A   Knowledge Based Qualifications linked to Competence Based   39
          Qualifications
Annex B   Mandatory Qualifications contained in the Framework         45




                                                                       3
Summary of Changes to this Framework

Changes have been made to the apprenticeship framework in December 2008 to
incorporate an additional awarding body who is offering the NVQs as follows:

Title                                Level   Qualification reference   Awarding body
                                             number
Food and Drink Service               2       500/4170/8                Edexcel

Food and Drink Service (Drink        2       500/4170/8                Edexcel
Service)
Front Office                         2       500/4219/1                Edexcel

Food Processing and Cooking          2       500/4203/8                Edexcel

Professional Cookery                 2       500/4174/5                Edexcel

Housekeeping                         2       500/4172/1                Edexcel

Multi-skilled Hospitality Services   2       500/4131/9                Edexcel

Professional Cookery                 3       500/4202/6                Edexcel




In addition, the People1st contact details have been updated.




                                                                                       4
1.     Contact Details of the Industry or Sector

Title, level and coverage of        Hospitality and Catering Apprenticeship/Foundation
apprenticeship                      Modern Apprenticeship (FMA) and Advanced
                                    Apprenticeship/Modern Apprenticeship (MA)
Name of Sector Skills               People1st
Council/Sector Body

Contact name                        Preetkiran Sumal

Address                             2nd Floor
                                    Armstrong House
                                    38 Market Square
                                    Uxbridge
                                    UB8 1LM

Telephone number                    0870 060 2550

Fax number                          0870 060 2551

Email address                       preetkiran.sumal@people1st.co.uk

Date sent to SfB AAG

Date of Implementation              1 January 2009


1.1    Responsibility for the Framework

       These frameworks will be the ongoing responsibility of People1st.




                                                                                         5
     2.1      Summary of the Mandatory Outcomes for the Hospitality and Catering
              Apprenticeship/Foundation Modern Apprenticeship

     Framework Code           Framework Issue Number

          2     2      0             0      8


  Apprenticeship/Foundation Modern Apprenticeship in Catering and             Level
                            Hospitality

Competence Based Element

Route A       NVQ in Food and Drink Service                                   2

Route B       NVQ in Food and Drink Service (Drinks Service)                  2

Route C       NVQ in Front Office                                             2

Route D       NVQ in Food Processing and Cooking                              2

Route E       NVQ in Professional Cookery                                     2

Route F       NVQ in Housekeeping                                             2

Route G       NVQ in Hospitality Services (Multi-Skilled)                     2

                           Knowledge based element

For all routes the knowledge-based element of the Apprenticeship is covered   2
 by the independent assessment of knowledge in the respective NVQ. This
   method of assessment is supported by the new Assessment Strategy.


                                  Key Skills
                                 For all routes

                             Application of Number                            1
                               Communication                                  1



                    Additional Employer Requirements
                               For all routes

                                    None
  We are not stipulating Additional Employer Requirements but we will be
     recommending best practice in additional guidance for delivery.




                                                                                      6
                  Employment rights and responsibilities

Induction covering workplace Employment Rights and Responsibilities.
Proof of the induction process having taken place will be required when
claiming certification. The evidence for this will be an approved and signed
copy of the Employment Rights and Responsibilities induction component, a
copy of which can be obtained from People1st. We will, in addition, develop a
pro-forma certificate of attendance for the candidate to be issued by the
employer or providers upon completion of the ERR. Content to be covered
under ERR, to be included in our additional guidance to be determined as;

•   Familiarisation of employer’s organisation
•   Requirements and expectations of the apprenticeship and advanced
    apprenticeship
•   Instruction in customer care
•   Range of statutory responsibilities and associated documentation
•   Sources of information and advice
•   Apprentice’s role in the organisation, including relationship with other
    departments and the industry as a whole
•   Principles, policies and codes of practice used by employers and how they
    relate to jobs in the industry
•   Why there is a range of statutory laws relating to ERR
•   Range of career pathways available, opportunities for career development
    and how to get information on them
•   How to effectively access information and advice on ERR
•   Types of representative bodies in the hospitality industry
•   Issues of public concern
•   Equality and Diversity issues




                                                                                7
2.2   Summary of the Mandatory Outcomes for the Hospitality and Catering
      Advanced Apprenticeship/Modern Apprenticeship

      Framework Code         Framework Issue Number

          2     2      0             0       8



          Advanced Apprenticeship/ Modern Apprenticeship                       Level

                       Competence Based Element

Route A       Professional Cookery                                             3

Route B       Hospitality Supervision                                          3


                       Knowledge based element

  For all routes the knowledge-based element of the Apprenticeship is          3
 covered by the independent assessment of knowledge in the respective
 NVQ. This method of assessment is supported by the new Assessment
                               Strategy.


                                Key Skills

                           Application of Number                               2
                             Communication                                     2



                    Additional Employer Requirements

                                   None
 We are not stipulating Additional Employer Requirements but we will be
    recommending best practice in additional guidance for delivery.

                Employment rights and responsibilities

Induction covering workplace Employment Rights and Responsibilities.
Proof of the induction process having taken place will be required when
claiming certification. The evidence for this will be an approved and signed
copy of the Employment Rights and Responsibilities induction component,
a copy of which can be obtained from People1st. We will, in addition,
develop a pro-forma certificate of attendance for the candidate to be
issued by the employer or providers upon completion of the ERR. Content
to be covered under ERR, to be included in our additional guidance to be
determined as;


                                                                                       8
•     Familiarisation of employer’s organisation
•     Requirements and expectations of the apprenticeship and advanced
      apprenticeship
•     Instruction in customer care
•     Range of statutory responsibilities and associated documentation
•     Sources of information and advice
•     Apprentice’s role in the organisation, including relationship with other
      departments and the industry as a whole
•     Principles, policies and codes of practice used by employers and how
      they relate to jobs in the industry
•     Why there is a range of statutory laws relating to ERR
•     Range of career pathways available, opportunities for career
      development and how to get information on them
•     How to effectively access information and advice on ERR
•     Types of representative bodies in the hospitality industry
•     Issues of public concern
•     Equality and Diversity issues

3        Rationale for the Framework

3.1      Why Apprenticeships are important to and appropriate for the sector

The Hospitality and Catering industry employs 1.9m people. It is a diverse industry         Comment [P1]: This includes
                                                                                            travel etc?
that includes restaurants, hotels, take-aways, cafes, pubs and contract caterers.
These businesses form an important part of the UK economy by themselves, but
catering is also essential to the operation of other industries in which some form of
hospitality takes place - for example transport, medical, educational and public
administration.

Apprenticeships are quite simply crucial to the sector for a number of reasons. This
fact is demonstrated by the high take up figures of apprenticeships. LSC figures alone
indicate that for the last full year where figures are available (2003/4) there were
20,282 registrations. This figure had almost been reached in the first three quarters of
2004/5, underlining the increasing popularity of the frameworks.

This tells a tale of how the Apprenticeship system is valued and used by our
employers, and how they have committed to working with government, training
providers and the candidates themselves to developing their Apprentices more fully.
Looking at completion rates, we recognise fully that there are some real challenges still
to be overcome with the way in which our Apprenticeships our operating, and we
recognise work needs to be done to make the Apprenticeship Frameworks a success.
However, completions are now starting to increase.
As mentioned, hospitality is an extremely diverse industry with a variety of different
sub-sectors and specialisms. It has a tradition of practical learning, with knowledge
and skills being demonstrated and imparted by actually doing the job itself. The high
uptake of Apprenticeships is due in large measure to the model of the Apprenticeship
framework meeting employer needs and helping ensure Apprentices are being given
the skills and knowledge that are necessary to them being an important and valued
member of the team.

                                                                                        9
We have made changes to they way in which knowledge is assessed within our
frameworks. We are confident that these changes will ensure all apprentices cover the
knowledge required to carry out their roles, largely because this knowledge will not
need to be solely delivered within a classroom environment.

This is not to say that we wish to discourage off-job learning. Quite the reverse. What
we are seeking is an appropriate blend between knowledge imparted and assimilated
on and off the job. We believe that the end result will be better assimilation of
knowledge by candidates within the rigour of an accredtied assessment strategy.

The changes that we have made to the way in which the Knowledge-based aspect of
the apprenticeship is delivered will help to ensure that we have frameworks that are
flexible enough for employers to fully support as programmes that add significant value
to their organisation. The independent assessment of the underpinning knowledge of
the NVQ represents a more rigorous and complete way of assessing (and ensuring
delivery) of knowledge. This will give fuller treatment of the theory aspect of the
apprenticeship. This in turn will afford the candidate opportunities to progress through
the frameworks and onto further study. An example of this could be on to a
Foundation Degree. We already have support from providers who readily accept
advanced apprentices onto their programmes, and we expect that the changes that we
are proposing to these frameworks will help candidates in accessing these progression
opportunities.

Some of the reasons why employers continue to value the apprenticeship programme
are as follows:

o It enables the development and recognition of candidates’ skills in the context of
  their every-day working lives, which gives employers confidence that their skills
  and qualifications are relevant to the jobs they do
o It enables them to develop the key skills that employers very often believe are a
  real problem with entrants to the industry
o They allow the candidate to develop a more rounded profile of skills and
  knowledge that will allow them to build a real career for themselves and enable
  progression to management and supervisory positions
o They give employers the opportunity to motivate the candidate which helps ensure
  a highly productive member of staff.

Apprenticeship frameworks have been written into the Sector Qualifications Strategy
as an important part of how we address skills needs in the industry. The amendments
that we are currently making will allow employers to continue their commitment to the
delivery of frameworks that are flexible and are able to reflect roles of candidates
within industry.


3.2   How Apprenticeships are crucial to addressing workforce development
      issues

Apprenticeships are a central plank of our strategy to addressing workforce
development needs.


                                                                                     10
The Hospitality and Catering Industries have acute Workforce Development needs,
and Apprenticeships are an important tool to improve the situation. We have known
for some time that there are particular structural features to our industry that have
made the acquisition of skills really difficult, including a very high rate of staff turnover.
Annual staff turnover can reach up to 188% in some sectors of the industry, and as an
average across the sector is about 40%. This is very costly to employers, and a barrier
to greater productivity. The very high example of 188% annual turnover is found in the
Bar and Pubs sector, especially in city centres, where there may be a team of 6-10,
with each role needing to be filled more than once in the course of a year. The more
extreme examples can be due to the poor perception of the roles and the tendency to
recruit from highly mobile workforce such as students etc.

The Apprenticeship system gives us the possibility of creating the opportunity for the
best candidates in industry to get a real commitment from their employer. This will in
turn help motivate the candidate, and lead to greater retention. This will help create a
virtuous circle, as the Apprentice moves on in their career to be managers of the
future, and will understand themselves how to motivate and retain staff.

There are, at all levels within industry, a number of hard-to-fill skills gaps, and we have
evidence to show how these are hampering the effectiveness and productivity of
industry. Research has highlighted some of the real problems industry face;

      •   A staggering 70% reported gaps in Customer Service skills amongst Level 2
          employees
      •   65% reported gaps in management and supervisory skills at Levels 3 and above
      •   39% of employees reported gaps at Levels 2 and 3 for skilled kitchen staff.

(Coverage: England: Source: National Employer Skills Survey 2003)

Apprenticeships offer industry a real chance of filling these skills gaps.

In addition to the identified skills gaps, there are also sectors of the industry that have
severe recruitment difficulties. These show particularly in the Housekeeping and Front
Office roles. By having Apprenticeship frameworks to support these occupations,
industry is able to demonstrate to prospective employees that it offers a career
structure, and takes the development of employees seriously. Frameworks are really
important here because they help to ‘professionalise’ an area of work that has
traditionally had a poor image, and offer a viable career to employees who wish to
enter the Hotel industry.

These routes at Level 2 offer progression onto the Advanced Apprenticeship/Modern
Apprenticeship which supports Supervisory and Management positions.


3.3       Take-up and completion within the sector.

The Frameworks within the Hospitality and Catering industry are relatively very
popular, with 20,282 candidates registered in 2003/4 (LSC supplied figures).




                                                                                           11
The take-up figures for the frameworks going forwards reflect an expected increase.
We have since seem a slight decrease for the full-year 2004/5. Figures for leavers for
04/05 were 17,060. We have sought views from providers as to why this might have
been the case, and the principal reason is better recruitment practice onto the
frameworks.

There has recently been more pressure on providers in order that they improve their
recruitment procedures and are more discerning about the candidates who they put on
to the frameworks. This has resulted in better selection of apprentices.

This fact is reflected in much improved completion rates. For example, we were
expecting a completion rate of 35% for the last full year. These have in fact turned out
to be 48% for Apprenticeships and 34% for Advanced Apprenticeships, bringing the
average, weighted completion rate across the frameworks to 45%.

This represents a massive improvement in completion rates.

We still feel as though there will be strong demand for the frameworks moving forward,
and as such feel as though the increases predicted as below should still come through.
We feel that there are many external factors that will drive the uptake of the
frameworks, including the continued growth of the industry, as well as drivers such as
increased industry demand stimulated by preparation for the Olympic games.

We are also developing work-streams to deliver supporting materials that will allow
employers implementing the frameworks to increase the support they are able to offer
their candidates, which we feel will help both uptake and completion.


Due to this predicted growth in the industry, and the activity of the SSC, employer and
providers in using Apprenticeships as part of the implementation of the Sector Skills
Agreement, the forecast growth for registrations in the sector are as follows;

2006/7 - 27,000
2007/8 - 29,500
2008/9 – 33,000

As stated, organic growth here will also be stimulated by the specific demand from the
Hospitality Sector for increased capacity in the run-up to the Olympics.

We have detailed below how we intend to take measures to continue to drive own the
rate of non-completion across the frameworks. In particular, we will be working with
the LSC and Providers to develop specific support for those candidates at Advanced
Apprenticeship/Modern Apprenticeship in order to drive up completion rates. This will
also require us to liaise with employers to try and ensure the appropriate support
networks are in place for learners.

There is a mixed and complex picture of why the rate of non-completion has been so
high. Most of these issues are structural issues to industry such as;

o Industry-wide high turnover of staff, which varies from 40% in kitchens to an
  incredible 188% in some sectors of Food and Drink Service

                                                                                      12
o Industry growth creating vacancies and allowing candidates to easily move on,
  sometimes providing a disincentive to completing their Advanced
  Apprenticeship/MA especially as opportunities to move into more lucrative Full-time
  employment are presented.

Whilst we are as an SSC looking to address these issues, they are long-term and not
easily addressed as part of this exercise, or indeed are possible to be dealt with by an
Apprenticeship system alone. It could be that longer-term we need a more radical
solution to these issues, and we look forward to the implementation of infra-structure to
support unitised awards and apprenticeships to help support this.

Issues included the quality of support given to the candidate by both provider and
employer. We are committed to working with both parties via the ALP sub-group and
our employer networks to develop better support for candidates to achieve better
completion rates. This gives us the opportunity of working with providers to share best
practice in order to get the worse providers producing better rates of completion. We
have engaged with providers in order to help develop capacity to cope with the
changes to the framework, so that they can deliver and assess the new framework,
particularly the independent assessment of the knowledge in the NVQ. This has been
a real help in terms of ensuring that providers see the need to support candidates
thoroughly throughout the completion of their programme, as the delivery of knowledge
will be assessed more thoroughly and throughout the course of the apprenticeship
experience.

As presented to the AAG recently, certification by equivalent route is as follows (for the
last full years)

Food and Drink (Drink only) - current equivalent route- 1412
Food and Drink Service – current equivalent route – 854
Food Preparation and Cooking – 1066
Food Processing and Cooking - 819
Front Office - 432

3.4    How Apprenticeships sit with and add value to, other qualifications and
       learning opportunities

Apprenticeships are the prime vehicle for the delivery of training in the Hospitality and
Catering Sector. Over 20,000 candidates begin an apprenticeship each year with both
small and micro-organisations as well as some of our leading national brands such as
Compass, Marriot and Whitbread.

People 1st has publicly pledged to improve the quality of content and delivery in
apprenticeship programmes. We see apprenticeships as central to the recruitment
and development of our future skilled staff. Our Sector Qualifications Strategy
underlines the role of Apprenticeships as central to our core objectives. All other
qualifications that we have recommended for the sector will need to articulate with the
Apprenticeship frameworks. There is evidence that in some workplaces the
Apprenticeship programme is used as the central learning objective, around which in-
house training is delivered.



                                                                                       13
Apprentices may come directly from school, attracted by the combination of practical
skills and knowledge the industry has to offer. Increasingly, we expect to see
progression from new Young Apprenticeship programmes (NB – Young
Apprenticeships do not apply to Wales). We currently have four such programmes
running nationally with more arriving this year. Having begun to master skills during
the young apprenticeship and, in the future, through a 14-19 diploma, candidates will
be offered a valuable progression route through an apprenticeship and advanced
apprenticeship programme, leading to programmes of higher level study if candidates
decide to choose this route.

The progression routes between the Apprenticeship and the Advanced Apprenticeship
are clear. The NVQs at the different levels articulate with each other accurately. The
Hospitality Supervision at Level 3, and the Professional Cookery at Level 3, offer a
suitable and smooth progression route from the respective Level 2 NVQs, and reflect
industry-recognised career progression.

Aside from the prospect of clear progression from the apprenticeship to the advanced
apprenticeship programmes, apprenticeships also form a recognised route into the
next level of opportunities on offer from both further and higher education.

We have changed the way in which the knowledge element of the apprenticeship
frameworks is going to be treated. The result of this will, we feel, lead to a fuller
assessment and therefore more thorough delivery of the underpinning knowledge
throughout the NVQ. This fuller treatment of the knowledge will allow the candidate to
develop a better theoretical understanding of their area of work. This differs from the
previous model, where technical certificates were unable to achieve full coverage of
the underpinning knowledge.

From this September, a new VRQ in Professional Cookery is being piloted. During the
academic year 2006/7, the award will be offered on the basis of a limited pilot only at
Levels 1 and 2. It is envisaged that the Level 2 will, when run nationally, allow
progression to the Level 2 NVQ and the respective apprenticeship/FMA framework,
whilst the Level 3, which should be introduced in the academic year 2007/8, will offer a
progression opportunity from the apprenticeship/FMA, or onto the Advanced
Apprenticeship/MA.

In addition, Higher Education Institutions recruit advanced apprentices for entry to a
foundation degree such as the foundation degree in Culinary Arts, on-licensed retail
management or other qualifications appropriate to our sector. Changes which act to
deepen the delivery of knowledge being delivered will help prepare candidates better,
in order that they are able to access these qualifications The changes that we have
made to the way in which underpinning knowledge is assessed will help candidates
because they will ensure assessment and fuller delivery of the knowledge over the full
content across the NVQ rather than the more limited coverage that would have been
provided technical certificates.

We are currently working with Foundation Degree Forward towards the development of
a template Foundation Degree for the sector. This will give us further opportunity to
ensure that Foundation Degrees provide a coherent progression pathway. It is also
worth adding that some candidates have entered Advanced Apprenticeship/MA, after


                                                                                      14
workplace experience, with General qualifications at GCSE or GCSE ‘A’ Level, albeit
this is not a formal pathway.

Many Apprentices decide to go straight into industry on completion of their
Apprenticeship/FMA. There are sufficient progression opportunities to facilitate this.
The details of the roles that are supported by each Apprenticeship pathway are listed
below in 3.5.

We have a Travel and Tourism framework within our Footprint, but there is no
significant overlap with or relation to the Hospitality and Catering frameworks.

3.5    The industries, occupations and career progression addressed by the
       frameworks.

Our frameworks must be relevant to our diverse range of employers, designed to meet
need and develop candidates into recognised roles with career structures.

An industry as diverse as this needs to have an appropriate range of framework
routes. We list the relevant industry, roles and career pathways by Framework route
below.

Route A       NVQ in Food and Drink Service

At least 231,845 people work in food and drink service across our sector. This route
focuses on the food side of the business (see Route B for drinks service which is
particularly relevant to bars, restaurants (the fastest growing industry in our footprint)
and hotels.

There is a marked difference between competent front of house (waiting) staff and
‘plate carriers’. Front of house staff are the interface with the customer and can make
or break a dining experience, making a significant difference to the profitability of their
organisations. These roles require a wide range of skills, leading up to silver service
and banqueting functions. Food Service is becoming an area where skills shortages,
particularly at the quality end of the market, are fast becoming acute.

This route has traditionally been the most popular in the Apprenticeship, and it leads
candidates to defined roles and career pathways within industry. Many of these sub-
sectors have acute employment shortages. Depending on the mix of NVQ units and
the working environment itself, this route offers the flexibility to develop candidates
who are required to meet a range of different demands ranging form a Silver-Service
environment to ‘quick-service’ organisations.

Occupations here could be Waiter or Silver Service Waiter. This route is also suitable
for a Team member in a quick-service environment and is used by event organisers.

Progression in terms of qualifications is primarily on to the next level of framework,
typically through the Hospitality Supervision route. Progression in terms of industry
roles could be to Manager, Team Supervisor, Head Waiter or Maitre’d, and eventually
into general management roles.

Route B       NVQ in Food and Drink Service (Drinks Service endorsed route)

                                                                                             15
This route also supports one of the fastest-growing industry sub-sectors. There are
approximately 284,181 staff employed in the pubs, bars and clubs sector. There is a
real need in this sector to deliver excellent customer service within an highly
commercial, low-margin business environment. In terms of business operations, the
roles supported by this route are crucial. In addition, this industry sector is very highly
regulated, and so poor practice can lead not only to lost custom but possibly to severe
legal penalties. It is vital therefore that the industry has skilled and knowledgeable
staff.

This again is an area where industry is up against problems of high turnover and a low
skills base, and the Apprenticeship/FMA is a powerful tool in trying to overcome these.

Occupations supported by this route include bar-person, cellar-person, and possibly
bar supervisor.

Progression opportunities in terms of qualifications and learning programmes are to
the Advanced Apprenticeship/MA, to the Hospitality Supervision Route. In terms of
employment, to Bar Supervisor, Bar Manager or eventually Publican. This could also
be a a route for regional managers within chains, and ultimately General Management.

Route C       NVQ in Front Office

This route is particularly relevant to the Hotel and Restaurant industries. The Hotel
industries are immensely important to the UK economy, as they form an important part
of our tourism offer.

This route particularly addresses Reception Staff. Roles here are mainly customer
facing, and are of crucial importance in underpinning the whole customer experience.
This area is a big employment need in the industry, and the existence of this route aids
recruitment and retention by offering candidates good training and career prospects.
This route is also relevant as it is recognised that it leads to rapid promotion, making it
even more crucial that there is a route whereby people can receive a rounded package
of learning and qualifications.

Opportunities for progression through qualifications include the Advanced
Apprenticeship/MA, although the fact that a number of transferable skills are delivered
means that there is the prospect of transferability to other, customer-facing routes,
such as the Travel apprenticeship.

Career routes open to a trained receptionist include Reception Manager, Front of
House Supervisor and General Management opportunities.


Route D      NVQ in Food Processing and Cooking

This route is of vital importance to what we can call ‘Institutional Catering’, and
involves employers such as the NHS, Armed Forces, Care Homes and Schools. This
is a really important route because the skills involved are quite different to those in
other areas involved in the preparation of meals, due to the use of large kitchens and
different catering methods such as Cook-Chill. Perhaps the most important difference

                                                                                         16
of all, is of course the fact that you are likely to be the main provider of nutrition for
your customers, and as such candidates supported by this route have a very direct and
major influence over the quality of their clients lives. There are an estimated 80,000
school caterers at least, and the drive in improving the level of skills here has never
been higher, and we expect this route to grow in importance and popularity in line with
increased investment in this sector.

This route will support progression with employers such as those listed above, but also
with the large contract caterers who bid for much of the institutional work. Some of
these companies, such as the Compass group, place a high priority on their
Apprenticeship schemes.

Occupations supported here include School Cook, Cook, Team member or Chef.
Progression in terms of programmes would be to the Advanced Apprenticeship/MA, on
either the Hospitality Supervision or, less so, the Professional Cookery route.
Progression in terms of career would be to Catering Supervisor or Sous Chef.
Eventual career paths could lead to Head Chef or Catering Manager.

Route E      NVQ in Professional Cookery

There are an estimated 397,126 Kitchen and Catering Assistants, and 256,724 Chefs
within the industry, making this a massive section of the workforce. All the research
that we have done, including most recently the research for the Sector Skills
Agreement, has highlighted severe skills gaps amongst kitchen staff.

The importance of this route, therefore, cannot be underestimated in giving us the tools
to deal with this workforce development need. This route in the Apprenticeship
supports the Food Preparation and Cooking function , so vital to Restaurants, Hotels,
Gastro-pubs, or indeed anywhere where food is prepared and cooked. We have at the
moment a real diversity of employers who use this route, from very small fine-dining
restaurants to the very large quick-service multiples.

The roles supported by this route are craft Chef, Kitchen assistant or Team member.
Progression in terms of the industry is to Sous Chef or Team Supervisor. Eventual
progression could be to Head Chef or Regional Manager within a large employer.
Progression in terms of qualifications will be to the Advanced Apprenticeship/MA.oute
F    NVQ in Housekeeping

Housekeeping and related aspects of Hotel Management are essential. Without
trained operational staff in this area, the Hotel will just not function. Professional
Housekeepers form a vital component of the Hospitality offer. There is an acute
workforce development need in this area, and Housekeepers are difficult to recruit, and
being able to offer a recognised programme leading to a career pathway is vital for
industry to be able to address shortages here. This route addresses the segment of
industry that deals with Accommodation Services, including the Hotel, Self-Catering
and Bed and Breakfast industry. Again, the industry is diverse in terms of types of
employers and practice.

The main occupation supported by this route is that of Housekeeper. Progression in
terms of qualifications and learning is to the Advanced Apprenticeship/MA.


                                                                                       17
Progression in terms of career is to Head Housekeeper, and other supervisory roles.
There is also scope to move to contract cleaning.

Route G       NVQ in Hospitality Services (Multi-Skilled)

This route is particularly suitable to those industry sub-sectors that deal with small-site
Accommodation Services, such as Youth Hostels, Holiday Parks, Smaller Hotels or
Bed and Breakfast establishments. There are at least 18,000 establishments that fall
within this sector of the industry. These establishments require a work-force who are
able to develop a set of skills that allow them to perform the large range of functions
required to in order for an establishment offering a variety of services to operate.
These are likely to include skills that are not typically required within larger
establishments such as hotels belonging to the larger chains etc. There are also some
bigger chains in the mainstream Food Preparation and Cooking sector who are likely
to use this route as a method of multi-skilling their team members.

Occupations supported here include Youth Hostel worker/Supervisor, Team
Member/Supervisor within a Holiday Park or Small Hotel. Progression in terms of
career development may be to manager of a Youth Hostel or smaller hotel. This route
can also be used for Team Members within a Food Prep and Cooking franchise/chain,
and can lead to Supervisory positions within this environment.

3.6    Advanced Apprenticeship/Modern Apprenticeship

Route A       NVQ in Professional Cookery

This route again addresses kitchen staff. As has been stated, there are at least
387,126 staff employed in this sector, and some of the largest workforce development
issues concern the up-skilling of Chefs. The Advanced Apprenticeship/MA has a real
role to play in trying to close the skills gaps here.

This route offers candidates access to a wide range of opportunities in industry, such
as Sous Chef and even Head Chef, not to mention progression to General
Management opportunities in large multiples. The craft skills delivered by this route
are also important to Institutional catering, such as hospitals, schools and the MoD.
Progression routes in terms of education and training would likely to be to a
Foundation Degree in Culinary Arts, or in Hospitality Management. The Advanced
Apprenticeship/MA at this level has traditionally been a direct entry route to Foundation
Degrees. When the VRQ in Professional Cookery is developed at Level 3, it will
provide a progress route on to the Advanced Apprenticeship.


Route B       Hospitality Supervision

The shortage of skilled managers and supervisors is a problem right across the
Hospitality and Catering industry, and has implications across the 1.9million workforce.
It is one of the biggest issues holding the industry back from achieving higher
productivity, with 65% of employers in the sector reporting skills gaps at Level 3
Supervisory and Management level.



                                                                                        18
This route in particular allows a learner to develop not only the technical skills required
to work in their chosen sub-sector of the industry, but also the management skills that
are needed in a supervisory role. These management skills will be built on as learners
here develop their careers through the industry.

Roles supported by this route include Head Housekeeper, Head of Reception, Unit
Manager in a Hotel Chain, Unit Manager in a Contract Catering Company, Unit or
Regional Supervisor/Manager in a restaurant/pub chain with multiple outlets.

The Advanced Apprenticeship/MA at this level has traditionally been a direct entry
route to Foundation Degrees. When the VRQ in Professional Cookery is developed at
Level 3, it will provide a progress route on to the Advanced Apprenticeship.


3.7    The consultation process for the frameworks

The amendments presented to the AAG follows consultation with industry, providers
and other stakeholders as to the best way to develop an apprenticeship framework that
best meets the blueprint.
This amendment has built on information gathered for the previous submission to the
AAG. This included employer interviews, candidate interviews and providers
interviews. This background research enabled us to develop recommendations at an
early stage of the review process. The changes represented by this application have
been worked up in conjunction with the steering group for the project;

Organisation                                                Name of Representative

Employers
The Spirit Group                                            Nicky Scotchford
Compass                                                     Mike Stapleton
Paramount                                                   Alison Keate
McDonalds                                                   Linda Winter/Dave Morris

Providers
VT Plus                                                     Andrew Pugh
HCTC                                                        Theresa Vincent/Tracy
                                                            Atherton/Ellie Harris
North Lancs Training Group                                  Gareth Lindsay
Protocol                                                    Stuart La-Ffin
Cambrian Training                                           Arwyn Watkins

Awarding Bodies
Hospitality Awarding Body                                   Oliver Taylor
City and Guilds                                             Matt Lardi
EDI                                                         Karen Lawlor
Others
Bournemouth and Poole College                               Wendy Hill
Worcester College of Technology                             Emily George/Kath Young

                                                                                         19
We have been careful to go back to our previous contributors to the consultation in
order to seek their views on the changes to the framework presented now. This has
helped us to present a solution that has general support within industry and the
provider network.

Industry views this method of delivering the framework as one which will help it to
deliver a more coherent framework for the candidate.

We have put a lot of energy in working with employers in order to develop an
apprenticeship framework that complies with the blueprint in a way that best meets the
needs of the sector.

A big feature of this consultation was being careful to guide employers and providers in
their views on what the framework should look like. We gave careful guidance on the
fact that the frameworks should be compliant with the blueprint.

3.8       Why has the apprenticeship been reviewed?

The frameworks were initially reviewed to include the following;

o revised NVQs
o changed levels for the Key Skills in the framework
o updated and simplified Employment Rights and Responsibilities

We have since been committed to building a robust process to ensure underpinning
knowledge is assessed, and in turn delivered, to apprentices. In making these
changes we have a framework that;

      •   provides industry with frameworks that are rigorous yet flexible, and can be
          delivered in a manner that reflects the working conditions of industry.
      •   adds coherence to the apprenticeship offer
      •   complies more fully with the blueprint

We have worked hard with awarding bodies, providers and regulators in order to
change the assessment strategy of the S/NVQs to formalise the independent
assessment of the underpinning knowledge. This will allow us to develop the
apprenticeship framework in a manner that will ensure rigorous assessment of greater
sections of the underpinning knowledge from the NVQ.

We have given an implementation timescale to centres. This will help them to prepare
for the changes to the way in which the frameworks will operate. This will also ensure
that all candidates that have started an apprenticeship from August will be doing the
revised framework. We will be including information in the guidance to providers
regarding the new assessment regime, and how we recommend fuller delivery of
knowledge in the programme.




                                                                                         20
4      Content of Framework

4.1    Competence Based Element

The Competence Based Element of the Frameworks is the new NVQs in Hospitality
and Catering (Annex B)

The following NVQs are included for the Apprenticeship/FMA

NVQ Level 2 in Food and Drink Service. This can be used to

NVQ Level 2 in Food and Drink Service (Drinks Service)

NVQ Level 2 in Front Office

NVQ Level 2 in Food Processing and Cooking

NVQ Level 2 in Professional Cookery

NVQ Level 2 in Housekeeping

NVQ Level 2 in Hospitality Services (Multi-Skilled)

Each of these qualifications has been developed in conjunction with employers to meet
specific market need. They reflect the way in which the industry has changed and
consolidated in recent years. Whilst Housekeeping and Front Office are not
significantly changed, the other routes have been developed in order that the delivery
can be tailored to meet employer needs. The Food and Drink Service, and Food and
Drink (Drink only) pathways have been designed in order to have the flexibility for
candidates to complete in a variety of workplaces, which reflects the fact that more
pubs are moving into food amongst other changes. The Food Processing and Cooking
route has been specifically designed to reflect the importance of Institutional Cooking.
This area has needed special attention for some time, as practice in this area has
changed, and the standards reflect this. In addition, the structure to the Professional
Cookery route has changed to the extent that we have separated the Preparation,
Cooking and Finishing of food, which again better reflects industry practice in the
increased use of central kitchens etc These changes better reflect working practice,
and as a result will better enable employers to address their known skills an
recruitment gaps.

The Competence based element of the Advanced Apprenticeship/MA is as follows;

NVQ Level 3 in Professional Cookery

NVQ Level 3 in Hospitality Supervision

The Level 3 Professional Cookery is a new NVQ, and has been developed in order to
support the training of craft chefs. This is a particular skills gap within industry. This
qualification has been designed to be delivered flexibly, in order that it can better meet
the demands of a range of diverse modern businesses. The splitting of the
preparation, cooking and finishing functions will allow the use of this qualification in a

                                                                                        21
greater variety of businesses, such as the those mainstream and franchised
restaurants that use central kitchens.

The NVQ Level 3 in Hospitality Supervision was in the previous award, and is the most
popular route for Advanced Apprenticeship/MA. This award is again flexible in the
number of occupations it supports. Because management and supervisory skills are in
particularly short supply in industry, this route makes a particular contribution to closing
this skills gap.

4.2    Knowledge Based Element

It is important that we make clear the rationale for our treatment of the knowledge-
based element of the frameworks.

The changes that we have made in 2006 allow the assessment and delivery of the
knowledge associated with the whole NVQs.

We wanted this because at the time it was the best way for industry to deliver and
assess large amounts of learning. The method of independent assessment that has
been recommended will be particularly useful, as it allows a good balance of off the job
and on the job learning. It allows the flexibility to schedule learning and assessment
opportunities around shift patterns which will be of benefit to the learner and employer.
This helps the employer to take a much more active supporting role in the delivery of
an apprenticeship that delivers real benefit to the learner.

In terms of the models of independent assessment being used, awarding bodies
set/assure questions and answer guides, which are then marked and retained at the
centre for external verification. We have also allowed use of on-line examination
systems that are secure, flexible and allow immediate feedback. Both of these
methods support flexible delivery of learning and assessment.

We worked with awarding bodies to develop an implementation timetable.

We have recommended 20 and 25 days off the job learning for apprenticeships and
advanced apprenticeships respectively, which is a figure based on current good
practice. We feel that this also offers the opportunity for us to improve practice
amongst those providers who are not currently delivering this amount of off-the-job
training.

We have a letter of support from the Professional Association of Catering Educators
(PACE), as well as the support of training providers delivering the vast majority of
apprentices, to the effect that this is a reasonable amount of time for off the job
learning.

Overall, our feeling is that the existing infra-structure will be capable of delivering the
knowledge-based element of the apprenticeship. The better providers will be able to
do this without much difficulty, whilst it will give us a good opportunity to improve
practice with those providers and employers who are not supporting the candidates’
learning sufficiently in this respect.



                                                                                              22
Independent assessment applies to all of the routes previously defined through the
framework. There will no longer be a need to deliver technical certificates and these
will therefore not feature in the framework.

In addition to the above, we feel that other benefits in this method of delivering the
knowledge-based element of the apprenticeship include;

    •   It will mean that knowledge throughout the NVQ will be assessed more
        rigorously. This will mean that learners will have the benefit of a fuller learning
        and assessment of the knowledge
    •   A fuller scope of knowledge in the respective NVQ will be assessed
        independently, meaning that the frameworks will address a greater amount of
        knowledge. This will also help to deliver a framework that is compliant with the
        apprenticeship blueprint.
    •   The delivery and assessment of knowledge will be conducted in a manner that
        suits the industry.

The key to success within our sector is a blend of both off and on-job learning.

The assessment of the underpinning knowledge in this way will drive more consistent
off-job delivery of learning as providers will need to ensure that candidates cover a
wider variety of knowledge across all units of the NVQ. This knowledge needs to be
delivered in a structured fashion at appropriate points in the development of the
apprentice. We believe this prompts learning providers (and employers) to take
greater ownership of the delivery of the learning to ensure candidates can achieve the
success rates required. As previously stated, learning providers such as the
Professional Association of Catering Educators supported the introduction of
independent assessment and confirmed that the provider network has the capacity to
deliver this.

Looking to on-the-job learning, the new system of independent assessment ensures all
relevant underpinning knowledge is delivered and assessed. We believe that it also
helps candidates acquire and assimilate the knowledge more quickly as we can
encourage their employer (line manager, coach or mentor) to deliver the knowledge
informally in the workplace, consistently revisiting knowledge areas on a regular basis
e.g. through asking questions, through thinking a process out loud, etc. By being able
to show employers the occupational standards and highlighting the kind of knowledge
areas that the candidate will cover, we can engage more employers in helping
candidates develop.

Assessment of the knowledge-based element is described in the Assessment Strategy
of the respective NVQs. The knowledge-based element of the framework is therefore
assessed in keeping with the accredited assessment methodology.

This system of assessment of the knowledge-based element of the apprenticeship
allows for the assessment of knowledge at Level 2 for Apprenticeships/Foundation
Modern Apprenticeships and at Level 3 for the Advanced Apprenticeship/Modern
Apprenticeship.




                                                                                         23
As stated, the rationale of this approach is based on industry practice, and how we can
best meet the requirements of the apprenticeship blueprint whilst having frameworks
that meet industry need.

We have a very diverse industry, and our apprenticeship programmes need to be able
to deliver the relevant skills and knowledge across a variety of different environments.
The approach to the knowledge-based element of the programme we are
recommending gives candidates, providers and employers flexibility in how the
knowledge-based element is delivered and assessed.

4.3   Key Skills

The profile of our Key Skills meet national minimum requirements.

Proxy arrangements

Apprenticeship learners who have achieved a good (A*-C) GCSE in English (Welsh) or
Maths need not be asked to attempt levels 1 or 2 key skills qualifications in
communication or application of number.

From the 1 September 2006, only qualification that cover the entire key skills will be
suitable for use as a proxy in Wales.

Relaxations

If a Welsh GCSE relaxation is being claimed, then the portfolio must either be entirely
in Welsh, or dual language – Welsh and English with no particular percentage. A
portfolio entirely through the medium of English would not be acceptable. Where
GCSE A*-C English (Welsh) or Maths is being claimed as a ‘relaxation’ against the
whole level 1 or 2 key skills qualification, a maximum period of five years will be
allowed between the award (i.e. date of certification) of the GCSE and the registration
(Start) date of the Apprenticeship programme.

In Wales, whilst the Key Skills qualifications remain national qualifications, as of
September 2004, the assessment regime is based on portfolio evidence only. Portfolio
assessment arrangements and quality assurance requirements remain the same
across Wales and England. It is acceptable to submit a portfolio through the medium
of Welsh.



4.4   Additional Employer Requirements

There are no additional employer requirements for this framework.

4.5   Employment Rights and Responsibilities

The Employment Rights and Responsibilities meets national minimum requirements.

5     Implementation of Framework


                                                                                         24
5.1    Employed Status

In all circumstances the employed route is strongly preferred for the hospitality
apprenticeship and advanced apprenticeship/ to link apprentices’ learning directly to
the occupation they are working in. All candidates on the Advanced Apprenticeships
must have employed status from the beginning of the apprenticeship. However,
candidates on the apprenticeship can be:

       •   directly employed by an employer and on their payroll
       •   based with an employer but not directly employed and paid an allowance by
           the employer
       •   based with a learning provider and placed with an employer who will provide
           work-based learning opportunities and will be paid under the Education
           Maintenance Allowance.

Where the Apprentice is not employed, there must be a clear link with an employer
who can provide the on-the-job learning.

In Wales, for both Foundation Modern Apprenticeships and Modern Apprenticeships,
candidates must have employed status.

5.2    Entry Requirements

Other than employer’s own recruitment criteria, there are no entry requirements for the
Apprenticeship/FMA. This is to ensure that the programme is open to the widest
possible range of candidates at this level only.

However, entry to the Advanced Apprenticeship/MA requires successful completion
of one of the following:

       •   the hospitality apprenticeship
       •   a hospitality related (or other relevant) level 2 NVQ
       •   a hospitality related (or other relevant) level 2 Vocationally-Related
           Qualification


Alternatively, entry to the Advanced Apprenticeship/MA can be based on the
apprentice having already gained level 2 comparable vocational experience and skills,
for example, people who have worked in a relevant vocational area for at least nine
months to a year prior to registering onto the advanced apprenticeship. This should be
identified by the learning provider in the initial assessment and demonstrated by the
candidate through the provision of a CV at the start of the programme.

It is essential for employers and learning providers to ascertain new entrants’ skills and
knowledge level before registering them for an Advanced Apprenticeship/MA
especially.

For both the apprenticeship and advanced apprenticeship, new entrants should be:

       •   motivated to succeed within the hospitality industry

                                                                                        25
      •   willing to learn and apply that learning in the workplace
      •   judged capable by the employer of completing the mandatory outcomes

5.3   Minimum Duration of Training

Apprenticeships are about achieving standards rather than timeserving. The average
duration of an apprenticeship will depend on the individual’s skills and understanding,
their past experience, their attitude, the level of support they receive from their
employers, tutors and assessors and their choices of occupational routes and NVQs.

The minimum acceptable timescales for completion are that the Apprenticehsip/FMA
should be completed in no less than 12 months, and the advanced Apprenticeship/MA
should take no less than 24 months to complete.


5.4   Health and Safety

The industry regards health and safety as an essential part of the hospitality
apprenticeship/FMA and advanced apprenticeship/MA. The employer must have a
policy which details health and safety responsibilities for themselves and the
apprentice (this will be overseen by the LSC/regional ELWa).

Health, safety and security is addressed in Employment Responsibilities and Rights
(ERR) covered in the induction component of this framework.

All partners involved in the implementation of apprenticeships must adhere to their
statutory responsibilities for health and safety as follows:

      •   a safe working environment for apprentices must be provided whilst they are
          at work or in training
      •   appropriate training on health and safety in the workplace must be given to
          each apprentice, covering all aspects of their job role
      •   awareness of, and compliance with, relevant legislation such as the Health &
          Safety at Work Act 1974 and the Working Time Regulations 1998 must be
          demonstrated
      •   the apprentice must be aware of and comply with their statutory
          responsibility for health and safety at work. This relates to their own safety
          and to the safety of others in the work place. They must also be aware of,
          and comply with, any additional health and safety procedures laid down by
          their employer/provider
      •   local LSCs/regional ELWa are responsible for monitoring the compliance of
          providers to their statutory health and safety obligations and will carry this
          out through their Quality Assurance procedures
      •   providers will monitor the compliance of employers with Health and Safety
          statutory requirements.

Employers should also ensure that they comply with all risk assessments that are
required by law.




                                                                                      26
In terms of additional Health and Safety requirements specific to the sector, the
frameworks cover the important issue of Food Safety in order that candidates choosing
specific routes are able to operate in a manner that does not pose a risk to themselves
or their customers.

5.5    Equality and Inclusion

Although the sector as a whole is generally representative of the multicultural society in
which we live, and has provided perhaps more opportunities for ethnic minorities to
achieve economic success than most sectors, we still need to be careful to monitor this
situation, especially in management and professional roles, where under-
representation of women and ethnic minorities can often be a problem. In addition, we
are aware that the industry tends to employ a large number of young people, and as a
result we need to be aware of, and explain the benefits of, a workforce that is diverse
not only in terms of ethnicity but also in age range.

We see the Apprenticeship/FMA and Advanced Apprenticeship/MA as being a
powerful tool to promote equality and inclusion as it is an ideal point to explain the
benefits of diversity and the responsibilities of promoting equality to the supervisors
and managers of tomorrow.

We monitor that there is open recruitment of Apprentices to the programme, which is
available to all young people, regardless of gender, ethnic origin, religion or disability
who meet the stated selection criteria.

All partners involved in the delivery of the apprenticeship - local LSCs/ELWa regional
offices, providers, assessment centres and employers must be committed to a policy of
equal opportunities and must have a stated equal opportunities policy and procedure.

Employers/providers must be able to demonstrate that there are no overt or covert
discriminatory practices in selection and employment. All promotional, selection and
training activities must comply with the following relevant legislation:
      • The Sex Discrimination Act, 1975 and Code of Practice
      • The Race Relations Act, 1976 and Code of Practice
      • The Disability Discrimination Act, 1995 and Code of Practice

The apprentice’s knowledge about equal opportunities policies and procedures can be
used as evidence for the Employment Responsibilities and Rights component of this
framework.

Providers will monitor equality of opportunity practice and procedures within their own
organisation and take positive action when necessary. It is also recommended that
employers/providers conduct an exit interview if the apprentice leaves the programme
before completion.

People 1st will retain overall responsibility for the development of the Apprenticeship
and for monitoring equality of opportunity, primarily by the analysis of the LSC/National
Council - ELWa statistical returns. Where questions arise concerning policy and
practice, People 1st will work closely with the local LSC(s)/ELWa regional office
concerned to identify causes and to implement positive action where appropriate.


                                                                                             27
We monitor the profile of the gender and ethnic balance in the industry. Our most
recent statistics indicate that there is an equal spread of male/female starts on
Apprenticeships/FMA (3,490 male to 3,555 female for the last full quarter) and
Advanced Apprenticeships/MA (3,926 female to 3,490 male for the last full quarter).
We also have figures that monitor the ethnicity of starters, which demonstrates a good
proportion of starters describe themselves as from ethnic minority communities. We
intend to continue to monitor this by analysis of the LSC/ELWa figures.

The fact we monitor these statistics allows us to act, with providers via the ALP
industry sub-group, and with industry at large, to re-dress any potential in-balance in
the profile of staff being recruited on to the Apprenticeship programme. This may lead
us to develop case studies of good practice.

5.6   Transfer Arrangements from Previous Framework

As there are new NVQs in the sector, cut off date for the old framework will be July 31
2006. The new framework (i.e. that which uses independent assessment of the
underpinning knowledge) will be used for all learners registered after the 1 August
2006.

Candidates registered after the 1st May 2006 on the previous framework (i.e. the pre-
August 2006 framework) but have not yet started their technical certificate may transfer
forward to the new framework. Where apprentices registered on the previous
framework wish to transfer to the newhospitality FMA/AMA, this should be agreed with
the local LSC/regional ELWa. Decisions to transfer apprentices must be made in their
best interests and be agreed by them and their employer. Details of the decision to
transfer from to the new framework must be recorded in a revised Individual
Apprenticeship Plan. Transfer arrangements relating to NVQs should be
communicated to the awarding body concerned.

Candidates who are already registered on the pre-August 2006 framework and have
started their technical certificates must remain on that framework. They should be
assessed under the conditions of the previous assessment strategy, and therefore
have the opportunity to complete the technical certificates.

5.7   Monitoring Arrangements for the Framework

We are keen to keep a tight grip on monitoring the framework, particularly so we can
be in a position to assess the effectiveness of the measures we have put in place to
drive down the rate of non-completion. The measures we are introducing will be both
quantitative and qualitative.

They include – monitoring of certification. Also, analysis of take up data provided by
funding bodies, as well as the data provided by inspection bodies. We are also
currently working with Training Providers and Awarding Bodies in order to build up a
full picture.

In addition to the above, our links with the Training Providers especially through the
Association of Learning Providers industry sub-group, allows us a qualitative measure
on how the frameworks are operating in practice.

                                                                                         28
We also are exploring systems of tracking candidates who have successfully
completed their frameworks throughout the early part of their career, in order to build
up a picture of the effectiveness of the programme.

6      Achievement and Progression

6.1    Certification

The successful apprentice will receive an Apprenticeship/FMA or Advanced
Apprenticeship/MA Completion Certificate from People 1st. This is separate from, and
in addition to, those certificates awarded for the achievement of the individual
components of the framework, e.g. NVQ, and Key Skills. Providers and / or Employers
are responsible for claiming the National Completion Certificate from People 1st and for
signing on the Certificate Request Form to confirm that the mandatory outcomes have
been met and are on file for audit purposes. A Certificate Request Form is to be
completed for each individual learner, with the name as it is to appear on the certificate
and the name of the local LSC/ELWa regional office supplied in full. The mandatory
outcomes are:

       •   Approved and signed Employee Induction component (ERR) for both
           Apprentice and Advanced Apprentice
       •   Relevant NVQ certificate/s (Level 2 and/or 3) - if a learner has entered the
           programme at Level 3, proof of accredited prior learning and/or experience
           must also be supplied
       •   Mandatory Key Skill Unit certificates at the appropriate level

All requests for a certificate will be subject to quality assurance checks by ourselves, in
accordance with the operating principals for the processing and issuing of certificates.

Compliance with these requirements results in the awarding of the Hospitality
Apprentice or Advanced Apprentice Certificate of Completion. All requests for
certificates will be verified and subjected to quality assurance checks by People 1st.

6.2    Progression

We are very mindful of the fact that the Apprenticeship frameworks both offer
progression from related frameworks and learning opportunities, and provide
progression to learning programmes and career opportunities.

In terms of progression to the frameworks, we expect candidates with a general
education background to be able to progress to the frameworks. We also note that we
are starting to see young people coming through Young Apprenticeships, and we are
very keen to promote this as a method of entry onto our Apprenticeship Frameworks,
and we will be working with Providers to ensure that this happens in practice. We also
see the opportunity presented by greater vocational content delivered in schools as an
opportunity to provide progression to Apprenticeship frameworks. We are currently
piloting the Young Apprenticeships, and gathering information on how best to bridge
candidates onto the Apprenticeship frameworks in order that we can enable suitable
progression.


                                                                                          29
There is a clear progression route from the Apprenticeship/FMA to the Advanced
Apprenticeship/MA. The competence based element of both apprenticeships
articulate, and the roles supported by the Level 2 NVQs are further developed in the
Level 3 NVQs, allowing candidates and employers to really build a career around the
apprenticeship structure.

Although the routes through the frameworks are designed in order that the Apprentice
can gain the skills that are relevant to their employer, the NVQs do allow for progress.
There are clear progression routes across from Food Processing and Cooking to
Professional Cookery, and from Food and Drink Service to Food and Drink Service
(Drink only). In addition, there is a less defined opportunity for candidates to progress
between Housekeeping and Front Office.

The frameworks themselves allow progression to some Professional Qualifications, i.e.
the National Certificate for Personal Licence Holders.

In terms of progression to further and higher education, the Advanced
Apprenticeship/MA is a recognised route into many Foundation Degrees, and we are
currently working with Foundation Degree Forward to put this recognition onto a more
formal footing. Foundation Degrees in the sector include the Foundation Degree in
Culinary Arts at Thames Valley University and Westminster Kingsway College. We are
in touch with other providers who are also looking to develop content here, and
progression is something we do discuss with providers.

Although there are not sector specific NVQs to form the basis of progression to Levels
4 and 5, there is sufficient management and supervisory content, particularly in the
Hospitality Supervision award, to enable progression to awards at Levels 4 and 5 of
management NVQs, or NVQs with significant management content.

In terms of the progression to specific job roles, for the Apprenticeship/FMA;

Route A       NVQ in Food and Drink Service

Occupations here could be Waiter or Silver Service Waiter. This route is also suitable
for a Team member in a quick-service environment and is used by event organisers.

Progression in terms of qualifications is primarily on to the next level of framework,
typically through the Hospitality Supervision route. Progression in terms of industry
roles could be to Manager, Team Supervisor, Head Waiter or Maitre’d, and eventually
into general management roles.




                                                                                       30
Route B      NVQ in Food and Drink Service (Drinks Service)

Progression opportunities in terms of qualifications and learning programmes are to
the Advances Apprenticeship/MA, to the Hospitality Supervision Route. In terms of
employment, to Bar Supervisor, Bar Manager or eventually Publican. This could also
be a a route for regional managers within chains, and ultimately General Management

Route C      NVQ in Front Office

Opportunities for progression through qualifications include the Advanced
Apprenticeship/MA, although the fact that a number of transferable skills are delivered
means that there is the prospect of transferability to other, customer-facing routes,
such as the Travel apprenticeship.

Career routes open to a trained receptionist include Reception Manager, Front of
House Supervisor and General Management opportunities.

Route D      NVQ in Food Processing and Cooking

This route will support progression with employers such as those listed above, but also
with the large contract caterers who bid for much of the institutional work. Some of
these companies, such as the Compass group, place a high priority on their
Apprenticeship schemes.

Occupations supported here include School Cook, Cook, Team member or Chef.
Progression in terms of programmes would be to the Advanced Apprenticeship/MA, on
either the Hospitality Supervision or, less so, the Professional Cookery route.
Progression in terms of career would be to Catering Supervisor or Sous Chef.
Eventually career could go to Head Chef or Catering Manager.

Route E      NVQ in Professional Cookery

The roles supported by this route are craft Chef, Kitchen assistant or Team member.
Progression in terms of the industry is to Sous Chef or Team Supervisor. Eventual
progression could be to Head Chef or Regional Manager within a large employer.
Progression in terms of qualifications will be to the Advanced Apprenticeship/MA.

Route F      NVQ in Housekeeping

The main occupation supported by this role is that of Housekeeper. Progression in
terms of qualifications and learning is to the Advanced Apprenticeship/MA.
Progression in terms of career is to Head Housekeeper, and other supervisory roles.
There is also scope to move to contract cleaning.

Route G      NVQ in Hospitality (Multi-Skilled)

Roles supported by this route include Youth Hostel supervisor, Team Member within a
Holiday Park or Team Member within a Food Preparation and Cooking franchise or
chain. Progression opportunities would be to supervisory and/or management
positions, with possible routes to eventual owner/manager of small hotels or Bead and
Breakfast establishments.

                                                                                      31
Advanced Apprenticeship/Modern Apprenticeship

Route A       NVQ in Professional Cookery

This route offers candidates access to a wide range of opportunities in industry, such
as Sous Chef and even Head Chef, not to mention progression to General
Management opportunities in large multiples. The craft skills delivered by this route
are also important to Institutional catering, such as hospitals, schools and the MoD.
Progression routes in terms of education and training would likely to be to a
Foundation Degree in Culinary Arts, or in Hospitality Management.


Route B       Hospitality Supervision

This route in particular allows a learner to develop not only the technical skills required
to work in their chosen sub-sector of the industry, but also the management skills that
are needed in a supervisory role. These management skills will be built on as learners
here develop their careers through the industry. Progression from this route into
Higher Education would be to a Foundation Degree in Hospitality Management, or onto
a more general management qualification. Roles that employees here could progress
to include Hotel Manager, General Manager of a Hotel or Visitor Attraction, Pub
Manager, Regional Manager in a Pub Chain, Regional Manager in a franchised
Hospitality and Catering chain or General Management positions within large multiples.




                                                                                        32
7 Fact Sheet
Apprenticeship/Foundation Modern Apprenticeship and Advanced
Apprenticeship/Modern Apprenticeship in Hospitality and Catering


What’s involved?

An apprentice can expect to be doing work based learning with an employer and to be
paid, either a wage if they are employed, or an allowance. The apprenticeship will
include a National Vocational Qualification, Key Skills and a ‘knowledge based element
or technical certificate as listed below.


Competence Based              Knowledge Based Element      Key Skills
Element
Apprenticeship/Foundation     Apprenticeship/Foundation    Apprenticeship/Foundation
Modern Apprenticeship:        Modern Apprenticeship:       Modern Apprenticeship:
• Route A: NVQ in Food and                                 • Application of Number –
  Drink Service (Level 2)     The knowledge based            Level 1
• Route B: NVQ in Food and    element will be covered by   • Communications – Level 1
  Drink Service (Drinks       the independent assessment
  Service) (Level 2)          of the NVQ, as per the
• Route C: NVQ in Front       accredited assessment
  Office (Level 2)            strategy
• Route D: NVQ in Food
  Processing and Cooking
  (Level 2)
• Route E: NVQ in
  Professional Cookery
  (Level 2)
• Route F: NVQ in
  Housekeeping (Level 2)
• Route G: NVQ in
  Hospitality and Catering
  (Multi-Skilled) (Level 2)




Advanced                                                   Advanced
Apprenticeship/Modern         Advanced                     Apprenticeship/Modern
Apprenticeship:               Apprenticeship/Modern        Apprenticeship:
                              Apprenticeship:              • Application of Number –
• Route A: Professional
  Cookery (Level 3)                                          Level 2
                              The knowledge-based          • Communications – Level 2
• Route B: Hospitality
                              element of the NVQ will be
  Supervision (Level 3)
                              covered by the independent
                              assessment of the NVQ, as
                              per the accredited
                              assessment strategy

                                                                                   33
The decision on which competence based and knowledge elements will be studied will be made
by the employer and/or training provider in discussion with the apprentice.
Entry requirements:
There are no entry requirements for the Apprenticeship/Foundation Modern
Apprenticeship.

Entry to the advanced apprenticeship requires successful completion of one of the
following:
       • the hospitality apprenticeship
       • a hospitality related (or other relevant) level 2 NVQ
       • a hospitality related (or other relevant) level 2 vocationally-related
           qualification
Alternatively, entry to the advanced apprenticeship/MA can be based on the apprentice
having gained level 2 comparable vocational experience and skills, for example,
people who have worked in a relevant vocational area for at least nine months to a
year prior to registering onto the advanced apprenticeship.

Depending on the occupational area the candidate intends to focus their advanced
apprenticeship on, entry may be permitted with other relevant vocationally-related or
occupational qualifications, such as leisure, tourism, administration and customer
service. Appropriate qualifications are those accredited to the National Qualifications
Framework (see QCA’s website www.qca.org.uk).

In general, for both the apprenticeship and advanced apprenticeship, new entrants
should be:

       •   motivated to succeed within the hospitality industry
       •   willing to learn and apply that learning in the workplace
       •   judged capable by the employer of completing the mandatory outcomes



Minimum Periods of Training:

The minimum acceptable timescales for completion are that the Apprenticehsip/FMA
should be completed in no less than 12 months, and the advanced Apprenticeship/MA
should take no less than 24 months to complete.

In terms of off-the-job training, whilst this will be the product of discussion between the
candidate, employer and any training provider involved in the process, it will have to be
enough to ensure full delivery of ;
    • the underpinning knowledge within the NVQ
    • the key skills
    • the Employment Rights and Responsibilities

We recommend that candidates should spend 20 days off-the-job learning for an
apprenticeship, and 25 days for an advanced apprenticeship. Because knowledge
throughout the NVQ in the apprenticeship will be assessed independently, in keeping
with the accredited assessment strategy of the NVQ, the delivery of the knowledge
element of the apprenticeship must reflect this. We feel that the recommended
timeframes will be necessary for full delivery of the knowledge in the NVQ.

                                                                                             34
What type of job might an apprentice be doing?

Apprenticeship/Foundation Modern Apprenticeship:
Route A: Waiter or Silver Service Waiter. This route is also suitable for a Team
member in a quick-service environment and is used by event organisers
Route B: Bar-person, cellar-person, and possibly bar supervisor
Route C: Reception
Route D: School Cook, Cook, Team member or Chef
Route E: Craft Chef, Kitchen assistant or Team member
Route F: Housekeeper
Route G: Youth Hostel worker/Supervisor, Team Member/Supervisor within a Holiday
Park or Small Hotel

Advanced Apprenticeship/Modern Apprenticeship:
Route A: Sous Chef and Head Chef
Route B: Head Housekeeper, Head of Reception, Unit Manager in a Hotel Chain, Unit
Manager in a Contract Catering Company, Unit or Regional Supervisor/Manager in a
restaurant/pub chain with multiple outlets



How long does the apprenticeship take to complete?
The minimum acceptable timescales for completion are that the Apprenticehsip/FMA
should be completed in no less than 12 months, and the advanced Apprenticeship/MA
should take no less than 24 months to complete.

Career progression after completing this apprenticeship
Apprenticeship/Foundation Modern Apprenticeship:
Route A: Manager, Team Supervisor, Head Waiter or Maitre’d, and eventually general
management roles
Route B: Bar Supervisor, Bar Manager or eventually Publican. This could also be a
route for regional managers within chains, and ultimately General Management.
Route C: Reception Manager, Front of House Supervisor and General Management
opportunities
Route D: Catering Supervisor or Sous Chef. Eventual career paths could lead to Head
Chef or Catering Manager.
Route E: Sous Chef or Team Supervisor. Eventual progression could be to Head Chef
or Regional Manager within a large employer.
Route F: Head Housekeeper, and other supervisory roles. There is also scope to
move to contract cleaning.
Route G: Manager of a Youth Hostel or smaller hotel. This route can also be used for
Team Members within a Food Prep and Cooking franchise/chain, and can lead to
Supervisory positions within this environment.

Advanced Apprenticeship/Modern Apprenticeship:
Route A: General Management opportunities in large multiples.
Route B: . Hotel Manager, General Manager of a Visitor Attraction, Pub Manager,

                                                                                  35
Regional Manager in a Pub Chain, Regional Manager in a franchised Hospitality and
Catering chain or General Management positions within large multiples.


Framework developed by:

People 1st
2nd Floor Armstrong House
38 Market Square
Uxbridge
UB8 1LH
Tel: 0870 060 2550
Fax: 0870 060 2551
Website: www.people1st.co.uk




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