2009 - 2011 CATALOG

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2009 - 2011 CATALOG Powered By Docstoc
					2 0 0 9 - 2 0 1 1 C A TA L O G
                               Correspondence DIRECTORY
Questions regarding the information provided in this Catalog may be addressed to the following offices
at this address:
                                            Paine College
                                       (Specify Name of Office)
                                         1235 Fifteenth Street
                                      Augusta, GA 30901-3182

General Information .......................... (706) 821-8200            Institutional Research ................................. 821-8283

Academic Affairs.........................................821-8255        International Programs ............................... 821-8229

Admissions ..................................................821-8320    International Student Advisement .............. 821-8282

Alumni Relations.........................................821-8247        Library/Learning Resources Center............ 821-8308

Athletic Department ....................................396-7599         Management Information Systems ............. 821-8350

Bookstore.....................................................821-8286   Mathematics Support Center ...................... 821-8212

Business Office............................................821-8317      Military Science (ROTC/ASU) .................. 667-4647

Campus Pastor .............................................821-8295      Office of the President ................................ 821-8230

Campus Safety.............................................821-8235       Online Courses ........................................... 396-8107

Career Services............................................821-8391      Planning & Evaluation ............................... 821-8324

Continuing Education..................................793-2030           Post Office .................................................. 821-8252

Division of Business Administration...........821-8332                   Pre-Professional Sciences Program……….821-8335

Division of Education..................................432-0727          Public Relations.......................................... 821-8323

Division of Humanities................................821-8326           Registrar...................................................... 821-8311

Division of Natural Sciences/Mathematics .821-8346                       Student Activities ....................................... 821-8634

Division of Social Sciences .........................821-8328            Student Affairs............................................ 821-8302

Financial Aid ...............................................821-8262    Student Government Association ............... 396-8150

Food Services ..............................................821-8395     Student Newspaper, “The Paineite” ........... 396-8150

Fort Gordon Resident Center.......................793-2030               Student Support Services............................ 821-8234

General Education Development Center .....821-8343                       Summer School........................................... 821-8311

Health Services............................................821-8219      Test Skills Development Center ................. 821-8300

Housing/Residence Life ..............................821-8634            Tutorial and Enrichment Center ................. 821-8345

Institutional Development ...........................821-8233            Yearbook, “The Lion” ................................ 396-8150
                                 MESSAGE FROM THE COLLEGE



Dear Students:

We celebrate your decision to make Paine College your choice for pursuing post secondary study. Paine
College prides itself in having engaged students, faculty members who are scholars in their respective
fields and staff members as well as administrators who are dedicated to supporting an environment
conducive to learning. We also have a dedicated cadre of alumni, religious leaders, corporate partners,
and other community persons who take an interest in and support the college community.

At Paine College we are committed to the Paine College Ideal and the mission of providing a “liberal
arts education of the highest quality that emphasizes academic excellence, ethical and spiritual values,
social responsibility, and personal development.” Since 1882, Paine College has had a rich history of
producing leaders in the fields of education, science, religion, business, athletics, and the arts. This is
evident by the eight bishops and nine college presidents who are graduates of Paine College.

The vision for Paine College is to be a premier liberal arts institution in the region. This vision will be
accomplished through strengthened faculty capacity, student engagement and measuring learning
outcomes, technology infrastructure development, facilities enhancement and “friend” raising.

In this catalog you will find information about the outstanding educational programs, services and
opportunities offered at Paine College. The catalog provides general information about the college, a
brief history of the college, as well as information on all academic programs. As you read the catalog,
notice that the common curriculum is organized according to six themes that have been “designed to
create coherence, emphasize the value-based nature of the curriculum, and the college’s conception of
its mission.” Courses and experiences are designed to educate the whole person by allowing “students
to focus their studies on an area of interest in preparation for a career or entrance into graduate or
professional school.”

Take the time to read the catalog in detail. Use it to help you make informed decisions about academic
programs, support services, policies and procedures of the college, and ways to engage in college and
community activities. Ask questions and refer to it often as you matriculate through Paine College.

Paine College is a small institution offering a big education. Best wishes for your continued success.




                                                    ii
           THE PAINE COLLEGE IDEAL




             To love truth and to seek it above material things;

           To ennoble and be ennobled by common fellowship;

                  To keep the energies of life at full tide;

               To cultivate an appreciation of the beautiful;

                     To work well and play with zest;

                   To have an open, unprejudiced mind;

             To live simply, practicing a reasonable economy;

                      To find joy in work well done;

To be an earnest disciple in the school of Him who brings the abundant life;

To work diligently for a better understanding of the White and Black races:

               Such is the spirit and ideal of Paine College.

  To all who share this spirit and are eager for the pursuit of high things,

                        we offer a hearty welcome.




             The Paine College Ideal was originally developed
    by a faculty committee appointed by President E. C. Peters in 1933
  and was revised by the Board of Trustees at the spring meeting in 2003.



                                     iii
                            TABLE OF CONTENTS

Correspondence Directory......................................................... Inside Front Cover

Message from the College ..................................................................................... ii
The Paine College Ideal ....................................................................................... iii

Introduction ............................................................................................................1

Academic Calendars...............................................................................................2

General Information .............................................................................................14

Fees and Finances.................................................................................................21

Financial Aid ........................................................................................................26

Admissions ...........................................................................................................34

Student Affairs .....................................................................................................40

Academic Regulations..........................................................................................44
Academic Program ...............................................................................................65

Division of Business Administration....................................................................69

Division of Education...........................................................................................75

Division of Humanities ........................................................................................85

Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics..................................................102

Division of Social Sciences ................................................................................122

Course Prefixes and Descriptions.......................................................................137

Online Courses ...................................................................................................166

International Studies Program ............................................................................169
Military Science .................................................................................................171

Fort Gordon Resident Center .............................................................................175

Support Programs ...............................................................................................180

Continuing Education.........................................................................................184

Board of Trustees ...............................................................................................185

Faculty ................................................................................................................186

Administrative Officers and Staff ......................................................................190

National Alumni Association, Officers ..............................................................196

Index...................................................................................................................197
Campus Map .............................................................................. Inside Back Cover
                                      INTRODUCTION
                                      INTRODUCTION
This catalog provides basic information about Paine College. It includes the history, mission, goals,
admissions standards and requirements, tuition and other costs, sources of financial aid, academic
This catalog provides basic information about Paine College. It includes the history, mission, goals,
regulations, and descriptions of courses and programs. The catalog also includes rules and regulations
admissions standards and requirements, tuition and other costs, sources of financial aid, academic
which govern student life at Paine College, and information related to student organizations and other
regulations, and descriptions of courses and programs. The catalog also includes rules and regulations
activities of the campus. Additionally, it includes the name, rank, and educational background of each
which govern student life at Paine College, and information related to student organizations and other
faculty member.
activities of the campus. Additionally, it includes the name, rank, and educational background of each
faculty member.
FEDERAL REGULATIONS
COMPLIANCE STATEMENT
FEDERAL REGULATIONS
COMPLIANCE STATEMENT
        Paine College, in compliance with Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of
the Education Amendments of 1972, the Americans with Disability Act, Sections 503 and 504 of the
        Paine College, in compliance with Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of
Rehabilitation Act of 1967 and the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, does not discriminate on the basis
the Education Amendments of 1972, the Americans with Disability Act, Sections 503 and 504 of the
of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, or age in any of its policies, procedures, or
practices; nor does 1967 and the in Discrimination Section 402 of the Vietnam Era the basis
Rehabilitation Act of the College, Agecompliance withAct of 1975, does not discriminate on Veterans




                                                                                                            INTRODUCTION
of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, or age in any of its policies, procedures, or
Readjustment Act of 1974, discriminate against any employees or applicants for employment because




                                                                                                              INTRODUCTION
practices; nor does the College, in compliance with Section 402 of the Vietnam Era Veterans
they are disabled veterans of the Vietnam Era, or because of their medical condition, their ancestry or
Readjustment Act of 1974, discriminate against any employees or applicants for employment because
their marital status; nor does the College discriminate on the basis of citizenship, within the limits
imposed by law or College policy; nor does the College discriminate on the basis of sexual ancestry or
they are disabled veterans of the Vietnam Era, or because of their medical condition, their orientation.
their marital status; nor does the College discriminate on the basis of citizenship, within the limits
This nondiscrimination policy covers admission, access, and treatment in College programs and
imposed by law or College policy; nor does the College discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation.
activities, and application for and treatment in College employment.
This nondiscrimination policy covers admission, access, and treatment in College programs and
activities, and application for and treatmentandCollege employment. Orders 11246 and 11375, Section
        In accordance with College policy in pursuant to Executive
503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Section 402 of the Vietnam Era Readjustment Act of 1974,
       In accordance with College policy and pursuant to Executive Orders 11246 and 11375, Section
the College is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.
503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Section 402 of the Vietnam Era Readjustment Act of 1974,
the College is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.
       In compliance with the provisions set forth in the Student Right-To-Know and Campus Security
Act, Public Law 101-542, as amended, Paine College discloses information about completion or
       In compliance with the provisions set forth in the Student Right-To-Know and Campus Security
graduation rates and campus safety policies and procedures to current and prospective students and
Act, Public Law 101-542, as amended, Paine College discloses information about completion or
employees.
graduation rates and campus safety policies and procedures to current and prospective students and
employees.
       Information on completion and/or graduation rates may be obtained from the Institutional
Research Office and campus safety data may be obtained from the Campus Safety Office.
       Information on completion and/or graduation rates may be obtained from the Institutional
Research Office and campus safety data may be obtained from the Campus Safety Office.




Paine College reserves the right to change without notice the academic calendar or fees,
provisions, course offerings, or requirements in this catalog, and to determine whether a student
Paine College reserves the right to change without notice the academic calendar or fees,
has satisfactorily met the requirements for admission or graduation. Advising errors do not
provisions, course offerings, or requirements in this catalog, and to determine whether a student
exempt students from the responsibility of meeting all degree requirements for graduation.
has satisfactorily met the requirements for admission or graduation. Advising errors do not
exempt students from the responsibility of meeting all degree requirements for graduation.
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                                                                     OPENING CONVOCATION-FALL                            Wednesday, September 9
                                                                         ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                                                                              2009-2010
                                                                                            Classes Resume                   Tuesday, September 8

                                                                              HOLIDAY—LABOR DAY                              Monday, September 7
                                                                                FALL SEMESTER
                                                                                                                                      SEPTEMBER
                                                                                     2009
                                  AUGUST                       Last Day for Class Changes (Drop and Add)                         Friday, August 14

                                  Sunday, August 2                         Orientation/Check-In For Students 8:00a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
ACADEMIC CALENDARs, 2009 – 2011




                                                                                                                                                       ACADEMIC CALENDARs, 2009 – 2011
                                                                LAST DAY FOR LATE REGISTRATION                              Wednesday, August 12
                                                                           President’s Barbeque 4:00p.m. – 6:00p.m.
                                                                           Pinning Ceremony 6:30p.m. – 7:00p.m.
                                                                              Late Registration Begins
                                                                              FIRST DAY OF CLASSES                             Tuesday, August 11
                                  Monday, August 3                         Faculty/Staff Development Workshop
                                                                           New Student Orientation Sessions (TBA)
                                                                   N-Z 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
                                                                   A-M 8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
                                  Tuesday, August 4                        Placement Examinations (English)
                                                                   COLLEGE-WIDE REGISTRATION                                   Monday, August 10
                                                                           New Student Orientation Sessions (TBA)
                                                 1:00 -5:00 p.m.
                                  Wednesday, August 5                      Placement Examinations (Mathematics, Reading TBA)
                                             advisement and registration for pre-registered students,
                                                 8:00 – 12:00 p.m.         New Student Orientation Sessions (TBA)
                                             for pre-registered students who do not need to see advisors,
                                  Thursday, August 6
                                           REGISTRATION                    Academic Advisement and Registration for New Students,
                                                                           8:00-12:00 p.m.
                                                                           Registration for Pre-Registered Students,
                                                                         Academic Advisement – 1:00 p.m.                            Friday, August 7
                                                                           1:00-5:00 p.m.
                                                                           Residence Halls open for Returning Students – 6:00 p.m.
                                                Residence Halls open for Returning Students – 6:00 p.m.
                                                1:00-5:00 p.m.
                                  Friday, August 7                         Academic Advisement – 1:00 p.m.
                                                Registration for Pre-Registered Students,
                                                8:00-12:00 p.m.
                                                                           REGISTRATION
                                                Academic Advisement and Registration for New Students,                         Thursday, August 6
                                                                             for pre-registered students who do not need to see advisors,
                                                                                 8:00 – 12:00 p.m.
                                                      New Student Orientation Sessions (TBA)
                                                                             advisement and registration for pre-registered students,
                                                      Placement Examinations (Mathematics, Reading TBA)                      Wednesday, August 5
                                                                                 1:00 -5:00 p.m.
                                                                  New Student Orientation Sessions (TBA)
                                  Monday, August 10                        COLLEGE-WIDE REGISTRATION
                                                                  Placement Examinations (English)                              Tuesday, August 4
                                                                           A-M 8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
                                                                           N-Z 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
                                                                  New Student Orientation Sessions (TBA)
                                                                  Faculty/Staff Development Workshop                            Monday, August 3
                                  Tuesday, August 11                       FIRST DAY OF CLASSES
                                                                           Late Registration Begins
                                                     Pinning Ceremony 6:30p.m. – 7:00p.m.
                                                     President’s Barbeque 4:00p.m. – 6:00p.m.
                                  Wednesday, August 12                     LAST DAY FOR LATE REGISTRATION
                                                     Orientation/Check-In For Students 8:00a.m. - 2:00 p.m.                         Sunday, August 2

                                  Friday, August 14                        Last Day for Class Changes (Drop and Add)                        AUGUST
                                                                                     2009
                                  SEPTEMBER
                                                                                FALL SEMESTER
                                  Monday, September 7                      HOLIDAY—LABOR DAY

                                  Tuesday, September 8                     Classes Resume
                                                                              2009-2010
                                                                         ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                                  Wednesday, September 9                   OPENING CONVOCATION-FALL
                                                                                          3
                                                                                          2
Paine College                     Academic Calendars, 2009 – 2011                               Page 3


OCTOBER

Tuesday, September 29-October 2      MID-TERM EXAMINATIONS

Monday, October 5                    FALL BREAK/Faculty and Students
                                     Mid-Term Grades Due in Registrar’s Office by 4:00p.m.

Tuesday, October 6                   Classes Resume

Wednesday, October 7                 First Day to File Application for May 2010 Graduation

Friday, October 9                    Last Day for Submitting Work for Removal of “I” Grades
                                     Last Day to Withdraw from a Course without Academic Penalty and
                                     Receive a “W” Grade

Saturday, October 17                 Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English
                                     9:00 a.m., Haygood-Holsey, Room 210
Friday, October 30                   Last Day for Submitting Changes for “I” Grades
                                     Last Day to File Application for May 2010 Graduation

NOVEMBER

Monday-Friday, November 2-13         ADVISEMENT & PRE-REGISTRATION

Tuesday, November 17                 Last Day for Assigning “WF” or “WP” Grades

Wednesday, November 25-27            HOLIDAY-THANKSGIVING
                                     BEGINS AT END OF THE DAY ON TUESDAY

Monday, November 30                  Classes Resume

DECEMBER

Thursday, December 3                 Last Day of Classes

Friday, December 4                   Reading Day and faculty conferences

Monday-Thursday, December 7-10       FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Friday, December 11                  Term Ends

Friday December 11                   Residence Halls Close at 12:00 Noon

Monday, December 14                  Grades Due in Registrar’s Office by 10:00 a.m.

                                     CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY
                                     BEGINS AT THE END OF THE DAY



                                  CALENDAR SUBJECT TO CHANGE
                                               4
Page 4                           Academic Calendars, 2009 – 2011                         Paine College



                                       SPRING SEMESTER
                                             2010

JANUARY

Friday, January 1                   NEW YEAR’S DAY OBSERVED

Monday, January 4                   Faculty/Staff Development
                                    Orientation/Check-In for New Students Living On Campus, 8:00 a.m.
                                    Orientation/Check-In for New Students Living Off Campus, 8:00 a.m.
                                    Orientation Assembly for New Students and Parents, 10:15 a.m.

Tuesday, January 5                  PLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS (English)
                                    Orientation Activities

Wednesday, January 6                PLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS (Reading and Mathematics)
                                    Orientation Activities

Thursday, January 7                 Academic Advisement and Registration for New Students 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
                                    REGISTRATION
                                     For pre-registered students who do not need to see advisors, 8:00-5:00 p.m.
                                     Advisement and registration for pre-registered students, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
                                    Residence Halls open for Returning Students 6:00 p.m.

Friday, January 8                    COLLEGE-WIDE REGISTRATION
                                      A-M 8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
                                      N-Z 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Monday, January 11                  FIRST DAY OF CLASSES
                                    Late Registration Begins

Wednesday, January 13               SPRING CONVOCATION


Thursday, January 15                LAST DAY FOR LATE REGISTRATION
                                    Last day for class changes (Drop and Add)

Friday, January 15                  DR. MARTIN L. KING, JR., OBSERVANCE
                                    Paine College/Medical College of Georgia/Augusta State University

Monday, January 18                  HOLIDAY-DR. MARTIN L. KING, JR. DAY

Tuesday, January 19                 Classes Resume

FEBRUARY

Monday-Thursday, February 8-11      CONFERENCE ON THE BLACK EXPERIENCE

Monday-Saturday, February 8-13      HOMECOMING WEEK

                                 CALENDAR SUBJECT TO CHANGE
                                              5
Paine College                      Academic Calendars, 2009 – 2011                              Page 5


Friday, February 12                   FOUNDER’S DAY CONVOCATION, 10:30 a.m.
                                      (NO CLASSES AFTER CONVOCATION)

Wednesday, February 24                PAINE COLLEGE BAPTIST DAY

MARCH

Tuesday-Friday, March 2-5             MID-TERM EXAMINATIONS

Monday, March 8                       Mid-Term Grades Due in Registrar’s Office by 10:00 a.m.

Monday-Friday, March 8-12             SPRING BREAK/Faculty and Students

Wednesday, March 10-12                SPRING BREAK/Staff

Monday, March 15                      Classes Resume

Monday-Friday, March 15-19            RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS WEEK

Thursday, March 18                    Last Day to Withdraw From a Course Without Academic Penalty and
                                      Receive a “W” Grade

Friday, March 19                      Last Day for Submitting Work for Removal of “I” Grades

Saturday, March 27                    Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English
                                      9:00 a.m., Haygood-Holsey, Room 210

Wednesday, March 31                   EASTER ASSEMBLY

APRIL

Friday, April 2                       HOLIDAY-GOOD FRIDAY

Monday, April 5                       Classes Resume

Monday-Friday, April 5-16             STUDENT ADVISEMENT
                                      PRE-REGISTRATION FOR SUMMER AND FALL

Wednesday, April 7                    HONORS DAY (Convocation)

Wednesday, April 14                   SENIOR ASSEMBLY (Last Assembly)

Tuesday-Wednesday, April 20-21        SENIOR EXAMINATIONS

Friday, April 23                      Senior Grades Due in Registrar’s Office by 10:00 a.m.

Tuesday, April 27                     Last Day for Assigning “WP” or “WF” Grades

Monday-Friday, April 26-April 30      Senior Week


                                 CALENDAR SUBJECT TO CHANGE
                                              6
Page 6                       Academic Calendars, 2009 – 2011                         Paine College

MAY

Saturday, May 1                 BACCALAUREATE CONVOCATION, 3:00 p.m.

Sunday, May2                    COMMENCEMENT CONVOCATION, 9:00 a.m.

Thursday, May 6                 Last Day of Instruction

Friday, May 7                   Reading Day

Monday-Thursday, May 10-13      FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Friday, May 14                  Residence Halls Close for Semester at 4:00 p.m. for All Students
                                Grades are due in the Registrar’s Office by 4:00 a.m.
                                Institutional/Division/Departmental/Staff Development and Planning
                                Activities




                                  SUMMER SEMESTER
                                       2010
MAY

Monday, May 24                  Residence Halls Open at 4:00 p.m.

Tuesday, May 25                  REGISTRATION

Wednesday, May 26               First Day of Classes
                                Late Registration Begins

Friday, May 28                  Last Day for Schedule Changes (Drop/Add)
                                Late Registration Ends

Monday, May 31                  Memorial Day

JUNE

Tuesday, June1                  Classes Resume

Monday-Tuesday, June 7&8        No Class/Service Activities

Wednesday, June 9               Classes Resume

Friday, June 11                 Last Day to Withdraw from Class Without Academic Penalty and
                                Receive a “W” Grade



                             CALENDAR SUBJECT TO CHANGE
                                          7
Paine College                 Academic Calendars, 2009 – 2011                            Page 7


JULY

Monday, July 5                   HOLIDAY INDEPENDENCE DAY
                                 (No Classes)

Tuesday, July 6                  Classes Resume

Wednesday, July 7                Last Day of Instruction

Thursday – Friday, July 8-9      FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Friday, July 9                   Residence Halls Close for Summer Session at 6:00 p.m.

Monday, July 12                  Grades Due in Registrar’s Office by 4:00 p.m.




                              CALENDAR SUBJECT TO CHANGE
                                           8
Page 8                 Academic Calendars, 2009 – 2011                             Paine College



                         ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                              2010-2011

                               FALL SEMESTER
                                    2010

AUGUST

Sunday, August 1          Orientation/Check-In For Students 8:00a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
                          President’s Barbeque 4:00p.m. – 6:00p.m.
                          Pinning Ceremony 6:30p.m. – 7:00p.m.

Monday, August 2          Faculty/Staff Development Workshop
                          New Student Orientation Sessions (TBA)

Tuesday, August 3         Placement Examinations (English)
                          New Student Orientation Sessions (TBA)

Wednesday, August 4       Placement Examinations (Mathematics, Reading TBA)
                          New Student Orientation Sessions (TBA)

Thursday, August 5        Academic Advisement and Registration for New Students,
                          8:00-noon
                          Registration for Pre-Registered Students,
                          1:00-5:00 p.m.
                          Residence Halls open for Returning Students – 6:00 p.m.

Friday, August 6          Academic Advisement – 1:00 p.m.

                          REGISTRATION
                            for pre-registered students who do not need to see advisors,
                                8:00 – noon
                            advisement and registration for pre-registered students,
                                1:00 -5:00 p.m.

Monday, August 9          COLLEGE-WIDE REGISTRATION
                          A-M 8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
                          N-Z 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Tuesday, August 10        FIRST DAY OF CLASSES
                          Late Registration Begins

Wednesday, August 11      LAST DAY FOR LATE REGISTRATION

Friday, August 13         Last Day for Class Changes (Drop and Add)



                       CALENDAR SUBJECT TO CHANGE
                                    9
Paine College                     Academic Calendars, 2009 – 2011                               Page 9



SEPTEMBER

Monday, September 6                  HOLIDAY—LABOR DAY

Tuesday, September 7                 Classes Resume

Wednesday, September 8               OPENING CONVOCATION-FALL

OCTOBER

Tuesday, September 28-October 1      MID-TERM EXAMINATIONS

Monday, October 4                    FALL BREAK/Faculty and Students
                                     Mid-Term Grades Due in Registrar’s Office by 4:00p.m.

Tuesday, October 5                   Classes Resume

Wednesday, October 6                 First Day to File Application for May 2011 Graduation

Friday, October 8                    Last Day for Submitting Work for Removal of “I” Grades
                                     Last Day to Withdraw from a Course without Academic Penalty and
                                     Receive a “W” Grade

Saturday, October 16                 Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English
                                     9:00 a.m., Haygood-Holsey, Room 210
Friday, October 29                   Last Day for Submitting Changes for “I” Grades
                                     Last Day to File Application for May 2011 Graduation

NOVEMBER

Monday-Friday, November 1-12         ADVISEMENT & PRE-REGISTRATION

Tuesday, November 16                 Last Day for Assigning “WF” or “WP” Grades

Wednesday-Friday, November 24-26     HOLIDAY-THANKSGIVING
                                     BEGINS AT END OF THE DAY ON TUESDAY

Monday, November 29                  Classes Resume

DECEMBER

Thursday, December 2                 Last Day of Classes

Friday, December 3                   Reading Day and faculty conferences

Monday-Thursday, December 6-9        FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Friday, December 10                  Term Ends


                                  CALENDAR SUBJECT TO CHANGE
                                              10
Page 10                 Academic Calendars, 2009 – 2011                         Paine College

Friday December 10         Residence Halls Close at 12:00 Noon

Monday, December 13        Grades Due in Registrar’s Office by 10:00 a.m.

                           CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY
                           BEGINS AT THE END OF THE DAY


                              SPRING SEMESTER
                                    2011

JANUARY

Saturday, January 1        NEW YEAR’S DAY

Monday, January 3          NEW YEAR’S DAY OBSERVED

Tuesday, January 4         Faculty/Staff Development
                           Orientation/Check-In for New Students Living On Campus, 8:00 a.m.
                           Orientation/Check-In for New Students Living Off Campus, 8:00 a.m.
                           Orientation Assembly for New Students and Parents, 10:15 a.m.

Wednesday, January 5       PLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS (English)
                           Orientation Activities

Thursday, January 6        PLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS (Reading and Mathematics)
                           Orientation Activities

Friday, January 7          Academic Advisement and Registration for New Students 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
                           REGISTRATION
                            For pre-registered students who do not need to see advisors, 8:00-5:00 p.m.
                            Advisement and registration for pre-registered students, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
                           Residence Halls open for Returning Students 6:00 p.m.

Monday, January 10          COLLEGE-WIDE REGISTRATION
                             A-M 8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
                             N-Z 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Tuesday, January 11        FIRST DAY OF CLASSES
                           Late Registration Begins

Wednesday, January 12      SPRING CONVOCATION

Friday, January 14         LAST DAY FOR LATE REGISTRATION
                           Last day for class changes (Drop and Add)
                           DR. MARTIN L. KING, JR., OBSERVANCE
                           Paine College/Medical College of Georgia/Augusta State University

Monday, January 17         HOLIDAY-DR. MARTIN L. KING, JR. DAY

Tuesday, January 18        Classes Resume

                        CALENDAR SUBJECT TO CHANGE
                                    11
Paine College                      Academic Calendars, 2009 – 2011                              Page 11

FEBRUARY

Monday-Thursday, February 7-10        CONFERENCE ON THE BLACK EXPERIENCE

Monday-Saturday, February 7-12        HOMECOMING WEEK

Friday, February 11                   FOUNDER’S DAY CONVOCATION, 10:30 a.m.
                                      (NO CLASSES AFTER CONVOCATION)

Wednesday, February 23                PAINE COLLEGE BAPTIST DAY

MARCH

Tuesday-Friday, March 1-4             MID-TERM EXAMINATIONS

Monday, March 7                       Mid-Term Grades Due in Registrar’s Office by 10:00 a.m.

Monday-Friday, March 7-11             SPRING BREAK/Faculty and Students

Wednesday-Friday, March 9-11          SPRING BREAK/Staff

Monday, March 14                      Classes Resume

Monday-Friday, March 14-18            RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS WEEK

Thursday, March 17                    Last Day to Withdraw From a Course Without Academic Penalty and
                                      Receive a “W” Grade

Friday, March 18                      Last Day for Submitting Work for Removal of “I” Grades

Saturday, March 26                    Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English
                                      9:00 a.m., Haygood-Holsey, Room 210

APRIL

Monday-Friday, April 4-15             STUDENT ADVISEMENT
                                      PRE-REGISTRATION FOR SUMMER AND FALL

Wednesday, April 6                    HONORS DAY (Convocation)

Wednesday, April 13                   SENIOR ASSEMBLY

Monday-Tuesday, April 18-19           SENIOR EXAMINATIONS

Wednesday, April 20                   EASTER ASSEMBLY (Last Assembly)
                                      Senior Grades Due in Registrar’s Office by 10:00 a.m.

Friday, April 22                      HOLIDAY-GOOD FRIDAY

Monday, April 25                      Classes Resume

Monday-Friday, April 25-April 29      Senior Week
                                 CALENDAR SUBJECT TO CHANGE
                                             12
Page 12                     Academic Calendars, 2009 – 2011                         Paine College


Tuesday, April 26              Last Day for Assigning “WP” or “WF” Grades

Saturday, April 30             BACCALAUREATE CONVOCATION, 3:00 p.m.

MAY
Sunday, May1                   COMMENCEMENT CONVOCATION, 9:00 a.m.

Thursday, May 5                Last Day of Instruction

Friday, May 6                  Reading Day

Monday-Thursday, May 9-12      FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Friday, May 13                 Residence Halls Close for Semester at 4:00 p.m. for All Students
                               Grades are due in the Registrar’s Office by 4:00 p.m.
                               Institutional/Division/Departmental/Staff Development and Planning
                               Activities


                                 SUMMER SEMESTER
                                      2011
MAY

Monday, May 23                 Residence Halls Open at 4:00 p.m.

Tuesday, May 24                 REGISTRATION

Wednesday, May 25              First Day of Classes
                               Late Registration Begins

Friday, May 27                 Last Day for Schedule Changes (Drop/Add)
                               Late Registration Ends

Monday, May 30                 Memorial Day-Holiday
                               (No Classes)

Tuesday, May 31                Classes Resume

JUNE

Monday-Tuesday, June 6-7       No Class/Service Activities

Wednesday, June 8              Classes Resume

Friday, June 10                Last Day to Withdraw from Class Without Academic Penalty and
                               Receive a “W” Grade

JULY
                            CALENDAR SUBJECT TO CHANGE
                                        13
Paine College                 Academic Calendars, 2009 – 2011                            Page 13


Monday, July 4                   HOLIDAY INDEPENDENCE DAY
                                 (No Classes)

Tuesday, July 5                  Classes Resume

Wednesday, July 6                Last Day of Instruction

Thursday – Friday, July 7-8      FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Friday, July 8                   Residence Halls Close for Summer Session at 6:00 p.m.

Monday, July 11                  Grades Due in Registrar’s Office by 4:00 p.m.




                              CALENDAR SUBJECT TO CHANGE
                                          14
                                                                        15
                                                                        15

                                                       GENERAL INFORMATION
                      Blacks in Augusta until that year.
                      continued its high school department until 1945, because there was no public secondary school for
                      college-level work was provided to justify changing the school’s name to The Paine College. Paine
                      HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE
                      Initially, advanced students received special instruction on an individual basis, but by 1903 sufficient
                      The Paine Institute began with a high school component and gradually developed a college department.
                      Paine College was founded by the leadership of the Methodist Episcopal Church South (MECS), now
                      United Methodist Church, and the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church (CME), now Christian
                      1910 after having headed Paine for twenty-six years.
                      Methodist Episcopal Church. Paine was the brainchild of Bishop Lucius Henry Holsey, who first
                      Mr. Gilbert launched Paine’s continuing tradition of having a biracial faculty. President Walker died in
                      expressed the idea for the College in 1869. Bishop Holsey asked leaders in the Methodist Episcopal
                      Paine’s first student and first graduate, to become the first Black member of the faculty. The hiring of
                      Church South to help establish a school to train Negro teachers and preachers so that they might in turn
                      presented a resolution to the Trustees authorizing President Walker to employ John Wesley Gilbert,
                      appropriately address the educational and spiritual needs of the people newly freed from the evils of
                      minister from Missouri, gave $25,000 to Paine for the endowment. Also in 1888, Trustee W. A. Candler
                      slavery. Leaders in the Methodist Episcopal Church South agreed, and Paine Institute came into being.
                      The year 1888 was a very significant one for Paine College. Reverend Moses U. Payne, an MECS




                                                                                                                                 GENERAL INFORMATION
GENERAL INFORMATION




                      On November 1, 1882, the Paine College Board of Trustees, consisting of six members, three from each
                      Fifteenth Street.
                      Church, met for the first time. They agreed to name the school in honor of the late Bishop Robert Paine
                      following the resignation of Reverend Callaway. In 1886, the College moved to its present site on
                      of the MECS who had helped to organize the CME Church. In December, the Trustees selected Dr.
                      On December 28, 1884, the Reverend George Williams Walker was elected President of Paine Institute
                      Morgan Callaway as the first President of the College and enlarged the Board from six to 19 members,
                      drawing its new membership from communities outside of Georgia so that the enterprise might not be
                      on Broad Street in downtown Augusta.
                      viewed as exclusively local.
                      George Williams Walker as its first teacher. In January 1884, classes began in rented quarters located
                      In 1883, a Charter of Incorporation for The Paine Institute was granted, and the Trustees elected Dr.
                      Bishop Holsey traveled throughout the Southeast seeking funds for the new school. On December 12,
                      1882, he presented the Trustees of Paine Institute with $7.15 from the Virginia Conference and $8.85
                      Paine College.
                      from the South Georgia Conference. In that same month, Reverend Atticus Haygood, a minister of the
                      CME minister – penny by penny from former slaves - became the financial base for the founding of
                      Methodist Episcopal Church South, gave $2,000 to support President Callaway through the first year.
                      Thus, a $2,000 gift from a white minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and $16 raised by a
                      Thus, a $2,000 gift from a white minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and $16 raised by a
                      Methodist Episcopal Church South, gave $2,000 to support President Callaway through the first year.
                      CME minister – penny by penny from former slaves - became the financial base for the founding of
                      from the South Georgia Conference. In that same month, Reverend Atticus Haygood, a minister of the
                      Paine College.
                      1882, he presented the Trustees of Paine Institute with $7.15 from the Virginia Conference and $8.85
                      Bishop Holsey traveled throughout the Southeast seeking funds for the new school. On December 12,
                      In 1883, a Charter of Incorporation for The Paine Institute was granted, and the Trustees elected Dr.
                      George Williams Walker as its first teacher. In January 1884, classes began in rented quarters located
                      viewed as exclusively local.
                      on Broad Street in downtown Augusta.
                      drawing its new membership from communities outside of Georgia so that the enterprise might not be
                      Morgan Callaway as the first President of the College and enlarged the Board from six to 19 members,
                      On December 28, 1884, the Reverend George Williams Walker was elected President of Paine Institute
                      of the MECS who had helped to organize the CME Church. In December, the Trustees selected Dr.
                      following the resignation of Reverend Callaway. In 1886, the College moved to its present site on
                      Church, met for the first time. They agreed to name the school in honor of the late Bishop Robert Paine
                      Fifteenth Street.
                      On November 1, 1882, the Paine College Board of Trustees, consisting of six members, three from each

                      The year 1888 was a very significant one for Paine College. Reverend Moses U. Payne, an MECS
                      slavery. Leaders in the Methodist Episcopal Church South agreed, and Paine Institute came into being.
                      minister from Missouri, gave $25,000 to Paine for the endowment. Also in 1888, Trustee W. A. Candler
                      appropriately address the educational and spiritual needs of the people newly freed from the evils of
                      presented a resolution to the Trustees authorizing President Walker to employ John Wesley Gilbert,
                      Church South to help establish a school to train Negro teachers and preachers so that they might in turn
                      Paine’s first student and first graduate, to become the first Black member of the faculty. The hiring of
                      expressed the idea for the College in 1869. Bishop Holsey asked leaders in the Methodist Episcopal
                      Mr. Gilbert launched Paine’s continuing tradition of having a biracial faculty. President Walker died in
                      Methodist Episcopal Church. Paine was the brainchild of Bishop Lucius Henry Holsey, who first
                      1910 after having headed Paine for twenty-six years.
                      United Methodist Church, and the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church (CME), now Christian
                      Paine College was founded by the leadership of the Methodist Episcopal Church South (MECS), now
                      The Paine Institute began with a high school component and gradually developed a college department.
                      Initially, advanced students received special instruction on an individual basis, but by 1903 sufficient
                                                                                           HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE
                      college-level work was provided to justify changing the school’s name to The Paine College. Paine
                      continued its high school department until 1945, because there was no public secondary school for
                      Blacks in Augusta until that year.
                                                       GENERAL INFORMATION

                                                                        15
                                                                        14
                                                                        15
Page 16
Paine College                            General Information                                    College
                                                                                          Paine Page 15

Under the leadership of President Edmund Clarke Peters, 1929-1956, Paine College was accredited by
the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools as a Class “B” institution in 1931 and then
as a Class “A” institution in 1945.

President E. Clayton Calhoun served as President from 1956 to 1970. During his leadership, Paine was
approved by the University Senate of The United Methodist Church in 1959, and the College was
admitted to full membership in the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools in 1961.

Dr. Lucius H. Pitts was elected President of Paine College in 1971. He was the first alumnus and first
Black President of the College. He died in his office in 1974. Dr. Julius S. Scott, Jr. served as
President of the College on two separate occasions: 1975 to 1982 and 1988 to 1994. Paine alumnus, Dr.
William Harris, served during the period of 1982 to 1988. In 1994, Dr. Shirley A. R. Lewis became
Paine College’s first female president.

On January 1, 2008 Dr. George Cleveland Bradley began his tenure, serving as the fourteenth President
of Paine College.

Paine College is a liberal arts institution offering courses and major programs in five divisions: Business
Administration, Education, Humanities, Natural Sciences and Mathematics and Social Sciences. The
College remains a small, predominantly Black, coeducational, church-related school, gratefully related
to its founding denominations and open to all.

Paine College’s alumni have established an exceptional record of achievement. Included among Paine’s
distinguished graduates are:

       Dr. Mack Gipson                First African American to obtain the Ph. D. in Geology and
                                      Consultant to NASA

       Dr. Shirley McBay              First African American to earn a Ph. D. from the University of
                                      Georgia; First African American Dean at M. I. T.

       Frank Yerby                    Internationally acclaimed author and film writer

       Louis Lomax                    Journalist

       Dr. Ora McConner Jones         Assistant Superintendent of Chicago Public Schools

       Bishop Woodie White            UMC Resident Bishop of the Indiana Area and Former Chair of
                                      the Council of Bishops

       Bishop Nathaniel Linsey        Senior Bishop of the CME Church

       Bishop Marshall Gilmore        CME Bishop of the Texas Area

       Dr. Lucius Pitts               First African American President of Paine College, 1971-1974

       Dr. William Harris             President of Paine College, 1982-1988
                                      President of Alabama State, 1994-2000
Page 17
Page 16                                  General Information                              Paine College
                                                                                          Paine College
       Dr. Elias Blake                President of Clark College, 1977-1987

       Dr. Roland Harris              President of Knoxville College, 1995-1997

       Dr. Clyde Williams             President of Miles College, 1971-1986

       Dr. Jacqueline Carmicheal      Professor at the University of Georgia and Biographer

       Ruth Crawford                  Director of Shiloh Comprehensive Community Center, designer of
                                      the Paine College Flag, and former schoolteacher

       Dr. Charles Larke              First African American Superintendent of the Richmond County
                                      School System

       Attorney Robert Bell           Chair, Paine College Board of Trustees and Founder of the
                                      Chairman’s Club of the Annual Alumni Fund

There have been fourteen terms of presidents of Paine College:

Morgan Callaway                       1882-1884          E. Clayton Calhoun                    1956-1970
George Williams Walker                1884-1911          Lucius H. Pitts                       1971-1974
John D. Hammond                       1911-1915          Julius S. Scott, Jr.                  1975-1982
D. E. Atkins                          1915-1917          William H. Harris                     1982-1988
Albert Deems Betts                    1917-1923          Julius S. Scott, Jr.                  1988-1994
Ray S. Tomlin                         1923-1929          Shirley A. R. Lewis                   1994-2007
E. C. Peters                          1929-1956          George C. Bradley                     2008-

Upon his retirement as President in 1994, Dr. Julius S. Scott, Jr., was elected President Emeritus by the
Board of Trustees.

During interim periods, the following persons served as chief administrators and chairpersons of the
interim committees:

Stewart B. Gandy, Chairman                           October-December, 1970
Canute M. Richardson, Chairman                       January-June, 1971
Canute M. Richardson, Acting President               March-December, 1974
Curtis E. Martin, Interim President                  July 2007 – January, 2008

MISSION STATEMENT

The Mission of Paine College, a church-related private institution, is to provide a liberal arts education
of the highest quality that emphasizes academic excellence, ethical and spiritual values, social
responsibility, and personal development to prepare men and women for positions of leadership and
service in the African American community, the nation, and the world.

VISION STATEMENT

Over the next five years, Paine College shall build on its achievements and legacy to be regionally
recognized as a premier liberal arts institution of higher education.
Page 18
Paine College                          General Information                                 College
                                                                                     Paine Page 17



CORE VALUES

          Excellence

          Appreciation of Heritage

          Integrity

          Fiscal Responsibility

          Service

STRATEGIC GOALS

          Faculty Capacity

          Student Engagement

          Facilities Enhancement

          Technology Infrastructure

          “Friend” Raising

ACCREDITATION AND MEMBERSHIPS

Paine College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools to award baccalaureate degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane,
Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Paine
College.

Other Accreditations and Memberships include:

The American Council on Education
The Association of American Colleges and Universities
The American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education
The Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP)
The Association of Private Colleges and Universities of Georgia
The College Entrance Examination Board
The Council of Independent Colleges
The Educational Senate of the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church
The Georgia Professional Standards Commission
The National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education
The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
The National Association of Schools and Colleges of the United Methodist Church
The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
The United Negro College Fund (UNCF)
Page 19
Page 18                                 General Information                             Paine College
                                                                                        Paine College
The University Senate of the United Methodist Church

COLLEGE SUPPORT

Support for the College is provided by the two founding churches, The United Methodist Church and the
Christian Methodist Episcopal Church. The General Board of Higher Education and Ministry of The
United Methodist Church provides church support and grants through the Black College Fund,
established in 1972. Support from the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church comes from the General
Conference and Annual Conferences, essentially those in the Sixth Episcopal District, and conferences
in the Second and Seventh Episcopal Districts. Baptist churches and organizations and other religious
denominations provide consistent support. The College Fund/UNCF is a major source of funding for the
College. Other resources are provided by higher education agencies of the federal government, the
College’s alumni and friends.

COMMUNITY RELATIONS

Strategically located in a growing metropolitan area, Paine College seeks to share its resources with the
community beyond its campus boundaries. These efforts include a sharing of facilities, faculties, and
resources and take the form of dialogue and cooperative projects with community agencies. Such
cooperative efforts extend to other educational institutions in this area—Augusta State University, the
Medical College of Georgia and Augusta Technical College—in the form of faculty dialogue, faculty
exchanges, and mutual sharing of cultural events. Some of the community agencies and institutions
with which the College is currently affiliated are:

Bethlehem Community Center                                     The Greater Augusta Arts Council
Central Savannah River Area (CSRA) Business League             The Twenty-First Century Augusta
Richmond County Adopt-A-School Program                         The United Way
Savannah River Site                                            Veterans Administration Hospital
The American Cancer Society

THE CAMPUS

Paine College has a 57 acre campus located in the heart of Augusta, Georgia. All the physical facilities
of the College are located within a geographical area bounded by Fifteenth Street, Laney-Walker
Boulevard, Beman Street, and Central Avenue. Most of the College buildings, including residence halls,
classroom buildings, and the library, are located in the main campus area. The baseball complex,
gymnasium, tennis courts, and the chapel/music building are also included in the campus area.

ACADEMIC BUILDINGS

Haygood-Holsey Hall, occupied in September 1977, is a multi-purpose structure that houses
administrative and faculty offices, classrooms, seminar rooms, and the computer labs.

Mary Helm Hall, completed in 1918, contains classrooms, faculty offices, several administrative
offices, and a computer laboratory. A major renovation was completed in 1981 and a partial renovation
in 2008.
Page 20
Paine College                           General Information                                  College
                                                                                       Paine Page 19
George Williams Walker Science Building, dedicated October 30, 1956, houses the laboratories for
biology, physics, and chemistry. The Walker Science Building was completely renovated during the
summer of 1994.

Gilbert-Lambuth Memorial Chapel was completed in 1968. The basic design of the chapel's nave is
cruciform, providing space to seat 1,200 persons in air-conditioned comfort. The rear section of this
building houses the music program and an auditorium that seats 200 persons. A new sound system was
added in 2007.

Warren A. Candler Building, completed in 1947, with renovation having been completed in 2000, is a
two-story brick structure that served as the College library through the Spring of 1991. Currently the
Division of Education and the Office of Admission is housed in this building. The Peters Museum and
the Candler Conference Center are on the second floor.

Collins-Callaway Library, completed in the spring of 1991, the facility is a spacious two story building
housing a variety of collections, equipment, individual and group study areas, computer and production
laboratories and classrooms. The Library is named for Dr. Daniel A. Collins, a 1936 graduate of Paine
College and former Chair of the Board of Trustees and Dr. Morgan Callaway, the first President of the
College.The spacious two-story brick structure accommodates books, archives, periodicals, other non-
print collections, varied study spaces, computer laboratories, and classroom spaces. The Library was
named in honor of Dr. Morgan Callaway, the first President of the College, and Dr. Daniel A. Collins,
'36, former Chair of the Board of Trustees.

The Psychology Laboratory is located on Laney-Walker Boulevard in a brick building which includes
a classroom, four research rooms, and a student library/lounge. It is equipped with modern experimental
equipment for the study of perception, learning, memory, and other aspects of human behavior.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDINGS

Edmund and Ethel Peters Campus Center, completed in 1969, houses the dining facilities of the
College, the offices of the Vice President and Dean of Student Affairs and staff, offices of various
student organizations, the post office, bookstore, and areas for recreation and relaxation.

Randall A. Carter Gymnasium and Auditorium, constructed in 1952, houses a weight room, offices
for coaches, and dressing facilities for practice and athletic events. The facility is utilized for
intercollegiate athletic competition for men and women’s basketball and women’s volleyball, as well as
for intramural activities for the general student body.

RESIDENCE HALLS—WOMEN

Berry-Gomillion House, which accommodates 100 women, was occupied in 1987. This air-
conditioned, spacious facility is named for Dr. Evelyn Berry and the late Dr. Charles G. Gomillion,
benefactors and members of the Paine College Board of Trustees.

Epworth House includes accommodations for approximately 115 students in air-conditioned comfort.
It symbolizes the interest of the young people of the former Methodist Episcopal Church, South who
were members of the Epworth League. The building was constructed through gifts of the Epworth
Leaguers. In the fall of 1978, it was completely renovated.
Page 21
Page 20                                General Information                            Paine College
                                                                                      Paine College
Graham House, opened for occupancy in the fall of 1971, is an air-conditioned building which
accommodates 108 students. It was named for William L. Graham, '29, Paine College Registrar,
Professor, and Vice President.

Sankofa House, which accommodates 47 women, was occupied in 2006. This newest residence hall
facility was named after the Adinkira symbol that means “turn back and fetch it” or the importance of
learning from the past.

RESIDENCE HALLS—MEN

Belle Bennett House, occupied in September 1962, houses 50 men in air-conditioned comfort. The
residence hall was furnished through the aid of the women's work of the Methodist Episcopal Church,
South. Belle Bennett was completely renovated in 1993.

Ervin House, completed in September 1967, is an air-conditioned building which houses 50 men. It is
named for the late W. C. Ervin, business manager of the College from 1929 until his death in 1964.

Emma C. W. Gray House, opened in January 1962, accommodates 50 students. Most of the money for
construction was contributed by the women of the Southeastern Jurisdiction of the United Methodist
Church. This residence hall is named after a devoted servant of the Church who served Paine College for
more than 30 years. It was completely renovated in 1995.

Hollis House, occupied in September 1967, is an air-conditioned building which houses 50 junior and
senior women. It is named for Mrs. Rossie Thompson Hollis, an alumnus who served on the Board of
Trustees.

OTHER BUILDINGS

The Division of Business Administration Office Complex is located on Laney-Walker Boulevard. It
houses the office of the faculty and staff of the Division.

Paine House, completed in 1968 and located on Beman Street, is the two-story residence of the
President of the College.

The Mathematics Support Center is located on Laney-Walker Boulevard. It houses the Director of the
Support Center and is designed to improve the mathematic skills of students at various levels.

The Paine College Alumni House is located on Laney-Walker Boulevard. It houses offices of the
Alumni Relations staff and the executive secretary of the Paine College National Alumni Association in
addition to a reception area.

The College Infirmary is housed in the Psychology Laboratory building located on Laney-Walker
Boulevard. It is staffed with a full-time nurse.

The Gipson building is located on Laney-Walker Boulevard. It houses the Dr. Mack Gipson, Jr.,
Tutorial and Enrichment Center, a college-wide support program that provides individual and small-
group tutoring in a variety of academic areas and includes an Internet-accessible computer lab. The
ROTC offices are also located in this building.
                                       FEES AND FINANCES

This Fee Schedule is provided to assist students           College policies during          the    year       should
in understanding the fee structure for the school          conditions so warrant.
year. It also provides pertinent due dates. In
order to insure a smooth registration, read this           APPLICATION FEE
section thoroughly.
                                                           A non-refundable application fee of $25.00
If you are depending on financial aid for all or a         ($45.00 for international students) must
portion of your resources, your financial aid              accompany all applications for admission.
must be APPROVED and all requirements of
the Financial Aid Office satisfied. Filing an              NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION FEE
application for financial aid does not
                                                           All new students are charged a new student            fee
constitute approval. Therefore, it is critical that
                                                           of $117.      This fee covers expenses                for




                                                                                                                       FEES AND FINANCES
                                                                                                                       FEES AND FINANCES
you adhere to the financial aid due dates and
                                                           orientation, meals, and activities. The $117          fee
deadlines. Students are encouraged to contact
                                                           is not waived for non-attendance during               the
the Financial Aid Office as soon as possible.
                                                           opening activities.
If applicable, students will be required to
                                                           COSTS
clear old balances before being allowed to
                                                           Students enrolled at the Fort Gordon Resident
register.
                                                           Center should see that section of the Catalog for
In order to secure a room, one must have paid              fees.
the deposit of $100 and have on account a
                                                           These costs do not include other fees a
minimum of one-half (1/2) of the total of
                                                           student may be charged, if applicable.
tuition, fees, room, and board by the first
payment due date.        Occupancy cannot be                               COST PER YEAR
guaranteed if this deadline is not met. Students                                     On-campus Off-campus
living in the residence halls will be required                                        Student    Student
to purchase the meal plan.                                 Tuition*                      $10,896    $10,896
                                                           Comprehensive Fees                898        898
Payments may be made by Money Order,                       Board                           3,168       -0-
Cashier’s Check, Visa, MasterCard or cash. Do              Room**                          2,580       -0-
not send cash by mail. Personal checks are                 Total Cost                    $17,542    $11,794
accepted in accordance with our personal check             *12 – 17 hours per semester
policy. Student’s name and social security                 **Berry-Gomillion Hall (private baths) $1,389.00
number should be included on all
                                                                       COST PER SEMESTER
correspondence. All payments sent by regular                                         On-campus Off-campus
mail should be addressed to:                                                          Student    Student
                 Paine College                             Tuition*                       $5,448     $5,448
                Business Office                            Comprehensive Fees                449        449
             1235 Fifteenth Street                         Board                           1,584       -0-
          Augusta, Georgia 30901-3182                      Room**                          1,290       -0-
                                                           Total Cost                     $8,771     $5,897
The College reserves the right to adjust tuition,          *12 – 17 hours per semester
fees, room, and board and revise pertinent                 **Berry-Gomillion Hall (private baths) $1,389.00


              Paine College reserves the right to change tuition and fees without notice.

                                                      22
                                                      21
                                                      22
Page 23
Page 22                                                  Fees and Finances                               Paine College
                                                                                                         Paine College
COMPREHENSIVE STUDENT FEES                                             PAYMENT SCHEDULE
                                                                       TUITION, FEES, ROOM AND BOARD
The comprehensive student fees include
assessments for student activities (athletics,                         *First Semester        Resident    Non-Resident
SGA, yearbook, Library, Lyceum, etc.), health,
breakage, student I.D., transit, and technology.                       1st Payment Due
The comprehensive student fee will be assessed                                 July 3          $4,428        $2,991
to all students taking four credit hours or more
                                                                       2nd Payment Due
per semester. Below is a breakdown of all costs                              August 11         $4,427        $2,990
associated with this fee.
                                                                       *Second Semester       Resident    Non-Resident
Purpose                             2009-2010 Fee
                                   Year     Semester                   1st Payment Due
Activities                            $450        $225                       December 1        $4,428        $2,991
Health *                                182         91
Breakage                                 88         44                 2nd Payment Due
Student ID                               36         18                        January 1        $4,427        $2,990
Transit                                  18          9
Technology                              124         62                     *This amount does not include other fees
Total                                 $898        $449                      student may be charged, if applicable.

*A full time registered student of Paine College
is covered under the Institution’s student                             INSTALLMENT SCHEDULE
insurance plan for medical expenses incurred in                        TUITION, FEES, ROOM AND BOARD
excess of expenses payable by any other health
care plan. Other health care plans include                             In the event the second payment cannot be made
insurance provided by primary/family insurance                         as suggested, students will be allowed to use the
plan.                                                                  following installment schedule. However, the
                                                                       first payment of the second installment must be
OTHER FEES/EXPENSES                                                    made at the time of registration.
Late Registration for Semester....................38.00
Graduation Fee..........................................227.00         *First Semester        Resident     Non-Resident
Lost I.D. Card .............................................24.00                  Installments of 2nd Payment
Student Teaching Fee................................227.00             Due at Registration    $1107          $ 747
                                                                       Due on Sept. 5           1107           747
Textbooks and Supplies ............................400.00
                                                                       Due on Oct. 5            1107           747
    (Estimated per semester)                                           Due on Nov. 5            1106           749
Applied Music (per semester).....................29.00                         Total          $4,4427        $2,990
Drop and Add Fee.........................................7.00
Part-Time Tuition (per semester hour) .....454.00                      *Second Semester Resident Non-Resident
Each Audit Course (per semester) ............387.00                             Installments of 2nd Payment
Deferred Payment Fee.................................84.00             Due at Registration   $1107          $ 747
Lost Key......................................................24.00    Due on Feb. 5           1107         747
Lab Fee........................................................23.00   Due on Mar. 5           1107         747
Parking (annually).......................................25.00         Due on Apr. 5           1106         749
Refrigerator Fee (per semester):                                              Total          $4,4427      $2,990
    Sharing with a roommate......................19.00
    Not sharing with roommate ..................38.00
                                                                           *This amount does not include other fees
                                                                            student may be charged, if applicable.
Paine College
Paine College                                  Fees and Finances                                  Page 24
                                                                                                  Page 23
MEAL PLANS                                                 Note: Any recipient of Title IV funds that
                                                           withdraws prior to the end of the term will be
Meal Plans for the cafeteria become effective on           subject to the “Return of Title IV Funds” policy.
the first day of registration. Students may                Refer to the Financial Aid Student Consumer
purchase meals in the cafeteria with cash prior            Information Guide.
to completing the registration process. Again,
all students living in a residence hall will be            Official Withdrawal
required to purchase a meal plan.
                                                           Students wishing to officially withdraw from the
WITHDRAWAL POLICY                                          college during the regular semester should:

Any student who wishes to withdraw from the                   1. Fill out an Official Withdrawal From
College must complete a withdrawal form that                     College Form (4-ply colored form
is available from the Registrar’s Office. When a                 available in the Registrar’s office).
student is considering withdrawal, the College                2. The date of intent to withdraw is noted
will provide any necessary counseling or                         on the withdrawal form by the
assistance to the student prior to the withdrawal.               Registrar’s Office at the time of pick-up.
The withdrawal is considered as official only                 3. The Registrar’s Office maintains an
after the student has been counseled by and                      Official Withdrawal From College log
received signatures from each of the following                   that records the student’s name, form
individuals: Retention Coordinator, Dean of                      pick-up date, and form return date.
Student Affairs, Director of Financial Aid, Chief             4. The student is required to secure
Fiscal Officer, Vice President of Academic                       signatures from the following offices:
Affairs, and the Registrar. The withdrawal form                      a. Dean of Students
must be kept in the Registrar’s Office. A                            b. Business Office
student who withdraws from the College and                           c. Financial Aid
does not follow the withdrawal procedures as                         d. Library
outlined is not eligible for a refund. Only                          e. Academic Affairs
after the above requirements have been                               f. Registrar’s Office (this is the last
completed will students be eligible for a credit                         place from which a signature is
to their account.                                                        secured)
                                                              5. The student must return the completed
The following schedule will be adhered to when                   form to the Registrar’s Office within
applying credit(s) to the student’s account:                     three (3) days from pick-up. The student
                                                                 is contacted should he/she fail to return
                                                 Credit          the completed form within three (3)
                           st
Withdrawal before the 1 day of classes.... 100%                  days. Any non-response is treated as an
Withdrawal during 1st week ......................... 90%         unofficial withdrawal.
Withdrawal during 2nd week ........................ 80%       6. The date of intent (the date the form was
Withdrawal during 3rd week......................... 80%          picked up) is officially posted on the
Withdrawal during 4th week......................... 70%          student’s record.
Withdrawal during 5th week......................... 70%       7. For a student who is unable to pick-up
Withdrawal during 6th week......................... 60%          an Official Withdrawal From College
Withdrawal during 7th week......................... 50%          Form, the date the students notifies the
Withdrawal during 8th week......................... 50%          Registrar’s Office of his/her intent to
Withdrawal after the 8th week....... NO CREDIT                   withdraw via telephone at (706) 821-
                                                                 8303 or the date of receipt of the intent
There is no reduction in tuition, fees, room and
                                                                 to withdraw submitted to the Registrar’s
board made for days absent at the beginning of
                                                                 Office via fax transmittal, email, U.S.
the semester.
Paine 24
Page College                             Fees and Finances                          Paine Page 25
                                                                                          College
      mail, or courier service will be posted to
      the students record as the official              Only students with credit balances are
      withdrawal date. Each notification is            eligible for refunds, and a student’s refund
      attached to an Official Withdrawal From          cannot exceed the credit balance. A credit
      College Form and circulated for                  balance occurs when funds that are credited
      appropriate signatures.                          to a student’s account (such as cash, federal
   8. The completed form is distributed in the         and state financial aid, scholarships, credits,
      following manner:                                etc.) exceed the amount of charges such as
          a. White copy – Registrar Office             tuition, fees, room, and board.
          b. Yellow copy – Financial Aid
          c. Pink copy – Vice President of             THE STUDENT IS LIABLE FOR ANY
              Academic Affairs                         REFUND THAT IS GENERATED BY A
          d. Goldenrod copy – Business                 FINANCIAL AID OVER AWARD. The
              Office                                   student can prevent over awards by
                                                       reporting all external awards (scholarships,
Unofficial Withdrawal                                  grants, stipends, tuition waivers, etc.) to the
For students who do not officially withdraw            Office of Financial Aid immediately. The
from the college:                                      external awards should be in writing on the
                                                       letterhead of the donor or agency. Students
   1. Instructors are to secure a Faculty              with pending scholarships and credit
      Administrative Recommendation for                balances are advised to request that the
      Excessive Absences form (during the              institution hold their credit balance until
      final enrollment verification process,           ALL scholarships are posted to their
      after mid-term and at the end of the             account.
      term) from the Vice President of
      Academic Affairs office to indicate the          To receive a refund, the student’s account
      student’s excessive absences and                 must be overpaid, and a refund must be
      overcuts and to assign the appropriate           requested at the Business Office.
      “W”, “WP”, or “WF” grade.
   2. Once this form has been completed and            Student refunds will be issued within 14
      returned to the office of the Vice               days of a credit balance and after
      President of Academic Affairs, a letter          institutional charges have been met.
      notifying the student of the withdrawal is
      mailed. A copy of the letter is distributed      Refunds can be picked up at the Business
      to the following:                                Office window Monday – Friday between 9
   3. When the Letter of Withdrawal is                 a.m. and 5 p.m. Students who would like
      received in the Registrar’s Office, the          refunds mailed, must leave a self-addressed
      date the student was withdrawn by the            stamped envelope with the Business Office.
      instructor is posted to the student’s
      record as the withdrawal date or the last     Note: It should be noted that most financial aid
      documented date of attendance.                is not on the students account at the beginning
                                                    of the semester.      However, the school is
REFUND POLICY                                       required to send monthly billing statements as
                                                    long as the student has a balance. Therefore,
Refunds will be made in accordance with the         students should not become alarmed if the
following refund regulations.                       first statement does not have any financial
                                                    aid listed.
   Institutional funds (scholarships, tuition
   waivers, or grants) are non-refundable.
Page 26
Paine College                            Fees and Finances                               College
                                                                                   Paine Page 25
All necessary paperwork should be on file in the    3. Students requesting transcripts will receive
Financial Aid Office to ensure that there will be      the first one free and all other transcripts
no delays in receiving financial. Please keep          will cost $5. Transcripts will be released
copies of all receipts and check stubs for             only when accounts are cleared.
personal records.
                                                    4. All seniors applying for graduation must pay
OTHER REGULATIONS                                      a NON-REFUNDABLE fee of $227.00
                                                       regardless of participation in the ceremony.
1. In case of suspension, no refund will be            The fee covers graduation activities, caps
   allowed.                                            and gowns, diplomas, etc. Fees paid for
                                                       services by members of special groups, e.g.,
2. Any expense incurred in an emergency by             Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society, are also
   the College for a student, such as medicine,        NON-REFUNDABLE.
   hospitalization, or damages, etc., will be
   charged to the student’s account.                5. Residence hall deposits are refunded only
                                                       when       admission       is      denied.

                              TUITION AND FEES ARE SUBJECT TO
                                  CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
                                                                     26
                                                                      1
                      62               31         HALF-TIME
                                                           FINANCIAL AID     (SAP), as follows:
                                                  LESS THAN               J. demonstrate satisfactory academic progress
                Paine College offers scholarships, grants, loans,
                      22               11         HALF-TIME               SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS
                and part-time employment from various funding
                                                  QUARTER-TIME            FOR    THE    DISBURSEMENT  OF
                                                                                     programs for which aid is received
                sources to assist eligible students in meeting
                      14             7            THREE                   FINANCIAL AID
                                                                          for     I. establish and maintain eligibility
                their educational expenses. The largest sum of
                      12             6            FULL-TIME
                support comes from the Federal Government
                                 YEARS
                                                                          Federal regulations (34CFR 668.16 (e)) require
                                                                                                          H. any federal grant
                 SEMESTERS       ACADEMIC
                through Title IV. Financial Aid is determined
                 NUMBER OF       NUMBER OF        STATUS                  schools to have a Satisfactory Academic
                by the information the applicant and his or her
                  MAXIMUM        MAXIMUM          ENROLLMENT              Progress Policy to carry out the statutory
                family provide on the Free Application for                requirement that a student must be making
                Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form, which must
                his or her four-year program of study is:                 satisfactory progress to be eligible for financial
                                                                             educational loan or owe a refund on
                be filed annually. Paine College recommends
                maximum time frame for a student to complete              aid under the Student Financial Aid Programs.
                                                                          G. not have been default on any federal
                that students complete financial aid applications
                QUANTITATIVE              MEASURE:        The             The policy must be cumulative and it must
                early, but definitely by March 1 of the year in           include any periods of enrollment which the
                                                                                F. not have been convicted of a drug offense
                which the funds are needed. To be considered
                       2.0                        94-186                  student did not receive aid from the Student
                for federal financial aid at Paine College, a
                       2.0                      60-93 hours               Financial Aid Programs. Students applying for
                                                                             living in the United States;
                student must meet the following criteria:
                       1.8                      28-59 hours               aid are subject to these regulations.
                                                                             male between 18 and 25 years of age and
                       1.7                      0-27 hours
                                                                          E. register with Selective Service, if you are a
                    REQUIRED
                A. have a high school diploma, GED, or high
                 CUMULATIVE GPA                ATTEMPTED                            Qualitative Measure – grade point
                   school education in a home school setting;
                    MINIMUM                 CUMULATIVE HOURS                        average (GPA)
                                                                             in a degree-seeking program of study;
                                                                                    Quantitative Measure – maximum time-
                                                                          D. be admitted and enrolled as a regular student
                B. be a United States citizen or eligible non-
                average standards as stated below:                                  frame in which a student is expected to
                   citizen;
                recipient is required to meet the grade point                       complete his or her program of study
                                                                                    C. have a valid Social Security Number;
                QUALITATIVE MEASURE: A financial aid
                C. have a valid Social Security Number;                   QUALITATIVE MEASURE: A financial aid
                                                                             citizen;
                complete his or her program of study                      recipient is required to meet the grade point
                                                                          B. be a United States citizen or eligible non-
                D. be admitted and enrolled as a regular student
                frame in which a student is expected to                   average standards as stated below:
                   in a degree-seeking program of study;
                Quantitative Measure – maximum time-                         school education in a home school setting;
                average (GPA)                                              CUMULATIVE HOURS                  MINIMUM
                                                                          A. have a high school diploma, GED, or high
                E. register with Selective Service, if you are a              ATTEMPTED                   CUMULATIVE GPA




FINANCIAL AID
                                                                                                             REQUIRED
                Qualitative Measure – grade point
                   male between 18 and 25 years of age and
                                                                                                                                 FINANCIAL AID




                                                                                    0-27 hours                  1.7
                                                                          student must meet the following criteria:
                   living in the United States;
                aid are subject to these regulations.                               28-59 hours                 1.8
                                                                          for federal financial aid at Paine College, a
                Financial Aid Programs. Students applying for                       60-93 hours                 2.0
                                                                          which the funds are needed. To be considered
                F. not have been convicted of a drug offense
                student did not receive aid from the Student                          94-186                    2.0
                                                                          early, but definitely by March 1 of the year in
                include any periods of enrollment which the               that students complete financial aid applications
                G. not have been default on any federal
                The policy must be cumulative and it must                 QUANTITATIVE              MEASURE:        The
                                                                          be filed annually. Paine College recommends
                   educational loan or owe a refund on any
                aid under the Student Financial Aid Programs.             maximum time frame for a student to complete
                                                                          Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form, which must
                   federal grant
                satisfactory progress to be eligible for financial        his or her four-year program of study is:
                                                                          family provide on the Free Application for
                requirement that a student must be making                 by the information the applicant and his or her
                H. establish and maintain eligibility
                Progress Policy to carry out the statutory     for        CUMULATIVE              MINIMUM        MAXIMUM
                                                                          through Title IV. Financial Aid is determined
                   programs for which aid is received                     HOURS                   NUMBER OF     NUMBER OF
                                                                          support comes from the Federal Government
                                                                          ATTEMPTED               ACADEMIC      SEMESTERS
                schools to have a Satisfactory Academic
                                                                                                  YEARS
                Federal regulations (34CFR 668.16 (e)) require            their educational expenses. The largest sum of
                I. demonstrate satisfactory academic progress
                                                                          FULL-TIME                   6              12
                                                                          sources to assist eligible students in meeting
                   (SAP), as follows:
                FINANCIAL AID                                             THREE                       7              14
                                                                          and part-time employment from various funding
                FOR    THE    DISBURSEMENT  OF                            QUARTER-TIME
                                                                          Paine College offers scholarships, grants, loans,
                SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS                            HALF-TIME                  11              22
                                                                          LESS THAN
                                                                          HALF-TIME                  31              62
                                                                                          FINANCIAL AID
                                                                     27
                                                                     27
Paine College
Paine College                                Financial Aid                                     Page 28
                                                                                               Page 27
                                                             Transfer Hours Earned must be
                                                             reflected on the Paine College transcript
 CUMULATIVE         MINIMUM                                  and will be counted towards hours
 HOURS ATTEMPTED CUMULATIVE GPA                              attempted and earned.
                    REQUIRED
     0-27 hours        1.7                            Monitoring Progress
     28-59 hours       1.8
                                                      Satisfactory Academic Progress is evaluated at
     60-93 hours       2.0
       94-186          2.0
                                                      the end of each Spring semester.

Satisfactory Academic Progress is reviewed            Financial Aid Probation
at the end of each spring semester. To                Students are placed on Financial Aid Probation
maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress, a            for one academic year if they fail to meet the
student must:                                         qualitative and/or quantitative standard.
                                                      Students are informed in writing of their
                                                      probationary status by the Financial Aid Office.
       earn 68% of the cumulative hours
                                                      Students may continue to receive Financial Aid
       attempted during the academic year
                                                      in the probationary period as long as they are
       earn the minimum cumulative grade
                                                      otherwise eligible. At the conclusion of the
       point average required per cumulative
                                                      probationary period, students must meet the
       hours attempted
                                                      qualitative and quantitative standards in order to
       not exceed the 150% maximum time               avoid being placed on financial aid suspension.
       frame extended for degree completion
                                                      Financial Aid Suspension
The Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy             Students are placed on Financial Aid
reflects the institution’s academic regulations as    Suspension if they fail to meet the minimum
they relate to the following:                         SAP standards following the probationary
                                                      period. Eligibility for future financial aid ceases.
Course Repeats, Incompletes, Withdrawals,             Students are financially responsible for all
and Enhancement Courses will be counted as            charges incurred. The Financial Aid Office
hours attempted.                                      notifies students in writing of their suspension
                                                      status, alternative financing options and
       Cumulative Hours Attempted is defined          guidelines for appealing the suspension.
       as all credit hours attempted at Paine
       College with a grade assignment of A,          Appeals Process
       B, C, D, F, WF, WP, W, NC, S, U, I, K,         Students placed on Financial Aid Suspension
       or CP. Audited courses are not counted         may appeal to the Committee on Financial Aid
       towards hours attempted or hours               Satisfactory Academic Progress. To appeal,
       completed.      Course    Credit    by         students must submit typed written explanations
       Examination will be counted towards            along with supporting official documentation
       overall hours attempted.                       detailing the mitigating circumstances which
                                                      resulted in the noncompliance of the SAP
       Cumulative Hours Earned is defined as          standards. Incomplete appeals will not be
       credit hours successfully completed with       considered. Each appeal will be considered on
       grade assignments of A, B, C, or D and         its own merit. Students will receive written
       will counted towards hours attempted           notification of the Committee’s decisions. All
       and earned.                                    decisions made by the Committee are final.



   AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS LISTED ABOVE ARE AWARDED SUBJECT TO THE
                       AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS.
Paine 28
Page College                                 Financial Aid                             Paine Page 29
                                                                                             College
Students approved for reinstatement of financial      FINANCIAL AID VERIFICATION
aid will be placed on probation for a period of
one academic year. Financial aid will be              A random number of financial aid applications
awarded based on available funding at the time        are selected for verification each academic year.
of the reinstatement. Students not approved for       When a student is notified by the Paine College
reinstatement must clear all SAP deficiencies at      Financial Aid Office that he or she has been
their    own     expense     before   additional      selected for verification, a signed copy of the
reinstatement consideration is extended.              parents’, student’s, and spouse’s federal income
                                                      tax return, a verification worksheet, and other
ENHANCEMENT COURSES                                   requested documentation must be submitted. If
                                                      untaxed income is received, a statement of those
A student may receive federal aid for up to one       benefits from the issuing agency must be
academic year’s worth of remedial coursework.         submitted to the Financial Aid Office. Federal
For the purpose of this limit, that is 30 semester    regulation 34 CFG 668.16(f) requires a school
or trimester hours, 45 quarter hours, or 900          to identify and resolve discrepant information
clock hours.                                          before disbursing Federal Student Aid funds. In
                                                      regards to conflicts in taxable income, the
ONLINE COURSES                                        following must be resolved:
                                                              whether a person was required to file a
Financial aid is available to degree-seeking,                 tax return
academically eligible, qualified students                     what the correct filing status for a person
enrolled in online courses. The online courses                should be
must be approved by an Advisor and the student                married filing separately, both claimed
may not accumulate any more than 48 credits of                “Head of Household”
online courses. No more than 40% of the                       student claimed self as exemption, but so
required hours of major courses can be taken                  did parent
online.                                                       net assets = $0 but income generated
                                                              from assets on return
APPLICATION PROCEDURES
                                                      Resolution    requires       approved      written
1. A Free Application for Federal Student Aid         documentation.
   (FAFSA) must be completed online at
   www.fafsa.ed.gov each year.       On the           Federal regulation 34 CFR 668.16(g) requires
   application, Paine College should be               an institution to refer to the Office of the
   designated as the college to receive the           Inspector General any credible information
   federal needs analysis report. The Paine           indicating that an applicant for Title IV aid may
   College school code is 001587.                     have engaged in fraud or other criminal
                                                      misconduct in connection with his or her
2. A verification worksheet must be submitted,        application. Examples include false claims of
   if requested.                                      independent student status, false claims of
                                                      citizenship, use of false identities, forgery of
3. Financial aid award letters will be prepared       signatures of certifications, and false statements
   after all documents have been received in          of income. Fraud is an intent to deceive as
   and approved by the Financial Aid Office.          opposed to a mistake.




   AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS LISTED ABOVE ARE AWARDED SUBJECT TO THE
                       AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS.
Paine College
Paine College                                Financial Aid                                   Page 30
                                                                                             Page 29
The Paine College Financial Aid Office will           per year is : $5,500 for freshmen with no more
not make an offer of financial assistance until       than $3,500 of this amount in subsidized loans;
all discrepant information is resolved.               $6,500 for sophomores with no more than
                                                      $4,500 of this amount in subsidized loans; and
Financial aid awards are not finalized until          $75,00 for juniors and seniors with no more
the application and verification processes            than $5,500 of this amount in subsidized loans.
have been completed.                                  The maximum loan amount for an independent
                                                      student and a dependent student whose parents
TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID                                have applied for and were denied a PLUS loan
                                                      due to adverse credit, per year is: $9,500 for
Major sources of financial aid are listed below;      freshmen with no more than $3,500 of this
however, students are encouraged to contact the       amount in subsidized loans; $10, 500 for
Financial Aid Office for possible alternative         sophomores with no more than $4,500 of this
sources. The Free Application for Federal             amount in subsidized loans; and $12,500 for
Student Aid should be used to apply for the           juniors and seniors with no more than $5,500 of
Federal Pell Grant, the Federal Supplemental          this amount in subsidized loans.
Educational Opportunity Grant, the Federal
Work Study Program, and the Federal Perkins           The Federal Direct PLUS Loan Program
Loan, and for Federal Direct Loans.                   Provides variable interest rate loans to parents
                                                      of dependent students.
The Federal Pell Grant Program
An entitlement program providing grants to            NOTE: Dissatisfaction with, or non-receipt of
eligible students.                                    the educational service being offered at this
                                                      institution does not excuse the student from
The Federal Supplemental Educational                  repayment of any loan made through the
Opportunity Grant Program                             federal      family      education       loan
A program that awards grants up to $4,000 per         program/federal direct loan program.
academic year to eligible students. Preference
will be given to those students who qualify for       The Georgia HOPE Scholarship Program
the Pell Grant.                                       Provides grant assistance to qualified full-time
                                                      and part-time students who are attending
The Federal Work Study Program                        accredited institutions within the state.
Offers part-time employment to eligible               Recipients are expected to maintain a 3.0 HOPE
students. Students may work a maximum of 20           grade point average in college in order to renew.
hours per week on or off campus.
                                                      The Georgia Tuition Equalization Grant
The Federal Perkins Loan Program                      Program
A loan program providing low-interest, long-          Provides grant assistance to legal residents of
term, deferred-payment loans to eligible              Georgia that are enrolled full-time at eligible
students. The cumulative loan maximum is              accredited private colleges and universities in
$8,000 for the first two years of school and          the State of Georgia.
$20,000 for completion of a bachelor’s degree.
                                                      PAINE    COLLEGE    SCHOLASTIC
The Federal Direct Loan Program                       SCHOLARSHIPS,    GRANTS,  AND
Provides variable interest rate, long-term,           TUITION WAIVERS
deferred payment loans to eligible students. The
maximum loan amount for a dependent student           Recipients of a Paine College Scholastic
                                                      Scholarship, Grant, or Tuition Waiver must

   AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS LISTED ABOVE ARE AWARDED SUBJECT TO THE
                       AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS.
Paine 30
Page College                                Financial Aid                            Paine Page 31
                                                                                           College
complete the FAFSA annually, meet satisfactory       Academic Scholarship must earn at least 30
academic standards and apply for all external        credit hours each academic year with a
resources for which they are eligible. Paine         minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0
College Scholastic Scholarships, Grants and          in order to maintain eligibility. Deficiencies
Tuition Waivers are not convertible to cash,         may be cleared during the summer term at the
cannot be used towards a book voucher, are           expense of the recipient.
subject to availability of funds, and will be
applied only after all external resources have       Transfer Scholarships
been exhausted.                                      Students entering Paine with at least 24 hours of
                                                     transferable credit and a cumulative grade point
SCHOLARSHIP SELECTION AND                            average of at least 3.0 in all college work may
RENEWAL CRITERIA                                     be eligible for a transfer scholarship. The
                                                     Transfer Scholarship cannot exceed one-half the
Selection Criteria for Incoming Students
                                                     total cost of tuition. Students receiving a
Scholastic scholarships are granted annually to
                                                     Transfer Scholarship must earn at least 30 credit
eligible freshmen and transfer students through
                                                     hours each academic year with a minimum
the Admissions Office. The amount of the
                                                     cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in order
scholarship will be based on the ACT or SAT
                                                     to maintain eligibility. Deficiencies may be
score and cumulative high school grade point
                                                     cleared during the summer term at the expense
average in a college preparatory curriculum.
                                                     of the recipient.
Once the initial scholarship award is made, a
student cannot apply to upgrade a scholastic
                                                     Central Savannah River Area (CSRA)
scholarship.        Scholastic scholarships are
                                                     Tuition Scholarship
extended for a period of eight consecutive
                                                     A CSRA high school student graduating in the
semesters for four-year programs of study and
                                                     top 10 percent of his or her class with a 3.0
ten consecutive semesters for five-year
                                                     grade point average in a college preparatory
programs of study. Summer semesters are
                                                     curriculum is eligible for a full tuition
excluded. Renewal is only to confirm continued
                                                     scholarship.     Students receiving a CSRA
eligibility for the existing scholarship.
                                                     Scholarship must earn at least 30 credit hours
Presidential Scholarships                            each academic year with a minimum cumulative
Presidential    Scholarships    cover    tuition,    grade point average of 3.0 in order to maintain
comprehensive fees, room, and board. The             eligibility. Deficiencies may be cleared during
awards are based on high academic achievement        the summer term at the expense of the recipient.
and a standardized test score.         Students
receiving a Presidential Scholarship must earn at    CHURCH-RELATED GRANTS
least 30 credit hours each academic year with a
                                                     United Methodist/Christian Methodist
minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.3
                                                     Episcopal Grant
in order to maintain eligibility. Deficiencies
                                                     Each student of either denomination is eligible
may be cleared during the summer term at the
                                                     for a grant of $500 per academic year.
expense of the recipient.
                                                     United Methodist/Christian Methodist
Academic Scholarships
                                                     Episcopal Minister's Grant
Academic Scholarships ranging from $500 to
                                                     A minister of either denomination is eligible for
$5,000 are available. Awards are based on the
                                                     a grant of $800 per academic year.
cumulative high school grade point average and
a standardized test score. Students receiving an


   AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS LISTED ABOVE ARE AWARDED SUBJECT TO THE
                       AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS.
Paine College
Paine College                               Financial Aid                                   Page 32
                                                                                            Page 31
United Methodist/Christian Methodist
Episcopal Minister's Dependent Grant                 Spousal Tuition Waiver
A dependent of a minister of either                  Paine College will provide fully paid tuition to
denomination is eligible for a grant of $1,000       an academically qualified spouse of regular,
per academic year.                                   full-time employees, employed for one full year
                                                     (12 months), when verification of spousal status
OTHER GRANTS                                         is presented and approved. The waiver is
                                                     contingent on the student maintaining
Alumni Dependent Grant                               satisfactory academic progress, and approval by
Dependents of alumni of Paine College are            the Chief Fiscal Officer. The waiver is not valid
eligible to receive a grant of $500 per academic     for tuition overloads or student fees.
year.
                                                     Staff Tuition Waiver
Athletic Grant                                       Permanent full-time employees who qualify for
A student must meet the minimum requirements         admission to the College may take one course
of the College as established for satisfactory       per semester at no cost, after being employed by
progress in order to receive financial aid. In       the College for one full year (12 months). The
addition, the student must meet the minimum          Staff Tuition Waiver is contingent on the
requirements established by NCAA for Division        approval of the employee’s immediate
II institutions to receive an athletic grant.        supervisor and the Chief Fiscal Officer. The
                                                     Staff Tuition Waiver is valid on a “space
                                                     available” basis. Tuition paying students have
The College Fund/UNCF Remission Grant
                                                     preference for final class assignments.
The dependent of a President of a College
Fund/UNCF college is eligible for a full tuition
                                                     A student may qualify for only one Paine
grant.
                                                     College grant, scholarship, or tuition waiver
                                                     during any enrollment period.
Sibling Grant
The first dependent student from a household         Recipients of the Church-Related and Other
will pay full tuition; a second or subsequent        Grants must be enrolled full time and must
student from the same household is eligible for a    maintain satisfactory academic progress.
half tuition grant. All students must be
dependent and enrolled full time.                    GIFTS AND AWARDS

TUITION WAIVERS                                      Paine College offers students a variety of gifts
                                                     and awards. These are acknowledged during the
Dependent Tuition Waiver                             Spring Honors Convocation. Awarding occurs
Paine College will provide fully paid tuition to     the following Fall semester.
academically qualified biological or adoptive
dependents of regular, full-time employees,          Campus Wide
employed for one full year (12 months), when         The Daniel A. S. Collins Award
verification of dependent status is presented and    The Peyton B. Cook Scholarship
approved. The waiver is contingent on the            Thomas E. Cook Endowed Scholarship
student maintaining satisfactory academic            Dolevich Scholarship Award
progress, and approval by the Chief Fiscal           Evelyn Etheridge-Beard Scholarship
Officer. The waiver is not valid for tuition         Gandy Memorial Scholarship Award
overloads, student fees, or online enrollment.       Lawrence R. Harper Award


   AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS LISTED ABOVE ARE AWARDED SUBJECT TO THE
                       AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS.
Paine 32
Page College                               Financial Aid                           Paine Page 33
                                                                                         College
William Randolph Hearst Award                       The Roy Roberts Award
The Samuel Hollingshead Award                       The Matrice M. Scott Award
The Carrie Hunley Glover Award                      The Samuel Silverstein Award
Freddie P. Jackson Endowed Scholarship
Louise Tarver Jackson Scholarship                   Education
David Jerram Scholarship                            Warren Willis Campbell Award
Edna Johnson Endowed Scholarship                    Ruth B. Crawford Book Stipend
The Mildred Johnson Scholarship Fund                Ola C. Gomillion Award
The Shirley A.R. Lewis & Ronald M. Lewis            Leonard Hill Endowed Scholarship
    Student High Achievement Award                  G. Preston & Wilhelmina K. Holland
The Joseph Lightsey Award                               Scholarship
LINKS, Inc. Scholarship                             Shirley Ann Hunter Award
McDaniels-Spencer Scholarship                       Edith King Award
The Gentry Moore Award                              J. T. Lacy Award
The Morris Scholarship                              Readers’ Digest
The Rev. Luther R. Neal Endowed Scholarship         Mary Shropshire-James Scholarship
The Dr. Silas Norman, Jr. Leadership Award          Evelyn Diane Clemmons Tinsley Endowed
The Erskine Peters Award                                Scholarship
Margaret A. Pitts Endowed Scholarship               Isaiah E. and Justine Washington Scholarship
The James Ramsey Scholarship
The Thelma Biggers Redd Scholarship                 Humanities
The Quincy L. Robertson Scholarship                 Ruth L. Bartholomew Award
Rev. James E. and Dr. Vivian U. Robinson            Evelyn Berry Award
    Scholarship                                     Cordella Blount Scholarship
Savannah River Site Scholarship                     E. Clayton and Frankie M. Calhoun Scholarship
The Dr. & Mrs. Julius S. Scott, Jr. Scholarship     The Rosa Harris Creque Award
The Sandra Cannon Scott Endowed Scholarship         Rabbi Norman M. and Rho Goldburg Award
Tim Shelnut Award                                   Rev. Doris L. Harvey Scholarship
The Sara Skinner Scholarship                        James Hinton Award
The Traynham-Phillips Scholarship                   Raymond & George Lillian Jenkins Award
Charles Walker Endowed Scholarship                  Ruby T. Jenkins Scholarship
The Howard Raworth Walker Scholarship               Ann Nealous & Ellis M. Johnson Endowed
Ellen Everett White Endowed Scholarship                 Scholarship
Bishop Woodie E. White Award                        Mass Communications Award
The Bertrell Collins Wright Scholarship             Jessye Norman Voice Scholarship
                                                    St. John Bicentennial Scholarship-Roy C.
Alpha Kappa Alpha                                       Delamotte Award
Alpha Kappa Alpha, Inc. Leadership Fellowship       St. Mary on the Hill Award
Alpha Kappa Alpha, Inc. Male Achievement            Marguerite Steffan Award
   Award                                            United Methodist Scholarship
                                                    Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. Scholarship
Business Administration                             Natural Sciences and Mathematics
Coca-Cola Award                                     Frank R. Davis Award
R. A. and B. L. Dent Award                          Mack Gipson, Jr. Scholarship
Georgia Power Award                                 Wanda F. Harris Scholarship Award
S. M. Jenkins Scholarship                           Santiago S. Richart Award
Pilgrim Education Fund Scholarship                  The John Thompson “Jack” Hayes Award


   AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS LISTED ABOVE ARE AWARDED SUBJECT TO THE
                       AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS.
Paine College
Paine College                               Financial Aid                                Page 34
                                                                                         Page 33

Social Sciences                                      Student Affairs
Araminta DeLamotte Award                             Hallie Gordon Buxton Award

Densler-Benning Scholarship                          The information contained in this section on
The William L. Graham Student of the Year            financial aid is subject to change to reflect
   Award                                             current institutional policies and the ever-
The Mamie King Singleton Award                       changing federal and state regulations. Check
                                                     with the Financial Aid Office for current
Upward Bound                                         practices reflecting changes.
Earnestine H. Bell Upward Bound Award




   AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS LISTED ABOVE ARE AWARDED SUBJECT TO THE
                       AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS.
                                                                 35
                                                                 35
                                      The units must include:            in the Catalog following the receipt of proof
                                                        ADMISSIONS       accepted at Paine College for courses listed
             accrediting agency.                                      8. Advanced placement credits may be
             CRITERIA
             from a school accredited by a state or regional              that the student scored at least three (3) on
             with 16 units of college preparatory courses                 the advancement placement test.
                                                                         Exit Exams.
             Students are admitted to Paine College on the
             grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale          Transcripts and references submitted by the
                                                                         500 on each of the Georgia High School
             basis of scholastic achievement, academic
             Applicants are expected to have a minimum                student are NOT ACCEPTABLE. Official
                                                                         secondary schools must score a minimum of
             potential, educational purpose, and personal             transcripts, score reports, etc. must be received
                                                                      7. Applicants graduating from Georgia public
             characteristics.
             completed fewer than 28 semester credit hours.
                                                                      from the institution.
             has no previous college credit or one who has               (final transcript or GED)
             APPLICATION PROCEDURES
             secondary school within the last five years and          APPLICATION DEADLINES
                                                                         by a state or regional accrediting agency
             complete or has completed an accredited                     preparatory courses from a school accredited
             The application and all supporting records
             A freshman applicant is one who is about to              Fall Semester                         August 1
                                                                         on a 4.0 scale with 16 units of college
             should be submitted at least TWO weeks prior             Spring Semester                     December 1
                                                                         minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0
             to the beginning of the semester in which the
               FIRST-TIME STUDENT (Undergraduate)                     Summer Session                          June 1
                                                                      6. Proof of high school graduation with a
             applicant expects to enter. Applicants must
             submit the information below.
             Management.                                              Failure to meet the identified deadlines may
                                                                         school official
             by action of the Committee on Enrollment                 prevent the student from being admitted for the
                                                                         one from a guidance counselor or other
             1. Completed Paine College Application for               desired semester.
ADMISSIONS




             may be admitted conditionally for one semester           5. Two letters of recommendation including
                Admission




                                                                                                                          ADMISSIONS
             Students who do not meet all necessary criteria
                                                                      As soon as all documents for the admission
                                                                          4. Short autobiographical essay (one page)
             2. Non-refundable application fee of $20 ($35
                          CONDITIONAL ADMITTANCE                      process have been received, the application will
                for international students)                           be evaluated and applicants will be notified of
                                                                         defined as
                                                                      the action taken. Applicants must submit the
             College.                                                    traditional applicants) (nontraditional is
             3. SAT or ACT score reports (waived for non-
             "Intent to Enroll" card upon acceptance to the
                                                                      "Intent to Enroll" card upon acceptance to the
                                                                      3. SAT or ACT score reports (waived for non-
                traditional applicants) (nontraditional is
             the action taken. Applicants must submit the
                                                                      College.
                defined as
             be evaluated and applicants will be notified of             for international students)
             process have been received, the application will         CONDITIONAL ADMITTANCE
                                                                      2. Non-refundable application fee of $20 ($35
             4. Short autobiographical essay (one page)
             As soon as all documents for the admission
                                                                      Students who do not meet all necessary criteria
                                                                         Admission
             5. Two letters of recommendation including
             desired semester.                                        may be admitted conditionally for one semester
                                                                      1. Completed Paine College Application for
                one from a guidance counselor or other
             prevent the student from being admitted for the          by action of the Committee on Enrollment
                school official
             Failure to meet the identified deadlines may             Management.
                                                                      submit the information below.
                                                                      applicant expects to enter. Applicants must
             6. Proof of high school graduation with a
                 June 1                      Summer Session           FIRST-TIME STUDENT (Undergraduate)
                                                                      to the beginning of the semester in which the
                minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0
             December 1                      Spring Semester          should be submitted at least TWO weeks prior
                on a 4.0 scale with 16 units of college
               August 1                      Fall Semester            A freshman applicant is one who is about to
                                                                      The application and all supporting records
                preparatory courses from a school accredited          complete or has completed an accredited
                by a state or regional accrediting agency
                             APPLICATION DEADLINES                    secondary school within the last five years and
                                                                                   APPLICATION PROCEDURES
                (final transcript or GED)                             has no previous college credit or one who has
                                                                      completed fewer than 28 semester credit hours.
             from the institution.                                    characteristics.
             7. Applicants graduating from Georgia public
             transcripts, score reports, etc. must be received        potential, educational purpose, and personal
                secondary schools must score a minimum of
             student are NOT ACCEPTABLE. Official                     Applicants are expected to have a minimum
                                                                      basis of scholastic achievement, academic
                500 on each of the Georgia High School
             Transcripts and references submitted by the              grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale
                                                                      Students are admitted to Paine College on the
                Exit Exams.
                 the advancement placement test.                      with 16 units of college preparatory courses
                 that the student scored at least three (3) on        from a school accredited by a state or regional
                                                                                                          CRITERIA
             8. Advanced placement credits may be                     accrediting agency.
                accepted at Paine College for courses listed
                                                        ADMISSIONS
                in the Catalog following the receipt of proof         The units must include:
                                                                 35
                                                                 34
                                                                 35
Paine College
Paine College                                Admissions                                      Page 36
                                                                                             Page 35
                                                    Post-Secondary Options Program in the State of
English                                  4 units    Georgia.
Mathematics                              3 units
Natural Sciences                         3 units    TRANSFER STUDENTS
Social Sciences (one history)            3 units
Electives                                3 units    A transfer student is one who has attended a
Electives may include work in foreign               regionally accredited post-secondary institution.
languages, fine arts, health and physical           Applicants may be accepted at Paine College
education, and other courses that are consistent    following a review of their official transcript(s)
with the Paine College curriculum.                  from other institutions.

EARLY ADMISSION PROGRAM                             A transfer student who has completed fewer
                                                    than 28 semester credit hours of college work at
Early admission may be granted to academically      another regionally accredited institution must
talented and mature students following              meet the general admission criteria for a
completion of grade eleven.                         freshmen applicant. Guidelines for transfer
                                                    students are outlined below.
CRITERIA FOR EARLY ADMISSION
                                                    1. A minimum cumulative grade point average
1. A minimum cumulative 3.0 grade point                (CGPA) of 2.0 from previous college work
   average (GPA) or better on a 4.0 scale in a         (official transcript(s) must be submitted) is
   college preparatory curriculum                      required.
2. A combined minimum SAT score of 900 or           2. Applicants must be in good academic
   more (19 or higher on the ACT)                      standing, as documented by receipt of the
                                                       Transfer Approval form, with the capability
3. Placement in the upper 10 percent of their
                                                       to return to the previous college.
    class
                                                    3. Failure to submit information about all
4. An interview with the Committee on
                                                       college work will result in academic
   Enrollment Management
                                                       sanctions which may include dismissal.
5. A short autobiographical essay (one page)
                                                    4. Transfer units are limited to a maximum of
6. Three letters of recommendation including           60 semester credit units.
   one from the secondary school guidance
                                                    5. Following acceptance into the College and
   counselor and the principal.
                                                       receipt of all official transcripts listed on the
HONORS SCHOLARS PROGRAM                                application, an evaluation of the information
                                                       submitted will be completed. The course
High school students wishing to take a course at       information and units of credit to be counted
Paine College prior to graduation may apply for        toward graduation at Paine will be recorded
admission as honor scholars. Admission criteria        on the appropriate program advisement form
are the same as those for the Early Admission          and Transfer Credits Accepted form.
Program. Students will be limited to one course
per semester. These students are classified as      6. Courses with the grade of "D" or lower are
special and their entry status is non-degree           not transferable; remedial or sub-collegiate
seeking. Students who qualify for the Honors           courses and/or units are not transferable.
Scholars Program may want to take advantage
of the financial assistance available through the
Paine 36
Page College                                  Admissions                                Paine Page 37
                                                                                              College
7. A minimum of 31 semester credit hours, not
   including common core curriculum hours,                 be in good academic standing at the home
   must be completed at Paine College from                 institution;
   the required courses for a single major in
   order to earn a degree from Paine College.              be accepted by the host institution;
   The final transcript for auditing purposes
   serving as the official record for verification         pay all required tuition and fees for a full-
   purposes. The final course required to                  time student at the home institution;
   complete graduation requirements must be
   taken at Paine College.                                 satisfy the overload requirements (if
                                                           applicable) of the home institution, not to
8. A student’s cumulative and major grade                  exceed 20 semester credit hours;
   point averages will be computed on only
   academic work completed at Paine College.               obtain approval of the faculty advisor; and

9. The degree requirements outlined in the                 obtain approval of the Vice President of
   Paine College catalog at the time of entry              Academic Affairs to be co-enrolled during
   are those which are to be met by all transfer           the summer requires that the student be
   students with the exception of requirements             enrolled in half the total number of credits at
   found in conflict with agencies such as the             Paine College.
   Professional Standards Commission, etc.
                                                     To be co-enrolled during the summer requires
For additional requirements, see the Policy on       that the student be enrolled in half the total
Awarding Transfer Credit and Evaluating              number of credits at Paine College.
Academic Records later in this section.
                                                     CO-ENROLLMENT PROCEDURES
CO-ENROLLED STUDENTS
                                                     Paine College students applying for co-
The college has established arrangements with        enrollment at Augusta State University must:
Augusta State University for students interested
in inter-college registration. Students who wish           obtain a co-enrollment form from the Office
to take advantage of such arrangements must                of Academic Affairs;
meet the academic requirements of the
respective institution’s agreement.         The            complete the co-enrollment form with a
purposes of inter-college registration are for             statement of justification and courses to be
students to enrich their educational experience,           taken approved by faculty advisor;
or to take courses necessary for graduation
which are not offered at the home institution              submit form to the Office of Academic
during a given term. Circumstances that may                Affairs for approval at least TWO days prior
warrant co- enrollment will be evaluated on a              to registration at Augusta State.
case-by-case basis. Co-enrollment is not a right
and Paine College approval is required.                    Submit the form to the Business Office to
                                                           verify that the student has completed the
To participate in this inter-college registration          registration process at the Paine College
program, a student must:                                   Business Office.

   be currently enrolled at the home institution     Augusta State University and Clark Atlanta
   for at least two-thirds of a full load (8         students applying for co-enrollment at Paine
   semester credit hours), except          mass      College must:
   communications majors;
Paine College
Paine College                               Admissions                                        Page 38
                                                                                              Page 37
   present    an    approved     co-enrollment           present a letter of Good Standing from their
   application form from the home institution            home institution signed by the appropriate
   of Augusta State University or Clark Atlanta          college official (academic dean or registrar)
   University, and                                       approving the course(s) to be taken and
                                                         certifying that the applicant is a student in
   complete a Paine College application form.            good standing eligible to return to that
                                                         institution;
TRANSIENT OR EXCHANGE STUDENTS                           complete an application form; and

Paine College students who take courses at               provide all required registration data.
another accredited college or university and
wish to have these credits counted toward their    RE-ADMISSION
degree are considered Transient Students. The
contents of such courses MUST be equivalent to     Students whose attendance has been interrupted
the Paine College courses. The College will        for one semester or more and who wish to return
accept a maximum number of nine semester           must apply for re-admission. Applications
credit hours in which grades of at least “C” is    should be submitted to the Office of the
earned. To receive approval for transient status   Registrar thirty (30) days prior to the beginning
students must have written permission from the     of the semester in which enrollment is desired.
advisor and:                                       Applications for re-admission should be secured
                                                   from and returned to the Registrar’s Office upon
   be in good academic standing (2.0 minimum       completion.        Students who have been
   grade point average) and eligible to return;    suspended or dismissed for academic reasons
                                                   should refer to the sections on Academic
   submit a copy of the course description from    Suspension and Academic Dismissal.
   the other institution to their academic
   advisor for prior approval of course work;      SPECIAL AND PART-TIME STUDENTS

   complete a “Transient or Exchange Student”      A special student is a non-degree seeking
   application form; and                           student. A part-time student is one who is
                                                   enrolled for fewer than 12 semester hours.
   submit completed and approved “Transient        These students must:
   or Exchange Student” application form to
   the Office of the Registrar.                          complete and submit an application form,
                                                         along with the application fee to the
The student will also be required to gain                Admissions Office;
admission/approval at the institution where the
course is to be taken.                                   submit official transcripts of all high school
                                                         or college work.
No course will be accepted without prior
approval.                                          When a non-degree seeking student desires to
                                                   change enrollment status to degree seeking, all
The procedures outlined must be completed by       requirements for new freshmen or transfers must
the STUDENT prior to the end of the final          be met. Students requesting upper division
examination period before the transient or         courses must submit a college transcript
exchange status is to become effective.            verifying that prerequisites have been met. (See
                                                   appropriate section on Application Procedures
Students from other institutions applying for      or Transfer Students).
entrance as transient or exchange students must:
Paine 38
Page College                                  Admissions                                Paine Page 39
                                                                                              College
VETERANS                                             Eligible veterans may receive equivalent credit
                                                     for physical education activity courses upon
The following guidelines and requirements are        presentation of a copy of his/her separation
set for students who receive Department of           papers (DD214) to the VA Certifying Official in
Veterans Affairs (VA) Benefits under                 the Registrar’s Office. A veteran has the option
Provisions of Chapter 30, 31, 32, or 35, Title 38,   to enroll in these activity courses without
or Chapter 106, Title 10, U.S. Code. Failure to      receiving equivalent credit, if desired. Once
comply with these guidelines may result in the       credit is awarded for these courses based on
termination of benefits. Eligible students must      military service, the physical education activity
have completed all college admissions                courses may not be taken as electives. Veterans
requirements and must be fully admitted into a       are limited in terms of the number of hours that
degree program before Enrollment Certification       may be attempted in enhancement courses.
(VA form 22-1999) can be submitted to the
Veterans Administration. To enable veterans to       INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
apply for formal educational programs leading
to the award of a degree, Paine College is able      Students from countries other than the United
to grant academic credit according to the            States are important to the College community
recommendations listed in A Guide to the             and are encouraged to apply. A student is
Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the         considered an international student if he or she
Armed Services, which is published by the            is not a citizen of the United States. The
American Council on Education.                       College has been authorized under federal law
                                                     to enroll non-immigrant alien students and to
Any student expecting to receive VA                  issue I-20 forms.
Educational Benefits is required to enroll with
the VA Certifying Official in the Registrar’s        International students applying for admission to
Office prior to the close of registration for a      Paine College, in addition to meeting the
given semester. VA benefits are provided for         admissions criteria and following the
courses of study, which have been noted on VA        application procedures, must submit the
form 22-1990 or 22-5490. Students will not be        following:
certified to receive VA Benefits for courses of
study not identified on this form.                         a Paine College application and application
                                                           fee of $35 in the form of an international
A veteran (or his/her dependent) desiring to               money order in U.S. dollars; or a check from
change their major must, for VA purposes,                  a bank in the United States;
complete VA Form 22-1995 or 22-5490 (which
may be obtained from the VA Certifying                     a recommendation form from an individual
Official in the Registrar’s Office) and submit it          who can verify the applicant’s academic
to the Veterans Administration; a copy of the              ability;
form must also be filed with the VA Certifying
Official on campus. If the student has received            a brief autobiographical essay;
pay for the number of required elective courses,
he/she will not be eligible to receive VA funds            GCE scores and course work indicating at
for his/her enrollment in additional elective              least 5 passes at the “Ordinary” level; one of
courses except by written consent of the                   those passes must be in English; students
Department of Veterans Affairs. It is the                  from non-English speaking countries must
responsibility of the students to notify the VA            provide a certified translation of their high
Certifying Official of any changes in their                school certificate and transcript; the cost of
enrollment (e.g., degree program, credit hours,            translation is the applicant’s responsibility;
withdrawing from class or school).
Paine College
Paine College                                  Admissions                                        Page 40
                                                                                                 Page 39
   TOEFL score (500 minimum required) or              mathematics course at the level of college
   ESL score (Students for whom English is            algebra or above and at least one college level
   not the native language are required to            composition course are exempt from placement
   exhibit proficiency in the English language.)      testing.
   Applicants already in the United States may
   submit either the TOEFL, SAT, ACT or               Prospective      non-traditional    students   must
   English Proficiency Examination (ESL)              submit:
   scores. Information concerning these tests
   and other requirements for international                 evidence of high school graduation or
   students are available from the Admissions               equivalency (A high school transcript is
   Office. The SAT/ACT score is required for                preferable if the student can obtain a copy.
   all incoming freshmen who are already in                 If a transcript is not available, a copy of the
   the United States. The SAT/ACT will be                   high school diploma, or a letter from the
   waived for some international students if                Board of Education School District is
   there is evidence the test is not offered in the         needed.)
   student’s country. However, these students
   will be required to take the test during the             official college transcripts if the student has
   first semester they are enrolled at Paine                any previous college credit.
   College.
                                                      POLICIES ON AWARDING TRANSFER
   a statement of financial responsibility            CREDIT AND EVALUATING ACADEMIC
   identifying the person(s) financially              RECORDS
   responsible for the applicant’s needs during
   his or her stay in the United States; include      Courses will be accepted for transfer only from
   verification of salary from the employer or        institutions that are accredited by a Regional
   funds availability statement from the              Accrediting agency (SACS, MSACS, NCACS,
   appropriate financial institution.                 NEASC, NASCU, WASC) and that offer at
                                                      least an associate degree. Credit will not be
Financial aid is not available for international      accepted from institutions that are candidates for
students, so they should be prepared to finance       accreditation or from members of the AICS
their education at Paine College.                     (Association of Independent Colleges and
                                                      Schools).
A limited number of academic scholarships are
available for international students with             An official evaluation (Evaluation of Transfer
exceptional academic qualifications.                  Credit or Academic Assessment) will be done
                                                      by the Office of the Registrar when the student
NON-TRADITIONAL STUDENTS                              is given degree status providing all supporting
                                                      official documents are on file. This evaluation
Applicants who graduated from high school or          will be provided to the program/division so that
received their GED at least five years prior to       courses to be used to satisfy program graduation
the date of enrollment to Paine College or may        requirements can be determined and properly
be categorized as a non-traditional student.          credited and recorded on the program sheet to
Non-traditional students may be first-time            be shared with the student.
college students or transfer students. The
primary difference between this category and
any other is that no standardized test scores are
required, although, these students will be
required to take the Placement Examination and
be remediated for any deficiencies noted.

Non-traditional transfer students who have
received credit with a grade of “C” or above in a
                                                                       41
                                                                       41

                                                                            opportunity to become familiar with College
                                                         STUDENT AFFAIRS
                  strategies that help the Institution manage
                                                                            freshmen and transfer students are provided an
                  Office aggressively implements retention
                  Through a planned program of activities, the              During the first week of each semester, all
                  Student life and development are expanded and             rules and regulations, and to become acquainted
                  enhanced through programs and services
                                                                            Student Affairs for more information.
                  eligibility.                                              with the staff and facilities of the College.
                  focused on intellectual, moral, cultural social
                  to ensure that they retain their scholarship              new students should contact the Office of
                                                                            Social events and other activities are arranged to
                  and healthy living experiences. Student Affairs
                  scholarship recipients are monitored and tracked          may be required to attend some sessions. All
                                                                            assist students in adjusting to their new
                  activities are primarily supportive and                   Readmitted, non-degree, and transient students
                  In conjunction with the Office of Financial Aid,          environment. Some sessions are targeted to
                  individually-oriented. A wide range of personal
                                                                            parents.
                  assistance services is provided to enable the
                  readmitted following an appeal.
                                                                            designated as New Student Orientation.
                  student to realize his or her maximum                     to participate in all activities planned and
                  educational potential. Programs are designed
                  who have been placed on probation or                      THE RETENTION PROGRAM
                                                                            All freshmen and transfer students are required
                  to:
                  monitoring the midterm progress of students
                                                                            The primary focus of the Retention Program at
                                                                            Paine College is to increase the retention,
                                                                                          NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION
                     extend the students’ classroom experience
                  absences, and
STUDENT AFFAIRS




                                                                            persistence, degree attainment, and graduation
                     through seminars, workshops and discussion
                  have been identified as having frequent




                                                                                                                                 STUDENT AFFAIRS
                                                                            rate of students admitted to the College either as
                                                                                  improve retention and graduation rates
                     groups in topic areas and in formats not
                  intervening appropriately with students who
                                                                            first-time freshmen or transfer students.
                     normally     available   through    formal
                                                                            Program personnel work collaboratively with
                                                                                  improve the quality of life for students
                     educational channels;
                  monitoring student progress in classes,
                  warning” notification system as a means of                the campus community to ensure that this
                                                                            objective is met.
                                                                                            recreational interests; and
                     provide opportunities for creative and
                  academic advisors to implement an “early                  stimulating     develop     productive      and
                     cultural growth;
                  working with faculty members and
                                                                            Major services provided by the Retention Office
                                                                            include:               build leadership skills;
                     build leadership skills;
                  include:
                  Major services provided by the Retention Office
                                                                               working with faculty members and
                                                                            cultural growth;
                     develop     productive      and    stimulating            academic advisors to implement an “early
                                                                            provide opportunities for creative and
                     recreational interests; and
                  objective is met.
                                                                               warning” notification system as a means of
                  the campus community to ensure that this
                                                                               monitoring student progress in classes,
                                                                            educational channels;
                     improve the quality of life for students
                  Program personnel work collaboratively with
                                                                            normally     available   through    formal
                  first-time freshmen or transfer students.
                                                                               intervening appropriately with students who
                                                                            groups in topic areas and in formats not
                     improve retention and graduation rates
                  rate of students admitted to the College either as
                  persistence, degree attainment, and graduation               have been identified as having frequent
                                                                            through seminars, workshops and discussion
                                                                               absences, and
                                                                            extend the students’ classroom experience
                  Paine College is to increase the retention,
                  NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION
                  The primary focus of the Retention Program at
                                                                               monitoring the midterm progress of students
                                                                            to:
                  All freshmen and transfer students are required
                                                                               who have been placed on probation or
                                                                            educational potential. Programs are designed
                  to participate in all activities planned and
                                THE RETENTION PROGRAM
                                                                            student to realize his or her maximum
                                                                               readmitted following an appeal.
                  designated as New Student Orientation.
                  parents.
                                                                            assistance services is provided to enable the
                                                                            individually-oriented. A wide range of personal
                  environment. Some sessions are targeted to
                  Readmitted, non-degree, and transient students            In conjunction with the Office of Financial Aid,
                                                                            activities are primarily supportive and
                  assist students in adjusting to their new
                  may be required to attend some sessions. All              scholarship recipients are monitored and tracked
                                                                            and healthy living experiences. Student Affairs
                  Social events and other activities are arranged to
                  new students should contact the Office of                 to ensure that they retain their scholarship
                                                                            focused on intellectual, moral, cultural social
                  with the staff and facilities of the College.
                  Student Affairs for more information.                     eligibility.
                                                                            enhanced through programs and services
                  rules and regulations, and to become acquainted           Student life and development are expanded and
                  During the first week of each semester, all               Through a planned program of activities, the
                  freshmen and transfer students are provided an            Office aggressively implements retention
                                                                            strategies that help the Institution manage
                                                         STUDENT AFFAIRS
                  opportunity to become familiar with College

                                                                       41
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Paine College
Paine College                                Student Affairs                                    Page 42
                                                                                                Page 41
enrollment and increase the graduation rate            All students and alumni seeking to explore
through advisement and retention.                      career interests, to organize their job search
                                                       campaigns, or to gain skills in resume
COUNSELING                                             preparation and job search techniques are
                                                       invited to visit the Center and to utilize its
Counseling Center services are available to all        various services.     The Center houses the
students (full and part-time), faculty, and staff      Michael L. Thurmond Career Information
of Paine College. Services include individual          Library that contains employer directories, self
and group counseling, individual and group             assessment information, college catalogs, and
testing, tutorial assistance, international student    computer and print access to over three hundred
advisement, orientation sessions and activities        job postings each week.
designed to improve basic learning skills.
Appropriate referrals are available as needed.         An on-campus job interview program with
                                                       representatives from business, industry,
RESIDENCE LIFE                                         government, and education is coordinated by the
                                                       Center.     These major employers come to
The College provides on-campus housing                 campus seeking graduating students in most
facilities for registered students. Four residence     career fields. The Center also sponsors several
halls for women and four for men provide a             Career Days during the academic year which
home away from home for boarding students.             brings employers to campus to talk to students
Each residence hall is administered by a director      about careers and job opportunities. Students
who is responsible for management and                  also have the opportunity to participate in the
supervision,       programming,       advisement,      Small College Consortium Career Fair
emergency intervention, and counseling.                conducted annually in Atlanta. The sessions are
Resident assistants help the directors with the        open to all majors and afford ideal settings for
coordination of residence hall activities.             students to make contact with potential
                                                       employers.
Residence hall programming involves the
                                                       The Center hosts Graduate and Professional
creation, planning, implementation, and
                                                       School Day, bringing to campus representatives
evaluation of a variety of activities in order to
                                                       from colleges and universities around the
provide social interaction and educational
                                                       country. The Center also sponsors a Graduate
enrichment. Emphasis is placed on maintaining
                                                       School Caravan in which students make on-site
a living-learning environment that stimulates the
                                                       visits to selected colleges and universities.
social, intellectual, athletic, and cultural
development of students.        Residents have
                                                       Other functions of the Center include:
opportunities to interact with and learn from
each other and become more involved and
                                                          serving as a liaison between students and
responsible members of the residence hall
                                                          employers;
community as they gain more awareness of self
and others.
                                                          conducting studies on the employment
                                                          outlook, salary trends, and the follow-up of
CAREER SERVICES
                                                          graduates;
The Career Services Center, a support program             bringing speakers to campus from business
of Student Affairs, is the central location for           and industry to discuss innovations that are
career planning, job placement, and cooperative           taking place in an ever changing work
education on the Paine College campus.                    environment.
Paine 42
Page College                               Student Affairs                             Paine Page 43
                                                                                             College
The Center also provides reproduction and            National Pan-Hellenic Council
distribution services of professional placement      N.A.A.C.P.
files which may be sent to employers or to           Paine College Cheerleaders
graduate schools.                                    Paine College Communications Association
                                                     Paineite
STUDENT ACTIVITIES                                   Pre-Alumni Council
                                                     Pre-Professional Science Alliance
The Student Activities staff plans and               Psychology Club
implements diverse social, cultural, educational,    Purple Prodigy
recreational, leadership development, and            Rotaract Club
governance programs which extend and enhance         SGAE/SNEA
the classroom experience. Registered student         S.I.F.E.
organizations,    including      the     Student     Sociology Club
Government Association, are also instrumental        Student Government Association
in sponsoring a broad range of activities            Wesley Fellowship
throughout the year.                                 Yearbook

STUDENT GOVERNMENT                                   FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
ASSOCIATION
                                                     Among the many student organizations at Paine
The Student Government Association is                are eight nationally chartered Greek-lettered
composed of full-time, registered students and       fraternities and sororities.       These service
elected officers of the student body. Elected        organizations exist to encourage good
officers represent the student body, plan social     scholarship, provide service to the College and
activities, and promote open communication           community, improve social relationships, foster
between students, administrators, and College        high moral and ethical conduct, and exemplify
Trustees.                                            the ideal college student. A chapter of the
                                                     National Pan-Hellenic Council assists in
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
                                                     regulating fraternity and sorority activities at the
Registered student organizations exist to            College.      These organizations must meet
promote school spirit; provide positive,             College and national guidelines.                The
constructive services to the College and             fraternities and sororities are:
community; give insight into specific fields of
study; and promote ideals of academic                Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.
excellence, citizenship, and leadership. Some of     Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.
the organizations include:                           Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.
                                                     Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.
Business Club                                        Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.
Camp Adventure                                       Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.
Concert Choir                                        Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.
Crème de la Crème                                    Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.
English Club
Environmental Science Club                           HEALTH SERVICES
French Club
Gospel Choir                                         The Office of Health Services provides limited
International Student Association                    health care in an efficient, ethical, and
Lions Activity Board (L.A.B.)                        confidential manner to the campus community
Mahogany Essence Dance Team                          and presents preventive medical programs
Mathematics and Computer Science Club                designed to promote good physical, mental, and
Paine College
Paine College                                Student Affairs                                 Page 44
                                                                                             Page 43
emotional wellness.       Medical assistance is        basketball, baseball, golf, track, and cross-
provided to students and staff through the             country. Paine College is a member of the
College’s Health Clinic which is staffed by a          Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
full-time nurse. The College physician is within       (SIAC) of the National Collegiate Athletic
immediate proximity to the campus and is               Association (NCAA) for Division II Schools.
available for consultation, emergency, or other
priority health-related situations. All students       INTRAMURALS
are required to submit a medical form to the
Clinic prior to enrollment. Medical treatment          An intramural program is provided for all
procedures are outlined in the Student                 students who may participate as individuals, a
Handbook.                                              class, club, fraternity, sorority, or other
                                                       organization. The intramural program begins in
ATHLETICS                                              the fall and continues throughout the school
                                                       year. All students are encouraged to participate
Intercollegiate athletic competition plays an          in some phase of the program.
important role in the lives of students. The
present athletic program includes ten varsity          Activities include flag football, basketball,
teams. Women’s teams compete in five sports:           softball, tennis, bowling, track and field, and
basketball, volleyball, softball, track, and cross-    several individual sports.
country. Men’s teams compete in five sports:
                                                                           45
                                                                           45
                       requirements of external agencies and, thus,             permits the taking of 18 to 20 hours, the
                                                        ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
                       Business Administration) are governed by                 Academic Affairs. If the student’s record
                       that some programs (ex. Teacher Education,               faculty advisor and the Vice President of
                       Paine College. Students should also be aware             hours for a total 18-20 when approved by the
                       THE SEMESTER SYSTEM
                       outdated program detrimental to the integrity of         required cost for each additional hour must be
                                                                                permitted to take additional semester credit
                       some courses or the determination of an                  paid. A strong written justification and approval
                                                                                grade point average (CGPA) of 2.5 may be
                       The academic year is divided into two periods
                       current curriculum due to the discontinuation of         of the advisor, coordinator, division chair, and
                                                                                Students who have a minimum cumulative
                       of sixteen weeks each, Fall and Spring
                       requirements may be asked to move to a more              Vice President of Academic Affairs is required
                       Semesters. For the odd or even years, refer to
                       in enrollment and attempting to meet graduation          for enrollment in more than 20 credits of
                                                                                be awarded for six credits.
                       the year in which the academic year ends.
                       faculty, may require that students, with a break         campus, online and transient credits during a
                                                                                credit hours. In the summer, financial aid may
                       There is also a Summer Session. Students may
                       programs, through the decisions of program               single semester. Fort Gordon courses shall be
                                                                                must be enrolled in a minimum of 12 semester
                       enter the College at the beginning of either             counted in the regular total for campus credits.
ACADEMIC REGULATIONS




                       However, students should be aware that                   credits. To receive full financial aid, a student
                       semester or the Summer Session.
                       year and term of their first enrollment.                 credits, and co-enrollment credits and online
                                                                                STUDENT CLASSIFICATION




                                                                                                                                    ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
                       defined in the Paine College Catalog for the             credits include on-campus credits, transient
                       Credit for courses is recorded in semester credit
                       of the academic requirements of the College as           12 to 17 credit hours per semester. These 17
                       hours. Most of the courses offered by the
                       Candidates for a degree must have completed all          Students are expected to complete an average of
                                                                                The normal course load for full-time students is
                       College meet three times per week for one                31 semester credit hours per academic year. To
                       semester and carry three semester credit hours.
                       the section titled Academic Programs.)                   allow for reasonable variations, classifications
                                                                                         ACADEMIC LOAD REGULATION
                       Many laboratory science courses carry four
                       Bachelor of Science. (For a list of majors, see          are determined on the following basis:
                       semester credit hours.
                       leading to two degrees: Bachelor of Arts and             value of the course.
                       The College offers major programs in fields              Freshman                           0 – 27 hours
                                                                                equivalent of 750 contact minutes per credit
                       The College also utilizes a split semester term          Sophomore                         28 – 59 hours
                                                                                weeks of courses. All courses must meet the
                       for courses offered through the Fort Gordon
                                        DEGREE REQUIREMENTS                     Junior                            60 – 93 hours
                                                                                November and December consisted of four
                       Center and for online courses. Additional                Senior                       94 hours and above
                                                                                interim sessions (accelerated) are offered during
                       interim sessions (accelerated) are offered during
                       94 hours and above                   Senior              Center and for online courses. Additional
                       November and December consisted of four
                            60 – 93 hours                   Junior              DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
                                                                                for courses offered through the Fort Gordon
                       weeks of courses. All courses must meet the
                            28 – 59 hours                   Sophomore           The College also utilizes a split semester term
                       equivalent of 750 contact minutes per credit
                             0 – 27 hours                   Freshman            The College offers major programs in fields
                       value of the course.                                     leading to two degrees: Bachelor of Arts and
                                                                                semester credit hours.
                       are determined on the following basis:                   Bachelor of Science. (For a list of majors, see
                                                                                Many laboratory science courses carry four
                       ACADEMIC LOAD REGULATION
                       allow for reasonable variations, classifications         the section titled Academic Programs.)
                                                                                semester and carry three semester credit hours.
                       31 semester credit hours per academic year. To           College meet three times per week for one
                       The normal course load for full-time students is
                       Students are expected to complete an average of          Candidates for a degree must have completed all
                                                                                hours. Most of the courses offered by the
                       12 to 17 credit hours per semester. These 17             of the academic requirements of the College as
                                                                                Credit for courses is recorded in semester credit
                       credits include on-campus credits, transient
                                     STUDENT CLASSIFICATION                     defined in the Paine College Catalog for the
                       credits, and co-enrollment credits and online            year and term of their first enrollment.
                                                                                semester or the Summer Session.
                       credits. To receive full financial aid, a student
                       counted in the regular total for campus credits.         However, students should be aware that
                                                                                enter the College at the beginning of either
                       must be enrolled in a minimum of 12 semester
                       single semester. Fort Gordon courses shall be            programs, through the decisions of program
                                                                                There is also a Summer Session. Students may
                       credit hours. In the summer, financial aid may
                       campus, online and transient credits during a            faculty, may require that students, with a break
                                                                                the year in which the academic year ends.
                       be awarded for six credits.
                       for enrollment in more than 20 credits of                in enrollment and attempting to meet graduation
                                                                                Semesters. For the odd or even years, refer to
                       Vice President of Academic Affairs is required           requirements may be asked to move to a more
                                                                                of sixteen weeks each, Fall and Spring
                       Students who have a minimum cumulative
                       of the advisor, coordinator, division chair, and         current curriculum due to the discontinuation of
                                                                                The academic year is divided into two periods
                       grade point average (CGPA) of 2.5 may be
                       paid. A strong written justification and approval        some courses or the determination of an
                       permitted to take additional semester credit
                       required cost for each additional hour must be           outdated program detrimental to the integrity of
                                                                                                  THE SEMESTER SYSTEM
                       hours for a total 18-20 when approved by the             Paine College. Students should also be aware
                       faculty advisor and the Vice President of                that some programs (ex. Teacher Education,
                       Academic Affairs. If the student’s record
                                                        ACADEMIC REGULATIONS    Business Administration) are governed by
                       permits the taking of 18 to 20 hours, the                requirements of external agencies and, thus,
                                                                           45
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                                                                           45
Paine College
Paine College                        Academic Regulations                                 Page 46
                                                                                          Page 45
these programs must remain current with state,       a major in one of the fields (the specified
regional, or national regulations in order to        sequence of course work);
make     recommendations      for   graduation,
licensure, accreditation, etc. Students should       a minimum of 31 semester credit hours (not
check with their advisor for content                 including Common Curriculum hours) of
requirements. The College will, however, make        academic study to count toward a degree
every effort to hold necessary changes to a          MUST be completed at Paine College with
minimum so as not to disadvantage the student        the final transcript for auditing purposes
or jeopardize programs.                              serving as the official record for verification
                                                     purposes. The final course must be taken at
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS                              Paine College.
                                                     a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in
Candidates for degrees must file an application      all courses taken at the College (2.5 for
for candidacy no later than the first Friday in      Teacher Education majors) and 2.5 in all
October and have an official degree audit            courses in the major with no grade less than
completed before the final examination period        a “C” in any course designated (*) as a
in the semester prior to the one in which all        major course (designated by each major);
requirements for graduation will be met.
Students should be aware that:                       a passing score on the Sophomore
                                                     Proficiency Examination in English; (to be
   advising errors do not exempt students from       completed during the sophomore year)
   the responsibility of meeting all degree
   requirements for graduation;                      a  passing    score   on    the   Senior
                                                     Comprehensive Major Field Examination;
   all requirements MUST be met to
   participate in the graduation ceremonies,         proof of having TAKEN the Graduate
   and;                                              Record Examination or an equivalent
                                                     national examination (MCAT, LSAT, state
   they should maintain a copy of their              exam such as GACE, etc.) as an exit
   Program Advisement Sheet and Monitoring           examination;
   Program Sheet which is to be updated with
   each contact with the advisor and further,        completion of all course requirements by the
   use it to monitor progress toward                 date the semester ends as stipulated by the
   graduation.                                       calendar for the main campus;

Graduation requirements include a minimum of         complete senior project or field paper;
56 semester credit hours of the Common
Curriculum, designated semester hours for the        clearance of all financial obligations to the
major, and/or electives for a minimum total of       College; and
124 semester credit hours.
                                                     approval by the faculty and Board of
Students must complete         the   following
                                                     Trustees.
requirements for graduation:
                                                  The Registrar’s Office presents candidates for
   Common Curriculum, major requirements,         graduation to the Vice President of Academic
   and electives to bring the total semester      Affairs who presents the candidates to the
   credit hours for graduation to a minimum of    faculty for certification that each candidate will
   124 semester credit hours;                     have met all academic requirements for the
Paine 46
Page College                           Academic Regulations                       Paine Page 47
                                                                                        College
degree prior to graduation. The President shall     structure, the course work is organized in six
present the candidates to the Board of Trustees     thematic categories with specified outcomes:
for approval. A student who fails to receive
approval for graduation has the right to appeal,       Fundamentals
in writing, to the Office of Academic Affairs.           Ability to write
Failure to fulfill all requirements will not             Knowledge of grammar and mechanics
qualify on for an appeal.                                Ability to communicate orally
                                                         Knowledge of vocabulary
AWARDING OF DEGREES                                      Reading comprehension
Degrees for all students (main campus and Fort
                                                       Spiritual and Social Values
Gordon Resident Center) will be awarded
                                                          Understand the history and significance
during the annual graduation ceremony held in
                                                          of faith and spirituality in the
May after students have met all requirements for
                                                          development of the society and the
graduation as given in the College Catalog.
                                                          individual
Degrees for students who have completed
requirements and who do not choose to
participate in the ceremony will be mailed upon        World Citizenship
request.                                                 Basic ideas, trends, and issues in the
Fort Gordon Resident Center students who                 history of civilization
complete graduation requirements at the end of           Knows Black heritage
the Spring II term and main campus students              Ability to communicate orally
who complete graduation requirements at the
end of the summer session will have their              The Aesthetic Heritage
degrees awarded at the graduation ceremony                Basic ideas, trends, and issues in the
held during the following May.                            history of civilization

Degrees for students who have completed all            Mathematics, Science, and Technology
graduation requirements except fulfillment of            Solve math problems
financial obligations to the College will be held        Interpret quantitative data
until September 1 following the graduation               Understand mathematical symbols and
ceremony. If the student’s financial obligations         relationships
have not been satisfied by that date, the student        Use the Internet effectively
must re-apply for graduation in order to receive         Use essential computer applications
a degree. The date on the degree will be the             effectively
date of the graduation immediately following             Understand scientific methods and
the satisfaction of all financial obligations.           processes
                                                         Basic knowledge of the development of
If, due to circumstances, a graduate finds it            science
necessary to request a copy of a previously
                                                         Understanding the environment
awarded degree, the copy may not bear the same
signatures as the original degree and will be
                                                       The Individual and Society
marked as “Re-issued.”
                                                          Understands the basic principles of
                                                          diversity
COMMON CURRICULUM
                                                    This thematization is designed to create
The Paine College Common Curriculum defines
                                                    coherence, emphasize the value-based nature of
the purpose and method of the College’s
                                                    the curriculum, and make the College’s
requirement for basic education. In terms of
Paine College
Paine College                                          Academic Regulations                                                  Page 48
                                                                                                                             Page 47
conception of its mission highly visible. The                           The Individual and Society (3 hours)
requirements are listed below.                                          SOC 201 or PSY 201 ...................................3 hrs

Common Curriculum Courses                                  Hours        Total: ....................................................56 hours

Fundamentals (9 hours)                                                  SOPHOMORE PROFICIENCY
EDU 101 ....................................................... 1 hr    EXAMINATION IN ENGLISH (SPEE)
ENG 101, 102 (both “C” or better)..............6 hrs
PED 120, 121, 210 (select 2) or HED 225...2 hrs                         Paine College requires students to pass all
                                                                        English courses in the Common Curriculum
Spiritual and Social Values (9 hours)                                   with a grade of “C” or better and, further, that
Religion:                                                               students pass the Sophomore Proficiency
    REL 230 and 231 ...................................4 hrs            Examination in English (SPEE), a writing
Philosophy:                                                             competency test, at the completion of the
    PHI 220 ..................................................2 hrs     English course sequence.       The student is
    PHI 230 or 234.......................................3 hrs          reminded that passing the SPEE is a
                                                                        requirement for graduation as well as
World Citizenship (15 hours)                                            participation in the graduation ceremonies.
HIS 112 ........................................................3 hrs   Students who have not completed the SPEE will
HIS 103 ........................................................3 hrs   not be allowed to graduate and will not be
HIS 104 ........................................................3 hrs   permitted to participate in the graduation
SPA 220 and 221 or FRE 220 and 221 ........6 hrs                        ceremonies. While the SPEE must have been
                                                                        passed in order to graduate, students are
The Aesthetic Heritage (6 hours)                                        expected to pass the SPEE as sophomores.
ART 120 or MUS 120..................................3 hrs
ENG 232 or 332 or 333................................3 hrs              All students who were enrolled at Paine in the
                                                                        Fall of 1981-1982 and thereafter are required to
Mathematics, Science, and Technology (14                                pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in
hours)                                                                  English as a criterion for graduation. The
Mathematics and Science Majors:                                         examination is offered during the Fall and
MAT 126 (“C” or better)* ...........................3 hrs               Spring semesters and the summer term.
Business Majors:                                                        Students are urged to attend the proficiency
MAT 127 (“C” or better) .............................3 hrs              examination review sessions in the semester in
Education Majors:                                                       which they plan to take the examination.
MAT 122 (“C” or better) .............................3 hrs              Students may take the examination as often as
Other Majors:                                                           needed to pass. All students who fail the SPEE
MAT 122 (“C” or better) .............................3 hrs              are required to take English 240, a two credit
*Note: With the proper pre-requisites, students                         remediation course, before being allowed to sit
may substitute MAT 220.                                                 for it again.

Science Majors:                                                         SENIOR COMPREHENSIVE MAJOR
BIO 111 and 112 or                                                      FIELD EXAMINATION
   CHE 120 and 121 (includes labs) ..........8 hrs
Non-science Majors:                                                     To ensure that all graduates possess an
BIO 102, ESC 101, PHS 101, or PHS 110 ..8 hrs                           appropriate level of competence in the major
                                                                        field, and to gather data relative to the
All Majors:                                                             preparation of majors, and curriculum and
    CSC 100 .................................................3 hrs      program strength, Paine College requires all
                                                                        students to pass a written comprehensive
Paine 48
Page College                            Academic Regulations                          Paine Page 49
                                                                                            College
assessment in the major field as a requirement       to a grade of "F" automatically at the end of the
for graduation and for participation in the          semester. The “I” grade is only issued if the
graduation ceremonies. The comprehensive             majority of the requirements are successfully
assessment encourages students to synthesize         met but one to two requirements are not
material in the discipline. The major field          submitted due to illness, etc.
examinations are given only once per semester
at a time determined by the department and the       GRADE CHANGES
division.
                                                     A grade will be changed only if an error in
GRADING SYSTEM/QUALITY POINTS                        computation has been discovered.          Such
                                                     changes must be made prior to mid-term of the
Grade Description             Quality Points         following semester.     Faculty must exhaust
A     Excellent (90 – 100%)              4.0         extreme care in grade computations and in
B     Good (80 – 89%)                    3.0         entering students’ grades.       These errors
C     Satisfactory (70 – 79%)            2.0         adversely impact students and will be monitored
D     Poor (60 – 69%)                    1.0         by Division Chairs and the Office of Academic
F     Failure (59% and below)            0.0         Affairs.
WF    Withdrew – failing                 0.0
W     Withdrew – without penalty         0.0         ADDING AND DROPPING CLASSES
WP    Withdrew – passing, no penalty     0.0
NC    Non-credit                         0.0         The last day for adding/dropping a course will
S     Satisfactory                       0.0         be the fourth class day of each semester. The
U     Unsatisfactory                     0.0         date is specified in the College Academic
I     Incomplete                         0.0         Calendar as the last day for class changes and is
V     Audit – no credit                  0.0         the official end of the drop/add period.
K     Credit by examination              0.0         Drop/Add forms are secured from the Office of
CP    Continued in Program               0.0         the Registrar. (Also see Withdrawals from a
                                                     Course.)
Course credit is awarded for earned semester
credit hours only.                                   SUBSTITUTION OF COURSES

GRADING SYSTEM FOR                                   Substitutions in courses are made only in cases
ENHANCEMENT COURSES                                  where the same credit hours and type can be
                                                     demonstrated and the specified outcomes for the
Grade Description             Quality Points         course can also be gained by the substitution
S     Satisfactory                       0.0         course.
CP    Continued in Program               0.0
W     Withdrew - without penalty         0.0         It is the responsibility of students to follow
WC Withdrew & continued in program 0.0               the curriculum requirements of the selected
                                                     major.
INCOMPLETE GRADES
                                                     Course substitutions will be allowed for courses
If, for an extenuating circumstance (illness,        taken at Paine and repeated at another institution
death in the family, etc.), a student is unable to   only if the course was failed at Paine College
complete the work of the course by the end of        and the course qualifies as a substitute course.
the semester, a grade of "I" may be given. This      For courses completed at other institutions, no
work must be completed by two weeks after            quality points are earned towards the calculation
mid-term of the subsequent semester in which         of the cumulative or major field grade point
the student is enrolled or the "I" will be changed   averages.
Paine College
Paine College                           Academic Regulations                                 Page 50
                                                                                             Page 49
                                                     satisfactory grade. Students auditing a course
All requests for course substitutions must be        who have formally enrolled are expected to
submitted with a strong justification which          attend class regularly and to complete
addresses the type of course and prescribed          assignments. Those auditing who do not attend
outcomes of the course. The request must             class regularly will be dropped from the class
receive approval from the faculty advisor, the       with a grade of “W”.
respective Division Chairperson and the Vice
President of Academic Affairs.                       No credit will be given for audited courses.

REPETITION OF COURSES                                FINAL EXAMINATIONS

Students may repeat a course twice in which a        Final examinations in all courses are on
"D" or "F" was earned. Courses in which              scheduled days at the end of each semester.
students have earned a "C" or better may not be      Copies of these examinations are filed with
repeated except by approval of the Division          Division Chairs, the Vice President of
Chair and the Provost, only in the case of           Academic Affairs and grades are filed with the
increasing the required GPA in the major for         Registrar.      Students MUST take final
graduation. Courses numbered below 100 can           examinations during the final examination
be taken no more than twice.                         period as scheduled and should refrain from
                                                     requesting early or late examinations.
AUDITING COURSES
                                                     CLASS ATTENDANCE
Classes may be audited on one of two levels:
formal or informal. Regularly enrolled students      Students should attend ALL classes for courses
and persons not regularly enrolled at Paine may      in which they are registered. No student,
formally audit courses by paying a fee for each      particularly in undergraduate years, can learn as
semester credit hour, provided permission is         well independently as in dynamic fellowship
obtained from the Vice President of Academic         with a group mutually involved in the learning
Affairs and the faculty person teaching the          process. Therefore, students are expected to
course. The names of those auditing a course         participate in course activities in order to
will be recorded on the rolls and the letter "V"     develop themselves and to contribute to their
(Audit, no credit) will be placed on the             classes.
transcript as a grade if expectations of the
course are met. These expectations shall be          Faculty will begin recording student’s absences
spelled out upon entering the course.                on the first day the class meets and students will
                                                     be held responsible for all class work beginning
Regularly enrolled students may audit a class on     with the first day of class.
an informal basis, provided permission is
obtained from the faculty person teaching the        Students still negotiating financial aid,
course. The names will not be recorded on rolls      registration, business office or housing issues
and they will not be permitted to change status      once classes begin must attend assigned
from informal audit to formal audit or               classes and negotiate business during
enrollment for credit.                               nonclass times. If the student has not
                                                     resolved these issues by a determined date,
Students or other persons may not change status      he/she may be dropped from the class or
from credit to audit or vice versa during or after   removed from campus housing.
the start of a course. If credit is desired for a
course which has been audited, one must re-             Students will be allowed to be absent the
enroll for credit and complete the course with a        equivalent of one class period (50 minutes)
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Page College                          Academic Regulations                         Paine Page 51
                                                                                         College
  per credit value of the class plus two              Program students will receive a grade of W
  additional 50 minute periods.                       or WC.

  For example, a three (3) credit hour course      COURSE CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
  meeting three times per week would allow a
  student a total of five absences. Students are   Students who have acquired knowledge in
  cautioned that classes meeting more than 50      informal and non-traditional ways may be
  minutes (re: classes meeting only two times      awarded college credits based on performance
  per week for three (3) or more credits) result   on advanced placement or other examinations.
  in the equivalent of 1 plus absentees each       This policy permits a student to request an
  time they are absent. A special caution is       examination in selected courses listed in the
  issued for short courses (ex. Fort Gordon) or    PAINE COLLEGE CATALOG and related to
  courses during summer school.             For    the student’s educational program. Credit by
  example, a summer school course that meets       examination will be listed as such on the
  for 150 minutes per course meeting would         transcript, along with the course number, title,
  mean the student could only be absent one        and semester hours of credit. The grade
  day and a portion of a second day.               assigned is not included in computing the grade
                                                   point average.
  When a student has exceeded this limit, he
  or she may remain in class only at faculty       Students may not take examinations for courses
  discretion. The faculty will consider            in which they have previously enrolled or others
  appropriate documentation for emergencies        in their planned educational program. Students
  when such documentation is presented on          who feel that they have sufficient knowledge in
  the day the student returns to class.            a specific course to pass it by examination
                                                   should follow the guidelines below.
  Three tardies shall constitute one absence.
  A student is tardy when she or he misses         GUIDELINES FOR CREDIT BY
  less than fifteen minutes of a class session.    EXAMINATION
  If the student misses fifteen or more minutes
  of a class session, he or she is considered      1. Students must make a formal application to
  absent.                                             the faculty advisor. The application should
                                                      include:
  Absences incurred the day immediately               a. title of course for which the examination
  preceding and the day immediately                       is to be given;
  following a school holiday shall carry a            b. reason for request; and
  double penalty.                                     c. prior experience which subsumes course
                                                          content (documentation required).
  Absences for official school business shall
  not be counted against the allowed absences,     2. Approval must be given by the appropriate
  providing the student presents proper               Program/Department Coordinator, Division
  documentation notifying the faculty person.         Chair, and the Vice President of Academic
                                                      Affairs prior to the administration of an
  Faculty persons shall submit a request to the       examination.
  Vice President of Academic Affairs to            3. Examinations will be administered only
  withdraw a student who has exceeded the             once.
  allowed absence limit. The student shall be
  notified in writing by the Vice President of     4. Students must score at least 70 percent.
  Academic Affairs and shall receive the
  grade of W, WP or WF.          Enhancement
Paine College
Paine College                           Academic Regulations                                 Page 52
                                                                                             Page 51
5. Date of examination will be decided by the        grade of record (see single exception for repeat
   department. The date of the examination           of courses with a “C” grade). In the case of
   must be prior to the test week of the             electives required to complete a major, if the
   semester.                                         student takes an elective, (ex. English elective
                                                     required) and fails that elective course that
6. For courses with a performance component,         grade will be counted as an “F” in computing
   such as music, art, physical education, etc., a   the major GPA unless the same course is
   performance assessment is mandatory thus          repeated and a higher grade is earned. The
   two scores are required. Both assessments         student may take another elective but passing a
   must be approved.                                 different course will not allow the previous
                                                     failing grade to be dropped.
A division or department may use any one of
the following tests:
                                                     STUDENT RECORDS AND RELEASE OF
   College     Level    Examination      Program     INFORMATION
   (CLEP);
                                                     Students may have access to their own
   examinations produced by professional             educational records during regular office hours
   societies with published national norms;          by contacting the Registrar’s Office (there is a
                                                     cost for transcripts). A student may appear in
   tests developed by a department and deemed        person or send a written request for a copy of
   equivalent to published test (must be             the record. Students also have access to their
   approved prior to administering the test)         records via the colleges’ website. The student
                                                     identification number and password are required
A fee of $75 will be charged for each                to access the records. Another person may not
examination. A copy of the examination, the          see a student’s educational record unless written
student’s examination papers, and the number of      permission is given by the student. A parent or
semester credit hours MUST be submitted by           guardian who is providing one-half or more of
the Division Chair to the Vice President of          the student’s financial support may obtain the
Academic Affairs.                                    educational record if said written statement is on
                                                     file with the College. Faculty and designated
CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGE                       staff of the College may have access to student
(CGPA)                                               educational records in the performance of their
                                                     regular duties. If an educational record contains
The cumulative grade point average is                information on more than one student, then a
calculated by dividing the total number of           student desiring access may review only such
quality points earned by the total number of         parts relating to that student. Students have the
hours attempted (include only hours for grades       right to challenge the content of their
of A, B, C, D, or F), (See special rule on           educational records to ensure that the records
WP/WF under Withdrawal from a Course).               are not inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of
In computing the ratio of quality points to          any rights.       Any evidence regarding an
semester credit hours, the hours for a repeated      inaccurate or misleading record should be
course will be counted only once. The highest        presented by the student.
grade earned in a repeated course during or after
the Fall 1982 semester will determine the            The release of all student information is
number of quality points if the course has been      governed by institutional policies and the
or is repeated and a higher grade was or is          Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of
earned. Grades of “C” or better may not be           1974. Paine College considers the following
repeated and the 1st grade of “C” or better is the   information to be directory- type information
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                                                                                            College
which may be released without permission from        therefore, expects from each student a high
the student:                                         standard of individual honesty and integrity in
                                                     all academic endeavors.
•   name
•   address                                          Academic dishonesty includes cheating on
•   date of birth                                    examinations, plagiarism, forgery, collusion,
•   place of birth                                   and credential misrepresentation, inclusive of
•   major field of study                             Internet documents and sources. Students found
•   participation in officially recognized           guilty of academic dishonesty are subject to
    activities and sports                            disciplinary action including loss of credit (F for
•   weight and height of members of the athletic     the course), suspension, or immediate dismissal
    teams                                            from the College at anytime.
•   degrees and awards received
                                                     Definitions
Students who desire that any or all of this
information be withheld must submit a written           Cheating on examinations or assignments
request to prevent disclosure. This request is          includes giving, receiving, offering or
submitted to the appropriate college official’s         soliciting information on tests or written
office within three days following the close of         assignments and using notes or books other
formal registration each semester.                      than those explicitly permitted by the faculty
                                                        person during an examination.
TRANSCRIPTS
                                                        Plagiarism is the failure to acknowledge the
A fee of five dollars ($5), payable in advance, is      author of a passage one is quoting or
charged for each copy of a transcript issued after      paraphrasing; failure to give credit to the
the first one. Requests for transcripts MUST be         source when one borrows information not
made in writing. Forms may be secured from              considered to be public knowledge; using or
the Registrar’s Office.                                 quoting from the work of another student or
                                                        other sources including the Internet.
Transcripts and grade reports will be withheld if
a student has ANY outstanding financial                 Forgery is willfully misrepresenting or
obligations to the College or has violated non-         altering a document with intent to defraud.
academic regulations.                                   It is a crime punishable by law. Its most
                                                        common occurrence among students
Students may obtain official or unofficial copies       includes, but is not limited to, the
of their Paine College transcript. Unofficial           misrepresentation of signatures (especially
copies will be stamped “ISSUED TO                       those of academic advisors) on official
STUDENT.” A student must sign a request                 documents of the College or the attempt to
form in the Registrar’s Office or send a signed,        cash checks that are not lawfully their own.
written request to release the transcript.
Requests may be accepted from persons other             Collusion includes cooperation of student(s)
than the student, only when the student has             with staff personnel in securing confidential
provided written, signed permission.                    information/material (tests, examinations,
                                                        etc.); bribery by student(s) or staff personnel
ACADEMIC HONESTY                                        to change examination grades and/or grade
                                                        point average(s); cooperative efforts by
Paine College recognizes honesty and integrity          student(s) and student assistant(s) to gain
as necessary to the academic purpose and                access to examinations or answers to
function of the Institution.    The College,            examinations for distribution; resubmission
Paine College
Paine College                           Academic Regulations                                 Page 54
                                                                                             Page 53
   of term papers and/or reports that have been      1. failing grade on work for which the
   previously submitted by oneself and/or               violation was committed;*
   peers, and cooperation of students and
   faculty/staff to obtain credit, financial aid,    2. dropping grade earned in a course by one
   etc. for courses they did not take or did not        letter grade;*
   complete.
                                                     3. failure of the course;
   Credential misrepresentation involves, but is
   not limited to, the use of untrue written         4. suspension from the course;
   statements regarding matters of fact in order
   to gain admission to or employment at Paine       5. suspension from Paine College;
   College or any other employment while a
   student and using falsified statements of         6. permanent dismissal from Paine College.
   fact, distribution of false printed materials,    *may be applied by faculty only
   and conduct manifestly intended to deceive
   or mislead.                                       APPEALS

DISCIPLINARY ACTION PROCEDURES                       A student has the right to appeal the decision for
                                                     disciplinary action assigned by a faculty person,
When a faculty or staff member has substantial       staff member, or the Vice President of
evidence that a student has engaged in dishonest     Academic Affairs. In the case where the
conduct which requires action within the bounds      decision is made by a faculty or staff member,
of his or her jurisdiction, the faculty or staff     the appeal should be made to the Vice President
member shall notify the student in writing of the    of Academic Affairs.
violation and the action taken within twenty-
four (24) hours. A copy of such notification         Decisions of the Vice President of Academic
should be submitted to the Vice President of         Affairs may be appealed to the Academic
Academic Affairs and the Dean for Student            Affairs Appeal Board which consists of a
Affairs. If the conduct requires disciplinary        designee of the President, two faculty members
action beyond the bounds (numbers 3 through 6)       (one appointed by the Vice President of
of the faculty or staff member, a written report     Academic Affairs and one elected by the
should be made to the Vice President of              faculty), and two students appointed by the
Academic Affairs within twenty-four (24) hours       Student Government Association. A student
with a copy to the student. The Vice President       who is dissatisfied with the decision of the
of Academic Affairs will determine the               Academic Affairs Appeal Board may appeal
penalty (ies) in discussion with the faculty         through the Vice President of Academic Affairs
person for violations within forty-eight (48)        to the President.
hours of receipt of the report based on the
number and severity of the violation(s)              All appeals must be made by the deadline stated
committed by the individual student.                 in the letter of notification.

The Vice President of Academic Affairs will          COLLEGE ASSEMBLY/CONVOCATION
send a copy of the notification of the decision to
the student and faculty or staff member.             The purpose of the assembly/convocation is to
                                                     disseminate information of mutual concern to
Penalties may include (but are not limited to)       the Paine College Family and to present
the following:                                       educational, cultural, campus information, and
                                                     other programs to students.
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                                                                                            College
Each student is expected to attend all assembly/
convocation programs as these programs are an        2. were not under disciplinary action.
integral part of the College experience. A
student may miss a maximum of two assemblies         A student who earns a 4.0 grade point average
per semester without penalty. A student who          (GPA) for any given semester will also be
misses more than the two allowed programs will       presented a Presidential Scholar Key by the
have one-half semester credit hour added to the      College President in public ceremony.
graduation requirements for each absence
beyond the limit.                                    A student who is a Presidential Scholar for two
                                                     consecutive semesters will become a member of
Staff members in the office of student affairs       the Presidential Honor Guild. To continue
monitor and document compliance with the             membership in the Guild, a student must
assembly/convocation policies.                       maintain a cumulative grade point average of
                                                     3.6 each semester. When the cumulative GPA
SENIOR HONORS                                        falls below 3.6, the member will be placed on
                                                     inactive status until such time as the minimum
The following honors may be awarded at               GPA is achieved. Students who have been
graduation to students enrolled full-time at         members of the Guild for the two semesters
Paine College for the final two years (unless        immediately prior to graduation will be given a
requirements of graduation can be completed in       scholarship to attend graduate school. The
less than full-time status during the last year of   scholar MUST have been accepted in graduate
enrollment) if at least half of the hours required   school and enrolled within six months following
for graduation have been taken at Paine College.     the completion of all requirements.        This
A student whose cumulative grade point average       scholarship award cannot be converted to cash.
ranges from:
                                                     DEAN’S LIST
1. 3.30 to 3.49 will be graduated Cum Laude;
                                                     At the end of each semester, students who have
2. 3.50 to 3.79 will be graduated Magna Cum          earned a grade point average of at least 3.6 and
   Laude; and                                        less than 4.0 are placed on the Dean’s List. The
                                                     students on this list must have been enrolled in a
3. 3.80 to 4.00 will be graduated Summa Cum          minimum of 15 semester credit hours of course
   Laude.                                            work numbered 100 or above and must not have
                                                     been under disciplinary action.
First and second honor students (valedictorian
and salutatorian) must have completed two-           HONOR ROLL
thirds of the common curriculum requirements
and two-thirds of the major field requirements       At the end of each semester, students who have
on the main campus.                                  earned a grade point average of at least 3.3 and
                                                     less than 3.6 are placed on the Honor Roll.
PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLAR AWARD                           These students must have been enrolled in a
                                                     minimum of 15 semester credit hours of course
At the end of each semester, students who have       work numbered 100 or above and must not have
earned a grade point average (GPA) of 4.0 are        been under disciplinary action.
listed as Presidential Scholars if they:
                                                     GOOD STANDING
1. have been enrolled for 15 or more semester        AND ACADEMIC PROGRESS
   credit hours in course work numbered 100
   or above and
Paine College
Paine College                           Academic Regulations                                Page 56
                                                                                            Page 55
All students permitted to register each semester
are considered in good standing with the
College. The expected institutional cumulative
grade point norm is 2.0; however, students are       PROBATION
considered to be making satisfactory progress if
they maintain the minimum cumulative grade           Satisfactory academic progress is determined
point average as indicated below:                    after a student has attempted 20 hours of regular
                                                     credit work. If a student’s cumulative grade
Attempted                       Cumulative           point average (CGPA) is not satisfactory at the
Hours of                        Grade Point          end of the semester thereafter, the student is
Regular CR Work              Average Required        automatically placed on academic probation.
                                                     Students who are on academic probation are
20 - 27 hours                          1.7           restricted to a maximum of 13 credit hours per
28 - 59 hours                          1.8           semester. Extra-curricular activities may also
60 - 93 hours                          1.9           be restricted.
94 hours and above                     2.0
                                                     ACADEMIC SUSPENSION
Students enrolled in General Education Support
Services Programs are making satisfactory            Students who fail to earn the minimum CGPA at
progress if they maintain the minimum                the end of the probationary semester will be
standards set by those programs.                     placed on academic suspension for the next
                                                     academic semester.       When suspended, the
The total number of hours will include those         student is not permitted to enroll for a minimum
attempted at Paine College and those accepted        of one regular academic semester (not including
from another institution as transfer credit. To be   the summer term). The suspended student must
eligible for graduation, students must have a        apply for reinstatement. If reinstated, the
cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (2.5 for       student must earn a semester GPA of 2.0 for
Education majors) and a cumulative average of        classes taken during re-enrollment or raise
2.5 in the major field with no grade lower than a    his/her CGPA to the minimum cumulative grade
“C.”                                                 point average for the attempted hour of regular
                                                     credit work (see Good Standing and Academic
A student’s eligibility for financial aid may be     Progress).
affected for failure to remain in good academic
standing (see Financial Aid).                        ACADEMIC DISMISSAL

WARNING                                              After being reinstated following suspension, a
                                                     student is subject to dismissal actions if he/she
1. Students will be sent scholastic warning          fails to achieve the minimum cumulative GPA
   letters if the grade point average for any        for the number of hours attempted or fails to
   semester is less than 2.0.                        earn a term GPA which reflects progress toward
                                                     the minimum cumulative GPA leading to
2. Students will be sent scholastic warning          academic good standing. The initial period of
   letters if the cumulative grade point average     dismissal is for one year. After a second
   at the end of any semester is less than 2.0.      academic dismissal, a student may not apply for
                                                     re-admission until a five-year period has
A maximum course load of 13 semester credit          elapsed. Any student who has been dismissed
hours and reduced involvement in extra-              for academic deficiencies for the second time
curricular activities are recommended.               may petition in writing to the Enrollment
                                                     Management Committee for permission to re-
Paine 56
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                                                                                           College
enroll. After a third dismissal, the student will    the approval of the instructor, advisor, Division
be ineligible to reapply to Paine College.           chair and the Dean for Student Affairs. If the
                                                     student is passing at the time of withdrawal, the
APPEAL                                               grade assigned will be “WP”, and if failing,
                                                     “WF”. The “WF” is computed in the grade
A student who is suspended or dismissed from         point-average until the course is repeated and a
the College may appeal, in writing, to the           higher grade is earned. The “WF/WP” grade
Enrollment Management Committee through the          may be awarded/received if approved only
Vice President of Academic Affairs within 10         between the eighth week of the semester up to
business days of the date on the letter of           ten days before the published date of the
dismissal. The student with the letter of appeal     beginning of final examinations.
must provide documentation stating specific
reason(s) for appealing.                             Enhancement program students will receive a
                                                     “W” if they withdraw within the first eight
RE-ADMISSION                                         weeks and a grade of “WC” will be awarded if
                                                     the student withdraws beyond the eighth week.
Dismissed students requesting re-admission to
the College must petition, in writing, the           WITHDRAWAL FROM COLLEGE
Committee on Enrollment Management at least
one month before the beginning of the semester       To withdraw from the College the student must
they plan to attend. Students who are re-            obtain a Withdrawal from College Form from
admitted will be on academic probation, and          the Registrar’s Office, obtain the necessary
will have two semesters to reach the required        signatures and return the form to the Registrar’s
minimum cumulative grade point average,              Office. The penalty for failure to comply with
provided they maintain the average necessary         the regulations is an “F” in all courses and
for satisfactory progress as defined under the       forfeiture of an approved dismissal. A student
probation section. Students who fail to achieve      is considered officially withdrawn from the
cumulative minimum GPA within two                    college only when the required form has been
semesters may be allowed to continue if term         returned to the Registrar’s Office.
GPA’s are above 2.0 and the student is making
substantial progress.                                Students who officially withdraw from the
                                                     college may only receive grades of “W”, “WP”
WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE                             or “WF”.

To withdraw from a course a student must             RETURNING TO COLLEGE
obtain a Withdrawal From Course form from
the Registrar’s Office, complete it and return the   Students who wish to return to Paine College
withdrawal form to the Registrar’s Office after      after withdrawing must complete the necessary
all signatures have been obtained. A student is      re-admission application and procedures
considered officially withdrawn from a course        obtained from/through the Registrar’s Office
only when the required form has been returned        (see Re-admission in the Admission’s section of
to the Registrar’s Office (student should retain a   this Catalog) and processed through the
copy).                                               Registrar’s office.

For the first eight weeks (mid-term) of classes, a   If the student is dismissed from the College, the
student may withdraw with a recorded grade of        student must meet the re-admission guidelines
“W”, and this grade will not be used in              as stipulated in the sections of this Catalog
computing the grade point-average. After eight       entitled Academic Suspension, Probation, Re-
weeks, a student may withdraw from class with        admission, and Academic Dismissal.
Paine College
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                                                                                             Page 57
                                                     Program faculty and students. Students who are
                                                     invited to join the Paine College Honors
                                                     Program will not automatically become a
HONORS PROGRAM                                       Presidential Scholar or a CSRA Scholar.

The Honors Program provides an enriched              The mission of the Paine College Honors
academic curriculum and learning environment         program supports the institution’s mission. At
for highly motivated and especially well-            the heart of the Paine College Honors Program
qualified students. It offers a series of special    is the transformative and transferable nature of a
courses within the Common Curriculum for             liberal arts education. Courses and experiences
freshmen and sophomores and Honors seminars          are designed to foster a spirit of inquiry and
for juniors and seniors. The Paine College           intellectual independence, to encourage the
Honors Program will focus on faculty working         integration of material from various disciplines
with small groups of dedicated and                   and to develop the abilities necessary for
accomplished students; an emphasis on                independent study and research.
independent learning; students entering into
dialogue with peers, teachers, and facilitators; a   The Processes and Procedures – In support of
demanding program of study in major and              Paine College’s core values of excellence and
minor fields; and engagement in external             fiscal responsibility, policies and procedures
experiential learning activities.                    should be put into place to ensure that Paine
                                                     College provides the best possible support to
The Paine College Honors Program will comply         students, while strengthening the institution.
with the recommendations of the National             The procedures governing Paine College
Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) for a fully         Honors Program are:
developed college honors program. The Paine
College Honors Program will accommodate the                 The chief financial officer (CEO) of the
special needs and abilities of the undergraduate            Institution will provide the Office of
students it is designed to serve.                           Admissions with the specific number of
                                                            new honor scholarships (i.e. Presidential
ADMISSION TO THE HONORS                                     Scholarships and CSRA Scholarships
PROGRAM                                                     they can offer. This number should be
                                                            offered no later than November 1 of
Admission to the program is determined by the               each academic year.
Director of the Honors Program and the Honors               The institution will maintain the total
Council. Students designated as Presidential                number of Paine College Honor Scholars
Scholars and Central Savannah Regional Area                 supported financially bye the institution
(CSRA) Scholars in their freshman year will be              at 30-35 (20-25 Presidential Scholars
members of the Paine College Honors Program.                and 10 CSRA Scholars).
A typical student enters the program as a                   Honor scholars must sign a new contract
freshman and remains throughout his/her                     each academic year to retain their
matriculation at the College. Students who earn             monetary support.
a grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 or higher                Honor scholars must participate in at
after completing at least 12 credit hours may               least on experiential learning opportunity
apply for membership in the Paine College                   beyond the campus. Honor scholars must
Honors Program. Students meeting the                        present the results of original research
minimum GPA requirement will be invited to                  before the culmination of their
apply for membership. The application process               undergraduate degree.
will include evidence of service, a written essay           Honor scholars must participate in
and an interview with the Paine College Honors              community based learning activities that
Paine 58
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                                                                                            College
       they have designed by themselves or in               scholarship related opportunities, and
       collaboration with others and document               incorporate service related activities as
       at least 20 hours of service per semester.           part of their instruction.
       Honor scholars will represent Paine                  The Paine College Honors Program
       College and their respective academic                Student Union (PCHPSU) will consist of
       programs where appropriate                           a core group of students who wills serve
                                                            as liaison with the Paine College Honors
Financial Support                                           Program Council and who will keep all
In order to receive the Presidential Scholarship            Paine College Honors Scholars fully
or the CSRA Scholarship students must                       informed on the program and elicit their
complete the Free Application for Federal                   cooperation       in     evaluation   and
Student Aid (FAFSA) on or before March 1. All               development of the program. This
Presidential and CSRA Scholars must apply for               student group will enjoy the autonomy
funding for which they qualify as identified by             of conducting business of the committee
college personnel. Presidential Scholars and                in representing the needs and concerns
CSRA Scholars may receive the firs $800 from                of all Paine College Honor Scholars. The
other scholarships as a refund to pay for the cost          PCHPSU will serve as members of the
of books. Presidential and CSRA Scholars may                Paine College Honors Program Council.
also receive the full amount of monetary support
for study abroad opportunities. All other            PAINE COLLEGE HONORS PROGRAM
scholarships designed to support students’ room,     CURRICULUM
board and/or tuition will reduce the amount of
the Presidential and CSRA scholarship by 75%         The programmatic part of the Paine College
of the amount of the additional scholarship. The     Honors Program will focus on faculty working
student may receive 25% of the supplemental          with small groups of dedicated and
scholarship as a refund.                             accomplished students; an emphasis on
                                                     independent learning; students entering into
Paine College Honors Program Structure               dialogue with peers, teachers, and facilitators; a
                                                     demanding program of study in major and
       The Director of the Paine College             minor fields; and engagement in external
       Honors Programs reports to the Provost        experiential learning activities.
       and Vice President of Academic Affairs.
       Paine College Honors Program will             The honors program is built on the idea of
       include an Honors Council consisting of       didactic engagement between faculty, students,
       Honor Program students and faculty.           researchers, and experts in a variety of
       The Honors Council will also include          disciplines.    Value    is    given    to    the
       representatives from all academic             interdisciplinary discovery of ideas and notions.
       divisions of the College.                     Features of the honors program are special
       Faculty members who are selected to           seminars on topics developed collaboratively
       teach in the Paine Colleges Honors            between faculty and students. These seminars
       Program will have a demonstrated track        are designed to capture the voices, research
       record of scholarship, be committed to        interests, and experiences of students as well as
       interdisciplinary      research      and      faculty members and facilitators. During
       instruction, and will be active members       seminars students’ hold the responsibility for
       in the development and review of the          beginning a discussion with a paper or
       Paine      College     Honors    college      presentation, engage in speaking and writing
       curriculum. Honors College faculty will       within an across disciplines, and sharing
       also include students in their research,      research results. Seminar participants have the
       support students in applying for              responsibility of engagement and critique.
Paine College
Paine College                                  Academic Regulations                                  Page 60
                                                                                                     Page 59
                                                              Students must have the permission of the
In the honors program the dialectic of learning               Honors Program Director and the respective
and teaching resolves itself into an exchange of              faculty person in order to register for an Honors
ideas where everyone learns, and the authority                course.
of teaching floats naturally from on authorized
and enabled voice to another.                                 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The curriculum for the Paine College Honors                   Honors Program students must complete
Program will be at least 20% of a student’s                   twenty-four (24) hours of honors courses with a
undergraduate course work. Scholars will take                 grade of “C” or better, and possess a cumulative
at least 24 credit hours of honor program                     grade point average of 3.3 and a cumulative
courses. All Honors Program courses fulfill                   average of 3.0 in Honors program courses.
common curriculum requirements or serve as                    Students meeting these criteria will graduate
general electives. In addition to courses, Paine              from Paine College with special recognition for
College Honors Scholars will also engage in                   academic honors at commencement exercises
research germane to their respective discipline.              and will be listed as Honors Program graduates
                                                              on their transcripts.
Courses                                          Hours
ENG 101H Composition....................................3     ALPHA KAPPA MU HONOR SOCIETY
ENG 102H Composition ...................................3
HIS 104H African American History ................3           Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society is a national
MAT 126H Precalculus .....................................3   general scholarship honor society open to junior
BIO 111H Principles of Biology I .....................4       and senior men and women in all academic
BIO 112H Principles of Biology II....................4        areas.    An undergraduate student shall be
SOC 201H Introduction to Sociology................3           eligible to be elected as a collegiate member if
PSY 201H Introduction to Psychology..............3            the individual:
HOP 300H Junior Colloquium...........................3
HOP 400H Senior Colloquium ..........................3           is registered as full time and is in good
                                                                 standing with the Institution;
The Paine College Honors Program will occupy
the upper level of the Yerby House on the                        is at least a junior in a degree program and
campus of Paine College where a library,                         has completed 50 percent of the course
lounge, reading rooms, and personal computers                    requirements for graduation;
will be made available for independent study,
group study areas as well as small group                         has a minimum grade point average of 3.3;
lectures or discussions.                                         is ranked in the upper 10% if the class;
The Paine College Honors Program is reviewed
                                                                 exemplifies good character; and
in accord with policies and procedures outlined
in the Paine College Planning and Evaluation
                                                                 exhibits the potential for leadership and
Guidelines and Procedures Manual (2009).
                                                                 service.
PARTICIPATION IN HONORS COURSES
                                                              ASSESSMENT, PLACEMENT AND
BY NON-HONORS PROGRAM
                                                              ENHANCEMENT
STUDENTS
                                                              New freshman students are required to
Students who are not in the Honors Program but
                                                              participate in ALL assessment activities during
are motivated to engage in the rigor associated
                                                              June or prior to completing the registration
with honors courses may take an honors course.
                                                              process in the first semester of their
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                                                                                            College
matriculation. Transfer students may also need           develop in the student a sense of confidence
to participate in assessment as determined by            in his or her ability to succeed in college.
the evaluation of a student’s transcript. The
assessment is of basic skills in English (writing     ENHANCEMENT COURSES
sample), reading and mathematics. The purpose
of these tests is to determine the appropriate        Enhancement courses are designed to prepare
level of courses in which a student is to initially   students for success in the regular college
enroll in order to enhance his/her chances of         courses. There are no units of credit awarded
academic success.                                     following the completion of enhancement
                                                      courses. Enrollment in enhancement courses
On the basis of the test results, students may be     does satisfy the credit hour requirements for
assigned to take enhancement courses (pre-            financial aid.
college level) in writing, reading and
mathematics. When required, students must             Each enhancement course shall offer five
satisfactorily complete these courses before          semester hours of institutional credit.
advancing to most other courses.                      Institutional credit does not apply to the
                                                      requirements for a degree program or to any
Paine College reserves the right to terminate         other requirement including the minimum of
the enrollment of students if their placement         124 semester credit hours required in order to
examination performance suggests that the             graduate. (see major requirements)
College is unable to service their identified
learning needs. Students in this category will        Students may take each enhancement course
be appropriately counseled by officials of the        twice. Pending a review of the student’s
college and every effort will be made to assist       academic performance and attendance by the
them in locating an educational institution           Vice President of Academic Affairs, the student
more suitable to their educational needs and          may be offered a third opportunity to enroll in a
performance level.                                    098 or 099 course during the summer term in
                                                      order to satisfy a deficient enhancement
ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM                                   requirement. This opportunity is only valid for
                                                      the summer term.         If a grade of "S"
The Enhancement Program is designed to offer          (satisfactory) is not earned after the third
students who need to improve basic skills an          attempt, the student is dismissed from the
opportunity to become proficient in reading,          College.      (Also see Grading System for
writing, and mathematics in order to succeed in       Enhancement Courses.)
college work.
                                                      READING
The goals of the Enhancement Program are to:
                                                      The goals of Reading Enhancement courses are
   develop in the student a responsibility for        to:
   his or her academic performance;
                                                         increase the vocabulary and comprehension
   develop in the student a sense of the                 level of the student;
   importance of academic skills in both
   college and post-college life;                        prepare students for academic work in their
                                                         college careers;
   provide opportunities for the student to
   improve reading, writing, and mathematics             apply an appropriate reading rate to different
   performance skills;                                   materials; and
Paine College
Paine College                         Academic Regulations                                 Page 62
                                                                                           Page 61
   develop critical thinking techniques.          enhancement course, the students must pass a
                                                  comprehensive final examination to successfully
Admission to the reading enhancement course is    complete the course. Students must meet the
determined on the basis of the placement test.    required standard score on the post-test in
The student must pass both the classwork and      order to exit the course.
the standardized post-test to successfully
complete the course. Students must meet the       ADVANCED PLACEMENT
required standard score on the post-test in
order to exit the course.                         Students who enter the College with advanced
                                                  placement credits earned while in high school
WRITING                                           may receive college credit if they present scores
                                                  of at least “3” on the tests that are taken
The goals of the Writing Enhancement course       following the completion of the courses.
are to:                                           Additional    details    regarding      advanced
                                                  placement may be obtained by contacting the
   lead students to a proficiency in written      Registrar.
   standard English;
   master mechanics of written standard           SPECIAL STUDIES
   English; and
                                                  Students may earn up to 15 hours of academic
   prepare students for entry to English 101      credit for work and/or programs through
   and other college courses.                     organizations which may not normally grant
                                                  undergraduate credits (credits may or may not
Admission to the writing enhancement course is    be used to satisfy degree requirements pending
determined on the basis of the placement test.    acceptance by program faculty and the
Students must pass both the class work and the    suitability of the course).
mandatory exit examination in writing to
successfully complete the course. Students        1. Special Studies may account for a maximum
must meet the required standard score on the         of 15 semester hours.
post-test in order to exit the course.
                                                  2. There are no grades or quality points
                                                     awarded for Special Studies.
MATHEMATICS
                                                  3. Special Studies will normally be counted as
The goals of Mathematics Enhancement courses         elective hours, except that the student’s
are to:                                              major division, with the approval of the Vice
                                                     President of Academic Affairs, may waive
   bring students to a proficiency level in          required courses if it is felt that the student’s
   mathematics;                                      Special Studies make the course in question
                                                     unnecessary.
   master the concepts and applications of
   basic mathematics; and                         4. A student considering engaging in Special
                                                     Studies should prepare a proposal which
                                                     should include:
   prepare students for entry to college level
   mathematics courses.
                                                     a. a full description of the program;
Admission to a mathematics enhancement
course is determined on the basis of the
placement test. At the end of each mathematics
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                                                                                             College
   b. an explanation of personal, scholarly, or          their work. This latter report may be
      professional benefits the student expects          prepared by the faculty liaison person only if
      to realize from Special Studies;                   the nature of the study makes him or her the
                                                         most knowledgeable outside observer. One
   c. a statement from the Chair of his or her           copy of each of these reports should be filed
      major division which:                              in the offices of the Vice President of
                                                         Academic Affairs, the Registrar, and the
       •   attests that the faculty in the division      faculty liaison person.
           support the program,
                                                      9. The Academic Council, in consultation with
       •   names a member of the faculty who             the faculty liaison person, will decide if the
           will serve as the student’s liaison           student has successfully completed his or
           with the College,                             her Special Studies. No credit will be
                                                         recorded until a decision has been made.
       •   recommends the number of credit
           hours to be granted for the program;       CONFERENCE COURSE
           and
                                                      A Conference Course is one in which a student
   d. an estimate of costs and income covering        may be allowed to enroll individually, due to
      the period of the program, together with        some exceptional circumstance, in a semester in
      an estimate of financial aid needed, if         which the course is not being offered. Failure to
      any.                                            follow the advisement guidelines or failure to
                                                      enroll due to failure to meet prerequisites due to
5. The student’s Special Studies proposal             having failed a course is not considered an
   should be submitted to the Vice President of       exceptional circumstance.
   Academic Affairs for transmittal to the
   Academic Council. This body will approve           CONFERENCE COURSE GUIDELINES
   or disapprove the program and determine the
   number of credit hours to be awarded.              1. The student has senior status, with a
                                                         minimum 2.5 GPA, and the course is needed
6. No student may undertake a program of                 for graduation.
   Special Studies until he or she has earned at
   least 30 semester hours, with a grade point        2. The student is not currently enrolled in
   average of at least 2.5.                              another type of Independent Study course
                                                         and will not exceed the total credit hours
7. During the period of Special Studies, a               allowed for independent study and
   student must be registered for at least 12            conference courses after completing this
   semester hours. He or she will be carried on          course (9 overall and 6 in the major).
   the College roster as a full-time student
   regardless of whether the student is in            3. The student has not previously taken the
   residence at the College.                             course.

8. Upon completion of Special Studies, a              4. A faculty member agrees to assume the
   student shall submit a detailed report of his         responsibility of directing the course as a
   or her accomplishments and personal                   Conference Course for a qualifying student
   evaluation of the experience. In addition,            due to an exceptional circumstance. The
   students shall be responsible for seeing to it        faculty member is also responsible for
   that an evaluative report is submitted by             ensuring the proper enrollment of the
   someone who was associated with them in               student.
Paine College
Paine College                           Academic Regulations                                 Page 64
                                                                                             Page 63
                                                     INTERNSHIP
A signed copy of the course syllabus must be
submitted with the request for a Conference          An Internship is an assignment in which a
Course.                                              student will work under supervision in a
                                                     professional environment.      The assignment
INDEPENDENT STUDY SPECIAL                            duties and responsibilities MUST be related to
PROJECT                                              the academic major. It provides an opportunity
                                                     for students to apply theory to a specific work
Independent Study is a special project which         assignment.
allows students to explore in depth an area not a
part of the regular curriculum offerings. The        INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES
special project should be designed to enrich and
broaden learning experiences of students             The specific guidelines governing internships
through independent research. The request for        are established by the respective program
the Independent Study must be approved by the        subject to review by the Curriculum Committee
faculty person directing the project, the Division   and approved by the Vice President of
Chair, and the Vice President of Academic            Academic Affairs. Students should obtain the
Affairs prior to the last day to register. A         syllabus, internship guidelines, etc. from the
contract describing the project, outlining the       program area in charge of the internship.
learning objectives and methods of evaluation        The placement of students, the assignment of
must accompany the request.                          supervisors and monitoring and evaluation are
                                                     the responsibility of the program.
INDEPENDENT STUDY SPECIAL
PROJECT GUIDELINES                                   Internships outside of the Paine College
                                                     community (area) may or may not be allowed
1. A faculty member may agree to direct an           and internships outside the Paine College area
   Independent Study or Special Project for a        may result in an additional charge to the student.
   student who has a minimum grade point
   average (GPA) of 3.0.                             COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM

2. Students requesting to complete an                The Cooperative Education Program is available
   Independent Study Special Project should          to all qualified Paine College students. This
   have a classification of junior or senior.        program allows a student who has completed
                                                     two semesters of study as a freshman, or one
3. The Independent Study or Special Project          semester as a transfer student above the
   should be one designed to enhance learning.       freshman level, to alternate a semester (or two
                                                     semesters) of paid employment in his or her
4. A maximum of 3 credit hours per semester          major field of concentration with a similar
   can be earned; credit hours should be based       period of study until the senior level (a
   on hours needed to complete the project but       minimum of three work periods). Thus, the
   should be a minimum of 135 clock hours per        student is able to integrate classroom work with
   three semester course.                            practical on-the-job experience while studying
5. The maximum number of credits that can be         for the undergraduate degree. It should be noted
   earned in the combined categories of              that students who enter the program as
   conference courses and independent study is       sophomores, do not graduate in the normal
   9 credits total.                                  period of four years because of the requirements
                                                     of alternating work and study periods.
                                                     A student may, upon application and approval,
                                                     receive academic credit for the co-op
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                                                                                          College
experience. All co-op students (credit and non-
credit) must register and pay the appropriate       To receive financial aid, a student must be
fees prior to beginning the assignment.             enrolled in a minimum of six (6) semester credit
                                                    hours for the six week summer term.
Upon graduation and after completing the
prescribed co-op period, the student, in addition   Only students who are enrolled in laboratory
to having attained the degree, also has             science courses may be permitted to take 13
accumulated 15 or more months of experience         semester hours when approved by the faculty
in his/her area of professional interest. In some   advisor and the Vice President of Academic
cases, seniority, retirement and fringe benefits    Affairs. Such permission will be granted only
have been gained as well.                           in special cases.

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES                              ATTENDANCE POLICY FOR SUMMER
                                                    SCHOOL
Students taking courses by correspondence must
get the permission of the appropriate Division      Students must attend all classes during the
Chair and the Vice President of Academic            summer term due to the compact nature of the
Affairs. Courses must be taken from regionally      classes. Consistent with the overall attendance
accredited institutions recognized by national      policy, students should understand that missing
accrediting agencies, such as the American          a day of classes equates to missing more than
Association of Collegiate Registrars and            one “50 minute” class period and, thus, the
Admissions Officers (AACRAO), the American          lengthy class sessions will not allow for
Council on Education, The United States Office      absenteeism.
of Education, and the Georgia State Department
of Education. Examinations must be taken            INTERIM SESSION
under the supervision of a Paine College
academic division representative.                   Courses are offered during the month of
                                                    December referred to as interim courses. A
Work by correspondence may not exceed 6             student is allowed to enroll in a maximum of
credit hours and grades below “C” will not be       three credits. These courses may be taken as
accepted. These courses are usually not             regular courses or online. Practicum, internship,
acceptable in the major. (See Division Chair)       conference courses, independent study and other
                                                    similar arrangements are not permitted
SUMMER SESSION                                      enrollments during the Interim Session. All
                                                    interim courses meet the same content
Paine College offers a Summer Session of 6          requirements as all other courses offered at the
weeks. Students enrolling in summer school          College met through the use of the extended
may take a maximum of 12 credit hours if the        meeting period format.
schedule of classes allows such.
                                      ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
                                      ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

THE CURRICULUM                                             A student may major in one of the following
THE CURRICULUM                                             A student may major in one of the following
                                                           areas:
The curriculum of the College is designed to               areas:
provide opportunities College is intellectual,
The curriculum of the for sound designed to                    Accounting
moral, opportunities
provide social, physicalfor sound intellectual,
                             and spiritual growth              Accounting
                                                               Biology/Pre-Professional Science
moral, Christian physical andIt spiritualdesigned
under social, influences.          is also growth              Biology/Pre-Professional Science
                                                               Biology/Secondary Education
under Christian influences. It is also designed
to meet the needs of the individual student and                Biology/Secondary Education
                                                               Chemistry
   meet       needs in acquiring scholarly habits
to assist the studentof the individual student and             Chemistry
                                                               Chemistry/Environmental Sciences
of work the study; in acquiring scholarly habits
to assist and studentto cultivate cultural qualities;          Chemistry/Environmental Sciences
                                                               Early Childhood Education
to develop leadership potential; to qualities;
of work and study; to cultivate culturalserve the              Early Childhood Education
                                                               English
to develop creatively inpotential;and to develop
community leadership attitude; to serve the                    English
                                                               English/Secondary Education




                                                                                                              ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
community creatively in attitude; and to develop
initiative, self-expression, self-confidence, and
                                                               English/Secondary Education
                                                               History




                                                                                                               ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
initiative, self-expression, self-confidence, and
creative thinking.
                                                               History
                                                               History/Secondary Education
creative thinking.
To achieve these ends, the curriculum is planned               History/Secondary Education
                                                               International Business
Toprovide athese ends,program of its offerings in
to achieve balanced the curriculum is planned                  International Business
                                                               Management
the areas a language, literature, and fine arts;
to provideof balanced program of its offerings in              Management Information Systems
the areas sciences andliterature, and finesocial
natural of language,         mathematics;       arts;          Management Information Systems
                                                               Marketing
natural sciences and philosophy. Professional
sciences; religion and mathematics; social                     Marketing
                                                               Mass Communications/Broadcasting, Drama,
sciences; religion and philosophy. Professional
offerings in business administration and                       Mass Communications/Broadcasting, Drama,
                                                               Journalism, and Public Relations
offerings (earlybusiness administrationgrades
education in       childhood and middle          and           Journalism, and Public Relations
                                                               Mathematics
education; and childhood and middle grades
education (earlyareas of concentration on the                  Mathematics
                                                               Mathematics/Computer Sciences
education; education levelconcentrationEnglish,
secondary and areas of in biology, on the                      Mathematics/Computer Sciences
                                                               Mathematics/Secondary Education
history and mathematics) are biology, English,
secondary education level inalso available.                    Mathematics/Secondary Education
                                                               Middle Grades Education
history and mathematics) are also available.                   Middle Grades Education
                                                               Philosophy and Religion
Lower level courses consist of 100 and 200                     Philosophy and Religion Counseling, and
                                                               Psychology/Experimental,
Lower level courses division courses consist of
level courses. Upper consist of 100 and 200                    Psychology/Experimental, Counseling, and
                                                               General
300 courses. Upper division courses consist of
leveland 400 level courses.                                    General
                                                               Sociology/Criminology, Social Psychology,
300 and 400 level courses.                                     Sociology/Criminology, Social Psychology,
                                                               and General
MAJOR PROGRAMS                                                 and General
MAJOR PROGRAMS                                             DECLARATION OF A MAJOR
A major is a sequence of specialized and related           DECLARATION OF A MAJOR
A majorthat allow students to focus their studies
courses is a sequence of specialized and related           At the beginning of the first semester of the
courses that allow students to focus theirastudies
on an area of interest in preparation for career           sophomore year, a of the must declare of the
                                                           At the beginning student first semesterthe area
on entrance of interest in preparation for a career
or an area into graduate or professional school.           sophomore year, a student must declare the area
                                                           in which he or she expects to major by
or entrance into graduate or professional school.          completing the Declaration of to Form in
                                                           in which he or she expectsMajormajor by
EMPHASIS WITHIN MAJOR PROGRAMS                                                          of later Form in
                                                           completing the DeclarationNot Major than the
                                                           the Registrar’s Office.
EMPHASIS WITHIN MAJOR PROGRAMS                             the Registrar’s Office.the Not later than the
                                                           registration period for     second semester of
In order to sharpen the competencies and skills            registration period for the or she semester of
                                                           the sophomore year, he second must have
In order to sharpen the competencies and skills
of students within majors, special academic                the sophomore the chair of the Division in
                                                           consulted with year, he or she must have
programs, within emphasis, are arranged.
of studentscalled an majors, special academic              which this major is chair of the Division in
                                                           consulted with the to be taken. At that time,
programs, called an emphasis, are arranged.
Details are provided as part of departmental               which this major is to bewill assign the student
                                                           the Division Chairperson taken. At that time,
Details are provided as part of departmental
program descriptions.                                      an Division Chairperson the assign the for the
                                                           the advisor who will be will counselor student
program descriptions.                                      an advisor who will be the counselor for her
                                                           student throughout the remainder of his or the
                                                                                        The of his
                                                           student throughout the remainder studentormay
                                                           undergraduate training.                      her
                                                        66 undergraduate training.
                                                        66                              The student may
                                                        66
                                                        65
                                                        66
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Page 66                                  Academic Programs                           Paine College
                                                                                     Paine College
however, request a change of advisor. The            3. return the form to the Registrar’s Office.
student may also change his or her major by
following the Change of Major procedures.            MINORS

CHANGE OF MAJOR                                      Minor programs are not required but are
                                                     available in art, economics, English, French,
In order to change a major, the student must:        biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics,
                                                     environmental sciences, history, psychology,
1. obtain the “change of major” form from the        sociology and Spanish. A minor consists of at
   Registrar’s Office;                               least eighteen hours in a field. Precise courses
                                                     and hours are prescribed, and students must take
2. obtain the signature of the officials indicated   these prescribed courses, consisting primarily of
   on the form; and                                  upper division courses.
                     DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
                     DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
                                    MAJORS
                                            ACCOUNTING
                                               MAJORS
                                     INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS




                                                                                                          DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
                                            ACCOUNTING
                                           MANAGEMENT
                                     INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
                            MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS




                                                                                                            DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
                                           MANAGEMENT
                                             MARKETING
                            MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
                                             MARKETING
MISSION                                                 accounting,        international      business,
                                                        management, management information
The Division of Business Administration is
MISSION                                                                    international
                                                        accounting, marketing;
                                                        systems, and                          business,
committed to the Mission of Paine College and           management, management information
is further committed to establish, promote, is
The Division of Business Administrationand           2. systems, and marketing; for students to
                                                        provide an opportunity
recognize to the Mission of Paine College and
committed educational practices that contribute         concentrate in an area of business
to the continuous to establish, of business
is further committed improvement promote, and                                         for liberal to
                                                     2. provide an opportunitysound students arts
                                                        administration with a
related programs that practices that contribute
recognize educationaladhere to the teaching and         concentrate in an area of business
                                                        background;
to the continuousofimprovement of business
learning practices     excellence established by        administration with a sound liberal arts
                               The teaching of
related programs that adhere to the Division and
accreditation standards.                                background;
                                                     3. prepare students for leadership positions in
learning practices of excellence established the
Business Administration is accredited by by             government, entrepreneurship, industry, and
                               The Schools of
accreditationof standards. Business Division and
Association Collegiate                               3. prepare students for leadership positions in
                                                        the community;
Business (ACBSP).
Programs Administration is accredited by the            government, entrepreneurship, industry, and
Association of Collegiate Business Schools and       4. the community; students are aware of
                                                        ensure that
Programs (ACBSP).
The Division of Business Administration offers          opportunities for professional certification in
a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in business           business that students are aware
                                                     4. ensure administration major programs; of
The Division of Business Administration offers
administration (BSA) with a core in business            opportunities for professional certification in
administration and (BS)           in in business
a Bachelor of Science majorsdegree accounting,       5. business administration major programs;
                                                        further students’ interest in and prepare them
administration (BSA) with a core in business
international       business,        management,        for graduate study;
administration and majors in oraccounting,
management information systems, marketing.           5. further students’ interest in and prepare them
international       business,        management,        for graduate study;
                                                     6. offer theoretical knowledge and practical
In addition, the Division systems, or marketing.
management informationoffers a combination of           experience through a program of
courses in accounting and management                 6. offer theoretical knowledge and practical
                                                        cooperative education and internships; and
In addition, the Division offers a combination of
information systems that a student can take after       experience through a program of
courses in accounting and management
receiving the BS degree with a major in                 cooperative education practical training
                                                     7. provide education andand internships; and in
information systemscoursesstudent can take after
accounting. These that a prepare students to            the use of computer technology in Business
receivingAmerican Institute of Certified Public
take the the BS degree with a major in               7. provide education and practical training in
                                                        Administration.
accounting. These coursesby the Georgia State
Accountants Exam given prepare students to              the use of computer technology in Business
take the American Institute of Certified Public
Board of Accountancy.                                   Administration.
                                                     COMMON CURRICULUM
Accountants Exam given by the Georgia State          REQUIREMENTS
Board of Accountancy.
GOALS                                                COMMON CURRICULUM
                                                     All students must complete 56 hours of
                                                     REQUIREMENTS courses. In the Common
                                                     Common Curriculum
The goals of the Division of Business
GOALS                                                All students must complete
                                                     Curriculum Mathematics 127 is56 hours of
                                                                                          the required
Administration are to:                               Common Curriculum courses. In the
                                                     mathematics course for BSA majors. Common
The goals of the Division of Business
                                                     Curriculum Mathematics 127 is the required
Administration are to:
1. provide quality instruction in the field of       mathematics course for BSA majors.
    business administration with majors in
1. provide quality instruction in the field of
                                                  68
    business administration with majors in 68
                                                  68
                                                  67
                                                  68
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                                                                                                  College
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS                             These courses are highlighted in the respective
                                                    majors on the suggested course sequence pages.
Consistent with Paine College’s graduation
requirements, students completing a major           Business Administration Core Courses
within the Division of Business Administration
must have a cumulative grade point average          For All Majors....................................42 Hours
(GPA) of 2.0 in all courses taken at the College    BSA 200 Survey of Business.............................3
and 2.50 (or better) grade point average (GPA)      BSA 201 Introduction to International Bus .......3
for business administration major core and          BSA 204 Accounting I.......................................3
major area courses. The courses used to             BSA 205 Accounting II .....................................3
calculate the GPA in the major are specified for    BSA 230 Business Systems Applications..........3
each of the major programs on program               BSA 231 Macroeconomic Principles.................3
advisement sheets and in this Catalog on the        BSA 232 Microeconomic Principles .................3
suggested course sequence pages.                    BSA 241 Principles of Finance..........................3
                                                    BSA 301 Principles of Management..................3
In general, all majors in the five programs in      BSA 306 Business Law I ...................................3
Business Administration calculate this GPA on       BSA 330 Statistics for Business Planning .........3
21 courses or 63 semester credit hours.             BSA 331 Quantitative Methods for Business ....3
Students are also required to have a grade of       BSA 341 Principles of Marketing......................3
“C” or better in the designated courses of the      BSA 489 Management Problems, Policies
BSA core and major area requirements. An                     and Planning.......................................3
overall cumulative GPA (all courses taken) of
2.00 is required for graduation.                    Major Area Courses

                                                    Accounting ..........................................21 Hours
MAJOR FIELD REQUIREMENTS IN
                                                    BSA 304 Intermediate Accounting I..................3
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
                                                    BSA 305 Intermediate Accounting II ................3
                                                    BSA 310 Managerial and Cost Accounting.......3
All business administration majors must take the
                                                    BSA 414 Management Information Systems ....3
core courses in business administration and then
                                                    BSA     Accounting Electives .........................9
select one of five majors: accounting,
                                                    (Select from BSA 345, 423, 430, 431, 443, or 444)
international      business,       management,
management information systems, or marketing.
                                                    International Business .......................21 Hours
                                                    BSA 320 Theory of Int’l Trade and Invest ........3
In addition, all juniors are required to take the
                                                    BSA 343 International Marketing......................3
Junior Exit Exam during the first semester of
                                                    BSA 414 Management Information Systems ....3
their junior year. Graduating seniors must take
                                                    BSA 420 Int’l Financial Management ...............3
the appropriate major field test from
                                                    BSA      International Business Electives ........9
Educational Testing Services (ETS) to be            (Select from BSA 321, 350, 400, 444, or 450)
administered by the Paine College Division of
Business Administration. A fee is applicable to     Management .......................................21 Hours
the major field test. This cost is to be            BSA 310 Managerial and Cost Accounting or
determined.                                         BSA 345 Entrepreneurial Accounting ...............3
                                                    BSA 380 Organizational Behavior ....................3
Students in the Division of Business                BSA 414 Management Information Systems ....3
Administration must satisfactorily complete the     BSA 480 Production Management ....................3
Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English        BSA     Management Electives .......................9
(SPEE) before they are allowed to enroll in         (Select from BSA 307, 332, 342, 370, or 451)
certain upper level division major courses.
Paine College
Paine College                                  Business Administration                                        Page 70
                                                                                                              Page 69
Management Information Systems ..21 Hours                       BSA 442 Marketing Research ...........................3
BSA 226 COBOL Programming .......................3              BSA        Marketing Electives ..........................9
BSA 228 Computer Programming Language ....3                     (Select from BSA 346,347,372,373,441)
BSA 422 Data Communication .........................3
BSA 440 Data Base Management......................3             Note: BSA 460 and 470 courses may be used as
BSA     MIS Electives .....................................9    electives when approved for a major field
(Select from BSA 328, 344, 415; CSC 250)                        Business Administration Electives......3 Hours
                                                                BSA       Select from any major area
Marketing ...........................................21 Hours
BSA 343 International Marketing......................3
BSA 371 Consumer Behavior............................3
BSA 414 Management Information Systems ....3
Paine 70
Page College                               Business Administration                                    Paine Page 71
                                                                                                            College
                                     SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE
                                         ACCOUNTING MAJOR

                                                 FRESHMAN YEAR
                          Fall Semester              CR                               Spring Semester          CR
ART      120    Art Appreciation or                     ENG 102             Composition II                      3
MUS      120    Music Appreciation                    3 FRE 221             Elementary French II or
EDU      101    Preparing for Excellence              1 SPA 221             Elementary Spanish II               3
ENG      101    Composition I                         3 HIS 104             African American History            3
FRE      220    Elementary French I or                  MAT 127             Calculus w/Business Applications    3
SPA      220    Elementary Spanish I                  3 PED 120             Fund and Tech Activities I          1
HIS      103    Survey of U.S. History                3 PSY 201             Intro to Psychology or
CSC      100    Computer Appl. and Prog.              3 SOC 201             Intro to Sociology                  3
                                                     16                                                        16

                                               SOPHOMORE YEAR
                        Fall Semester              CR                                Spring Semester           CR
BSA      200* Survey of Business                    3 BIO 102               Biological Science                  4
BSA      204* Accounting I                          3 BSA 205*              Accounting II                       3
HIS      112 World History                          3 ENG 232               Introduction to Literature          3
PHI      220 Values and Society                     2 PHI 230               Problems of Philosophy              3
PHS      101 Physical Science                       4 REL 231               Religions of the World              2
REL      230 Essentials of Christian Faith          2 PED 121               Fund and Tech Activities II         1
                                                   17                                                          16


                                                   JUNIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester            CR                               Spring Semester          CR
BSA      201*   Intro. to International Business       3 BSA 232*           Microeconomics                      3
BSA      230*   Business System Applications           3 BSA 301*           Principles of Management+           3
BSA      231*   Macroeconomics                         3 BSA 305*           Intermediate Accounting II+         3
BSA      241*   Principles of Finance                 3 BSA 330*            Statistics for Bus. Planning        3
BSA      304*   Intermediate Accounting I              3 BSA *              Accounting Elective                 3
                                                      15                                                       15

                                                   SENIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester             CR                              Spring Semester           CR
BSA      331*   Quant. Methods for Business+           3 BSA 306*           Business Law I                      3
BSA      341*   Principles of Marketing                3 BSA 489*           Mgt Problems, Policies, and Plng    3
BSA      310*   Managerial and Cost Acctg              3 BSA *              Accounting Elective                 3
BSA      414*   Management Info. Systems              3 BSA *               Accounting Elective                 3
                General Elective                      3 BSA *               Elective                            3
                                                      15                                                       15

                                             Total Credit Hours: 125

A grade of C or better is required in all major courses.
*Indicates courses used to calculate the 2.5 major field GPA
+Students must pass the sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
Paine College
Paine College                              Business Administration                                             Page 72
                                                                                                               Page 71
                                    SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE
                                   INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MAJOR

                                                  FRESHMAN YEAR
                          Fall Semester               CR                              Spring Semester             CR
ART      120    Art Appreciation or                      ENG 102            Composition II                         3
MUS      120    Music Appreciation                     3 FRE 221            Elementary French II or
EDU      101    Preparing for Excellence               1 SPA 221            Elementary Spanish II                  3
ENG      101    Composition I                          3 HIS 104            African American History               3
FRE      220    Elementary French I or                   MAT 127            Calculus w/Business Applications       3
SPA      220    Elementary Spanish I                   3 PED 120            Fund and Tech Activities I             1
HIS      103    Survey of U.S. History                 3 PSY 201            Intro to Psychology or
CSC      100    Computer Appl. and Prog.               3 SOC 201            Intro to Sociology                     3
                                                      16                                                          16

                                               SOPHOMORE YEAR
                        Fall Semester              CR                                 Spring Semester             CR
BSA      200* Survey of Business                    3 BIO 102               Biological Science                     4
ENG      232 Introduction to Literature             3 BSA 201*              Intro to International Business        3
HIS      112 World History                          3 BSA 232*              Microeconomic Principles               3
PHI      220 Values and Society                     2 PHI 230               Problems of Philosophy                 3
PHS      101 Physical Science                       4 REL 231               Religions of the World                 2
REL      230 Essentials of Christian Faith          2 PED 121               Fund and Tech Activities II            1
                                                   17                                                             16


                                                  JUNIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester            CR                                Spring Semester             CR
BSA      204*   Accounting I                          3 BSA 205*            Accounting II                          3
BSA      230*   Business System Applications          3 BSA 241*            Principles of Finance                  3
BSA      231*   Macroeconomic Principles              3 BSA 330*            Statistics for Business Planning       3
BSA      320*   Theory of Int’l Trade and Invest.+    3 BSA 343*            International Marketing                3
BSA      341*   Principles of Marketing               3 BSA *               International Business Elective        3
                                                     15                                                           15

                                                   SENIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester             CR                              Spring Semester              CR
BSA      301*   Principles of Management +            3 BSA 306*            Business Law I                         3
BSA      331*   Quant. Meth. for Business+             3 BSA 489*           Mgt Problems, Policies, and Plng       3
BSA      414*   Management Info. Systems              3 BSA *               International Business Elective        3
BSA      420*   Int’l Financial Management            3 BSA *               Elective                               3
BSA      *      International Business Elective        3                    General Elective                       3
                                                      15                                                          15

                                             Total Credit Hours: 125

A grade of C or better is required in all major courses.
*Indicates courses used to calculate the 2.5 major field GPA
+Students must pass the sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
Paine 72
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                                                                                                            College
                                     SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE
                                        MANAGEMENT MAJOR

                                                   FRESHMAN YEAR
                          Fall Semester               CR                              Spring Semester          CR
ART      120    Art Appreciation or                       ENG 102           Composition II                      3
MUS      120    Music Appreciation                      3 FRE 221           Elementary French II or
EDU      101    Preparing for Excellence                1 SPA 221           Elementary Spanish II               3
ENG      101    Composition I                          3 HIS 104            African American History            3
FRE      220    Elementary French I or                    MAT 127           Calculus w/Business Applications    3
SPA      220    Elementary Spanish I                    3 PSY 201           Intro to Psychology or
HIS      103    Survey of U. S. History                 3 SOC 201           Intro to Sociology                 3
CSC      100    Computer Appl. and Prog.                3 REL 230           Essentials Christian Faith          2
PED      120    Fund & Tech Activities I               1                                                       17
                                                       17

                                               SOPHOMORE YEAR
                        Fall Semester              CR                                Spring Semester           CR
BSA      200* Survey of Business                    3 BIO 102               Biological Science                  4
HIS      112 World History                          3 BSA 204*              Accounting I                        3
PHI      220 Values and Society                     2 BSA 301*              Principles of Management            3
PHS      101 Physical Science                       4 PHI 230               Problems of Philosophy              3
ENG      232 Intro to Literature                    3 REL 231               Religions of World                  2
                                                   15 PED 121               Fund. & Tech. Activities II         1
                                                                                                               16

                                                    JUNIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester             CR                            Spring Semester            CR
BSA      201*   Intro. to International Business       3 BSA 231*           Macroeconomics Principles           3
BSA      205*   Accounting II                          3 BSA 232*           Microeconomics                      3
BSA      230*   Business System Applications           3 BSA 310*           Managerial & Cost Acc.+ Or
BSA      330*   Statistics for Bus. Planning           3 BSA 345*           Entrepreneurial Acc.+              3
                General Elective                       3 BSA 331*           Quant. Methods for Business+        3
                                                      15 BSA *              Management Elective                 3
                                                                                                               15

                                                    SENIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester              CR                            Spring Semester            CR
BSA      241*   Principles of Finance                  3 BSA 306*           Business Law I                      3
BSA      341*   Principles of Marketing                3 BSA 414*           Management Info. Systems            3
BSA      380*   Organizational Behavior+               3 BSA 489*           Mgt Problems, Policies, and Plng    3
BSA      480*   Production Management                  3 BSA *              Management Elective                 3
BSA      *      Management Elective                    3                    General Elective                    3
                                                      15                                                       15

                                             Total Credit Hours: 125

A grade of C or better is required in all major courses.
*Indicates courses used to calculate the 2.5 major field GPA
+Students must pass the sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
Paine College
Paine College                              Business Administration                                           Page 74
                                                                                                             Page 73
                            SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE
                     MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIS) MAJOR

                                                 FRESHMAN YEAR
                          Fall Semester             CR                                Spring Semester           CR
ART      120    Art Appreciation or                     ENG 102             Composition II                       3
MUS      120    Music Appreciation                    3 FRE 221             Elementary French II or
EDU      101    Preparing for Excellence              1 SPA 221             Elementary Spanish II                3
ENG      101    Composition I                        3 HIS 104              African American History             3
FRE      220    Elementary French I or                  MAT 127             Calculus w/Business Appl.            3
SPA      220    Elementary Spanish I                  3 PED 120             Fund and Tech Act.                   1
HIS      103    Survey of U.S. History                3 PSY 201             Intro to Psychology or
CSC      100    Computer Appl. and Prog.              3 SOC 201             Intro to Sociology                   3
                                                     16                                                         16

                                                SOPHOMORE YEAR
                        Fall Semester               CR                              Spring Semester             CR
BSA      200* Survey of Business                     3 BIO 102              Biological Science                   4
ENG      232 Intro to Literature                     3 BSA 204*             Accounting I                         3
HIS      112 World History                           3 BSA 230*             Business System Applications         3
PHI      220 Values and Society                      2 PHI 230              Problems of Philosophy               3
PHS      101 Physical Science                        4 REL 231              Religions of the World               2
REL      230 Essentials of Christian Faith           2 PED 121              Fund and Tech Act.                   1
                                                    17                                                          16

                                                   JUNIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester            CR                               Spring Semester           CR
BSA      201*   Intro. to International Bus.          3 BSA 228*            Computer Prog. Language              3
BSA      205*   Accounting II                         3 BSA 232*            Microeconomic Principles             3
BSA      231*   Macroeconomic Principles              3 BSA 241*            Principles of Finance                3
BSA      226*   COBOL Programming                     3 BSA 301*            Principles of Management+            3
BSA      *      MIS Elective                          3 BSA 330*            Statistics for Bus. Planning         3
                                                     15                                                         15

                                                   SENIOR YEAR
                         Fall Semester               CR                             Spring Semester             CR
BSA      331* Quant. Methods for Business+            3 BSA 306*            Business Law I                       3
BSA      341* Principles of Marketing                 3 BSA 440*            Data Base Management                 3
BSA      422* Data Communication+                     3 BSA 489*            Mgt Problems, Policies, and Plng     3
BSA      *    MIS Elective                            3 BSA *               MIS Elective                         3
BSA      *    Elective                                3                     General Elective                     3
                                                     15                                                         15

                                               Total Credit Hours: 125

A grade of C or better is required in all major courses.
*Indicates courses used to calculate the 2.5 major field GPA
+Students must pass the sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
Paine 74
Page College                               Business Administration                                    Paine Page 75
                                                                                                            College
                                     SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE
                                         MARKETING MAJOR

                                                 FRESHMAN YEAR
                          Fall Semester             CR                                Spring Semester          CR
ART      120    Art Appreciation or                     ENG 102             Composition II                      3
MUS      120    Music Appreciation                    3 FRE 221             Elementary French II or
EDU      101    Preparing for Excellence              1 SPA 221             Elementary Spanish II               3
ENG      101    Composition I                         3 HIS 104             African American History            3
FRE      220    Elementary French I or                  MAT 127             Calculus w/Business Applications    3
SPA      220    Elementary Spanish I                  3 PED 121             Fund and Tech Activities II         1
HIS      103    Survey of U.S. History                3 PSY 201             Intro to Psychology or
                General Elective                      3 SOC 201             Intro to Sociology                  3
PED      120    Fund and Tech Activities I            1                                                        16
                                                     17

                                               SOPHOMORE YEAR
                        Fall Semester              CR                                Spring Semester           CR
BSA      200* Survey of Business                    3 BIO 102               Biological Science                  4
ENG      232 Intro to Literature                    3 BSA 341*              Principles of Marketing             3
HIS      112 World History                          3 CSC 100               Computer Application and Prog.      3
PHI      220 Values and Society                     2 PHI 230               Problems of Philosophy              3
PHS      101 Physical Science                       4 REL 231               Religions of the World              2
REL      230 Essentials of Christian Faith          2                                                          15
                                                   17

                                                   JUNIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester             CR                               Spring Semester          CR
BSA      204*   Accounting I                          3 BSA 205*            Accounting II                       3
BSA      230*   Business System Applications          3 BSA 232*            Microeconomic Principles            3
BSA      231*   Macroeconomic Principles              3 BSA 330*            Statistics for Bus. Planning        3
BSA      201*   International Business                3 BSA 371*            Consumer Behavior                   3
BSA      343*   International Marketing+              3 BSA *               Marketing Elective                  3
                                                     15                                                        15

                                                   SENIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester             CR                              Spring Semester           CR
BSA      241*   Principles of Finance                 3 BSA 306*            Business Law I                      3
BSA      301*   Principles of Management +            3 BSA 489*            Mgt Problems, Policies, and Plng    3
BSA      331*   Quantitative Mgt. for Business+       3 BSA *               Marketing Elective                  3
BSA      414*   Management Info. Systems              3 BSA *               Marketing Elective                  3
BSA      442*   Marketing Research                    3 BSA *               Elective                            3
                                                     15                                                        15

                                             Total Credit Hours: 125

A grade of C or better is required in all major courses.
*Indicates courses used to calculate the 2.5 major field GPA
+Students must pass the sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
                                 DIVISION OF EDUCATION
                                 DIVISION OF EDUCATION
                                    MAJORS
                         EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
                                    MAJORS
                          MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION
                         EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
                            SECONDARY EDUCATION
                          MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION
                            SECONDARY EDUCATION
                   POST–BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATION AREAS
               EARLY CHILDHOOD, MIDDLE GRADES, BIOLOGY, ENGLISH,
                   POST–BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATION AREAS
                          HISTORY, AND GRADES, BIOLOGY, ENGLISH,
               EARLY CHILDHOOD, MIDDLEMATHEMATICS
                          HISTORY, AND MATHEMATICS

The Division of Education serves two purposes           competence in technology, a commitment to




                                                                                                              DIVISION OF EDUCATION
for Paine College. The serves two purposes
The Division of Education Division provides             diversity and in technology, knowledge so that
                                                        competence strong content a commitment to




                                                                                                               DIVISION OF EDUCATION
programs of study leading to teacher
for Paine College. The Division provides                they are and to make a positive impact on all
                                                        diversity able strong content knowledge so that
                     provides the to teacher
certification,ofandstudy leading physical and
programs                                                learners through make a positive impact onand
                                                        they are able to their use of assessment all
certification, and provides theinphysical and
health education courses offered the Common             implementation of use of assessment and
                                                        learners through their reflective practitioner
Curriculum.
health education courses offered in the Common          practices and strategies.
                                                        implementation of reflective practitioner
Curriculum.                                             practices and strategies.
The programs leading to teacher certification are       GOALS OF THE DIVISION OF
in programs of Early Childhood Education,
Thethe areas leading to teacher certification are       EDUCATION
                                                        GOALS OF THE DIVISION OF
Middle Grades Education, and Secondary
in the areas of Early Childhood Education,              EDUCATION
Education. Secondary programs are Secondary
Middle Grades Education, and offered in                 The Division of Education emphasizes teacher
Biology,      Secondary programs Mathematics.
Education.English, History and are offered in           education goals that directly connect to the
                                                        The Division of Education emphasizes teacher
These programs require students toMathematics.
Biology, English, History and complete the              Paine College mission and vision and serve as a
                                                        education goals that directly connect to the
major in the discipline students the Division of
These programs require in either to complete the        critical part of the Paine College higher
                                                        Paine College mission and vision and serve as a
Humanities, Division of Natural Sciences and
major in the discipline in either the Division of       education structure. The unit College higher
                                                        critical part of the Paine goals are further
Mathematics or the Division of Social Sciences.
Humanities, Division of Natural Sciences and            intertwined within the institution’s further
                                                        education structure. The unit goals aremission
Students then complete required coursework in
Mathematics or the Division of Social Sciences.         intertwined within the the need for graduates
                                                        statement that expresses institution’s mission
Students then complete required courseworkfor
the Division of Education to qualify in                 to acquire personal development, professional
                                                        statement that expresses the need for graduates
recommendation Education to qualify for
the Division offor initial certification. The           to acquire personalcompetence, and social
                                                        and vocational          development, professional
College’s Teacher Education Programs The
recommendation for initial certification. are           responsibility. Further, the educational process
                                                        and vocational competence, and social
approved Teacher Education Programs are
College’s by the Georgia Professional Standards         at Paine College is grounded in the philosophy
                                                        responsibility. Further, the educational process
approved by and the Professional Standards
Commission the Georgia National Council for             that liberal learning grounded in the philosophy
                                                        at Paine College is fosters the greatest possible
Accreditation and the Education.
Commission of Teacher National Council for              development of each individual’s creative and
                                                        that liberal learning fosters the greatest possible
Accreditation of Teacher Education.                     development of each individual’s the Division
                                                        intellectual abilities. To this end, creative and
UNIT MISSION STATEMENT                                  furthers the highest ideals of professional
                                                        intellectual abilities. To this end, the Division
UNIT MISSION STATEMENT                                  excellence and personal concern professional
                                                        furthers the highest ideals ofthat model the
The Division of Education, the unit, has                excellence educational ideals in that model the
                                                        College’s and personal concern the classroom
assumed a mission Education, the unit, has
The Division of consistent with the mission             College’s educational ideals in To fulfill these
                                                        and throughout the community. the classroom
assumed a mission consistent with theconnects
of the College. The Division’s mission mission          principles, the Division has identified the
                                                        and throughout the community. To fulfill these
of the College mission in that itmission connects
to     College. The Division’s seeks to provide         principles,goals: Division has identified the
                                                        following the
students with mission in that it seeks to provide
to the College a liberal arts education that            following goals:
emphasizes academic excellence, ethical and
students with a liberal arts education that             1. to develop teacher candidates at the initial
spiritual values, social responsibility, and
emphasizes academic excellence, ethical                 1. level who will foster positive change within
                                                             to develop teacher candidates at the initial
personal      development.         Within
spiritual values, social responsibility, and  this           level learning foster positive change within
                                                             the who will community through work,
development, students are provided this
personal      development.         Within      the           service, and leadership
                                                             the learning community through work,
knowledge, skills, and dispositions inclusive of
development, students are provided the                       service, and leadership
knowledge, skills, and dispositions inclusive of 7676
                                                   76
                                                   75
                                                   76
Paine 76
Page College                                  Education                              Paine Page 77
                                                                                           College
2. to ensure that candidates have the necessary      OUTCOMES OF THE CONCEPTUAL
   skills to successfully communicate with the       FRAMEWORK
   school community in order to grow
   professionally and to be a contributing           Students in the Teacher Education Unit who
   member of their home, community,                  successfully complete any program leading to
   workplace, and the professional community         teacher certification will master the outcomes
                                                     listed below. These outcomes describe in
3. to ensure that candidates possess the             general terms the knowledge-based and skill-
   knowledge, skills, and dispositions to be         based competencies of program graduates
   able to impact all learners in a positive way,    reflecting the philosophy of the Unit,
   and to ensure that candidates have the            educational Standards of learned societies, and
   knowledge of diverse students and the skills      the Professional Standards Commission. In
   necessary to provide culturally responsive        short, the outcomes listed below represent the
   instruction to meet the challenges and            competencies a preservice educator, as a
   demonstrate respect for all learners.             reflective practitioner and professional, must
                                                     know and be able to do. As a part of continuous
THE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK                             Teacher Education Program evaluation and
                                                     assessment, outcomes are reviewed yearly and
The conceptual framework for the Teacher             revised as needed.       In addition to these
Education Unit, embodied in the theme The            outcomes, students achieve related certification
teacher as reflective practitioner: From theory      area objectives as adopted by particular learned
to practice, provides the framework for the          societies as well as specific course objectives
design of the curriculum, field experiences,         listed on each syllabus.
instruction and other essentials for the
preparation of teacher candidates.           This    1. Reflective Practitioners are well grounded in
framework encompasses the mission of the                discipline content for the purpose of being
Institution and the Unit, our beliefs, philosophy       able to improve the instructional process
and the expected outcomes as defined by                 through explication and clarification.
standards of learned societies and discipline or
professional organizations (e.g., NAEYC,             2. Reflective Practitioners are able to plan,
NMSA, NCTE, NCTM, NCSS, NSES, etc.)                     implement, and assess instructions necessary
                                                        for improving the achievement levels of
Becoming a Reflective Practitioner involves a           learners with diverse levels of ability and
process whereby teacher candidates participate          learning styles. Preservice teachers are
in varied activities designed to engender a             involved in critical and creative thinking.
commitment to continuous improvement and                Both are used to test, refine, and evaluate
lifelong learning. That is, reflective teaching         assertions of ideas. Preservice teachers are
engages teacher candidates in thinking about            active learners, busily engaged in the
teaching and learning, using curriculum theories        process of bringing new knowledge and new
appropriately, and employing instructional              ways of comprehending a wide range of
strategies which enable them to consider insight        information to a diverse group of students.
and wisdom as they relate to providing high-
quality instruction. Reflective teaching consists    3. Reflective Practitioners use diversified field
of a continuous cycle: planning, teaching,              experiences to develop clear insight and
assessing, and reflecting, which leads to action        knowledge of practical applications that
and ultimately refines instructional quality and        allow opportunities for growth and
builds professional competence.                         development as it relates to the pedagogical
                                                        theories. Diversified field experiences allow
Paine College
Paine College                                 Education                                     Page 78
                                                                                            Page 77
   the preservice teacher to act in deliberate       THE TEACHER EDUCATION UNIT
   and intentional ways, to devise new ways of
   teaching, and to interpret new experiences        The chairperson of the Division of Education,
   from a teacher’s perspective. Preservice          by virtue of the authority granted by the
   teachers are involved in curriculum               President of Paine College, has been given the
   planning, organization of effective teaching,     charge of the overall leadership for teacher
   attention to diversity, integration of            education.      This authority involves the
   technology, and use of assessment data to         establishment of a collaborative relationship
   improve instruction.                              between the Division of Education, other
                                                     Divisions, and PK-12 institutions. Within the
4. Reflective Practitioners are able to modify,      Teacher Education Unit, students are able to
   adapt, and revise previously used                 pursue certification in six areas while earning
   instructional plans to improve teaching and       the B.S. Degree in Education (Early Childhood,
   learning.     Reflective teaching provides        Middle Grades) or the B.S. or B.A. in the
   teachers with the willingness and ability to      discipline with certification in Mathematics,
   reflect on the origins and consequences of        English, Biology, or History.
   their actions and decisions, as well as on
   situations and constraints embedded within        CRITERIA FOR ADMISSION TO THE
   the instructional, curricular, school, and        TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM
   social context in which they work.
                                                     Students must successfully complete course
5. Reflective Practitioners engage in ethical        work to receive degree credit for a specified
   and moral practices and behaviors consistent      program of study. To be admitted to Teacher
   with the expectations of professional             Education, students must:
   educators. Preservice teachers participate in
   activities and experiences that involve active         Pass the following courses with a “C” or
   monitoring and development of dispositions             better: ENG 101 and 102, MAT 122, CSC
   that support learning and attention to                 100, and EDU 220.
   introspection and practices.                           Pass     the    college-wide    Sophomore
                                                          Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE).
6. Reflective Practitioners are able to plan and          Submit cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher.
   implement instruction for a diverse student            Pass the Georgia Assessments for the
   population. Preservice teachers become                 Certification of Educators (GACE) Basic
   educated in multicultural thinking and                 Skills Assessment (or provide written proof
   employ      appropriate      strategies    to          of exemption).     Exemption requirement:
   accommodate diverse learners.                          SAT total score 1000 (critical reading and
                                                          mathematics), GRE total score 1030, or
7. Reflective Practitioners are competent in the          ACT total score 43.
   use of technology for enhancing the teaching           Submit clear background check (no criminal
   and learning process. Preservice teachers              record or dishonorable discharge from the
   will demonstrate the ability to employ a               armed services).
   variety of standards-based strategies that             Complete the Teacher Education Unit
   incorporate technology to enhance the                  Application.
   achievement of learners and is used to help
                                                          Complete Personal Dispositions Matrix with
   mange assessment data systems designed to
                                                          a rating of “Acceptable.”
   improve teaching and learning.
                                                          Students may submit a written request for an
                                                          exemption from the admission policy for
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                                                                                                  College
   one semester. Submission of the request            MAJOR FIELD COURSES
   does not guarantee approval.
                                                      EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
FIELD/CLINICAL EXPERIENCES
                                                      Early Childhood Education ..............82 Hours
Field/clinical experiences are an integral part of
the Teacher Education Program and are                 Major Field Courses (67 Hours)
designed to enhance the preparation of                ART 325 Art for Teachers ................................2
prospective teachers as they become Reflective        EDU 220 Foundations of Education (F) ............3
Practitioners.     In the Teacher Education           EDU 301 Educational Media+...........................3
Program, field experiences are systematically         EDU 302 ECE Curriculum and Methods (F)+ ..3
selected      and      planned      to      ensure    EDU 312 Children’s Literature (F)+..................3
students/candidates the opportunity to observe,       EDU 315 ECE Mathematics for Teachers (F)+.3
plan, and practice in a variety of settings. Field    EDU 336 Science/Social Studies Content+ .......3
experiences           are         developmental;      EDU 339 Classroom Management (F)+ ............3
students/candidates gradually assume increased        EDU 345 Developmental Psychology ...............3
responsibilities as they transition to clinical       EDU 455 Exceptional Children .........................3
practice.                                             ENG 205 Teaching of Writing...........................3
                                                      ERD 305 ECE Teaching of Reading (F)+ .........3
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO                         ERD 320 Reading Diagnosis (F)+ .....................3
CLINICAL PRACTICE                                     ERD 322 Reading Presc and Recovery I (F)+ ...3
                                                      ERD 327 Reading Presc and Recovery II (F)+..3
Clinical Practice is the capstone experience that     GEO 231 World Regional Geography...............3
provides opportunities for candidates to apply        MAT 300 Fundamentals of Mathematics ..........3
theories in classroom settings.                       MAT 314 Problem Solving................................3
                                                      MAT 333 Introduction to Geometry..................3
The candidate must:                                   MAT 340 Number Systems ...............................3
                                                      MUS 324 Music for Elementary Teachers (F)+ 2
   Submit an application for clinical practice to     PED 324 Health/Phy Ed Meth and Mat (F)+.....3
   the advisor one semester prior clinical
   practice.                                          Clinical Practice Courses (15 Hours)
   Complete all course requirements in the            EDU 489 Assessment Skills in Education .........3
   major field with a grade of “C” or better and      EDU 490 ECE Directed Teaching & Seminar.12
   a GPA of 2.50 or better.                           EDU 490L ECE Directed Teaching Laboratory0
   Have at minimum a cumulative GPA of
   2.50.                                              MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION
   Submit a clear background check.
   Submit personal/professional dispositions          Middle Grades Education ...................75 or 76
   matrices at a rating of “Acceptable.”
   Provide proof of membership in a                   Major Field Courses (60 or 61 Hours)
   professional education organization.               EDU 220 Foundations of Education (F) ............3
                                                      EDU 301 Educational Media+...........................3
   Provide a passing score on the GACE II Test
                                                      EDU 303 MG/SEC Curriculum and Meth (F)+.3
   of Content Knowledge Examination in their
                                                      EDU 308 Teaching of Language Arts (F)+ or
   area of preparation, or on the state required
                                                      EDU 329 MG/SEC Math for Teachers (F)+ or
   licensure test.
                                                      EDU 332 Science for Teachers (F)+ or
                                                      EDU 340 Social Studies for Teachers (F)+ .......6
                                                      EDU 339 Classroom Management (F)+ ............3
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EDU 345 Developmental Psychology ...............3                    BIO 425 Ecology + ............................................4
EDU 393 Educational Psychology.....................3
EDU 455 Exceptional Children .........................3              History/Social Sciences Concentration (15
ERD 307 MG/SEC Teaching of Reading (F)+ ..3                          Hours)
Content 1................................................ 15 or 16   GEO 231 World Regional Geography...............3
Content 2................................................ 15 or 16   HIS 310 Georgia History + ................................3
                                                                     POS 330 United States Government..................3
     Science Concentration students must enroll                      POS 331 State/Local Government .....................3
     in EDU 332 Science for Teachers                                 SOC 438 Community and Urban Life ...............3
     Language Arts concentration students must
     enroll in EDU 308 Teaching Language Arts                        (F) indicates Field Experience required
     History/Social    Sciences  Concentration                       + indicates that the Sophomore Proficiency
     students must enroll in EDU 340 Social                          Examination in English (SPEE) must be passed
     Studies for Teachers                                            before taking the course
     Mathematics Concentration students must
     enroll in EDU 329 MG & SEC Mathematics                          SECONDARY GRADES
     for Teachers
                                                                     Candidates who major in Biology, English,
(F) indicates Field Experience required                              History and Mathematics may obtain initial
+ indicates that the Sophomore Proficiency                           certification by enrolling in appropriate courses
Examination in English (SPEE) must be passed                         offered through the Division of Education.
before taking the course                                             Candidates complete the major in their
                                                                     respective discipline and integrate major courses
Clinical Practice Courses (15 Hours)                                 with education coursework to obtain
EDU 489 Assessment Skills in Education .........3                    certification for teaching.
EDU 491 MG Directed Teaching & Seminar..12
EDU 491L MG Directed Teaching Laboratory .0                          Courses required of secondary                     education
                                                                     students are listed below.
Middle Grades Education Content Options
                                                                     Pre-Clinical Practice Courses (27 hours)
Mathematics Concentration (15 Hours)                                 EDU 220 Foundations of Education (F) ............3
MAT 300 Fundamentals of Mathematics ..........3                      EDU 301 Educational Media+...........................3
MAT 309 Discrete Mathematics........................3                EDU 303 MG/SEC Curr and Methods (F)+ ......3
MAT 314 Problem Solving................................3             EDU 308 Teaching Language Arts (F)+ or
MAT 333 Introduction to Geometry+ ...............3                   EDU 329 MG & SEC Math for Teachers (F)+or
MAT 340 Number Systems ...............................3              EDU 332 Science for Teachers (F)+ or
                                                                     EDU 340 Social Studies for Teachers (F)+ .......3
Language Arts Concentration (15 Hours)                               EDU 339 Classroom Management (F)+ ............3
ENG 234 World Literature in Translation .........3                   EDU 345 Developmental Psychology ...............3
ENG 300 Advanced Composition .....................3                  EDU 393 Educational Psychology.....................3
ENG 330 American Literature 1608 1870 +......3                       EDU 455 Exceptional Children .........................3
ERD 307 MG/SEC Teaching of Reading (F)+ ..3                          ERD 307 MG/SEC Teaching of Reading (F)+ ..3
ERD 328 Adolescent Literature.........................3                                                      27 Hours

Science Concentration (16 Hours)                                          Biology Education Majors must enroll in
ESC 101 Environmental Science Fundamentals4                               EDU 332 Science for Teachers
PHS 111 Physical Science .................................4               English Education Majors must enroll in
BIO 111 Principles of Biology I ........................4                 EDU 308 Teaching Language Arts
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                                                                                            College
   History Education Majors must enroll in EDU       POST-BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMS
   340 Social Studies for Teachers
   Mathematics Education Majors must enroll          Individuals who have earned a degree from a
   in EDU 329 MG & SEC Mathematics for               regionally accredited institutions, have a 2.50 or
   Teachers                                          higher GPA (3.00 if graduate degree) and who
                                                     pass a required background check may seek a
(F) indicates Field Experience Required              certification in any of the five areas in which
+ indicates that the Sophomore Proficiency           Paine College is eligible to recommend
Examination in English (SPEE) must be passed         certification. Interested individuals apply for
before taking the course                             non-degree admission and, if accepted, seek the
                                                     initial certification recommendation through the
Clinical Practice Courses (15 Hours)                 post-baccalaureate certification program. The
EDU 489 Assessment Skills in Education .........3    Post Baccalaureate or non-degree certification
EDU 492 SEC Directed Teaching/Seminar.....12         program areas include Early Childhood
EDU 492L SEC Directed Teaching Lab............0      Education, Middle Grades Education and
                                     15 Hours        Secondary Education in the areas of Biology,
                                                     English, History, and Mathematics. To enroll in
Suggested course sequences for secondary             clinical practice or internship, the candidate
grades may be found within the respective            must complete a minimum of 18 credits through
major division.                                      the     College      in   its   post-baccalaureate
                                                     certification program.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
                                                     CRITERIA FOR ADMISSION TO
Candidates must fulfill College and certification    POST-BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMS
requirements to graduate from the Teacher
Education Program. Students must meet criteria       The student must:
listed below:
                                                          Have earned a degree from a regionally
   Pass clinical practice (EDU 490 and 490L               accredited institution.
   or EDU 491 and 491L or EDU 492 and                     Have an overall GPA of 2.50 or higher, or a
   492L).                                                 3.0 if graduate degree.
   Pass EDU 489.                                          Submit a clear background check.
   Compile and present education portfolio                Complete oral interview with a rating of
   with a rating of “Proficient.”                         “Proficient.”
   Submit Personal/Professional Dispositions              Pass the GACE Basic Skills Assessment.
   Matrixes with a rating of “Acceptable.”                Submit Personal Dispositions Matrix at a
   Have 2.50 major field and cumulative                   rating of “Acceptable.”
   GPAs.
                                                     SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR
Candidates applying for graduation after one or      TEACHER EDUCATION MAJORS AND
more years of a break in continuous enrollment       POST-BACCALAUREATE STUDENTS
are required to meet current external agency
criteria and the Paine College criteria in force     Students who matriculate in a teacher
during the year the student seeks graduation.        preparation program may expect to incur
                                                     additional minimal costs associated with this
                                                     professional program. Financial requirements
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                                                                                           Page 81
include, but are not limited to, items listed         completing two one-credit instructional courses
below:                                                in activities such as tennis or aerobics. The
                                                      requirement can also be met by completing
   Proof of liability insurance                       HED 225 for three-credits. Only two of these
   Proof of background check                          credits, however will count in the Common
   Proof of health clearance (e.g., TB exam)          Curriculum.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION                                    Paine College does not offer a degree in
                                                      Physical Education nor does it make
Paine College requires that all students complete     recommendations for certification in this area.
a minimum of two credits in Physical
Education. This requirement is met by
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                                                                                                      College
                               SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                                 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

                                              FRESHMAN YEAR
                           Fall Semester           CR                             Spring Semester           CR
EDU     101    Prep. for Excellence                 1 CSC   100         Computer App and Programming         3
ENG     101    Composition I                        3 PHS   101         Prin. and App. Phy. Science          4
HIS     112    World History                        3 ENG 102           Composition II                       3
ART     120    Art Appreciation or                    HIS   103         Survey of U.S. History               3
MUS     120    Music Appreciation                   3 REL   231         Religions of the World               2
PED      120   Fund and Tech of Activities I**      1 PHI   230         Problems of Philosophy or
PHI     220    Values and Society                   2 PHI   234         History of Western Philosophy        3
MAT     122    College Algebra                      3                                                       18
REL     230    Essentials Of Christian Faith        2
                                                   18
                                             SOPHOMORE YEAR
                           Fall Semester           CR                             Spring Semester           CR
BIO     102    Prin. and Appl. of Bio               4 ENG 205*          Teaching of Writing                  3
HIS     104    African American History             3 EDU 220*          Foundations of Education (F)         3
PED     121    Fund and Tech of Activities II**     1 FRE   221         Elementary French II or
PSY     201    Intro to Psychology                  3 SPA   221         Elementary Spanish II                3
FRE     220    Elementary French I or                 GEO 231*          World Regional Geography            3
SPA     220    Elementary Spanish I                 3 ENG 232           Intro to Literature                  3
MAT     300*   Fundamentals of Mathematics          3 MAT 314*          Problem Solving                      3
                                                   17                                                       18
                                                JUNIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester           CR                             Spring Semester         CR
EDU     301*   Educational Media+                   3 ERD 322*          Reading Presc and Recovery I (F)+ 3
EDU     302*   ECE Curriculum and Methods (F)+      3 EDU 336*          Science/Social Studies Content+    3
MUS     324*   Music for Elementary Teachers (F)+ 2 EDU 339*            Classroom Management (F)+          3
ART     325*   Art for Teachers +                   2 MAT 340*          Number Systems                     3
EDU     345*   Developmental Psychology             3 MAT 333*          Intro to Geometry                  3
ERD     305*   ECE Teaching of Reading (F)+         3 ERD 320*          Reading Diagnosis (F)+             3
                                                   16                                                     18
                                                SENIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester           CR                           Spring Semester         CR
EDU     312*   Children’s Literature (F)+           3 EDU 489*          Assessment Skills in Education   3
EDU     315*   ECE Mathematics for Teachers (F)+ 3 EDU 490*             ECE Directed Teaching & Seminar 12
PED     324*   Health/Phy Ed. Meth & Mat’ls (F)+    3 EDU 490L*         ECE Directed Teaching Lab        0
EDU     455*   Exceptional Children                 3                                                   15
ERD     327*   Reading Presc and Recovery II (F)+ 3
                                                   15

                                         Total Hours Required: 135
Students must be formally admitted to Teacher Education.
A grade of “C” or better is required in all major and prerequisite courses.
*Indicates courses (n = 26) used to calculate the 2.5 major field GPA
**HED 225 Personal and Community Hygiene substitutes for two (2) of the following courses: PED 120 Basketball, PED
     121 Tennis, PED 210 Aerobics
(F) Field Experience
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
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                                   SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                                      MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION
                                            FRESHMAN YEAR
                            Fall Semester      CR                       Spring Semester                                     CR
EDU 101          Prep. for Excellence            1 CSC    100 Computer App. and Programming                                  3
ENG 101          Composition I                  3 PHS     101 Prin. and App. Physical Science                                4
HIS    112       World History                  3 ENG 102 Composition II                                                     3
ART 120          Art Appreciation or               REL    231 Religions of the World                                         2
MUS 120          Music Appreciation             3 PHI     230 Problems of Philosophy or
PED    120       Fund and Tech of Activities I**1 PHI     234 History of West. Philosophy                                     3
MAT 122          College Algebra                 3                                                                           15
REL    230       Essentials of Christian Faith   2
                                                16
                                          SOPHOMORE YEAR
                      Fall Semester            CR                       Spring Semester                                     CR
BIO    102 Prin. and Appl. of Biology           4 HIS     104 African American History                                       3
HIS    103 Survey of U.S. History                3 EDU 220* Foundations of Education (F)                                     3
PED    121 Fund and Tech of Activities II**      1 FRE    221 Elementary French II or
PSY    201 Introduction to Psychology            3 SPA    221 Elementary Spanish II                                           3
FRE    220 Elementary French I or                  ENG 232 Introduction to Literature                                         3
SPA    220 Elementary Spanish I                  3 ENG 205* SEC/MG Teaching of Writing                                        3
PHI    220 Values and Society                    2 Concentration*                                                            3
                                                16                                                                           18
                                             JUNIOR YEAR
                      Fall Semester            CR                       Spring Semester                                     CR
EDU 301* Educational Media+                     3 EDU 339* Classroom Management (F)+                                         3
EDU 308* Teaching of Language Art (F)+ or          EDU 303* MG/SEC Curr and Methods (F)+                                     3
EDU 329 MG/SEC Math for Teachers (F+) or           EDU 393* Educational Psychology                                           3
EDU 332 Science For Teachers (F)+ or               Concentration*                                                            3
EDU 340 Social Studies for Teachers (F)+        3 Concentration*                                                             3
EDU 345* Developmental Psychology                3 Concentration*                                                            3
Concentration*                                   3                                                                          18
Concentration*                                   3
Concentration*                                  3
                                                18
                                             SENIOR YEAR
                      Fall Semester            CR                       Spring Semester                                     CR
ERD 307* MG/SEC Teaching of Reading (F)         3 EDU 489* Assessment Skills in Education                                    3
EDU 455* Exceptional Children                   3 EDU 491* MG Directed Teaching & Seminar                                   12
EDU 308* Teaching of Language Arts (F)+ or         EDU 491L* MG Directed Teaching Lab                                        0
EDU 329* MG/SEC Math (F) or                                                                                                 15
EDU 332 Science for Teachers (F) or
EDU 340 Social Studies for Teachers (F)          3
Concentration*                                   3
Concentration*                                   3
Concentration*                                   3
                                                18

                                              Total Hours Required: 134
Students must be formally admitted to Teacher Education.
A grade of “C” or better is required in all major and prerequisite courses.
*Indicates courses (n = 22) used to calculate the major field GPA.
**HED 225 Personal and Community Hygiene substitutes for two (2) of the following: PED 120 Basketball, PED 121 Tennis, PED 210
     Aerobics
(F) Field Experience
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
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                                                                                            College
MIDDLE GRADES AREAS OF CONCENTRATION

The student must select two concentrations of 15-16 credits.

The following constitutes the choices for Middle Grades concentrations; substitutions may be made only
with the approval of the Chairperson of the Division of Education.

        Mathematics Concentration         Hours            Language Arts Concentration         Hours
MAT    300 Fundamentals of Mathematics      3 ENG       234 World Literature in Translations     3
MAT    309 Discrete Math                    3 ENG       300 Advanced Composition                 3
MAT    314 Problem Solving                  3 ENG       330 American Literature 1608 1870 +      3
MAT    333 Intro to Geometry +              3 ERD       307 MG/SEC Teaching of Reading (F)+      3
MAT    340 Number Systems                   3 ERD       328 Adolescent Literature                3

          Science Concentration           Hours     History/Social Sciences Concentration      Hours
ESC    101 Environmental Science Fund       4 GEO 231 World Regional Geography                   3
PHS    111 Physical Science                 4 HIS    310 Georgia History +                       3
BIO    111 Principles of Biology I          4 POS    330 United States Government                3
BIO    425 Ecology +                        4 POS    331 State/Local Government                  3
                                                SOC 438 Community and Urban Life                 3
                                 DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
                                          OF HUMANITIES
                                 DIVISION MAJORS
                                               ENGLISH
                                                MAJORS
                                      MASS COMMUNICATIONS
                                               ENGLISH
                                    PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION
                                      MASS COMMUNICATIONS
                                    PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION
                                         OTHER OFFERINGS
                                                  ART
                                         OTHER OFFERINGS
                                                DRAMA
                                                  ART
                                        FOREIGN LANGUAGE
                                                DRAMA
                                        FOREIGN LANGUAGE




                                                                                                           DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
Division of Humanities’ mission is to provide a       3. cultural heritage as embodied in the




                                                                                                             DIVISION OF HUMANITIES
socially relevant and ethically informed liberal           humanities.
Division of Humanities’ mission is to provide a
arts education that will help students become         3. cultural heritage as embodied in the
more profoundly aware of informed liberal
socially relevant and ethically themselves and        4. humanities.
                                                           provide opportunities for the development of
arts education that will what it is to be become
realize more completely help students human.               talents in drama, art, music, debate and
                                  themselves and
more profoundly aware of courses and more
By offering general education                         4. provide opportunities for the development of
                                                           journalism; and
realize more completely what it is to be human.
advanced programs in communications, the                   talents in drama, art, music, debate and
By offering general education courses and more
visual and performing arts, philosophy and            5. journalism; and
                                                           promote development of Christian character.
religion, programs in communications, the
advancedlanguages and literature, the Division
visual and performing dynamic foundations of
exposes students to the arts, philosophy and          5. promote development of Christian character.
                                                      THE ENGLISH EXIT EXAMINATION
religion, languages and develops the aesthetic
contemporary culture, literature, the Division
exposes students to the dynamic foundations of
appreciation and critical thinking skills, and        THE ENGLISH EXIT EXAMINATION ENG
                                                      Students enrolled in composition courses
                culture, value contributions to
contemporary to make develops the aesthetic
enables them                                          099, ENG 101, and ENG 102 are required to
appreciation and critical thinking skills, and
their communities, our nation, and the world.         take and pass the composition Examination
                                                      Students enrolled in English Exit courses ENG
enables them to make value contributions to           (EEE), a 101, and ENG 102 are
                                                      099, ENG writing competency test. required to
                                                                                                Students
their Division of Humanities and thecourses in
The communities, our nation, offers world.            take and pass the English Exit Examination
                                                      must take this examination in addition to
seven areas: Art, English, Foreign Languages,         (EEE), a writingassignments throughout the
                                                      completing all competency test. Students
                                offers courses in
The Division of Humanities Philosophy and
Mass Communications,                                  must take Passing the EEE is not addition to
                                                      semester. this examination in a guarantee
seven areas: Art, English, Foreign Languages,
Religion, and Music. Students may major in            completing all assignments throughout one
                                                      that students will pass the course; it is only the
Mass Communications, Philosophy and
English,     English     Secondary     Education,     semester. Passing the EEE Students must earn
                                                      of the course requirements. is not a guarantee
Religion, and and
Philosophy               Students and
                 Music. Religion, may major in
                                            Mass      a passing grade pass the course; it is pass the
                                                      that students will on coursework and only one
English,     English     Secondary     Education,
Communication. Minors are offered in Art,             of thein order requirements. 099, ENGmust earn
                                                      EEE course to pass ENG Students 101, and
Philosophy              Religion,
                and and Religion, and
English, Philosophy                         Mass
                                      French, and     a passing grade on coursework and pass the
                                                      ENG 102.
Communication. Minors are offered in Art,
Spanish.                                              EEE in order to pass ENG 099, ENG 101, and
English, Philosophy and Religion, French, and         ENG 102.   ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Spanish. of the Division of Humanities are to:
The goals
                                                                 ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
                                                      The English Department strives to enhance
     goals of the Division of Humanities are
Thestrengthen the communication skills of to:
1.                                                    students’ oral and written communication skills
    students;                                         The English Department strives to enhance
                                                      and to cultivate students’ knowledge and
1. strengthen the communication skills of             students’ oral of literature. The Department
                                                      appreciation and written communication skills
2. students;
    help students develop religious convictions       teaches cultivate demonstrate the ability to
                                                      and to students to students’ knowledge and
    and philosophical thoughts as they seek to        appreciation of literature. The Department
                                                      read thoughtfully and critically, to analyze
2. help students develop religious convictions
    understand and appreciate the                     teaches students to demonstrateideas ability to
                                                      critically, and to express their the logically,
    and philosophical thoughts as they seek to        clearly, and precisely. critically, build and
                                                      read thoughtfully and It seeks toto analyze
    understand and appreciate the                     critically, and to express their ideas logically,
                                                   86
                                                   86 clearly, and precisely. It seeks to build and
                                                  86
                                                  85
                                                  86
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                                                                                                College
refine students' ability to communicate                of careers. In cooperation with the Division of
effectively, to explore their thoughts and             Education, the English Department provides a
feelings, and to become aware of how others            program of study that leads to professional
think, write and speak.                                certification for English Majors with Emphasis
                                                       in Secondary Education. The Department
In addition, the Department seeks to help              supports the Common Curriculum by teaching
students read and write about literature.              basic composition, literature, and speech
Through the study of literature, students gain         courses.
insight into experiences, thinking, and feelings
different from their own, and they come to             Required and elective courses in English,
perceive the likeness among people as well as          American, and African American literature also
differences determined by such circumstances           include diverse writers who by reason of race,
as gender, race, and class.                            class, and gender have been excluded from the
                                                       mainstream of literary study. In addition to
In their study of literature, students learn various   helping students come to know the richness of
ways of interpreting and analyzing literature.         these traditions, the Department offers courses
They are introduced to the major genres of             which invite students to appreciate the richness
literature poetry, drama, fiction, and the             of other literary traditions.
essay and trace the basic history and
development of the English language and of the         The specific course sequence for majors and
English, American, and African American                graduation requirements are listed below in
literary traditions.                                   some detail.

OBJECTIVES                                             DECLARATION OF MAJOR AND
                                                       COMMON CURRICULUM COURSES
Students who successfully complete a major in
English will:                                          To declare a major in English, a student must
                                                       submit an application and writing sample to the
1. express       themselves      appropriately,        English Department and have passed the
   effectively, and creatively through speech          Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English.
   and writing                                         Prospective majors must complete ENG 101,
                                                       ENG 102, and ENG 232 with grades of “C” or
2. understand and appreciate literature of the         better. These are Common Curriculum
   world through the study of the major literacy       requirements.
   movements and authors;
                                                       MAJOR FIELD REQUIREMENTS
3. know and use the major facets of literary           IN ENGLISH
   analysis; and
                                                       In addition to English 101, 102, and 232, fifty-
4. pursue graduate study, teaching, and other          one hours are required of all English majors of
   related careers.                                    which 27 hours must be in literature. English
                                                       majors must complete courses in the major with
The English Department offers traditional and          a grade of “C” or better. The following courses
innovative courses to meet the needs of both           must be taken to meet the 51-hour requirement:
English majors and non-majors. The
Department offers a program of study leading to        English Major Courses ...........................Hours
the Bachelor of Arts in English and one leading        ENG 234 – World Literature in Trans I.............3
to a minor in English. It prepares majors for          ENG 235 – World Literature in Trans II ...........3
further study of literature and for a wide range       ENG 300 – Advanced Composition ..................3
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                                                                                                                        Page 87
ENG 311 – His of the English Lang+................3                 ENG 333 Black Lit of the 20th Century ............3
ENG 324 – English Lit: Beowulf to 1784+ .......3                    ENG 410 Literary Criticism...............................3
ENG 325 – English Lit Since 1784....................3               ENG 421 Public Speaking .................................3
ENG 330 – American Lit 1608-1870+ ..............3                   ENG 430 Shakespearean Drama........................3
ENG 331 – American Lit Since 1870 ................3                 ENG 454 Senior Sem. in Reading & Res ..........3
ENG 332 – Black Literature 1760-1900............3                   ENG 455 English Research Project ...................3
ENG 333 – Black Literature of the 20th Cent ...3
ENG 410 – Literary Criticism............................3           Required Education and Reading Courses
ENG 421 – Public Speaking ..............................3           for Secondary Certification
ENG 430 – Shakespearean Drama.....................3
ENG 454 – Senior Sem. in Reading and Res.....3                      Courses ....................................................Hours
ENG 455 – English Research Project ................3                EDU 220 Foundations of Education ..................3
English Electives (numbered 400 or above*) ....6                    EDU 301 Educational Media .............................3
*Selected in consultation with an advisor.                          EDU 303 MG/SEC Curr. & Methods (F)+........3
                                                                    EDU 308 Teaching of Language Arts (F)+ .......3
REQUIREMENTS FOR ENGLISH                                            EDU 339 Classroom Management (F)+ ............3
MAJORS WITH EMPHASIS IN                                             EDU 345 Developmental Psychology ...............3
SECONDARY EDUCATION                                                 EDU 393 Educational Psychology.....................3
                                                                    EDU 455 Exceptional Children .........................3
To declare a major with emphasis in Secondary                       EDU 489 Assessment Skills in Education .........3
Education, a student must submit an application                     EDU 492 SEC Directed Teaching/Seminar.....12
and writing sample to the English Department                        EDU 492L SEC Directed Teaching/Sem. Lab ..0
and have passed the Sophomore Proficiency                           ERD 307 MG/SEC Teaching of Reading (F)+ ..3
Examination in English. Prospective English
Education majors must complete ENG 101,                             (F) indicates Field Experience required
ENG 102, and ENG 232 with grade of C" or                            + indicates that the Sophomore Proficiency
better. These are Common Curriculum                                 Examination in English (SPEE) must be passed
requirements. In addition, English Education                        before taking the course
majors must complete courses in the major with
a grade of “C” or better. Other requirements are                    MINOR FIELD REQUIREMENTS
listed below.
                                                                    In addition to English 101, 102, and 232, the
ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION                                      following courses must be taken to meet the 18-
                                                                    hour requirement for a minor in English:
To be admitted to the Teacher Education
Program, all requirements as outlined in the                        Courses.....................................................Hours
Division of Education section of this Catalog                       ENG 234 World Literature in Translation or
must be completed.                                                  ENG 235 World Literature in Translation .........3
                                                                    ENG 300 Advanced Composition .....................3
Required Major Courses for English Majors                           ENG 330 or ENG 331 American Literature ......3
with Emphasis in Secondary Education                                ENG 324 or ENG 325 English Literature..........3
                                                                    English Electives (numbered 400 and above)....6
Courses ....................................................Hours
ENG 234 World Literature in Translation .........3                             MASS COMMUNICATIONS
ENG 235 World Literature in Translation .........3                                   PROGRAM
ENG 311 History of the English Language .......3
ENG 324 English Lit: Beowulf to 1784 ............3                  The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Mass
ENG 330 American Literature: 1608-1870 .......3                     Communications is designed to ensure that
ENG 331 American Literature since 1870.........3                    students learn the mission and responsibilities of
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                                                                                            College
mass communications in a diverse, democratic              Supervisor.       Work agreements with
society, and that students learn to communicate           internship employers regarding hours of
effectively in such a society. Programs offer             service, job description, and work duties and
up-to-date instruction with a balance of courses          responsibilities must be approved by the
between      theoretical,    conceptual,     and          student’s Faculty Internship Supervisor. At
professional skill, including studies in history,         the end of each internship, students will
function, procedure, law and ethics. Each of the          present a portfolio and make an aural
four Mass Communications tracks ensures that              presentation to the Mass Communication
students will acquire the necessary knowledge,            faculty based on their internship experience.
values, and competencies for pursuing careers in          Specific details are available from the
the field.                                                Internship Supervisor.

Programs are also designed to ensure a balance      3. Students must have a 2.50 GPA in their
between courses in speech, journalism, drama,          major courses in order to qualify for
mass communications, and other liberal arts            graduation.
disciplines. Students will receive rigorous,
practical training as well as demanding             4. Students must complete all specific
scholarly     instruction,   leading   to     the      requirements for their respective Mass
development of competency in the use of                Communication track.
language and visual literacy. Students will learn
to gather, analyze, organize, synthesize and        5. Students must have successfully passed the
communicate information in formats appropriate         SPEE before they may enroll in the
to particular forms of journalism, broadcasting,       following courses:
drama, and public relations.
                                                          Broadcasting Track: All MAC courses 300
Through co-enrollment with Augusta State                  level and above
University (ASU), students may elect to take              Drama Track: All MAC and DRA courses
courses at ASU subject to approval and                    300 level and above
recommendations by the student’s Advisor,                 Journalism Track: All MAC and JRN
Coordinator, and the Vice President of                    courses 300 level and above
Academic Affairs.                                         Public Relations Track: All MAC courses
                                                          300 level and above
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
                                                    BROADCASTING TRACK
In addition to the general graduation               BROADCASTING TRACK
requirements     of    the college, Mass            The broadcast track takes a technical approach
Communications majors must meet the                 to audio and video production. It incorporates
following requirements:                             basic principles, types, characteristics, and
                                                    accessories of audio and video production,
1. Students must receive a grade of “C” or          including studio operations. This track offers
   better in Mass Communications courses in         practical experience in the use of multi-channel
   order for the course to count towards            techniques for both analog and digital recording,
   graduation.                                      as well as basic techniques of radio and
                                                    television     studio    production,    including
2. Students must complete six hours of              producing and directing. This program is
   internship as part of the program of study. It   designed for the student who may wish to
   will serve as the student’s capstone             pursue a career on the air or behind the scenes in
   experience and will be supervised by a Mass      a journalistic or production capacity.
   Communications          Faculty    Internship
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Required Major Courses for Mass                                     College family at large either by invitation of on
Communications Broadcasting Track                                   an audition basis.

Courses ....................................................Hours   The Drama track is designed for students
MAC 201 Media & Society ...............................3            preparing for a career in drama and for those
MAC 203 Introduction to Electronic Media......3                     preparing for a MFA graduate program in
MAC 301 Media, Law, and Ethics+ .................3                  drama. The program serves to augment and
MAC 402 Radio Production I+..........................3              enhance the other mass communications
MAC 403 Radio Production II+ ........................3              programs.
MAC 461 Television Production I+ ..................3
MAC 462 Television Production II ...................3               Drama students will complete a Senior Project
MAC 480 Broadcast Announcing......................3                 where the student will perform in a main-stage
JRN 252 News Reporting and Writing I............3                   production as actor, set designer, stage manager,
JRN 253 News Reporting and Writing II ..........3                   sound designer, or costume designer.
ENG 421 Public Speaking .................................3
MAC 491 Internship+ ......................................12        Drama students will complete an internship
                                                                    where they will receive field experience with a
Select 6 hrs of courses from the following:                         theater company.
DRA 270 Theatre Performance and Play
          Production (repeatable).....................1             All drama students are required to participate in
DRA 271 Acting I ............................................3      Drama Department productions with duties as
DRA 272 Acting II ............................................3     assigned by the department Coordinator.
DRA 273 Acting III ...........................................3     Required Major Courses for Mass
ENG 233 Types of Drama ................................3            Communications Drama Track
MAC 202 Film Appreciation .............................3
MAC 460 Special Topics+ ............................ 1-3            Courses.....................................................Hours
MAC 471 Public Relations Writing+ ................3                 MAC 201 Media and Society ............................3
MAC 472 Public Relations Campaigns+...........3                     MAC 202 Film Appreciation .............................3
MAC 473 Magazine Writing+ ...........................3              MAC 301 Media, Law, and Ethics+ ..................3
BSA 301– Principles of Management......….….3                        ENG 233 Types of Drama ................................3
BSA 341– Principles of Marketing……...…….3                           DRA 270 Theatre Performance & Play
                                                                               Production (repeatable).....................1
+Students must pass the SPEE prior to taking                        DRA 271 Acting I .............................................3
these courses (includes MAC electives if                            DRA 272 Acting II ...........................................3
numbered 300 or above).                                             DRA 273 Acting III ...........................................3
                                                                    ENG 421 Public Speaking .................................3
DRAMA TRACK                                                         ENG 430 Shakespearian Drama+ ......................3
                                                                    ENG 436 Contemporary Drama+ ......................3
Drama plays a vital roll in the life of Paine                       MAC 491 Internship (repeatable*)+ ............... 6/6
College, offering students an opportunity to                        DRA 491 Independent Project (repeatable**)+..6
study and perform dramatic works rich in                            *Must be repeated for a total of 12 hours
African-American history as well as works                           **May be repeated as a drama or general
representative of a general history of drama.                       elective for 6 hours
Productions may entail the performance of a
simple monologue, two-person scene, Reader’s                        Select 12 hrs of courses from the following:
Theatre, one-act play, Improv, video taped                          DRA 375 Stage Lighting+ .................................3
material, and/or a full-scale dramatic or musical                   DRA 376 Scene Design+ ...................................3
production. Productions are open to the Paine                       DRA 377 Costume Design+ .............................3
                                                                    DRA 378 Directing+..........................................3
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                                                                                                                     College
DRA 380 Sound Design+ ..................................3           +Students must pass the SPEE prior to taking
DRA 381 Stage Management+ ..........................3               these courses (includes MAC and DRA
                                                                    electives if numbered 300 or above).
+Students must pass the SPEE prior to taking
these courses (includes MAC and DRA                                 PUBLIC RELATIONS TRACK
electives if numbered 300 or above).
                                                                    Students who pursue the Public Relations track
JOURNALISM TRACK                                                    are taught both theoretical foundations and
                                                                    hands-on application learning. Studies include
Students who pursue the Journalism track will                       writing strategies and detailed campaigns
be given instructions in the basics of writing for                  including analysis of the interests, concerns and
the media in terms of style, structure, processes,                  attitudes of the various publics served. Focus is
and procedures of journalism. Studies focus on                      on      developing       skill    for     making
the gathering of information and analyzing and                      recommendations of the best advertising
shaping the material into accurate and clear                        program through press releases, news,
reporting.                                                          conferences, mail, brochures, employee
                                                                    publications, web sites and the like.
Required Major Courses for Mass
Communications Journalism Track                                     Required Major Courses for Mass
                                                                    Communications Public Relations Track
Courses.....................................................Hours
MAC 201 Media & Society ...............................3            Courses.....................................................Hours
MAC 203 Introduction to Electronic Media......3                     MAC 201 Media & Society ...............................3
MAC 301 Media, Law, and Ethics+ .................3                  MAC 203 Intro to Electronic Media..................3
MAC 402 Radio Production I+..........................3              MAC 301 Media, Law, and Ethics ....................3
MAC 460 News Editing.....................................3          MAC 402 Radio Production I ............................3
MAC 461 Television Production I+ ..................3                MAC 461 Television Production I.....................3
MAC 473 Magazine Writing+ ...........................3              MAC 471 Public Relations Writing...................3
MAC 480 Broadcast Announcing+ ...................3                  MAC 472 Public Relations Campaigns .............3
MAC 491 Internship (repeatable*)+ ............... 6/6               MAC 473 Magazine Writing .............................3
JRN 252 News Reporting and Writing I............3                   MAC 491 Internship (repeatable*)+ ............... 6/6
JRN 253 News Reporting and Writing II ..........3                   JRN 252 News Reporting and Writing I............3
ENG 421 Public Speaking+ ...............................3           JRN 253 News Reporting and Writing II ..........3
*Must be repeated for a total of 12 hours                           ENG 421 Public Speaking+ ...............................3
                                                                    BSA 341 Principles of Marketing......................3
Select 12 hours of course-work from the                             *Must be repeated for a total of 12 hours
following:
MAC 202 Film Appreciation .............................3            Select 3 hours from the following:
MAC 403 Radio Production II+ ........................3              ENG 233 Types of Drama .................................3
MAC 462 Television Production II+ .................3                MAC 471 Public Relations Writing...................3
MAC 471 Public Relations Writing+ ................3                 MAC 472 Public Relations Campaigns .............3
MAC 472 Public Relations Campaigns+...........3                     MAC 473 Magazine Writing .............................3
DRA 270 Theatre Performance & Play                                  BSA 200 Survey of Business.............................3
          Production (repeatable, 3 hrs) ...........1               BSA 301 Principles of Management..................3
DRA 271 Acting I..............................................3
DRA 272 Acting II.............................................3     Select 3 hours from the following:
DRA 273 Acting III ...........................................3     MAC 461 Television Production I.....................3
ENG 233 Types of Drama .................................3           DRA 270 Theatre Performance & Play
                                                                              Production (repeatable, 3 hrs) ...........3
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DRA 271 Acting I..............................................3         increased sensibility to conceptual subtleties
DRA 272 Acting II.............................................3         and linguistic nuances

+Students must pass the SPEE prior to taking                      2. express herself/himself clearly, cogently,
these courses (includes MAC and DRA                                  and critically in his/her written work.
electives if numbered 300 or above).
                                                                  3. understand the influence of the Bible on
                                                                     history, law, American community life, and
        PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION                                      culture
              DEPARTMENT
                                                                  4. develop an expertise in interpreting the
The aim of the Philosophy and Religion                               plurality of religions in their historical
program is to clarify and deepen the student’s                       settings, and critically to appreciate the
understanding of the religious dimensions of                         influence religions exert in shaping
human culture and experience as well as to                           experience and society.
develop their analytical skills and critical
thinking. We further seek to reinforce religious                  5. identify and analyze the secondary literature
influence rather than the development of the                         relevant to philosophical/religious topics
doctrine of a certain religion. We endeavor to
help students appreciate the fundamental roles                    6. recognize informal logical fallacies as well
played by philosophical inquiry in the Eastern                       as criteria for well-formed definitions
and Western worlds. Since religion is a major
factor in human culture, having shaped both the                   7. understand and appreciate themselves better
lives of its adherents as well as the societies of                   as moral agents in the world, and appreciate
which it is a part, students will study religion as                  the moral and spiritual dimensions of the
a human phenomenon and begin to understand                           interpretive activity they pursue in the study
humanity in its deepest and fullest dimensions.                      of religion

Since religiosity finds expressions in a variety                  8. understand tools of formal logical analysis,
of forms, the program therefore offers a wide                        including derivations and truth tables
range of courses treating diverse aspects of
religion and philosophy in cultures around the                    9. engage in philosophical practice within the
world. The courses explore religion and                              analytic and Continental traditions of
philosophy texts and thinkers, and seeks to                          philosophy
engage the student to think of the variety of
ways in which religion leaders and philosophers                   10. distinguish between Islam, Judaism, and
have formulated values, addressed matters of                          Christianity
conviction, and acted out their relationship to
the world of spirit as well as ways in which                      11. identify the eight major religions of the
culture, tradition, and experience intersect.                         world by comparing their teachings, their
                                                                      founders and their origins
OBJECTIVES
                                                                  MAJOR FIELD REQUIREMENTS FOR
A student who has successfully completed a                        PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION MAJOR
major in philosophy and religion will be able to:                 WITH PHILOSOPY EMPHASIS

1. understand, analyze, and critically evaluate a                 Required courses for the Philosophy and
   wide range of philosophical issues and texts                   Religion major with a Philosophy emphasis are
   in the history of philosophy/religion with an                  PHI 234, 240, 330, 334, 335, 336, 338, 431,
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                                                                                                                 College
432, 435, and 436; and REL 430. The minimum                                                     ART
major field grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 is
calculated using these 12 courses. Additionally,                           Courses are offered in a variety of Art areas.
fifteen (15) hours of Philosophy and Religion                              These courses are designed to:
electives are required.
                                                                           1. help the student develop aesthetic sensitivity
NOTE: A grade of “C” or better is required for                                through;
all courses in the major and for all support
courses (a total of 51 hours)                                                     learning to discern visual forms of art by
                                                                                  solving analytical problems and by
MAJOR FIELD REQUIREMENTS FOR                                                      observing, experiencing and producing
PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION MAJOR                                                     personal creative expression;
WITH RELIGION EMPHASIS
                                                                                  gaining an understanding of the
Required Courses for the Philosophy and                                           organization and interrelatedness of the
Religion major with a Religion emphasis are                                       elements and principles of art:
REL 220, 221, 333, 334, 335, 430, 432, 434,
435, 436; PHI 240, 234 and 431. The minimum                                       learning to judge and criticize art,
major field grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 is                                   subjectively and objectively;
calculated using these 13 courses. Additionally,
twelve (12) hours of Philosophy and Religion                                      acquiring perceptivity and technical
electives are required.                                                           competence through exhibitions, studio
                                                                                  and classroom experiences; and
NOTE: A grade of “C” or better is required for
all courses in the major and for all support                               2. encourage students to share their creative
courses (a total of 51 hours)                                                 accomplishments with others, through
                                                                              campus and community activities
PRE-SEMINARY STUDY
                                                                           MINOR FIELD REQUIREMENTS
The     following       courses    satisfy    the                          IN ART
recommendations for pre-seminary study of the
American Association of Theological Schools                                Students may select an art minor, which requires
and also satisfy the requirements of a minor.                              a minimum of 18 semester hours, from the
                                                                           following courses: ART 121, 221, 223, 226,
Courses.....................................................Hours          228, and 301.
English 232 ........................................................3
Religion 220, 221...............................................6                     FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Philosophy..........................................................6                    DEPARTMENT
    Ancient
    Medieval                                                               The Foreign Language Department assists
    Early Modern                                                           students in understanding, speaking, reading,
    19th & 20th Century                                                    and writing a foreign language. The students
Philosophy 240...................................................3         also learn the essential facts of the culture and
History 330.........................................................3      civilization of the specified language and an
Philosophy 338...................................................3         appreciation of the literature of the language.
Religion 430 or Philosophy 431 ........................3                   The objectives of the Foreign Language
Total ................................................................27   Department are to teach students to:
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                                                                                                    Paine Page 93
1. understand, speak, read and write a foreign           academic year of credit in that language at an
   language                                              accredited institution.

2. know the essential facts of the culture and           MINOR FIELD REQUIREMENTS
   civilization of the target language; and              IN FRENCH

3. know and appreciate some of the literature            Courses.....................................................Hours
   of language.                                          FRE 322 Intermediate French............................3
                                                         FRE 323 Intermediate French II ........................3
GENERAL LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS                            FRE 342 Conversational French........................3
                                                         FRE 343 Adv Conversation and Comm ............3
All students are required to demonstrate a               FRE 426 Survey of French Literature I .............3
proficiency in a modern language that is not             FRE 427 Survey of French Literature II ............3
their native tongue. This may be done by                 FRE 440 Afro-French Literature .......................3
successfully completing French 220 and 221 or            Total Hours.....................................................21
Spanish 220 and 221, or by demonstrating
proficiency through examinations.                        MINOR FIELD REQUIREMENTS
                                                         IN SPANISH
If a student transfers to Paine having completed
a full academic year of college credit in a              Courses.....................................................Hours
foreign language generally accepted by                   SPA 322 Intermediate Spanish I ........................3
regionally accredited colleges and universities,         SPA 323 Intermediate Spanish II.......................3
Paine will accept that credit as fully satisfying        SPA 342 Conversational Spanish ......................3
foreign language requirements. If a student              SPA 343 Adv Conversation and Comm ............3
transfers to Paine with at least one-half of an          SPA 426 Survey of Spanish Literature I............3
academic year of college credit in a foreign             SPA 427 Survey of Spanish Literature II ..........3
language not taught at Paine, that language will         SPA 440 Afro-Hispanic Literature ....................3
be accepted if the student completes an                  Total Hours.....................................................21




                                                    94
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                                                                                                            College
                                 SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                                        ENGLISH MAJORS

                                            FRESHMAN YEAR
                         Fall Semester          CR                                  Spring Semester            CR
ENG     101    Composition I                     3 ENG 102                  Composition II                      3
EDU     101    Preparation for Excellence        1 SOC 201                  Introduction to Sociology           3
PHI     220    Values and Society                2 MAT 122                  College Algebra                     3
CSC     100    Computer Applications and Prog. 3 HIS   104                  African American History            3
HIS     103    Survey of U.S. History            3 FRE 221                  Elementary French II or
FRE     220    Elementary French I or              SPA 221                  Elementary Spanish II                3
SPA     220    Elementary Spanish I              3 PED 121                  Fund and Tech of Activities II       1
PED     120    Fund and Tech of Activities I     1                                                              16
                                                16

                                             SOPHOMORE YEAR
                         Fall Semester           CR                                  Spring Semester          CR
REL     230    Essentials of Christian Faith      2 REL 231                 Religions of the World             2
MUS     120    Music Appreciation or                HIS  112                World History                      3
ART     120    Art Appreciation                   3 BIO 102                 Prin. and App. Biological Science 4
PHI     230    Problems of Philosophy or            ENG 232                 Introduction to Literature         3
PHI     234    History of Western Philosophy I    3                         General Electives                  4
PHS     101    Prin. and App. Physical Science    4                                                           16
               General Electives                  4
                                                 16

                                               JUNIOR YEAR
                        Fall Semester            CR                                 Spring Semester            CR
ENG     234*   World Literature in Translation I 3 ENG 235*                 World Literature in Translation II 3
ENG     324*   English Lit. from Beowulf+          3 ENG 300*               Advanced Composition                3
ENG     330*   American Lit. 1608-1870+           3 ENG 325*                English Literature since 1784       3
ENG     332*   Black Literature 1760-1900          3 ENG 331*               American Literature since 1870      3
                                                                                                      th
ENG     *      Elective                            3 ENG 333*               Black Literature of the 20 Cent.    3
                                                  15                                                           15

                                                   SENIOR YEAR
                         Fall Semester               CR                  Spring Semester                       CR
ENG     311*   History of the English                 3 ENG 455* English Research Project                       3
               Language+
ENG     430*   Shakespearean Drama                     3 ENG         421* Public Speaking                        3
ENG     454*   Senior Sem. in Reading/Res.             3                  General Elective                       3
ENG     410*   Literary Criticism                       3                 General Elective                       3
ENG     *      Elective                                 3                 General Elective                       3
                                                       15                                                       15

                                            Total Credits Hours: 124
*Indicates courses used to calculate the major field GPA.
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
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                              SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                            ENGLISH MAJORS WITH CERTIFICATION IN
                                     SECONDARY ENGLISH

                                              FRESHMAN YEAR
                          Fall Semester            CR                              Spring Semester              CR
ENG     101    Composition I                         3 ENG 102           Composition II                          3
EDU     101    Prep. for Excellence                  1 MAT 122           College Algebra                         3
PHI     220    Values and Society                    2 PSY 201           Introduction to Psychology or
CSC     100    Computer App./Programming             3 SOC 201           Introduction to Sociology               3
SPA     220    Elementary Spanish I or                 HIS  104          African American History                3
FRE     220    Elementary French I                   3 SPA 221           Elementary Spanish II or
PED     120    Fund and Tech of Activities I**       1 FRE 221           Elementary French II                     3
HIS     103    Survey of U.S. History               3 PED 121            Fund and Tech of Activities II**         1
                                                    16                                                           16
                                             SOPHOMORE YEAR
                          Fall Semester            CR                             Spring Semester               CR
ENG     232    Introduction to Literature            3 BIO  102          Prin.& App. Biological Science          4
REL     230    Essen. of Christian Faith             2 REL 231           Religions of the World                  2
MUS     120    Music Appreciation or                   HIS  112          World History                           3
ART     120    Art Appreciation                      3 EDU 220*          Foundations of Education (F)            3
PHS     101    Prin. and App. Physical Science       4 ENG 235*          World Literature in Translation II      3
PHI     230    Problems of Philosophy or                                                                        15
PHI     234    History of Western Philosophy I       3
ENG     234*   World Literature in Translation I     3
                                                    18
                                                 JUNIOR YEAR
                          Fall Semester            CR                             Spring Semester               CR
ENG     311*   History of English Language           3 EDU 339*          Classroom Management (F)                3
ENG     330*   American Lit. 1608-1870 (F)          3 ENG 331*           American Lit. since 1870 (F)            3
EDU     301*   Educational Media                     3 ENG 333*          Black Lit. of the 20th Century          3
EDU     345*   Developmental Psychology             3 EDU 303*           MG/SEC Curr. & Method (F)+              3
ENG     324*   English Lit. from Beowulf to 1784 3 EDU 393*              Educational Psychology                  3
                                                    15                                                          15

                                                 SENIOR YEAR
                         Fall Semester             CR                     Spring Semester                       CR
ENG     430*   Shakespearean Drama                   3 EDU 489* Assessment in Education                          3
ENG     410*   Literacy Criticism                    3 EDU 492* Sec Directed Teaching & Seminar                 12
EDU     308*   Teach Language Arts (F)+              3 EDU 492L* Sec Directed Teaching Lab                       0
ERD     307*   MG/SEC Teach of Readg(F)+             3                                                          15
ENG     421*   Public Speaking                       3
EDU     455*   Exceptional Children                  3
                                                    18

                                           Total Credit Hours: 128
A grade of “C” or better is required in all major and prerequisite courses.
**HED 225 Personal and Community Hygiene Substitutes for two (2) of the following courses: PED 120 Fund and Tech of
Activities I, PED 121 Fund and Tech of Activities II, PED 210 Aerobics
(F) Field Experience
+ Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
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                                                                                                    College
                              SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                               MASS COMMUNICATIONS MAJORS
                                   BROADCASTING TRACK

                                            FRESHMAN YEAR
                        Fall Semester           CR                              Spring Semester           CR
ENG    101    Composition I                      3 ENG 102            Composition II                       3
EDU    101    Prep for Excellence                1 SOC 201            Introduction to Sociology            3
PHI    220    Values and Society                 2 MAT 122            College Algebra                      3
CSC    100    Computer Applications and Prog     3 HIS 104            African American History             3
HIS    103    Survey of U.S. History             3 FRE 221            Elementary French II or
FRE    220    Elementary French I or               SPA 221            Elementary Spanish II                 3
SPA    220    Elementary Spanish I               3 PED 121            Fund and Tech of Activities II        1
PED    120    Fund and Tech of Activities I      1                                                         16
                                                16

                                        SOPHOMORE YEAR
                     Fall Semester          CR                                  Spring Semester           CR
REL    230 Religions of the World            2 ENG 232                Introduction to Literature           3
MUS    120 Music Appreciation                3 REL 231                Essentials of Christian Faith        2
PHI    230 Problems of Philosophy or           BIO  102               Prin. and App. Biological Science    4
PHI    234 History of West. Philosophy       3 HIS  112               World History                        3
PHS    101 Prin and Appl Physical Science    4 MAC 203*               Intro to Electronic Media            3
MAC    201* Media and Society                3                                                            15
                                            15

                                               JUNIOR YEAR
                        Fall Semester            CR                            Spring Semester            CR
ENG 421*      Public Speaking                      3 MAC 403*         Radio Production II+                 3
MAC 301*      Media, Law, and Ethics+              3 JRN  253*        Reporting & Writing II               3
MAC 402*      Radio Production I+                 3 MAC     *         Elective                             3
JRN 252*      News Reporting and Writing I        3                   General Elective                     3
              General Elective                    3                   General Elective                     3
                                                  15                                                      15

                                               SENIOR YEAR
                   Fall Semester                 CR                             Spring Semester           CR
MAC 461* Television Production I+                  3 MAC 480*         Broadcast Announcing                 3
MAC 491* Internship+                               6 MAC 491*         Internship                           6
MAC *    Elective                                  3 MAC 462*         Advanced Television Production II    3
         General Elective                          3 MAC   *          Elective                             3
         General Elective                          2                                                      15
                                                  17

                                         Total Credit Hours: 124
A grade of “C” or better is required for all courses in the major.
*Indicates courses used to calculate the 2.5 major field GPA
+Students must pass the SPEE prior to taking these courses (includes MAC electives if numbered 300 or above).
Mass Communication Elective to be selected from: MAC 202, MAC 302, MAC 460, MAC 471, MAC 472, MAC 473, DRA
270, DRA 270A, DRA 271, DRA 272, DRA 273, ENG 233.
HED 225 Personal and Community Hygiene Substitutes for two (2) of the following courses: PED 120 Fund & Tech of
Activities I, PED 121 Fund & Tech of Activities II, or PED 210 Aerobics.
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                                 SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                                  MASS COMMUNICATIONS MAJORS
                                         DRAMA TRACK

                                       FRESHMAN YEAR
                   Fall Semester           CR                                        Spring Semester               CR
ENG 101 Composition I                       3 ENG 102                      Composition II                           3
EDU 101 Prep for Excellence                 1 HIS 104                      African American History                 3
PED 120 Fund and Tech of Activities I or      BIO 102                      Prin & Appl Biological Science or
PED 210 Aerobics                            1 ESC 101                      Envir Science Fundamentals or
ART 120 Art Appreciation or                   PHS 101                      Prin & Appl Physical Science or
MUS 120 Music Appreciation                  3 PHS 110                      Intro to Atmospheric Science             4
HIS 103 Survey of U.S. History              3 MAT 122                      College Algebra                         3
HIS 112 World History I                     3                              General Elective                         3
CSC 100 Computer Applications and Prog      3                                                                      16
                                           17
                                      SOPHOMORE YEAR
                   Fall Semester           CR                                        Spring Semester            CR
REL 231 Religions of the World              2 BIO 102                      Prin. & Appl Bio Science or
FRE 220 Elementary French I or                ESC 101                      Envir Science Fundamentals or
SPA 220 Elementary Spanish I                3 PHS 101                      Prin & Appl Phys. Science or
PHI 220 Values and Society                  2 PHS 110                      Intro to Atmospheric Science          4
MAC 201* Media and Society                  3 FRE 221                      Elementary French II or
REL 230 Essentials of Christian Faith       2 SPA 221                      Elementary Spanish II                 3
PED 121 Fund and Tech Activities II or        ENG 232                      Intro to Literature or
PED 210 Aerobics                            1 ENG 332                      Black Literature 1760-1900 or
SOC 201 Intro to Sociology or                 ENG 333                      Black Literature of the 20th Century 3
PSY 201 Intro to Psychology                 3 ENG 233*                     Types of Drama                        3
                                           16 PHI 230                      Principles of Philosophy or
                                              PHI 234                      History of Western Philosophy I       3
                                                                                                                16
                                                  JUNIOR YEAR
                        Fall Semester               CR                     Spring Semester                         CR
MAC     301* Media, Law, and Ethics+                 3 MAC 202* Film Appreciation                                   3
DRA     270E* Theatre Perf & Play Prod                1 DRA 270F* Theatre Perf & Play Prod                          1
DRA     271* Acting I+                                3 DRA 272* Acting II                                          3
DRA     *     Elective                                3 DRA *     Elective                                          3
DRA     491* Independent Project                     3 DRA *      Elective                                          3
              General Elective                        3 DRA 491* Independent Project                                3
                                                     16                                                            16
                                                  SENIOR YEAR
                          Fall Semester             CR                     Spring Semester                         CR
ENG     430*   Shakespearean Drama                    3 ENG 436* Contemporary Drama                                 3
MAC     491*   Internship+                            6 ENG 421* Public Speaking                                    3
DRA     *      Elective                               3 MAC 491* Internship                                         6
DRA     273*   Acting III                            3            General Elective                                  3
                                                     15                                                            15

                                            Total Credit Hours: 127
A grade of “C” or better is required for all courses in the major.
*Indicates courses used to calculate the 2.5 major field GPA
+Students must pass the SPEE prior to taking these courses (includes MAC and DRA electives if numbered 300 or above).
Paine 98
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                                                                                                           College
                                 SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                                  MASS COMMUNICATIONS MAJORS
                                       JOURNALISM TRACK

                                   FRESHMAN YEAR
                  Fall Semester        CR                                           Spring Semester                CR
ENG 101 Composition I                   3 ENG 102                           Composition II                          3
EDU 101 Prep for Excellence             1 SOC 201                           Introduction to Sociology               3
PHI 220 Values and Society              2 MAT 122                           College Algebra                         3
CSC 100 Computer Applications & Prog 3 HIS 104                              African American History                3
HIS 103 Survey of U.S. History          3 FRE 221                           Elementary French II or                 3
FRE 220 Elementary French I or          3 SPA 221                           Elementary Spanish II
SPA 220 Elementary Spanish I              PED 121                           Fund and Tech of Activities II           1
PED 120 Fund and Tech of Activities I   1 DRA 270                           Theater Perf & Play Prod                 1
DRA 270A Theater Perf & Play Prod       1                                                                           17
                                       17

                                          SOPHOMORE YEAR
                        Fall Semester          CR                                   Spring Semester                CR
REL     230    Religions of the World           2 ENG 232                   Introduction to Literature              3
MUS     120    Music Appreciation               3 REL 231                   Essentials of Christian Faith           2
PHI     230    Problems of Philosophy or        3 BIO 102                   Prin and Appl Biological Science        4
PHI     234    History of Western Philosophy I    HIS 112                   World History                           3
PHS     101    Prin. and App. Physical Science 4 MAC 201*                   Media and Society                       3
MAC     203*   Introduction to Electronic       3                                                                  15
               Media
                                               15

                                     JUNIOR YEAR
                  Fall Semester        CR                                           Spring Semester                CR
MAC 301* Media, Law, and Ethics+         3 JRN 253*                         News Report. and Writing II+            3
JRN 252* News Report. and Writing I+    3 MAC 473*                          Magazine Writing+                       3
MAC 461* Television Production I+        3 MAC 480*                         Broadcast Communications+               3
MAC *    Elective                       3 MAC     *                         Elective                                3
MAC *    Elective                       3                                   General Elective                        3
                                        15                                                                         15

                                                  SENIOR YEAR
                        Fall Semester               CR                              Spring Semester                CR
MAC     402*   Radio Production I+                   3 MAC 491*             Internship                              6
MAC     491*   Internship+                           6 MAC *                Electives                               3
MAC     460*   News Editing                           3                     General Elective                        3
ENG     421*   Public Speaking+                      3                      General Elective                        3
                                                     15                                                            15

                                             Total Credit Hours: 124
A grade of “C” or better is required for all courses in the major.
*Indicates courses used to calculate the 2.5 major field GPA
+Students must pass the SPEE prior to taking these courses (includes MAC and JRN electives if numbered 300 or above).
Paine College
Paine College                                           Humanities                                                 Page 100
                                                                                                                    Page 99
                                   SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                                    MASS COMMUNICATIONS MAJORS
                                      PUBLIC RELATIONS TRACK

                                              FRESHMAN YEAR
                          Fall Semester           CR                                       Spring Semester               CR
ENG      101    Composition I                      3 ENG 102                     Composition II                           3
EDU      101    Prep for Excellence                1 SOC 201                     Introduction to Sociology                3
PHI      220    Values and Society                 2 MAT 122                     College Algebra                          3
CSC      100    Computer Applications and Prog     3 HIS  104                    African American History                 3
HIS      103    Survey of U.S. History             3 FRE 221                     Elementary French II or
FRE      220    Elementary French I or               SPA 221                     Elementary Spanish II                   3
SPA      220    Elementary Spanish I               3 PED 121                     Fund and Tech of Activities II          1
PED      120    Fund and Tech of Activities I      1                                                                     16
                                                  16

                                         SOPHOMORE YEAR
                       Fall Semester         CR                                            Spring Semester               CR
REL      231 Religions of the World            2 ENG 232                         Introduction to Literature               3
MUS      120 Music Appreciation                3 REL 231                         Essentials of Christian Faith            2
PHI      230 Problems of Philosophy or           BIO 102                         Prin and Appl Biological Science         4
PHI      234 History of Western Philosophy I   3 HIS 112                         World History                            3
PHS      101 Prin and Appl Physical Science    4 MAC 203*                        Introduction to Electronic Media         3
MAC      201* Media & Society                 3                                                                          15
MAC        * Elective                         2
                                              17

                                                     JUNIOR YEAR
                          Fall Semester                 CR                                Spring Semester                CR
MAC 301*        Media, Law, and Ethics+                  3 JRN   253*            News Report. and Writing II              3
JRN 252*        News Report. and Writing I               3 MAC 202*              Film Appreciation                        3
MAC 402*        Radio Production I+                      3 MAC 473*              Magazine Writing+                        3
ENG 421*        Public Speaking+                         3 MAC      *            Elective                                 3
                General Elective                         3                       General Elective                         3
                                                        15                                                               15


                                                     SENIOR YEAR
                         Fall Semester                  CR                                 Spring Semester               CR
BSA      341* Principles of Marketing+                   3 MAC 471*              Public Relations Writing                 3
MAC      491* Internship+                                6 MAC 472*              Public Relations Campaign                3
MAC      461* Television Production I                    3 MAC 491*              Internship                               6
              General Elective                           3 MAC    *              Elective                                 3
                                                        15                                                               15


                                                Total Credit Hours: 124
A grade of “C” or better is required for all courses in the major.
*Indicates courses used to calculate the 2.5 major field GPA
+Students must pass the SPEE prior to taking these courses (includes MAC electives if numbered 300 or above).
Students must complete an internship in their last year of study, which is used as the student’s exit tool. Additional
internships may be taken if Junior/Senior status.
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                                                                                                Paine College
                      SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
       PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION MAJORS WITH AN EMPHASIS IN PHILOSOPHY

                                               FRESHMAN YEAR
                           Fall Semester          CR                            Spring Semester               CR
ENG      101     Composition I                     3 ENG 102           Composition II                          3
PHI      230     Problems of Philosophy            3 PHI 220           Values and Society                      2
CSC      100     Computer Applications and Prog    3 MAT 122           College Algebra                         3
HIS      103     Survey of U.S. History            3 HIS 104           African American History                3
FRE      220     Elementary French I or               FRE 221          Elementary French II or
SPA      220     Elementary Spanish I              3 SPA 221           Elementary Spanish II                   3
EDU      101     Prep for Excellence                1 REL 230          Essentials of the Christian Faith       2
PED      120     Fund and Tech of Activities I      1 PED 121          Fund and Tech of Activities II          1
                                                   17                                                         17

                                         SOPHOMORE YEAR
                       Fall Semester         CR                                  Spring Semester              CR
REL      231 Religions of the World           2 HIS 112                World History                           3
MUS      120 Music Appreciation               3 PHI 235*               Hist of West Philosophy II              3
PHI      234* Hist of West Philosophy I       3 ESC 101                Envir Science Fundamentals              4
PHS      101 Prin and App Physical Science    4 ENG 232                Introduction to Literature              3
SOC      201 Introduction to Sociology        3 PHI 240*               Critical Thinking                       3
                                             15                                                               16

                                              JUNIOR YEAR
                     Fall Semester              CR                              Spring Semester               CR
PHI   330* African American Philosophy           3 PHI 335*            Social & Political Phil (or equiv.)+    3
PHI   334* Hist of Phil in the U.S. (or equiv.) 3 PHI 431*             Ethics+                                 3
PHI   338* Logic                                 3 PHI 438*            Aesthetics (or equiv.)                  3
PHI/REL    Elective                              3 PHI/REL             Elective                                3
           General Elective                      3                     General Elective                        3
                                                15                                                            15

                                                       SENIOR YEAR
                    Fall Semester                        CR                     Spring Semester               CR
PHI   435* Contemporary Issues In Phil+                   3 PHI 436*   Contemp Issues in Rel and Phil          3
PHI/REL    Elective                                       3 REL 430*   Philosophy of Religion                  3
PHI/REL    Elective                                       3 PHI/REL    Elective                                3
           General Elective                               2            General Elective                        3
           General Elective                               3            General Elective                        3
                                                         14                                                   15

                                                Total Credit Hours: 124
A grade of “C” or better is required for all courses in the major.
*Indicates courses used to calculate the 2.5 major field GPA
+Students must pass the SPEE prior to taking these courses.
Paine College
Paine College                                            Humanities                                       Page 102
                                                                                                          Page 101
                      SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
         PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION MAJORS WITH AN EMPHASIS IN RELIGION

                                              FRESHMAN YEAR
                       Fall Semester Freshman    CR                            Spring Semester Freshman        CR
 EDU      101     Prep for Excellence              1 ENG 102               Composition II                       3
 ENG      101     Composition I                   3 PHI 220                Values and Society                   2
 PHI      230     Problems of Philosophy           3 MAT 122               College Algebra                      3
 CSC      100     Computer Applications & Prog    3 HIS 104                African American History             3
 HIS      103     Survey of U.S. History           3 FRE 221               Elementary French II or
 FRE      220     Elementary French I or             SPA 221               Elementary Spanish II               3
 SPA      220     Elementary Spanish I            3 REL 230                Essentials of the Christian Faith    2
 PED      120     Fund and Tech of Activities I    1 PED 121               Fund and Tech of Activities II       1
                                                  17                                                           17
                                            SOPHOMORE YEAR
                         Fall Semester           CR                                  Spring Semester           CR
 REL      231 Religions of the World               2 HIS 112               World History                        3
 MUS      120  Music Appreciation                  3 PHI 240*              Critical Thinking                    3
 REL      220* Old Testament Religion              3 ESC 101               Environmental Science Fund           4
 PHS      101 Prin. And App. Physical Science      4 ENG 232               Introduction to Literature           3
 SOC      201 Introduction to Sociology            3 PHI 234*              Hist. of West Philosophy I           3
                                                  15                                                           16

                                             JUNIOR YEAR
                    Fall Semester              CR                                   Spring Semester            CR
 REL 333* Hebrew Prophecy & Modern Appl         3 REL 435*                 Contemporary Issues in Religion+     3
 REL 335* Major Religions                       3 REL 430*                 Philosophy of Religion               3
 REL 221* New Testament Religion                3 PHI 431*                 Ethics+                              3
 REL/PHI  Elective                              3 REL/PHI                  Elective                             3
          General Elective                      3                          General Elective                     3
                                               15                                                              15
                                             SENIOR YEAR
                     Fall Semester             CR                                    Spring Semester           CR
 REL 436* Contemp. Issues In Rel (Sr. Field)+   3 REL 434*                 Black Religion                       3
 REL 432* Christian Education in the Church     3 REL 334*                 Christian Classics                   3
 REL/PHI  Elective                              3 REL/PHI                  Elective                             3
          General Elective                      2                          General Elective                     3
          General Elective                      3                          General Elective                     3
                                               14                                                              15

                                                 Total Credit Hours: 124
A grade of “C” or better is required for all courses in the major.
*Indicates courses used to calculate the 2.5 major field GPA
+Students must pass the SPEE prior to taking these courses.
                                                                                                  103
                                                                                                  103
DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS




                                                                                                                                                           DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS
                                                          environmental science emphasis;                  graduate school, teaching, and other areas
                                               with    38 hours   for     DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES
                                                                         chemistry   majors                preparation for entry into medical school,
                                                                                AND MATHEMATICS         6. provide pre-requisite courses and other
                                                  33 hours for students majoring in chemistry;
                                                                                 MAJORS                    life;
                                                                        BIOLOGY/PRE-PROFESSIONAL,
                                                  secondary education emphasis;*                           and computer technology play in modern
                                                                      BIOLOGY/SECONDARY EDUCATION,
                                               66 hours for students majoring in biology with              which the natural sciences, mathematics,
                                                               CHEMISTRY, CHEMISTRY/ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE,
                                                                                                        5. give students an understanding of the roles
                                                              MATHEMATICS, MATHEMATICS/COMPUTER SCIENCE, AND
                                                  a pre-professional emphasis;
                                                                    MATHEMATICS/SECONDARY EDUCATION
                                               37 hours for students majoring in biology with              the scientific method;
                                                                                                        4. develop an appreciation for a knowledge of
                                               support course hours are:
                                               The Division of Natural Sciences and
                                               exclusive of Common Curriculum and                          which require knowledge of the natural
                                                                                                           education;
                                               Mathematics     is    organized   into    three
                                               hours required for a major within the Division,             sciences, mathematics and computer
                                                                                                           technology in the context of a liberal arts
                                               departments: the Department of Biology; the
                                               and mathematics. The minimum major core                     technology;
                                                                                                           sciences, mathematics and computer
                                               Department of Chemistry, Physics and
                                               Majors in the Division are in biology, chemistry         3. provide a thorough foundation in the natural
                                               Environmental Science; and the Department of             7. provide opportunities for undergraduate
                                               Mathematics and Computer Science. Each
                                                                                    MAJORS                 research;
                                                                                                           computer technology;
                                               department is supervised by a coordinator, who              in the natural sciences and mathematics, and
                                               is responsible to the division chair.
                                                   computer technology.                                 8. provide scientific resources for the College
                                                                                                        2. help students achieve academic excellence
                                               Departmental matters are administered by the
                                                   sciences, engineering, mathematics, and                 and the community;
                                               appropriate coordinator.
                                                   perspectives on the applications of the                 College;
                                               10. provide,    whenever   possible,   global            9. increase the number of highly qualified
                                                                                                        1. carry out the mission and goals of the
                                               The goals of the Division of Natural Sciences               minority scientists and teachers of natural
                                               and Mathematics are to:
                                                  sciences and mathematics; and                            sciences and mathematics; and
                                                                                                        and Mathematics are to:
                                                  minority scientists and teachers of natural           The goals of the Division of Natural Sciences
                                               1. carry out the mission and goals of the
                                               9. increase the number of highly qualified               10. provide,    whenever   possible,   global
                                                  College;                                                  perspectives on the applications of the
                                                                                                        appropriate coordinator.
                                                  and the community;                                        sciences, engineering, mathematics, and
                                                                                                        Departmental matters are administered by the
                                               2. help students achieve academic excellence
                                               8. provide scientific resources for the College              computer technology.
                                                                                                        is responsible to the division chair.
                                                  in the natural sciences and mathematics, and          department is supervised by a coordinator, who
                                                  computer technology;
                                                  research;                                             MAJORS
                                                                                                        Mathematics and Computer Science. Each
                                               7. provide opportunities for undergraduate               Environmental Science; and the Department of
                                               3. provide a thorough foundation in the natural          Majors in the Division are in biology, chemistry
                                                                                                        Department of Chemistry, Physics and
                                                  sciences, mathematics and computer
                                               technology;                                              and mathematics. The minimum major core
                                                                                                        departments: the Department of Biology; the
                                                  technology in the context of a liberal arts
                                               sciences, mathematics and computer                       hours required for a major within the Division,
                                                                                                        Mathematics     is    organized   into    three
                                                  education;
                                               which require knowledge of the natural                   exclusive of Common Curriculum and
                                                                                                        The Division of Natural Sciences and
                                                                                                        support course hours are:
                                               4. develop an appreciation for a knowledge of
                                                  the scientific method;
                                                                    MATHEMATICS/SECONDARY EDUCATION     37 hours for students majoring in biology with
                                                                                                           a pre-professional emphasis;
                                                              MATHEMATICS, MATHEMATICS/COMPUTER SCIENCE, AND
                                               5. give students an understanding of the roles
                                                               CHEMISTRY, CHEMISTRY/ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE,
                                                  which the natural sciences, mathematics,
                                                                      BIOLOGY/SECONDARY EDUCATION,      66 hours for students majoring in biology with
                                                  and computer technology play in modern
                                                                        BIOLOGY/PRE-PROFESSIONAL,          secondary education emphasis;*
                                                  life;                          MAJORS
                                                                                                        33 hours for students majoring in chemistry;
                                               6. provide pre-requisite courses and other
                                                                                AND MATHEMATICS
                                                  preparation for entry into medical school,
                                                                          DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES  38 hours   for    chemistry   majors       with
                                                  graduate school, teaching, and other areas               environmental science emphasis;
                                                                                                  103
                                                                                                  102
                                                                                                  103
Paine College
Paine College                   Natural Sciences and Mathematics                       Page 104
                                                                                       Page 103
34 hours for students majoring in mathematics;
                                                   6. increase the number of highly qualified
75 hours for students majoring in mathematics         minority biologists and biology teachers.
   with secondary education emphasis; *
                                                   MAJORS AND MINORS
46 hours for students majoring in mathematics
   with computer science emphasis.                 The Biology Department offers two types of
                                                   biology majors, as outlined below, plus the
* Includes education and Reading Pedagogy          biology minor.
hours needed for certification.
                                                   The department urges its majors to take a minor
MINORS                                             in an appropriate supporting area, such as
                                                   chemistry, mathematics, physics, sociology or
Minors are offered in each of the departmental     psychology.
areas.
                                                   Also, when applicable, to take those courses
        BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT                         required in the specific professional education
                                                   sequence, as outlined by the Division of
The objectives of the Biology Department are       Education in conjunction with the Division of
to:                                                Natural Sciences and Mathematics.

1. develop an understanding of life through a      Criteria for Admission to the Biology Major
   comprehensive study of the concepts,            Programs
   methodologies and principles of biology;
                                                   To be admitted to the Biology Major Programs,
2. provide a broad education and strong            students must:
   foundation in the biological sciences;
                                                   1. have passed (if required) REA 099, ENG
3. provide effective science experiences which        099, and MAT 099 with a grade of “S”.
   will prepare students for:
                                                   2. have passed the Sophomore Proficiency
   a. teaching careers     in   the   biological      Examination in English (SPEE).
      sciences;
                                                   3. have completed the following courses with a
   b. matriculation in graduate schools;              grade of “C” or better:
                                                          -BIO 111 and BIO 112
   c. matriculation in professional schools of            -CHE 120 and CHE 121
      dentistry, allied health sciences,                  -MAT 126
      medicine, veterinary medicine, nursing              -ENG 101 and ENG 102
      and pharmacy; and                            *Note: the above courses may be repeated no
                                                   more than two times in order for the student to
   d. employment in industry;                      achieve the “C” or better grade.

4. provide the courses required to meet            4. submit a written application for admission
   common curriculum requirements for non-            and include two letters of recommendation
   science majors;                                    from science or mathematics faculty.

5. develop interests in specialized subjects in    5. Students    not   meeting      the   above
   the field of biology; and                          requirements will be classified as pending
Paine 104
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                                                                                       Paine College
   and will not be allowed to take upper level        or better is required for all courses in the Major
   Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics         and for all support courses.
   courses until formally accepted into the
   major.                                             Additional courses required are: CSC 100 and
                                                      MAT 126, if needed, (common curriculum
BIOLOGY MAJOR WITH PRE-                               hours); CHE 120, CHE 121 CHE 334, CHE 335
PROFESSIONAL SCIENCE EMPHASIS                         and CHE 421; MAT 220; and PHY 201 and
                                                      PHY 202. With the proper pre-requisites,
The Biology major with a Pre-Professional             students may substitute MAT 220 for MAT 126.
Science emphasis offers courses in preparation        For students planning careers in biology, MAT
for graduate work, medicine, dentistry, and           335 is strongly recommended. Biology Pre-
veterinary medicine, in addition to pharmacy,         professional Emphasis majors are urged to elect
allied health sciences, and nursing. Complete         chemistry, mathematics or physics as a minor.
lists of courses suggested in each area of interest
are available from academic advisors.                 BIOLOGY MAJOR WITH SECONDARY
                                                      EDUCATION EMPHASIS
For students interested in medicine, dentistry,
veterinary medicine, pharmacy and graduate            Required biology courses for students with a
programs, the completion of the bachelor's            Secondary Education Emphasis are BIO 111
degree at Paine College prior to entry into the       and BIO 112 (common curriculum hours); BIO
professional school is advised.                       220, BIO 227, BIO 321, BIO 322, BIO 425 and
                                                      BIO 431.
Some allied health sciences and nursing
programs are generally set up on a "2+ 2" or "3+      Additional courses required within the Division
2" basis. This means two or three years at Paine      are: CSC 100, MAT 126, if needed, (common
College, followed by two years at the second          curriculum hours); MAT 220; and CHE 120 and
(professional)   institution,    based     upon       CHE 121. With the proper pre-requisites,
acceptance (not a direct transfer). In these          students may substitute MAT 220 for MAT 126.
programs, the only degree awarded is the B. S.
degree in the professional area at the second         Education and Reading Pedagogy courses
institution.                                          required for secondary certification in Biology
                                                      are EDU 220, EDU 301, EDU 303, EDU 332,
A student who expects a strong recommendation         EDU 339, EDU 345, EDU 393, EDU 455, EDU
from Paine College should earn at least a 3.0         489, EDU 492, EDU 492L, and ERD 307.
("B") average for all courses taken at Paine.
                                                      MAJOR FIELD PAPER REQUIREMENT
It is the responsibility of the student to check      IN BIOLOGY
and follow the specific requirements of the
professional school(s) of interest.                   Biology majors with Pre-Professional Emphasis
                                                      are required to conduct an original experimental
Required biology courses for majors with the          research investigation and report the results
Pre-Professional Science Emphasis are BIO 111         orally and in a formal written report to the
and BIO 112 (common curriculum hours); BIO            Biology Department. Students must begin work
220, BIO 227, BIO 320, BIO 321, BIO 322,              on the major field project by the beginning of
BIO 425 and BIO 431; and eight (8) hours of           their junior year. An acceptable report must be
biology elective courses at or above the 200          completed one month prior to the end of the
level. Four semesters of Biology Seminar (BIO         semester that the student is enrolled in BIO 473.
470, BIO 471, BIO 472 and BIO 473) are                See course description for BIO 473 for further
required of all biology majors. A grade of “C”        details.
Paine College
Paine College                   Natural Sciences and Mathematics                                        Page 106
                                                                                                        Page 105
The electronic classroom portfolio, including
the oral presentation, will be accepted in lieu of   REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGY
the major field paper requirement for Biology        MAJORS WITH PRE-PROFESSIONAL
majors with Secondary Education Emphasis.            SCIENCE EMPHASIS

BIOLOGY EXIT EXAMINATION                             Common Curriculum ............................Hours
                                                     BIO 111 Principles of Biology I ........................4
Senior Biology majors with Pre-Professional          BIO 112 Principles of Biology II.......................4
Emphasis are required to take a written exit         CSC 100 Computer Applications and Prog. ......3
examination prior to graduation. The Biology         MAT 126 Precalculus ........................................3
Exit Examination consists of the following two
parts:                                               Major Core ..............................................Hours
                                                     BIO 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology I.....4
Part A consists of the standardized test entitled    BIO 227 Vertebrate Zoology .............................4
“Biology Major Field Test” from the                  BIO 320 Plant Physiology .................................4
Educational Testing Service (ETS).                   BIO 321 Genetics+ ............................................4
                                                     BIO 322 Cell Biology ........................................4
Part B consists of a Department-produced             BIO 425 Ecology ...............................................4
section.                                             BIO 431 Microbiology.......................................4
                                                     BIO 470 Seminar I/ Intro Seminar.....................0
Part B, the Department-produced section, will        BIO 471 Seminar II/Inter Seminar.....................0
be composed by the Biology Faculty. This             BIO 472 Seminar III/Adv Seminar+..................0
section consists of 150 multiple choice              BIO 473 Seminar IV/Sr Field Seminar..............1
questions and covers not only BIO 111/112, but
course content from each of the following            Electives in Biology .................................Hours
Biology Major Core Courses: BIO 220, BIO             (at least 8 hours)*
227, BIO 320, BIO 321, BIO 322, BIO 425, and
BIO 431. Students should have taken at least         BIO 202 Scientific and Medical Terminology...2
five, but preferably all of these core courses       BIO 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology II....4
before taking the exit examination. There will       BIO 226 Invertebrate Zoology...........................4
be an approximately equal number of questions        BIO 303 Histology.............................................4
from each area. Students must score at least         BIO 310 Systematic Botany...............................4
70% or above on Part B in order to have a            BIO 329 Entomology.........................................4
passing score.      A passing score on this          BIO 441 Embryology.........................................4
examination must be recorded at least one            BIO 450 Independent Research ...................TBA
month prior to the expected date of graduation.      BIO 460 Special Topics ...............................TBA
The Biology Exit Examination for Biology             SUPPORT COURSES
majors with Secondary Education Emphasis will        (grade of C or better is required in all support
be the Georgia Assessment for the Certification      courses)
of Educators II (GACE II) examination.
                                                     Chemistry.................................................Hours
BIOLOGY MINOR
                                                     CHE 120 General Chemistry I...........................4
A minor in biology requires at least 18 hours of     CHE 121 General Chemistry II..........................4
Biology courses (200 level or above) beyond          CHE 334 Organic Chemistry I+ ........................4
BIO 111 and BIO 112 and CHE 120 and CHE              CHE 335 Organic Chemistry II .........................4
121. Successful completion of the minor also         CHE 421 General Biochemistry ........................4
requires evaluation of the student's competency
by the Biology Faculty.                              Physics......................................................Hours
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                                                                                                            Paine College
PHY 201 College Physics I................................4         MAT 220 Calculus I ..........................................4
PHY 202 College Physics II ..............................4
                                                                   Education and Reading Pedagogy.........Hours
Mathematics                                                        EDU 220 Foundations of Education (F) ............3
MAT 220 Calculus I+ ........................................4      EDU 301 Media Technology+...........................3
                                                                   EDU 303 MG/SEC Curr. and Methods (F)+ .....3
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency                      EDU 332 Science for Teachers (F)+ .................3
Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking                      EDU 339 Classroom Management (F)+ ...........3
these courses.                                                     EDU 345 Developmental Psychology ...............3
                                                                   EDU 393 Educational Psychology.....................3
*Note: For Biology majors with Pre-                                EDU 455 Exceptional Children .........................3
Professional Science Emphasis, four of the eight                   EDU 489 Assessment in Education ..................3
elective hours may include, with departmental                      EDU 492 SEC Directed Teaching/Seminar.....12
permission, courses at the 200 level or above in                   EDU 492L SEC Directed Teaching/Sem. Lab ..0
chemistry, physics, or mathematics.                                ERD 307 SEC Teaching of Reading (F)+ .........3

The required major field grade point average                       +Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency
(GPA) of 2.5 for the Biology major with Pre-                       Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking
Professional Science Emphasis is computed                          these courses.
using the biology major core courses, and                          (F) Field Experience Required
biology electives.
                                                                   The required grade point average (GPA) of 2.5
REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGY                                           for the Biology Major with Secondary
MAJORS WITH SECONDARY                                              Education Emphasis is computed using the
EDUCATION EMPHASIS                                                 biology major core courses, and the education
                                                                   and reading pedagogy courses.
Common Curriculum .............................Hours
BIO 111 Principles of Biology I ........................4                   CHEMISTRY, PHYSICS AND
BIO 112 Principles of Biology II.......................4                    ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
CSC 100 Computer Applications and Prog. ......3                                  DEPARTMENT
MAT 126 Precalculus ........................................3
                                                                   The objectives of the Chemistry, Physics, and
Major Core ..............................................Hours     Environmental Sciences Department are to:
BIO 220 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (F)4
BIO 227 Vertebrate Zoology .............................4          1. prepare students to meet professional goals
BIO 321 Genetics+ ............................................4       for:
BIO 322 Cell Biology (F) ..................................4
BIO 425 Ecology ...............................................4       a. employment       in   government    and
BIO 431 Microbiology.......................................4              industry;
                                                                       b. matriculation in graduate programs;
SUPPORT COURSES                                                        c. matriculation in medical, dental, health
(grade of C or better is required in all support                          care and professional schools;
courses)
                                                                   2. give students in other departments within the
Chemistry.................................................Hours       Division a background in chemistry and
CHE 120 General Chemistry I...........................4               physics;
CHE 121 General Chemistry II..........................4

Mathematics ............................................Hours
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                                                                                        Page 107
3. increase the number of highly qualified          REQUIREMENTS FOR THE
   minority chemists and chemistry teachers;        CHEMISTRY MAJOR
   and
                                                    Required chemistry courses for students in
4. increase the number of minority graduates in     chemistry are CHE 120 and CHE 121 (Common
   the environmental professions                    Curriculum hours), CHE 233, CHE 334, CHE
                                                    335, CHE 336, CHE 436, CHE 437, and eight
MAJORS AND MINORS                                   hours of chemistry electives. Four semesters of
                                                    chemistry seminar are also required (CHE 470,
The Chemistry, Physics, and Environmental           CHE 471, CHE 472 and CHE 473).
Sciences Department offers two majors:
Chemistry      and     Chemistry      with    an    Additional courses required within the Division
Environmental Science Emphasis. In addition         are: CSC 100 and MAT 126, if needed,
to the majors, minors are available in chemistry,   (Common Curriculum hours); MAT 220, MAT
physics, and environmental science. The             221 and MAT 222; BIO 111 and BIO 112; and
Department urges its majors to take a minor in      PHY 201 and PHY 202. With the proper pre-
an appropriate supporting area, such as biology,    requisites, students may substitute MAT 220 for
mathematics, or physics.                            MAT 126.

Criteria for Admission to the Chemistry             A grade of “C” or better is required for all
Major Programs                                      courses in the major and all support courses.

1. Have passed (if required) REA 099, ENG           REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CHEMISTRY
   099, and MAT 099 with a grade of “S.”            MAJOR WITH ENVIRONMENTAL
                                                    SCIENCE EMPHASIS
2. Have passed the Sophomore Proficiency
   Examination in English (SPEE)                    Required courses for students in this major are
                                                    CHE 120, CHE 121 (common core curriculum
3. Have completed the following courses with        hours), CHE 233, CHE 334, CHE 335, CHE
   a grade of “C” or better:                        436, CHE 470, CHE 471, CHE 472, and CHE
                                                    473.
   - CHE 120 and CHE 121
   - MAT 126                                        Required courses in Environmental Science are
   - ENG 101 and ENG 102                            ESC 201, ESC 202, ESC 210, ESC 302, ESC
*Note: the above courses may be repeated no         401, and four hours of environmental science
more than two times in order for the student to     electives.
achieve the “C” or better grade.
                                                    Additional courses required within the Division
4. Submit a written application for admission       are: CSC 100 and MAT 126, if needed,
   and include two letters of recommendation        (Common Curriculum hours); MAT 220 and
   from science or mathematics faculty.             MAT 221; BIO 111 and BIO 112; and PHY 201
                                                    and PHY 202. With the proper pre-requisites,
5. Students     not    meeting      the    above    students may substitute MAT 220 for MAT 126.
   requirements will be classified as pending
   and will not be allowed to take upper level      A grade of “C” or better is required for all
   Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics courses        courses in the major and all support courses.
   until formally accepted into the Major.
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                                                                                                 Paine College
CHEMISTRY EXIT EXAMINATION                            CHE 120 General Chemistry I...........................4
REQUIREMENT                                           CHE 121 General Chemistry II..........................4
                                                      CSC 100 Computer Applications and Prog. ......3
Senior majors in Chemistry or Chemistry with          MAT 126 Precalculus ........................................3
Environmental Science Emphasis are required
to take a written exit examination prior to           Chemistry Core .......................................Hours
graduation. A passing score on this examination       CHE 233 Quantitative Analysis.........................4
of 70% or higher must be recorded at least one        CHE 334 Organic Chemistry I+ ........................4
month prior to the expected date of graduation.       CHE 335 Organic Chemistry II .........................4
                                                      CHE 336 Instrumental Analysis ........................4
                                                      CHE 436 Physical Chemistry I ..........................4
MAJOR FIELD PAPER REQUIREMENT                         CHE 437 Physical Chemistry II.........................4
FOR BOTH CHEMISTRY MAJORS                             CHE 470 Seminar I/Intro Seminar+ ..................0
                                                      CHE 471 Seminar II/Inter Seminar....................0
Senior majors in Chemistry and Chemistry with         CHE 472 Seminar III/Adv Seminar...................0
Environmental Science Emphasis are required           CHE 473 Seminar IV/Sr Field Seminar.............1
to conduct a research project (laboratory, field,
or clinical) and report the results orally and in a   Chemistry Electives (8 hours should be
formal written report to the Chemistry                selected from the following):
Department. Students must begin work on the
major field project by the beginning of their         Courses.....................................................Hours
junior year. An acceptable report must be             CHE 421 General Biochemistry ........................4
completed at least one month prior to the             CHE 422 Inorganic Chemistry...........................4
expected date of graduation. See course               CHE 423 Organic Analysis................................4
descriptions for CHE 470 through CHE 473 for          CHE 425 Organic Preparation ...........................3
further details.                                      CHE 450 Independent Research .................... 1-4
                                                      CHE 460 Special Topics................................ 1-4
CHEMISTRY MINOR
                                                      SUPPORT COURSES
A minor in chemistry requires a minimum of 18         (a grade of C or better is required in all support
hours in chemistry courses beyond CHE 120             courses)
and CHE 121.
                                                      Biology......................................................Hours
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MINOR
                                                      BIO 111 Principles of Biology I ........................4
A minor in Environmental Science requires a           BIO 112 Principles of Biology II.......................4
minimum of 18 hours of prescribed
environmental science courses beyond the 100          Mathematics ............................................Hours
level.                                                MAT 220 Calculus I ..........................................4
                                                      MAT 221 Calculus II .........................................4
PHYSICS MINOR                                         MAT 222 Calculus III........................................4

A minor in Physics requires a minimum of 18           Physics......................................................Hours
hours of prescribed physics courses at the 200        PHY 201 College Physics I................................4
level or above.                                       PHY 202 College Physics II ..............................4

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CHEMISTRY                        +Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency
MAJOR                                                 Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking
                                                      these courses.
Common Curriculum ............................Hours
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A grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 is required                       MAT 221 Calculus II .........................................4
for the Chemistry major. The GPA is computed
using the Chemistry Core Courses and                                 Physics......................................................Hours
Chemistry electives.                                                 PHY 201 College Physics I................................4
                                                                     PHY 202 College Physics II ..............................4
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CHEMISTRY
MAJOR WITH ENVIRONMENTAL                                             +Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency
SCIENCE EMPHASIS                                                     Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking
                                                                     these courses.
Common Curriculum ............................Hours
CHE 120 General Chemistry I...........................4              A grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 is required
CHE 121 General Chemistry II..........................4              for the Chemistry Major with Environmental
CSC 100 Computer Applications and Prog. ......3                      Science Emphasis. The GPA is computed using
MAT 126 Precalculus ........................................3        the Chemistry core courses, the Environmental
                                                                     Science core courses, and the Environmental
Chemistry Core .......................................Hours          Science elective courses.
CHE 233 Quantitative Analysis.........................4
CHE 334 Organic Chemistry I+ ........................4               DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND
CHE 335 Organic Chemistry II .........................4                    COMPUTER SCIENCE
CHE 436 Physical Chemistry I ..........................4
CHE 470 Seminar I/Intro Seminar+ ..................0                 The objectives of the Mathematics                            and
CHE 471 Seminar II/Inter Seminar....................0                Computer Science Department are to:
CHE 472 Seminar III/Adv Seminar...................0
CHE 473 Seminar IV/Sr Field Seminar.............1                    1. give students an understanding of the role
                                                                        and utility of mathematics and the skills to
Environmental Science Core..................Hours                       apply the principles of mathematics in their
ESC 201 Intro to Environmental Justice............3                     experiences;
ESC 202 Waste Mgt/Pollut. Prevent Strategies.3                       2. improve the ability of students to use
ESC 210 Environmental Statistical Tech.+ ......3                        logical, quantitative reasoning;
ESC 302 Environmental Monitor\ Instrumen ....4
ESC 401 Environmental Toxicology .................4                  3. give students who are planning careers in
                                                                        mathematics a rigorous foundation in the
Environmental Science ..........................Hours                   concepts and methods of modern
Electives (select 4 hours)                                              mathematics;
ESC 301 Environmental Policy Mgt/ Regs .......3
ESC 402 Intro. to Risk Assessment/ Mgt ..........4                   4. meet common curriculum requirements for
ESC 450 Independent Research.................... 1- 4                   non-science majors;
ESC 460 Special Topics................................ 1- 4
                                                                     5. increase the number of highly qualified
SUPPORT COURSES                                                         minority mathematicians and mathematics
(grade of C or better is required in all support                        teachers; and
courses)
                                                                     6. provide students in mathematics and
Biology......................................................Hours      computer science with the technology and
BIO 111 Principles of Biology I ........................4               applications     necessary      for    post-
BIO 112 Principles of Biology II.......................4                baccalaureate study and/or the work force.

Mathematics ............................................Hours
MAT 220 Calculus I ..........................................4
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                                                                                     Paine College
MAJORS AND MINORS
                                                    MATHEMATICS MAJORS
The Mathematics Department offers three
majors: Mathematics, Mathematics with               Required mathematics courses for students
Computer Science Emphasis and Mathematics           majoring in Mathematics are MAT 220, MAT
with Secondary Education Emphasis. A minor          221, MAT 222, MAT 309, CSC 230, MAT 322,
in Mathematics is also offered.                     MAT 334, MAT 442, MAT 450, MAT 472 and
                                                    MAT 473, and one mathematics elective, which
The Mathematics major is designed to give the       may include other computer science courses
student experience in both abstract thinking and    and/or physics courses (200 level or above), but
applicable     mathematics     sufficient     for   may not include MAT 300, MAT 314, or MAT
mathematics-related employment or graduate          340.
study.     The major in Mathematics with
Computer Science Emphasis is designed to give       Additional courses required within the Division
the student experience in abstract thinking,        are either BIO 111 and BIO 112 or CHE 120
computer programming, and mathematics               and CHE 121 (Common Curriculum hours) and
sufficient for computer-related employment or       PHY 201 and PHY 202.
graduate study. The Mathematics major with
Secondary Education Emphasis is designed to         A grade of “C” or better is required for all major
give the student a strong mathematics               and support courses.
background while making room for professional
courses in education leading to certification in    MATHEMATICS MAJOR WITH
Secondary Mathematics.                              SECONDARY EDUCATION EMPHASIS

Criteria for Admission to the Mathematics           Required Mathematics courses for students
Major Programs                                      majoring in Mathematics with Secondary
                                                    Education emphasis are MAT 220, MAT 221,
To be admitted to the Mathematics Major             MAT 222, CSC 230, MAT 309, MAT 333,
Programs, students must:                            MAT 334, MAT 344, MAT 450, and one
                                                    mathematics elective (200 level or above, may
1. have passed (if required) REA 099, ENG           not include MAT 300, MAT 314, or MAT 340).
   099, and MAT 099 with a grade of “S.”
                                                    Additional courses required within the Division
2. have passed the Sophomore Proficiency            are CHE 120 and CHE 121, or BIO 111 and
   Examination in English (SPEE)                    BIO 112 or PHY 201 and PHY 202 (common
                                                    curriculum hours).
3. completed the following courses with a
   grade of “C” or better on the first attempt:     Education and Reading Pedagogy courses
   - MAT 122 or                                     required for certification in Secondary
   - MAT 126                                        Education are ERD 307, EDU 220, EDU 301,
                                                    EDU 303, EDU 329, EDU 339, EDU 345, EDU
4. have a cumulative GPA of 2.5                     393, EDU 455, EDU 489, and EDU 492.

5. Students    not     meeting    the   above       A grade of “C” or better is required for all major
   requirements will be classified as pending       and support courses.
   and will not be allowed to take upper level
   Mathematics, Computer Science, or Physics
   courses until formally accepted into the
   major.
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                                                                                                     Page 111
MATHEMATICS MAJOR WITH                               MAJOR FIELD PAPER REQUIREMENT
COMPUTER SCIENCE EMPHASIS                            IN MATHEMATICS

Required courses for students in Mathematics         Majors in Mathematics and Mathematics
with Computer Science Emphasis are MAT 220,          Computer Science are required to select a
MAT 221, MAT 222, MAT 309, MAT 334,                  mathematical topic beyond the normal course
MAT 335, MAT 472, MAT 473, CSC 226, CSC              work and write an expository paper on the
230, CSC 231, CSC 250 or BSA 328, CSC 340,           approved topic. An acceptable paper must
CSC 341, CSC 462, and one computer science           contain     significant   mathematics       with
elective.                                            appropriate mathematical symbols. In addition,
                                                     the student must make an oral presentation
Additional courses required within the Division      before the mathematics faculty.             This
are BIO 111 and BIO 112 or CHE 120 and CHE           requirement must be completed at least one
121; and PHY 201 and PHY 202.                        month prior to the end of the semester that the
                                                     student is enrolled in MAT 473 (see course
A grade of “C” or better is required for all major   description for MAT 473 for further details).
and support courses.
                                                     The electronic classroom portfolio, including
DUAL-DEGREE PROGRAM:                                 the oral presentation, will be accepted in lieu of
MATHEMATICS MAJOR WITH                               the major field paper requirement for
ENGINEERING EMPHASIS                                 Mathematics majors with Secondary Education
                                                     emphasis.
Paine College offers a cooperative "3+2" Dual-
Degree Program with Tuskegee University in
the areas of Mathematics and Engineering. The        MATHEMATICS MINOR
student will earn the Bachelor of Science degree
in Mathematics from Paine College and a              In order to obtain a minor in mathematics, a
bachelor’s degree in the chosen engineering          student must complete at least 18 hours in
field in five years, spending three years at Paine   Mathematics including MAT 220, MAT 221
College and two years at Tuskegee University.        and MAT 222 and at least two courses
                                                     numbered 300 or above.
MAJOR FIELD EXAMINATION
REQUIREMENT IN MATHEMATICS                           REQUIREMENTS FOR MATHEMATICS
                                                     MAJOR
Majors in Mathematics and Mathematics
Computer Science are required to pass (70%           Common Curriculum .............................Hours
accuracy or above) a written examination             BIO 111 Principles of Biology I ........................4
developed by the Department of Mathematics           and
covering all required mathematics core courses.      BIO 112 Principles of Biology II.......................4
The test is normally taken during the first week     or
of December of the Fall Semester or the last         CHE 120 General Chemistry I...........................4
week of March of the Spring semester of the          and
Senior Year. In lieu of this requirement, the        CHE 121 General Chemistry II..........................4
major field examination for Mathematics with
Secondary Education Emphasis will be the             CSC 100 Computer Applications
Georgia Assessment for the Certification of          and Programming...............................................3
Educators II (GACE II).
                                                     MAT 126 Precalculus* ......................................3
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                                                                                                                  Paine College
*If needed; with the proper pre-requisites,                          and
students may substitute MAT 220                                      CHE 121 General Chemistry II..........................4

Mathematics Core...................................Hours             CSC 100 Computer Applications and
MAT 220 Calculus I ..........................................4       Programming......................................................3
MAT 221 Calculus II .........................................4
MAT 222 Calculus III+ .....................................4         MAT 126 Precalculus* ......................................3
CSC 230 Principles of Programming I ..............3                  *If needed; with the proper pre-requisites,
MAT 309 Discrete Mathematics........................3                students may substitute MAT 220
MAT 322 Real Analysis ....................................3
MAT 334 Linear Algebra+ ................................3            Mathematics Core...................................Hours
MAT 442 Differential Equations+.....................3                MAT 220 Calculus I ..........................................4
MAT 450 Modern Algebra ................................3             MAT 221 Calculus II .........................................4
MAT 472 Seminar I ...........................................0       MAT 222 Calculus III+ .....................................4
MAT 473 Seminar II..........................................1        MAT 309 Discrete Mathematics........................3
MAT elective (numbered 200 or above*)..........3                     MAT 334 Linear Algebra+ ................................3
                                                                     MAT 335 Probability and Statistics...................3
*May include other computer science courses                          MAT 472 Seminar I ...........................................0
(200 level or above) or 300 or 400 level physics                     MAT 473 Seminar II..........................................1
courses. May not include MAT 300, MAT 314
or MAT 340.                                                          Computer Science Core..........................Hours
                                                                     CSC 226 Introduction to Computers..................3
SUPPORT COURSES                                                      CSC 230 Prin. of Programming I.......................3
(Grade of C or better required in all support                        CSC 231 Prin. of Programming II .....................3
courses)                                                             CSC 340 Object Oriented Prog I+ .....................3
                                                                     CSC 341 Object Oriented Prog II ......................3
Physics......................................................Hours   BSA 328 or CSC 250 Algorithms and Data
PHY 201 College Physics I................................4             Structure.......................................................3
PHY 202 College Physics II ..............................4           CSC 462 Operating System ...............................3
                                                                     CSC elective.......................................................3
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency
Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking                        SUPPORT COURSES
these courses.                                                       (Grade of C or better required in all support
                                                                     courses)
A grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 is required
for Mathematics Majors.       This GPA is                            Physics......................................................Hours
computed using the Mathematics core courses                          PHY 201- College Physics I ..............................4
and electives.                                                       PHY 202 College Physics II ..............................4

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATHEMATICS                                         +Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency
MAJORS WITH COMPUTER SCIENCE                                         Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking
EMPHASIS                                                             these courses.

Common Curriculum .............................Hours                 A grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 is required
BIO 111 Principles of Biology I ........................4            for Mathematics Majors with Computer Science
and                                                                  emphasis. This GPA is computed using the
BIO 112 Principles of Biology II.......................4             Mathematics core courses and the Computer
or                                                                   Science Core courses.
CHE 120 General Chemistry I...........................4
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REQUIREMENTS FOR MATHEMATICS                                         EDU 492 SEC Directed Teaching/Seminar.....12
MAJOR WITH SECONDARY                                                 EDU 492L SEC Directed Teaching/Sem Lab ...0
EDUCATION EMPHASIS                                                   ERD 307 SEC/MG Teaching of Reading (F) ....3

Common Curriculum .............................Hours                 Plus general electives to bring the total to a
BIO 111 Principles of Biology I ........................4            minimum of 124 hours.
and
BIO 112 Principles of Biology II.......................4             +Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency
or                                                                   Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking
CHE 120 General Chemistry I...........................4              these courses.
and                                                                  (F) Field Experience Required
CHE 121 General Chemistry II..........................4
                                                                     The grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 is
                                                                     required for Mathematics majors with
CSC 100 Computer Applications
                                                                     Secondary Education Emphasis. The GPA is
and Programming...............................................3
                                                                     computed using the Mathematics core courses
                                                                     and the education/reading pedagogy courses.
MAT 126 Precalculus* ......................................3
*If needed; with the proper pre-requisites,                          PRE-PROFESSIONAL SCIENCES
students may substitute MAT 220                                      PROGRAM
In addition to common curriculum courses                             The Division of Natural Sciences and
listed, the Mathematics majors with Secondary                        Mathematics, through combinations in the basic
Education Emphasis must take the following                           disciplines of biology, chemistry, mathematics
courses.                                                             and physics, provide curricula tailored for
Mathematics Core...................................Hours             specific health career interests (medicine,
MAT 220 Calculus I ..........................................4       dentistry, veterinary medicine, pharmacy, allied
MAT 221 Calculus II .........................................4       health sciences, and nursing), engineering, and
MAT 222 Calculus III+ .....................................4         graduate studies.
CSC 230 Principles of Programming I ..............3
MAT 309 Discrete Mathematics........................3                Students interested in medicine, dentistry,
MAT 333 Geometry (F).....................................3           veterinary medicine and graduate programs are
MAT 334 Linear Algebra (F)+ ..........................3              advised to complete the bachelor's degree at
MAT 344 Number Theory ................................3              Paine College prior to entry into professional
MAT 450 Modern Algebra ................................3             school.
MAT Electives ...................................................3
     (200 level or above; may not include                            Although degrees are not conferred in pre-
     MAT 300, MAT 314, or MAT 340)                                   professional areas such as allied health, nursing
                                                                     and pharmacy at Paine College, the biology/pre-
Education and Reading Pedagogy.........Hours                         professional sciences curricula prepares students
EDU 220 Foundations of Education (F)............3                    to enter the institutions where they can complete
EDU 301 Media Technology+...........................3                their professional training.
EDU 303 Middle Grades and Secondary
  Curriculum and Methods (F)+ .....................3                 Students spend two (2) or three (3) years at
EDU 329 MG/ SEC Math for Teachers (F)+ ....3                         Paine College and then apply for acceptance to a
EDU 339 Classroom Management (F)+ ...........3                       professional institution (not a direct transfer)
EDU 345 Developmental Psychology ..............3                     where the B. S. degree is awarded in the
EDU 393 Educational Psychology.....................3                 professional area of study.
EDU 455 Exceptional Children .........................3
EDU 489 Assessment in Education ...................3
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                                                                                         Paine College
Since requirements for pre-professional degrees          settings; research experiences and other related
vary according to programs, it is important that         activities are provided. In order to continue in
students work with the pre-professional sciences         the Pre-Professional Sciences Program, a
advisors so they may receive proper advisement.          student must have no less than a grade of "C" in
It is the responsibility of the student to check         all major courses at the end of the freshman year
and follow the specific requirements of the              and must maintain at least a 2.5 cumulative
professional school he or she plans to attend.           GPA for each subsequent semester while in the
                                                         program. A student who expects to receive a
The Pre-Professional Sciences Program is                 recommendation from Paine College should
committed to providing students enrichment               earn at least a 3.0 (“B”) average for all major
experiences and exposures that will enhance the          courses taken at Paine College and must have
facilitation and successful matriculation in             participated in the Pre-Professional Sciences
professional programs. Review workshops on               Program.
test-taking skills (MCAT, DAT, GRE, etc.),
clinical observations in various health-care




                                                   115
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                                                                                                                  Page 115
                                     SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                                         BIOLOGY MAJORS WITH
                                       PRE-PROFESSIONAL EMPHASIS

                                                FRESHMAN YEAR
                            Fall Semester           CR                                         Spring Semester        CR
BIO      111      Principles of Biology I            4 BIO 112                       Principles of Biology II          4
EDU      101      Prep for Excellence                1 ENG 102                       Composition II                    3
ENG      101      Composition I                      3 PSY 201                       Intro to Psychology or            3
CSC      100      Computer Applic and Prog           3 SOC 201                       Intro to Sociology
PED      120      Fund and Tech of Activities I**    1 ART 120                       Art Appreciation or               3
CHE      120      General Chemistry I                4 MUS 120                       Music Appreciation
                                                    16 CHE 121                       General Chemistry II               4
                                                                                                                       17
                                            SOPHOMORE YEAR
                        Fall Semester           CR                                             Spring Semester        CR
HIS      103 Survey of U.S. History              3 HIS  104                          African American History          3
BIO      220* Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 ENG 232                               Introduction to Literature        3
PED      121 Fund and Tech of Activities II**    1 BIO  470*                         Seminar I                         0
SPA      220 Elementary Spanish I or             3 PHI  220                          Values and Society                2
FRE      220 Elementary French I                   SPA 221                           Elementary Spanish II or          3
HIS      112 World History                       3 FRE 221                           Elementary French II
REL      230 Essentials of the Christian Faith   2 REL 231                           Religions of the World             2
                                                16 PHI  230                          Problems of Philosophy            3
                                                                                                                       16
                                                         JUNIOR YEAR
                        Fall Semester                      CR                                 Spring Semester         CR
BIO      320* Plant Physiology                               4 BIO  425*             Ecology                           4
BIO      321* Genetics+                                      4 BIO  322*             Cell Biology                      4
BIO      471* Seminar II                                    0 BIO   472*             Seminar III+                      0
MAT      220 Calculus I+                                     4 BIO  227*             Vertebrate Zoology                4
CHE      334 Organic Chemistry I+                           4 CHE 335                Organic Chemistry II              4
                                                            16                                                        16
                                                         SENIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester                  CR                                  Spring Semester        CR
PHY      201      College Physics I                          4 PHY 202               College Physics II                4
BIO      473*     Seminar IV                                1 CHE 421                General Biochemistry              4
BIO      431*     General Microbiology                      4 BIO   Elec*            Electives                         4
BIO      Elec*    Electives                                  4                                                        12
                  General Electives                          3
                                                            16

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 125
**May take PED 210 instead of PED 120 or PED 121; or may take HED 225 instead of PED 120 and PED 121.
A grade of "C" or better is required in all major, support and prerequisite courses.
(*) Indicates the courses used to calculate the required 2.5 major field GPA.
+ Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
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                                                                                                              Paine College
                                     SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                                       BIOLOGY WITH AN EMPHASIS IN
                                          SECONDARY EDUCATION

                                                  FRESHMAN YEAR
                            Fall Semester             CR                                       Spring Semester          CR
BIO      111     Principles of Biology I               4 BIO  112                    Principles of Biology II            4
ENG      101     Composition I                         3 ENG 102                     Composition II                      3
EDU      101     Prep. for Excellence                  1 HIS  112                    World History                       3
PED      120     Fund and Tech of Activities I**       1 PED 121                     Fund and Tech of Activities II**    1
ART      120     Art Appreciation or                   3 CSC 100                     Computer Prog and Applic            3
MUS      120     Music Appreciation                      HIS  104                    African American History            3
REL      230     Essentials of the Christ. Faith       2                                                                17
HIS      103     Survey of U. S. History               3
                                                      17
                                                 SOPHOMORE YEAR
                            Fall Semester             CR                                       Spring Semester          CR
PHI      230     Problems of Philosophy                3 BIO  227*                   Vertebrate Zoology                  4
PSY      201     Intro to Psychology or                3 ENG 232                     Introduction to Literature          3
SOC      201     Intro to Sociology                      MAT 220                     Calculus I                          4
PHI      220     Values and Society                    2 SPA 221                     Elementary Spanish II or            3
REL      231     Religions of the World                2 FRE 221                     Elementary French II
SPA      220     Elementary Spanish I or               3 EDU 220*                    Foundations of Education (F)       3
FRE      220     Elementary French I                                                                                    17
BIO      220*    Human Anatomy and Phys I (F)          4
                                                      17
                                                   JUNIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester             CR                                      Spring Semester           CR
BIO      321*    Genetics+                             4 BIO  322*                   Cell Biology (F)                    4
EDU      301*    Media Technology+                     3 EDU 339*                    Classroom Management (F)            3
CHE      120     General Chemistry I                   4 CHE 121                     General Chemistry II                4
EDU      393*    Educational Psychology                3 EDU 345*                    Developmental Psychology            3
                                                      14 EDU 303*                    MG/SEC Curr and Meth (F)            3
                                                                                                                        17
                                                         SENIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester                   CR                     Spring Semester                       CR
EDU      332*    Science for Teachers (F) +                  3 EDU 489* Assessment in Education                          3
EDU      455*    Exceptional Children                       3 EDU 492* SEC Dir. and Teaching Seminar                    12
BIO      431*    General Microbiology                        4 EDU 492L* SEC Dir. and Teaching Sem. Lab                  0
ERD      307*    Teaching of Reading (F) +                   3                                                          15
BIO      425*    Ecology                                     4
                                                            17

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 131

**May take PED 210 instead of PED 120 or PED 121; or may take HED 225 instead of PED 120 and PED 121.
A grade of "C" or better is required in all major, support and prerequisite courses.
(*) Indicates the courses used to calculate the required 2.5 major GPA.
(F) Field Experience
+ Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
Paine College
Paine College                       Natural Sciences and Mathematics                                          Page 118
                                                                                                              Page 117
                                 SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                                       CHEMISTRY MAJORS

                                           FRESHMAN YEAR
                         Fall Semester         CR                      Spring Semester                            CR
EDU     101 Prep. for Excellence                 1 ENG 102 Composition II                                          3
ENG     101 Composition I                       3 HIS   103 Survey of U.S. History                                 3
HIS     112 World History                        3 REL 230 Essentials of Christian Faith                           2
CSC     100 Computer Applic and Prog            3 PHI   220 Values and Society                                     2
PED     120 Fund and Tech of Activities I**     1 PSY 201 Intro. to Psychology or                                  3
HIS     104 African American History            3 SOC 201 Intro. to Sociology
                                                14 ART 120 Art Appreciation or                                     3
                                                   MUS 120 Music Appreciation                                      16
                                          SOPHOMORE YEAR
                         Fall Semester         CR                      Spring Semester                            CR
PED     121 Fund and Tech of Activities II**     1 BIO  112 Principles of Biology II                               4
PHI     230 Problems of Philosophy               3 ENG 232 Introduction to Literature                              3
BIO     111 Principles of Biology I              4 REL 231 Religions of the World                                  2
SPA     220 Elementary Spanish I or              3 SPA 221 Elementary Spanish II or                                3
FRE     220 Elementary French I                    FRE 221 Elementary French II
CHE     120 General Chemistry I                  4 CHE 121 General Chemistry II                                     4
                                                15                                                                 16
                                             JUNIOR YEAR
                         Fall Semester         CR                      Spring Semester                            CR
MAT     220 Calculus I+                          4 MAT 221 Calculus II                                             4
CHE     334* Organic Chemistry I+                4 CHE 335* Organic Chemistry II                                   4
CHE     470* Seminar I+                          0 CHE 471* Seminar II                                             0
CHE     233* Quantitative Analysis               4 CHE 336* Instrumental Analysis                                  4
CHE     Elect* Elective                          4 CHE Elect* Elective                                             4
                                                16                                                                16
                                             SENIOR YEAR
                         Fall Semester         CR                      Spring Semester                            CR
MAT     222 Calculus III                         4 CHE 437* Physical Chemistry II                                  4
CHE     436* Physical Chemistry I                4 CHE 473* Seminar IV                                             1
CHE     472* Seminar III                        0 PHY 202 College Physics II                                       4
PHY     201 College Physics I                    4            General Electives                                    6
               General Electives                 4                                                                15
                                                16

                                             Total Credit Hours: 124

**May take PED 210 instead of PED 120 or PED 121; or may take HED 225 instead of PED 120 and PED 121.
A grade of "C" or better is required in all major, support and prerequisite courses.
(*) Indicates the courses used to calculate the required 2.5 major GPA.
+ Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
Paine 118
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                                                                                                              Paine College
                         SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
              CHEMISTRY MAJORS WITH ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE EMPHASIS

                                                FRESHMAN YEAR
                            Fall Semester           CR                                         Spring Semester          CR
CHE      120     General Chemistry I                 4 CHE 121                       General Chemistry II                4
EDU      101     Prep for Excellence                 1 ENG 102                       Composition II                      3
ENG      101     Composition I                       3 HIS  104                      African American History            3
HIS      103     Survey of U.S. History              3 REL 230                       Essentials of Christian Faith       2
PED      120     Fund and Tech of Activities I**     1 PED 121                       Fund and Tech of Activities II**    1
ART      120     Art Appreciation or                 3 HIS  112                      World History                       3
MUS      120     Music Appreciation                                                                                     16
REL      231     Religions of the World              2
                                                    17
                                               SOPHOMORE YEAR
                            Fall Semester           CR                                         Spring Semester          CR
CSC      100     Computer Applic and Prog            3 MAT 220                       Calculus I                          4
BIO      111     Principles of Biology I             4 PHI  220                      Values and Society                  2
SPA      220     Elementary Spanish I or             3 BIO  112                      Principles of Biology II            4
FRE      220     Elementary French I                   ENG 232                       Introduction to Literature          3
PHI      230     Problems of Philosophy              3 SPA 221                       Elementary Spanish II or            3
PSY      201     Intro. to Psychology or             3 FRE 221                       Elementary French II               16
SOC      201     Intro. to Sociology                16
                                                 JUNIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester           CR                                        Spring Semester           CR
ESC      302*    Envir Monitoring and Inst.          4 MAT 221                       Calculus II                         4
CHE      334*    Organic Chemistry I+                4 CHE 335*                      Organic Chemistry II                4
CHE      470*    Seminar I+                          0 CHE 471*                      Seminar II                          0
ESC      201*    Intro to Environmental Justice      3 ESC 210*                      Envir Statistical Techniques+       3
CHE      233*    Quantitative Analysis               4 ESC 202*                      Waste Management and Pollution      3
                                                    15                                                                  14
                                                 SENIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester           CR                                        Spring Semester           CR
ESC      401*    Envir Toxicology                    4 CHE 473*                      Seminar IV                          1
CHE      436*    Physical Chemistry I                4 PHY 202                       College Physics II                  4
CHE      472*    Seminar III                         0 ESC Elec*                     ESC elective                        4
PHY      201     College Physics I                   4                               General Electives                   6
                 General Electives                   4                                                                  15
                                                    16

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 125
**May take PED 210 instead of PED 120 or PED 121; or may take HED 225 instead of PED 120 and PED 121.
A grade of "C" or better is required in all major, support and prerequisite courses.
(*) Indicates the courses used to calculate the required 2.5 major GPA.
+ Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
Paine College
Paine College                            Natural Sciences and Mathematics                                     Page 120
                                                                                                              Page 119
                                     SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                                          MATHEMATICS MAJORS

                                             SENIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester       CR                     Spring Semester                             CR
CSC      100     Computer Applic and Prog        3 PSY 201 Intro to Psychology or                                  3
EDU      101     Prep for Excellence             1 SOC 201 Intro to Sociology
ENG      101     Composition I                  3 ENG 102 Composition II                                           3
HIS      103     Survey of U.S. History         3 HIS   104 African American History                               3
ART      120     Art Appreciation or            3 PED 121 Fund and Tech of Activities II**                         1
MUS      120     Music Appreciation                SPA 221 Elementary Spanish II or                                3
SPA      220     Elementary Spanish I or        3 FRE 221 Elementary French II
FRE      220     Elementary French I               PHI  220 Values and Society                                      2
PED      120     Fund and Tech of Activities I**1                                                                  15
                                                17
                                           SOPHOMORE YEAR
                         Fall Semester         CR                     Spring Semester                             CR
ENG      232 Introduction to Literature          3 MAT 221* Calculus II                                            4
MAT      220* Calculus I                         4 CHE 121 General Chemistry II or                                 4
CHE      120 General Chemistry I or              4 BIO  112 Principles of Biology II
BIO      111 Principles of Biology I               PHI  230 Problems of Philosophy                                 3
REL      230 Essentials of Christian Faith       2 HIS  112 World History                                           3
MAT      309* Discrete Mathematics              3 REL 231 Religions of the World                                   2
                                                16                                                                 16
                                             JUNIOR YEAR
                         Fall Semester         CR                     Spring Semester                             CR
MAT      222* Calculus III+                      4 MAT 322* Real Analysis                                          3
PHY      201 College Physics I                   4 PHY 202 College Physics II                                      4
CSC      230* Principles of Programming I        3           General Electives                                     3
MAT      334* Linear Algebra+                    3           General Electives                                     3
              General Electives                 3 MAT Elect* Mathematics Electives                                 3
                                                17                                                                16
                                             SENIOR YEAR
                         Fall Semester         CR                     Spring Semester                             CR
MAT      442* Differential Equations+            3 MAT 450* Modern Algebra                                         3
MAT      472* Seminar I                         0 MAT 473* Seminar II                                              1
              General Electives                  3           General Electives                                     3
              General Electives                  3           General Electives                                     3
              General Electives                  3           General Electives                                     3
              General Electives                  3                                                                13
                                                15

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 125

**May take PED 210 instead of PED 120 or PED 121; or may take HED 225 instead of PED 120 and PED 121.
 A grade of "C" or better is required in all major, support and prerequisite courses.
(*) Indicates the courses used to calculate the required 2.5 major GPA.
+ Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
Paine 120
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                                                                                                              Paine College
                        SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
              MATHEMATICS MAJORS WITH EMPHASIS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

                                            FRESHMAN YEAR
                              Fall Semester     CR                                             Spring Semester           CR
MAT      220* Calculus I                         4 MAT 221*                          Calculus II                          4
EDU      101 Prep for Excellence                 1 ENG 102                           Composition II                       3
ENG      101 Composition I                       3 HIS 104                           African American History             3
HIS      103 Survey of U.S. History              3 REL 230                           Essentials of Christian Faith        2
PSY      201 Intro to Psychology or                SPA 221                           Elementary Spanish II or
SOC      201 Intro to Sociology                  3 FRE 221                           Elementary French II                 3
SPA      220 Elementary Spanish I or               PHI 220                           Values and Society                  2
FRE      220 Elementary French I                 3                                                                       17
                                                17
                                           SOPHOMORE YEAR
                         Fall Semester          CR                                             Spring Semester           CR
ENG      232 Introduction to Literature          3 ART 120                           Art Appreciation or                  3
CSC      100 Computer Applic and Prog            3 MUS 120                           Music Appreciation
CHE      120 General Chemistry I or                HIS 112                           World History                       3
BIO      111 Principles of Biology I             4 CSC 230*                          Principles of Programming I         3
REL      231 Religions of the World              2 PHI 230                           Problems of Philosophy              3
PED      120 Fund and Tech of Activities I**     1 PED 121                           Fund and Tech of Activities II**    1
CSC      226* Introduction to Computers          3 CHE 121                           General Chemistry II or
                                                16 BIO 112                           Principles of Biology II            4
                                                                                                                         17
                                                         JUNIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester                  CR                                  Spring Semester           CR
MAT      309*    Discrete Mathematics                        3 MAT 335*              Probability and Statistics           3
PHY      201     College Physics I                           4 PHY 202               College Physics II                   4
CSC      231*    Principle of Programming II                 3 CSC 250*              Algorithms and Data Structures or    3
MAT      222*    Calculus III+                              4 BSA 328*               Data Structures
                 General Elective                            3 CSC 340*              Object Oriented Program I+           3
                                                            17 CSC Elec*             CSC electives                       3
                                                                                                                         16
                                                         SENIOR YEAR
                        Fall Semester                      CR                                 Spring Semester            CR
MAT      334* Linear Algebra+                                3 CSC 462*              Operating Systems                    3
MAT      472* Seminar I                                     0 MAT 473*               Seminar II                           1
CSC      341* Object Oriented Program II                    3                        General Elective                     3
              General Elective                               3                       General Elective                     3
              General Elective                               3                       General Elective                     3
                                                            12                                                           13

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 125

**May take PED 210 instead of PED 120 or PED 121; or may take HED 225 instead of PED 120 and PED 121.
A grade of "C" or better is required in all major, support and prerequisite courses.
(*) Indicates the courses used to calculate the required 2.5 major GPA.
+ Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
Paine College
Paine College                            Natural Sciences and Mathematics                                           Page 122
                                                                                                                    Page 121
                     SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
        MATHEMATICS MAJORS WITH AN EMPHASIS IN SECONDARY EDUCATION

                                            FRESHMAN YEAR
                              Fall Semester     CR                                             Spring Semester          CR
MAT      220* Calculus I                         4 MAT 221*                          Calculus II                         4
ENG      101 Composition I                       3 ENG 102                           Composition II                      3
EDU      101 Prep. for Excellence                1 HIS 104                           African American History            3
CSC      100 Computer Applic and Prog            3 PED 121                           Fund and Tech of Activities II**    1
HIS      103 Survey of U.S. History              3 PSY 201                           Intro to Psychology or              3
PED      120 Fund and Tech of Activities I**     1 SOC 201                           Intro to Sociology
REL      230 Essentials of Christian Faith       2 ART 120                           Art Appreciation or                  3
                                                17 MUS 120                           Music Appreciation                  17
                                           SOPHOMORE YEAR
                         Fall Semester          CR                                             Spring Semester          CR
FRE      220 Elementary French I or                FRE 221                           Elementary French II or
SPA      220 Elementary Spanish I                3 SPA 221                           Elementary Spanish II               3
MAT      222* Calculus III                       4 HIS 112                           World History                       3
CHE      120 General Chemistry I or              4 CHE 121                           General Chemistry II or             4
BIO      111 Principles of Biology I or            BIO 112                           Principles of Biology II or
PHY      201 College Physics I                     PHY 202                           College Physics II
PHI      230 Problems of Philosophy              3 PHI 220                           Values and Society                  2
REL      231 Religions of the World              2 ENG 232                           Introduction to Literature           3
                                                16 EDU 220*                          Foundations of Education (F)        3
                                                                                                                         18
                                            JUNIOR YEAR
                          Fall Semester       CR                                               Spring Semester          CR
MAT      309* Discrete Mathematics              3 MAT 333*                           Introduction to Geometry (F)        3
MAT      Elec.* Electives                       3 EDU 345*                           Developmental Psychology            3
CSC      230* Principle of Programming I        3 EDU 339*                           Classroom Management (F)            3
EDU      301* Media Technology+                 3 MAT 450*                           Modern Algebra+                     3
EDU      393* Educational Psychology           3 EDU 303*                            MG and SEC Curr and Meth (F)        3
                                               15                                                                       15
                                            SENIOR YEAR
                          Fall Semester       CR                                              Spring Semester           CR
EDU      455* Exceptional Children              3 EDU 489*                           Assessment in Education            12
MAT      334* Linear Algebra+ (F)              3 EDU 492*                            Sec Dir Teaching and Seminar        3
ERD      307* Teach of Reading (F)             3                                                                        15
EDU      329* MG and SEC Math for Teach (F)    3
MAT      344* Number Theory                     3
                                               15

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 128

**May take PED 210 instead of PED 120 or PED 121; or may take HED 225 instead of PED 120 and PED 121.
A grade of "C" or better is required in all major, support and prerequisite courses.
(*) Indicates the courses used to calculate the required 2.5 major GPA.
+ Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
(F) Field Experience
                                                                                   123
                                                                                   123

                                                            DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

                                                                         MAJORS
                                                                                            on campus and in the community;
                                                             HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
                              local and surrounding area.                                   experiences through programs and projects
                                                                      PSYCHOLOGY
                              sites and other important resources in the                 3. develop a background of social scientific
                                                                       SOCIOLOGY
                              familiarize students with museums, historic     6.            history, sociology, and psychology.
                              their communicative skills; and                            2. provide quality instruction in the fields of
                                                                       OTHER OFFERINGS
                              encourage and assist students to improve        5.            students.
DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES




                                                                         ECONOMICS
                              research, both oral and written;                           1. widen the intellectual interests of the
                                                                          PRE-LAW
                              with a sound background in historical




                                                                                                                                              DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
                              provide students, especially history majors,    4.                         The goals of the Division are to:
                              sciences in secondary schools;
                              The Division of Social Sciences is composed of             4. provide students with a strong foundation
                              sciences necessary for the teaching of social              pertaining to their respective departments.
                              three departments: History and Political                      for graduate study and prepare them for
                              history, political science, and other social               handle student advisement and all matters
                              Science,     Psychology,      and      Sociology.             career options; and
                              provide an education in various areas of        3.         Division Chair. The department coordinators
                              Psychology offers emphases in experimental                 5. expose students to global issues so that they
                              present in relationship to the past;                       administered by a coordinator responsible to the
                              psychology, counseling psychology, and general                understand the interdependencies of global
                              help students gain an understanding of the      2.         major departments, each of which is
                              psychology. Sociology offers emphases in                      systems and recognize the human
                              economic and intellectual heritage;                        All programs fall under the province of the three
                              criminology, social psychology, and general                   development process around the world.
                              themes of humankind’s social, political,
                              sociology. Certification in education is available
                              acquaint students with the major ideas and      1.         Division.
                              in history. Minors are available in history,                 HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
                                                                                         experience, and pre-law are also offered in this
                              psychology, sociology, economics, political                           DEPARTMENT
                              Science Department are to:                                 science, gerontology, sociology of the black
                              science and international studies. Courses in
                              The objectives of the History and Political                social work, geography, anthropology, political
                              social work, geography, anthropology, political            The objectives of the History and Political
                                                                                         science and international studies. Courses in
                              science, gerontology, sociology of the black               Science Department are to:
                                         DEPARTMENT                                      psychology, sociology, economics, political
                              experience, and pre-law are also offered in this
                                HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE                            in history. Minors are available in history,
                              Division.                                                  1. acquaint students with the major ideas and
                                                                                         sociology. Certification in education is available
                                                                                            themes of humankind’s social, political,
                                 development process around the world.                   criminology, social psychology, and general
                              All programs fall under the province of the three             economic and intellectual heritage;
                                 systems and recognize the human                         psychology. Sociology offers emphases in
                              major departments, each of which is                        2. help students gain an understanding of the
                                 understand the interdependencies of global              psychology, counseling psychology, and general
                              administered by a coordinator responsible to the              present in relationship to the past;
                              5. expose students to global issues so that they           Psychology offers emphases in experimental
                              Division Chair. The department coordinators                3. provide an education in various areas of
                                 career options; and                                     Science,     Psychology,      and      Sociology.
                              handle student advisement and all matters                     history, political science, and other social
                                 for graduate study and prepare them for                 three departments: History and Political
                              pertaining to their respective departments.                   sciences necessary for the teaching of social
                              4. provide students with a strong foundation               The Division of Social Sciences is composed of
                                                                                            sciences in secondary schools;
                              The goals of the Division are to:                          4. provide students, especially history majors,
                                                                                            with a sound background in historical
                                                                          PRE-LAW
                              1. widen the intellectual interests of the                    research, both oral and written;
                                                                         ECONOMICS
                                 students.                                               5. encourage and assist students to improve
                                                                       OTHER OFFERINGS
                              2. provide quality instruction in the fields of               their communicative skills; and
                                 history, sociology, and psychology.                     6. familiarize students with museums, historic
                                                                       SOCIOLOGY
                              3. develop a background of social scientific                  sites and other important resources in the
                                                                      PSYCHOLOGY
                                 experiences through programs and projects                  local and surrounding area.
                                                             HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
                                 on campus and in the community;
                                                                         MAJORS

                                                            DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

                                                                                   123
                                                                                   122
                                                                                   123
Paine College
Paine College                                           Social Sciences                                        Page 124
                                                                                                               Page 123
HISTORY MAJOR                                                  Requirements........................................... 12 hrs
                                                               HIS 112 World History......................................3
The history curriculum is divided into sections,               HIS 103 Survey of United States History ..........3
and each major is required to complete a                       HIS 104 African American History ...................3
specific number of hours from each section.                    SOC 201 Introduction to Sociology...................3
Students      seeking    secondary    education
certification in history must also complete the                Section II Non-Western Civilizations and
prescribed education and reading pedagogy                      Developing Nations .... …………………...6 hrs
courses.                                                       HIS 311 Latin America......................................3
                                                               HIS 402 History of Sub-Saharan Africa ............3
REQUIREMENTS FOR HISTORY                                       HIS 420 Modern Asia ........................................3
MAJORS                                                         HIS 428 Middle East and North Africa .............3

A history major must complete at least 57                      Section III European History................... 6 hrs
semester hours of history including common                     HIS 330 Medieval Europe .................................3
curriculum requirements, HIS 103, 104, and                     HIS 331 Early Modern Europe+ ........................3
112. All history majors must take SOC 201 and                  HIS 332 Late Modern Europe+ .........................3
PSY 201.                                                       HIS 435 Twentieth Century Russia ...................3

In addition to the common curriculum required                  Section IV United States History ........... 12 hrs
courses 103, 104, and 112 in Section I, history                HIS 222 U. S. History to 1865...........................3
majors must take the following courses from                    HIS 223 U. S. History since 1865......................3
Sections IV and V: HIS 222 and HIS 223; HIS                    HIS 310 Georgia History+ .................................3
460 and HIS 461; Political Science 330;                        HIS 410 U. S. Economic History.......................3
Geography 231; and ECO 231. They must also                     HIS 325 American Military History ..................3
complete one elective course from Section VI.                  HIS 348 Women in U. S. History+....................3
                                                               HIS 440 United States Diplomatic History........3
History majors are required to complete a
directed project of historical inquiry during the              Section V Additional Requirements ...... 18 hrs
senior year while enrolled in HIS 461.                         HIS 460 Historical Methodologies ....................3
Prerequisites include a passing grade in HIS 460               HIS 461 History Research Project .....................3
and a passing grade on the Sophomore                           ECO 231 Macroeconomics ................................3
Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE).                     GEO 231 World Regional Geography...............3
                                                               POS 330 United States Govt..............................3
All history majors are required to pass a                      PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology.................3
comprehensive departmental examination that
includes components from World History,                        Section VI Other History and Political
United States History, and African American                    Science Electives........................................ 3 hrs
History. Seventy-five percent is considered a                  HIS 250-254 Special Topics in History .............3
passing score.     Pre-requisite to taking the                 HIS 426-427 Special Topics in History .............3
examination is a passing score on the SPEE.                    HIS 429-431 Special Topics in History .............3
                                                               POS 331 State/Local Govt .................................3
Students majoring in history are expected to                   POS 400 U. S. Constitut’l Law..........................3
take courses as outlined below:                                POS 410 International Relations........................3

Common Curriculum                                              + Students must pass the Sophomore
Requirements: .....................................56 hours    Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE)
                                                               prior to taking these courses.
Section I Common Curriculum
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                                                                                                            Paine College
All history majors are required to have a 2.5                      Students majoring in history with an emphasis
GPA for any history common curriculum                              in secondary education are expected to take
courses and any other required courses taken in                    courses as outlined below:
Sections II-VI in the history curriculum.
                                                                   Section I Common Curriculum
General Electives............................................16    Requirements........................................... 12 hrs
Total Credit Hours............................... 124-125          HIS 112 World History......................................3
                                                                   HIS 103 Survey of United States History ..........3
REQUIREMENTS FOR HISTORY                                           HIS 104 African American History ...................3
MAJORS WITH EMPHASIS IN                                            SOC 201 Introduction to Sociology or
SECONDARY EDUCATION                                                PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology.................3

Students must be admitted to the Teacher                           Section II Non-Western Civilizations and
Education Program.                                                 Developing Nations .... …………………...3 hrs
                                                                   HIS 311 Latin America......................................3
Common Curriculum                                                  HIS 402 History of Sub-Saharan Africa ............3
Requirements: .....................................56 hours        HIS 420 Modern Asia ........................................3
                                                                   HIS 428 Middle East and North Africa .............3
History majors seeking secondary education
certification must complete at least 45 semester                   Section III European History................... 6 hrs
hours of history including         the common                      HIS 330 Medieval Europe .................................3
curriculum requirements, HIS 103, 104, and                         HIS 331 Early Modern Europe+ ........................3
112; and SOC 201 or PSY 201.                                       HIS 332 Late Modern Europe+ .........................3
                                                                   HIS 435 Twentieth Century Russia ...................3
In addition to the common curriculum required
courses History 103, 104, and 112; and SOC                         Section IV United States History ............. 9 hrs
201 or PSY 201 in Section I, history secondary                     HIS 222 U. S. History to 1865...........................3
education majors must take the following                           HIS 223 U. S. History since 1865......................3
courses from Sections IV and V: HIS 222, 223,                      HIS 310 Georgia History+ .................................3
and 310; HIS 460 and HIS 461; Political
Science 330; Geography 231; and ECO 231.                           Section V Additional Requirements ...... 15 hrs
                                                                   HIS 460 Historical Methodologies ....................3
History majors seeking secondary education                         HIS 461 History Research Project .....................3
certification are required to complete a directed                  ECO 231 Macroeconomics ................................3
project of historical inquiry during the senior                    Geography 231 World Regional Geography .....3
year while enrolled in HIS 461. Prerequisites                      Political Science 330 United States Govt ..........3
include a passing grade in HIS 460 and a
passing grade on the Sophomore Proficiency                         Education and Reading Pedagogy
Examination in English (SPEE).                                     Courses................................................42 Hours
                                                                   EDU 220 Foundations of Education .................3
All history majors are required to pass a                          EDU 301 Media Technology .............................3
comprehensive departmental exitexamination                         EDU 303 MG/SEC Curr and Methods (F)+ ......3
that includes components from World History,                       EDU 339 Classroom Management (F)+ ............3
United States History, and African American                        EDU 340 Social Studies for Teachers (F)+ .......3
History. Seventy-five percent is considered a                      EDU 345 Development Psychology ..................3
passing score. Pre-requisite to taking the exit                    EDU 393 Educational Psychology.....................3
examination is a passing score on the SPEE.                        EDU 455 Exceptional Children .........................3
                                                                   EDU 489 Assessment Skills in Education .........3
                                                                   EDU 492 SEC Directed Teaching/Seminar.....12
Paine College
Paine College                                         Social Sciences                             Page 126
                                                                                                  Page 125
EDU 492L SEC Directed Teaching/Sem. Lab ..0                  3. a background against which personal
ERD 307 MG/SEC Teach of Reading (F)+.......3                    problems might be resolved, self-
                                                                understanding gained, and interpersonal
(F) Field Experience                                            relationships enriched; and
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency
Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking                4. support for other disciplines such as teacher
these courses.                                                  education, biology, and sociology.

All history secondary education majors are                   PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR
required to have a 2.5 GPA for any history
common curriculum courses, any other required                Psychology majors must complete the common
courses taken in Sections II-V in the history                curriculum requirements of the College, 45
curriculum, and the education and reading                    hours of advanced psychology courses, and
pedagogy courses.                                            sufficient electives to satisfy the minimum
                                                             requirement of 124 hours for graduation. The
Total Credit Hours............................... 131-132    psychology major consists of 24 hours of core
                                                             courses, plus 9 hours in one of three emphases,
HISTORY MINOR                                                and 12 hours of psychology electives. All
                                                             psychology majors must take SOC 201.
The minor in history requires the completion of
18 semester hours in the history curriculum in               All psychology majors must pass the
addition to History 103, 104 and 112.                        Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English
                                                             (SPEE) before they are allowed to take the
POLITICAL SCIENCE AND                                        following courses: PSY 321, PSY 405, PSY
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES MINOR                                  441, and PSY 442.

Students are required to complete 18 hours of                All psychology majors must have a cumulative
political science courses.      All minors are               2.5 GPA in the courses required for the
required to take the following core courses:                 psychology major (i.e., courses in the core
                                                             curriculum, courses in the emphasis, and
        POS 320 Introduction to Global Studies               psychology elective courses). Students must
        POS 330 United States Government                     have a grade of “C” or better in each course
        POS 410 International Relations                      required for the major.

Students must choose three (3) other courses or              Student must provide proof of having taken the
nine (9) other hours of electives in consultation            Graduate Record Examination or another
with their advisor.                                          national examination (MCAT, LSAT, etc.).

       PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMEMT                                 All psychology majors must pass the Senior
                                                             Comprehensive       Exit    Examination in
The objectives of the Psychology Department                  Psychology. Students must pass the SPEE
are to provide:                                              before taking the Exit Examination.

1. knowledge and skills related to behavioral                All psychology majors must successfully
   research;                                                 complete the senior field paper and give an oral
                                                             presentation on the paper as part of the
2. preparation for graduate school and/or                    completion of the Senior Research Project series
   careers in psychology;                                    (PSY 471, PSY 472, and PSY 473).
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                                                                                                  Paine College
Core Curriculum.....................................Hours                 SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
PSY 260 Social Science Statistics .....................3
PSY 321 Learning..............................................3    The objectives of the Sociology Department are
PSY 322 Experimental Psychology ...................3               to:
PSY 345 Developmental Psychology ................3
PSY 405 History and Systems of Psychology ...3                     1. Provide students with an understanding of
PSY 441 Abnormal Psychology ........................3                 the origin and evolution of human society
PSY 442 Tests & Measurements .......................3                 and the form, institutions, and functions of
PSY 471 Senior Research Project I ...................1                groups and how these structures change;
PSY 472 Senior Research Project II ..................1
PSY 473 Senior Research Project III.................1              2. Instill into students a comprehension of
                                                                      analytical and statistical skills and
Experimental Emphasis..........................Hours                  techniques;
PSY 302 Experimental Design ..........................3
PSY 371 Sensation and Perception....................3              3. Provide students with functional areas of
PSY 401 Physiological Psychology...................3                  specialization which broaden career options
                                                                      of those graduate studies; and
Counseling Emphasis..............................Hours
PSY 334 Marriage and the Family or                                 4. Examine and analyze issues and concerns
PSY 361 Social Psychology...............................3             pertaining to race relations in an effort to
PSY 420 Theories of Personality.......................3               promote better relations among racial and
PSY 450 Introduction to Counseling .................3                 ethnic groups.

General Psychology Emphasis ...............Hours                   SOCIOLOGY MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
Three courses selected from the above
emphases, with at least one from each...............9              Sociology Majors must complete a minimum of
                                                                   124 hours for graduation. These requirements
Psychology Electives (numbered above 201) .12                      are broken down into the following:

TOTAL HOURS IN MAJOR                                                      56 hours in the common curriculum;
(including SOC 201).......................................48              21 hours in a particular area of emphasis
                                                                          (Criminology, Social Psychology or
GENERAL ELECTIVES..............................20                         General Sociology).
                                                                          18 hours of support courses; and
COMMON CURRICULUM
                                                                          14 hours of free electives.
REQUIREMENTS.........................................56
                                                                   All sociology majors must have a cumulative
PSYCHOLOGY MINOR
                                                                   2.5 GPA in the courses required for the
                                                                   sociology majors (i.e., courses in the core
The minor in psychology requires 18 hours of
                                                                   sociology curriculum, courses in the emphasis
advanced psychology courses, including
                                                                   and support area). Students must have a grade
Psychology 260 (Statistics), Psychology 321
                                                                   of “C” or better in each course required for the
(Learning),    and       Psychology     345
                                                                   major.
(Developmental Psychology). Other courses
should be chosen in consultation with the
                                                                   All sociology majors must also pass the Senior
advisor.
                                                                   Comprehensive Major Exit Examination in
                                                                   Sociology. Passing the Sophomore Proficiency
                                                                   Examination in English (SPEE) is a prerequisite
                                                                   for all the 400 level sociology courses, except
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                                                                                                                                    Page 127
special topics courses. Passing the SPEE is also                             Total ................................................................15
a prerequisite to take the Exit Examination.
Students must take the GRE or another                                        General Sociology
standardized examination (MCAT, LSAT,                                        SOC 325 Demography.......................................3
GMAT) as part of graduation requirements.                                    SOC 334 Marriage and the Family ....................3
                                                                             SOC 382 Minority Groups.................................3
Main campus students may not enroll at Fort                                  SOC 390 Sociology of Aging or
Gordon. Methods of Research and Senior Field                                 SOC 395 Sociology of Health & Medicine .......3
Paper courses are taught only on the main                                    SOC 338 Sociology of Organizations or
campus as fall semester courses.                                             SOC 438 Comm. and Urban Life ......................3
                                                                             Total ................................................................15
Core Curriculum.....................................Hours
SOC 260 Social Science Statistics.....................3                      MINOR REQUIREMENTS
SOC 310 Deviant Behavior ...............................3
SOC 328 Soc. of Black Experience ...................3                        A minor in sociology consists of 18 semester
SOC 361 Social Psychology ..............................3                    hours. All sociology minors are required to take
SOC 440 Sociological Theory ...........................3                     SOC 361 and SOC 440 in addition to 12 hours
SOC 460 Methods of Research..........................3                       of sociology course work at the 300-400 level.
SOC 461 Senior Field Paper ..............................3
Total ................................................................21     ECONOMICS MINOR

Support Courses......................................Hours                   An economics minor will help students of any
ECO 231 Macroeconomics ................................3                     discipline to understand and analyze current
GEO 231 World Reg. Geography......................3                          economic issues like inflation, unemployment,
POS 330 U.S. Government                                                      economic growth, income distribution, and
   or POS 331 State/Local Government ..........3                             governmental policies. It will analyze the
PSY 201 Intro to Psychology.............................3                    creation and distribution of wealth, the causes of
SOC 365 Cultural Anthropology .......................3                       poverty and inequality and the formulation of
SOC 211 Intro to Social Work...........................3                     policies to alternate poverty.
Total ................................................................18
                                                                             Students interested in an economics minor must
AREAS OF EMPHASIS                                                            complete 18 hours of economics as follows.

Criminology                                                                  Courses.....................................................Hours
SOC 300 Social Problems..................................3                   ECO 321 Money and Banking...........................3
SOC 315 Juvenile Delinquency .........................3                      ECO 341 Contemporary Issues in Economics...3
SOC 334 Marriage and the Family ....................3                        ECO 371 Consumer Economics ........................3
SOC 340 Criminology .......................................3                 ECO Electives (300 level or above)...................9
PSY 411 Abnormal Psychology ........................3                        Total ................................................................18
Total .................................................................15
                                                                                              PRE-LAW PROGRAM
Social Psychology
SOC 382 Minority Groups.................................3                    The pre-law program at Paine College is
SOC 390 Sociology of Aging or                                                primarily an academic advisement program in
SOC 395 Sociology of Health & Medicine .......3                              the Social Sciences Division, but is available to
SOC 338 Sociology of Organizations or                                        students in all majors. Students are advised to
SOC 438 Community and Urban Life ...............3                            develop a strict work program to enhance their
PSY 420 Personality Theory..............................3                    reading, writing, and thinking skills.
PSY 441 Abnormal Psychology ........................3
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                                                                                  Paine College
Arrangements are made for pre-law students to      attend the Law School Forums in Atlanta
beginning with their sophomore year. The Paine     admissions policies. Students interested in law
College Testing Center arranges with each          should consult with the College’s pre law
student an LSAT preparation schedule. The          advisor in the Department of History and
Career Planning and Placement Center               Political Science.
maintains information on law schools and
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                                     SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                                            HISTORY MAJORS

                                                   FRESHMAN YEAR
                   Fall Semester                       CR                                      Spring Semester             CR
EDU 101 Prep for Excellence                             1 ENG 102                     Composition II                        3
ENG 101 Composition I                                   3 HIS   103*                  Survey of U.S. History                3
GEO 231  World Regional Geography                       3 MAT 122                     College Algebra                       3
HIS 112* World History                                  3 PED   121                   Fund and Tech of Activities II        1
CSC 100  Computer App. and Programs                     3 SOC 201                     Introduction to Sociology             3
FRE 220 Elementary French I or                            FRE   221                   Elementary French I or
SPA 220 Elementary Spanish I                            3 SPA   221                   Elementary Spanish I                  3
                                                       16                                                                  16
                                                  SOPHOMORE YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester             CR
PHS     101     Prin & Appl of Phy Science or             ART 120                     Art Appreciation or
PHS     110     Intro to Atmospheric Science            4 MUS 120                     Music Appreciation                    3
PED     120     Fund and Tech of Activities I           1 BIO   102                   Prin &Applic of Bio Science or
PHI     220     Values and Societies                    2 ESC   101                   Environmental Science                 4
PSY     201*    Introduction to Psychology              3 HIS   104*                  African American History              3
REL     230     Essentials of the Christian Faith       2 HIS   223*                  U.S. History since 1865               3
HIS     222*    U.S. History to 1865                    3 ENG 232                     Introduction to Literature            3
                                                       15                                                                  16
                                                    JUNIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester             CR
ECO     231*    Macroeconomics                          3                             General Electives                     3
HIS     402*    History of Sub-Saharan Africa+          3 GEO 231                     World Regional Geography              3
HIS     *       Electives (Sections II IV, VI)          3 HIS   428*                  Middle East and North Africa+         3
HIS     *       Electives (Sections II IV, VI)          3 HIS   *                     Electives (Sections II IV, VI)        3
POS     330*    United States Government                3 PHI   230                   Problems of Philosophy                3
                                                       15                                                                  15
                                                    SENIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester             CR
                General Electives                       3                             General Electives                     3
                General Electives                       3                             General Electives                     3
                General Electives                       2 HIS                         Electives                             3
HIS             Electives (Sections II IV, VI)          3 HIS   *                     (Sections II IV, VI)                  3
HIS     460     Historical Methodologies+               3 HIS   461                   History Research Project              3
REL     231     Religions of the World                  2                                                                  15
                                                       16

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 124
A grade of “C” or better is required in all major and prerequisite courses.
* Indicates the courses used to calculate 2.5 GPA for the major.
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
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                                                                                                             Paine College
                        SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
             HISTORY MAJORS WITH CERTIFICATION IN SECONDARY HISTORY

                                                  FRESHMAN YEAR
                   Fall Semester                      CR                                       Spring Semester          CR
EDU 101 Prep for Excellence                            1 BIO   101                    Prin and App of Bio Science        4
ENG 101  Composition I                                 3 HIS   104*                   African American History           3
GEO 231* World Regional Geography                      3 ENG 102                      Composition II                     3
HIS 112* World History                                 3 HIS   103*                   Survey of U.S. History             3
CSC 100 Computer App & Prog                            3 MAT 122                      College Algebra                    3
PHS 101 Prin and App of Phy Science or                   PED   120                    Fund and Tech of Activities I**    1
PHS 110 Intro to Atmospheric Science                   4                                                                17
                                                      17
                                                 SOPHOMORE YEAR
                            Fall Semester             CR                                       Spring Semester          CR
PHI     230     Problems of Philosophy                 3 ECO 231*                     Macroeconomics                     3
HIS     222*    U.S. History to 1865 (F)               3 REL   230                    Essentials of Christian Faith      2
PSY     201*    Intro to Psychology or                   ENG 232                      Introduction to Literature         3
SOC     201     Intro to Sociology                     3 FRE   221                    Elementary French II or
FRE     220     Elementary French I or                   SPA   220                    Elementary Spanish II             3
SPA     220     Elementary Spanish I                   3 EDU 220*                     Foundations of Education (F)      3
PED     121     Fund and Tech of Activities II**       1 HIS   223*                   U.S. History since 1865 (F)       3
PHI     220     Values and Society                     2                                                                17
ART     120     Art Appreciation or
MUS     120     Music Appreciation                     3
                                                      18
                                                   JUNIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester             CR                                       Spring Semester          CR
EDU     301*    Educational Media                      3 HIS   310*                   Georgia History (F)+               3
REL     231     Religions of the World                 2 EDU 339*                     Classroom Management (F)+          3
HIS     460*    Historical Methodologies+              3 EDU 303*                     MG/SEC Curr and Meth (F)+          3
EDU     345*    Developmental Psychology               3 EDU 393*                     Educational Psychology             3
HIS     330*    Medieval Europe+ or                      HIS   461*                   History Research Project           3
                (His 331, 332, or 435)                 3                                                                15
                                                      14
                                                   SENIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester             CR                                     Spring Semester          CR
POS     330*    United States Government               3 EDU 489*                     Assessment in Education          3
HIS     311*    Latin America or                         EDU 492*                     SEC Directed Teaching & Seminar 12
                (HIS 402, 420, or 428)                 3 EDU 492L*                    SEC Directed Teaching Lab        0
EDU     340*    Social Studies for Teachers (F)+       3                                                              15
EDU     455*    Exceptional Children                   3
ERD     307*    Teaching of Reading (F)+               3
HIS     330*    Medieval Europe+ or
                HIS 331, 332, or 435                   3
                                                      18

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 131
A grade of “C” or better is required in all major and prerequisite courses.
** HED 225 Personal and Community Hygiene Substitutes for two (2) of the following courses:
   PED 120 Basketball, PED 121 Tennis, PED 210 Aerobics
(F) Field Experience
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
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                                  SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                              PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS WITH AN EMPHASIS IN
                                           COUNSELING

                                                      FRESHMAN YEAR
                           Fall Semester                  CR                                   Spring Semester           CR
EDU     101     Prep for Excellence                        1 ENG 102                  Composition II                      3
ENG     101     Composition I                              3 CSC  100                 Computer App.& Prog.                3
MAT     122     College Algebra                            3 ESC  101                 Environ. Science Fund. (or          4
BIO     102     Biological Science                         4                          PHS 101 or 110)
PSY     201     Introduction to Psychology                 3 PHI  220                 Values and Society                 2
PED     120     Fund & Tech of Activities I                1 HIS  112                 World History                       3
                                                          15 PED  121                 Fund & Tech of Activities II        1
                                                                                                                         16
                                                     SOPHOMORE YEAR
                            Fall Semester                CR                                     Spring Semester          CR
HIS     103     Survey of U.S. History                     3 ENG 232                  Intro to Lit (or ENG 332 or 333)    3
SPA     220     Elementary Spanish I or                    3 SPA   221                Elementary Spanish I or             3
FRE     220     Elementary French I                          FRE   221                Elementary French I
REL     230     Essentials of the Christian Faith          2 PHI   230                Prob of Philosophy (or PHI 234)    3
ART     120     Art Appreciation or                       3 HIS    104                African American History           3
MUS     120     Music Appreciation                           REL   231                Religions of the World             2
SOC     201     Introduction to Sociology                 3 PSY    260*               Social Science Statistics           3
                General Elective                           1                                                             17
                                                          15
                                                       JUNIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester                 CR                                    Spring Semester           CR
PSY     321*    Learning+                                  3 PSY   420*               Theories of Personality+            3
PSY     345*    Developmental Psychology                  3 PSY    442*               Tests & Measurements+               3
PSY     450*    Introduction to Counseling                 3                          General Elective                    3
PSY     322*    Experimental Psychology                    3                          General Elective                    3
PSY     441*    Abnormal Psychology+                       3 PSY   *                  Elective                            3
                                                          15 PSY   471*               Senior Research Project I           1
                                                                                                                         16
                                                         SENIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester                   CR                               Spring Semester              CR
PSY     405*    History & Systems of Psychology+             3 PSY            473* Senior Research Project III            1
PSY     361*    Social Psychology or                         3 PSY            *    Elective                               3
PSY     334*    Marriage and Family                            PSY            *    Elective                               3
PSY     472*    Senior Research Project II                   1 PSY            *    Elective                               3
                General Elective                             3                     General Elective                       3
                General Elective                             3                     General Elective                       2
                General Elective                             2                                                           15
                                                            15

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 124
A grade of “C” or better is required in all major and prerequisite courses.
* Indicates the courses used to calculate 2.5 GPA for the major.
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
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                                                                                                             Paine College
                                  SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                              PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS WITH AN EMPHASIS IN
                                          EXPERIMENTAL

                                                      FRESHMAN YEAR
                           Fall Semester                  CR                                  Spring Semester            CR
EDU     101     Preparing for Excellence                   1 ENG 102                  Composition II                      3
ENG     101     Composition I                              3 CSC  100                 Computer Applications and Prog      3
MAT     122     College Algebra                            3 ESC  101                 Environmental Science Fund
BIO     102     Princ/Appl of Biol Science                 4                          (or PHS 101 or 110)                4
PSY     201     Introduction to Psychology                 3 PHI  220                 Values and Society                  2
PED     120     Fund and Tech of Activities I              1 HIS  112                 World History                       3
                                                          15 PED  121                 Fund and Tech of Activities II      1
                                                                                                                         16
                                              SOPHOMORE YEAR
                           Fall Semester           CR                                           Spring Semester          CR
HIS     103     Survey of U.S. History               3 ENG 232                        Intro to Lit (or ENG 332 or 333)    3
FRE     220     Elementary French I or               3 FRE   221                      Elementary French II or
SPA     220     Elementary Spanish I                   SPA   221                      Elementary Spanish II               3
SOC     201     Introduction to Sociology            3 PSY   260*                     Social Sciences Statistics          3
REL     230     Essent of Christian Faith            2 HIS   104                      African American History            3
ART     120     Art Appreciation or                  3 PHI   230                      Prob of Philosophy (or PHI 234)     3
MUS     120     Music Appreciation                     REL   231                      Religions of the World              2
                General Elective                     1                                                                   17
                                                    15
                                                 JUNIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester           CR                                          Spring Semester           CR
PSY     345*    Developmental Psychology             3 PSY   442*                     Tests and Measurements+             3
PSY     321*    Learning+                            3 PSY   441*                     Abnormal Psychology+                3
PSY     322*    Experimental Psychology             3 PSY    371*                     Sensation and Perception            3
PSY     302*    Experimental Design                  3 PSY   *                        Elective                            3
                General Elective                     3                                General Elective                    3
                                                       PSY   471*                     Senior Research Project I           1
                                                    15                                                                   16
                                                 SENIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester           CR                                          Spring Semester           CR
PSY     405*    History & Systems of Psychology+     3 PSY   473*                     Senior Research Project III         1
PSY     472*    Senior Research Project II           1 PSY   401*                     Physiological Psychology            3
PSY     *       Elective                             3 PSY   *                        Electives                           3
                General Elective                    3 PSY    *                        Electives                           3
                General Elective                     3                                General Elective                    3
                General Elective                     1                                General Elective                    3
                                                    14                                                                   16

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 124
A grade of “C” or better is required in all major and prerequisite courses.
* Indicates the courses used to calculate 2.5 GPA for the major.
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
Paine College
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                                  SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                              PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS WITH AN EMPHASIS IN
                                       GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

                                                      FRESHMAN YEAR
                           Fall Semester                  CR                                   Spring Semester          CR
EDU     101     Prep for Excellence                        1 ENG 102                  Composition II                     3
ENG     101     Composition I                              3 CSC   100                Computer Applications & Prog       3
MAT     122     College Algebra                            3 ESC   101                Envir Science (or PHS 101 or 110) 4
BIO     102     Princ/Appl of Bio Science                  4 PHI   220                Values and Society                 2
PSY     201     Introduction to Psychology                 3 PED   121                Fund and Tech Activities II        1
PED     120     Fund and Tech of Activities I              1 HIS   112                World History                      3
                                                          15                                                            16
                                                     SOPHOMORE YEAR
                            Fall Semester                 CR                                    Spring Semester          CR
HIS     103     Survey of U.S. History                     3 ENG 232                  Intro to Lit (or ENG 332 or 333)    3
FRE     220     Elementary French I or                       FRE   221                Elementary French II or
SPA     220     Elementary Spanish I                       3 SPA   221                Elementary Spanish II              3
REL     230     Essentials of Christian Faith              2 REL   231                Religions of the World              2
SOC     201     Introduction to Sociology                  3 PHI   230                Prob of Philosophy (or PHI 234)     3
ART     120     Art Appreciation or                          HIS   104                African American History            3
MUS     120     Music Appreciation                         3 PSY   260*               Social Science Statistics           3
                General Elective                           1                                                             17
                                                          15
                                                       JUNIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester                  CR                                   Spring Semester           CR
PSY     345*    Developmental Psychology                   3 PSY   442*               Tests and Measurements+             3
PSY     441*    Abnormal Psychology+                       3 PSY   371*               Sensation and Perception or         3
PSY     302*    Experimental Design or                       PSY   401*               Physiological Psychology or
PSY     450*    Introduction to Counseling                 3 PSY   420*               Theories of Personality+
PSY     321*    Learning+                                  3 PSY   *                  Elective                            3
PSY     322*    Experimental Psychology                    3 PSY   471*               Senior Research Project I           1
                General Elective                           1                          General Elective                    3
                                                          16                          General Elective                    3
                                                                                                                         16
                                                         SENIOR YEAR
                           Fall Semester                   CR                      Spring Semester                       CR
PSY     405*    History & Systems of Psychology+            3 PSY    473* Senior Research Project III                     1
PSY     *       Electives                                    3 PSY   *    Elective                                        3
PSY     334*    Marriage and Family or                         PSY   *    Elective                                        3
PSY     361*    Social Psychology or                                      General Elective                                3
PSY     371*    Sensation and Perception                     3            General Elective                                3
PSY     472*    Senior Research Project II                   1                                                           13
                General Elective                             3
                General Elective                             3
                                                            16

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 124
A grade of “C” or better is required in all major and prerequisite courses.
* Indicates the courses used to calculate 2.5 GPA for the major.
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
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                                                                                                             Paine College
                                  SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                               SOCIOLOGY MAJORS WITH AN EMPHASIS IN
                                          CRIMINOLOGY

                                                   FRESHMAN YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester            CR
EDU     101     Preparing for Excellence                1 ENG 102                     Composition II                       3
ENG     101     Composition I                           3 CSC   100                   Computer Appl And Prog               3
MAT     122     College Algebra                         3 SOC 201                     Introduction to Sociology            3
HIS     112     World History                           3 BIO   102                   Prin and Appl of Bio Science or
REL     230     Essentials of the Christian Faith       2 ESC   101                   Environmental Science                4
PHS     101     Princ/Appl of Physical Science or          HIS  103                   Survey of United State History       3
PHS     110     Intro to Atmospheric Science            4                                                                 16
                                                       16
                                                  SOPHOMORE YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester            CR
FRE     220     Elementary French I or                     FRE  221                   Elementary French II or
SPA     220     Elementary Spanish I                    3 SPA   221                   Elementary Spanish II                3
HIS     104     African American History                3 PHI   230                   Problems of Philosophy              3
ART     120     Art Appreciation or                        REL  231                   World Religion                       2
MUS     120     Music Appreciation                      3 SOC 260                     Social Science Statistics            3
PHI     220     Values and Society                      2 SOC 211                     Introduction to Social Work          3
ENG     232     Introduction to Literature              3 PED   121                   Fund and Tech of Activities II       1
PED     120     Fund and Tech of Activities I           1                             General Elective                     2
                                                       15                                                                 17
                                                    JUNIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester            CR
SOC     310*    Deviant Behavior                        3 SOC 361*                    Social Psychology+                   3
SOC     334*    Marriage and the Family                 3 SOC 315*                    Juvenile Delinquency                 3
SOC     365*    Cultural Anthropology                   3 SOC 340*                    Criminology and Penology+            3
PSY     201*    Introduction to Psychology              3 SOC 440*                    Sociological Theory+                 3
SOC     300*    Social Problems                         3 SOC 328*                    Sociology of the Black Experience    3
                                                       15                                                                 15
                                                    SENIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester            CR
PSY     441*    Abnormal Psychology                     3 ECO 231*                    General Economics                    3
SOC     460*    Methods of Research+                    3 GEO 231*                    World Geography                      3
POS     330*    United State Government or                 SOC 461*                   Senior Field Paper                   3
POS     331*    State/Local Government                  3                             General Elective                     3
                General Elective                        3                             General Elective                     3
                General Elective                        3                                                                 15
                                                       15

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 124
A grade of “C” or better is required in all major and prerequisite courses.
* Indicates the courses used to calculate 2.5 GPA for the major.
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
Paine College
Paine College                                               Social Sciences                                        Page 136
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                                  SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                               SOCIOLOGY MAJORS WITH AN EMPHASIS IN
                                       GENERAL SOCIOLOGY

                                                   FRESHMAN YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester         CR
ENG     101     Composition I                           3 ENG 102                     Composition II                    3
EDU     101     Prep for Excellence                     1 SOC 201                     Introduction to Sociology         3
MAT     122     College Algebra                         3 CSC   100                   Computer Appl And Prog            3
HIS     112     World History                           3 HIS   102                   Survey of U. S. History           3
REL     230     Essentials of the Christian Faith       2 BIO   102                   Princ & App of Bio Science or
PHS     101     Princ/Appl of Physical Science or          ESC  101                   Environmental Science             4
PHS     110     Intro to Atmospheric Science            4                                                              16
                                                       16
                                                  SOPHOMORE YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester         CR
ENG     232     Introduction to Literature              3 FRE   221                   Elementary French II or
HIS     104     African American History                3 SPA   221                   Elementary Spanish II             3
PHI     220     Values and Society                      2 PHI   230                   Problems of Philosophy            3
ART     120     Art Appreciation or                        REL  231                   World Religion                    2
MUS     120     Music Appreciation                      3 PSY   201                   Intro To Psychology               3
FRE     220     Elementary French I or                     SOC 260                    Social Science Statistics         3
SPA     220     Elementary Spanish I                    3 PED   121                   Fund And Tech of Activities II    1
PED     120     Fund and Tech of Activities I           1                                                              15
                                                       15
                                                    JUNIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester         CR
SOC     310*    Deviant Behavior+                       3 SOC 361*                    Social Psychology+                3
SOC     334*    Marriage and the Family                 3 SOC 440*                    Sociological Theory+              3
SOC     365*    Cultural Anthropology                   3 POS   330*                  United State Government or
SOC     211*    Intro to Social Work                    3 POS   331*                  State/Local Government            3
SOC     390*    Sociology of Aging or                      SOC 438*                   Community and Urban Life+ or
SOC     395*    Sociology of Health & Medicine          3 SOC 338*                    Sociology of Organizations       3
                General Elective                        2                             General Elective                  3
                                                       17                                                              15
                                                    SENIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester         CR
SOC     325*    Demography                              3 ECO 231*                    General Economics                 3
SOC     328*    Soc. of the Black Experience            3 GEO 231*                    World Geography                   3
SOC     460*    Methods of Research                     3 SOC 461*                    Senior Field Paper                3
SOC     382*    Minority Groups                         3                             General Elective                  3
                General Elective                        3                             General Elective                  3
                                                       15                                                              15

                                                  Total Credit Hours: 124
A grade of “C” or better is required in all major and prerequisite courses.
* Indicates the courses used to calculate 2.5 GPA for the major.
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
Paine 136
Page College                                               Social Sciences                                       Page 137
                                                                                                             Paine College
                                  SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR
                               SOCIOLOGY MAJORS WITH AN EMPHASIS IN
                                       SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

                                                   FRESHMAN YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester            CR
EDU     101     Preparing for Excellence                1 ENG 102                     Composition II                       3
ENG     101     Composition I                           3 CSC   100                   Computer Appl. And Prog.             3
MAT     122     College Algebra                         3 SOC 201                     Introduction to Sociology            3
HIS     112     World History                           3 BIO   102                   Princ. & Appl. of Bio. Science or
REL     230     Essentials of the Christian Faith       2 ESC   101                   Environmental Science                4
PHS     101     Princ/Appl of Physical Science or          HIS  103                   Survey of United States History      3
PHS     110     Intro to Atmospheric Science            4                                                                 16
                                                       16
                                                  SOPHOMORE YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester            CR
FRE     220     Elementary French I or                     FRE  221                   Elementary French or
SPA     220     Elementary Spanish I                    3 SPA   221                   Elementary Spanish                   3
HIS     104     African American History                3 PHI   230                   Problems of Philosophy              3
Art     120     Art Appreciation or                     3 REL   231                   World Religion                       2
MUS     120     Music Appreciation                         SOC 260                    Social Science Statistics            3
PHI     220     Value and Society                       2 PED   121                   Fund and Tech of Activities II       1
ENG     232     Introduction to Literature              3 SOC 211*                    Introduction to Social Work         3
PED     120     Fund and Tech of Activities I           1                                                                 15
                                                       15
                                                    JUNIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester            CR
SOC     310*    Deviant Behavior                        3 SOC 361*                    Social Psychology+                   3
SOC     365*    Cultural Anthropology                   3 SOC 440*                    Sociological Theory+                 3
SOC     382*    Minority Groups                         3 PSY   441*                  Abnormal Psychology                  3
PSY     201*    Introduction to Psychology              3 SOC 438*                    Community and Urban Life+ or
SOC     390*    Sociology of Aging or                      SOC 338*                   Soc. of Organizations               3
SOC     395*    Soc. of Health & Medicine               3 SOC 328*                    Soc. of Black Experience             3
                General Elective                        2                                                                 15
                                                       17
                                                    SENIOR YEAR
                            Fall Semester              CR                                      Spring Semester            CR
PSY     420*    Theories of Personality                 3 ECO 231                     General Economics                    3
SOC     460*    Methods of Research+                    3 GEO 231                     World Geography                      3
POS     330*    United States Government or                SOC 461                    Senior Field Paper                   3
POS     331*    State/Local Government                  3                             General Elective                     3
                General Elective                        3                             General Elective                     3
                General Elective                        3                                                                 15
                                                       15


                                                  Total Credit Hours: 124
A grade of “C” or better is required in all major and prerequisite courses.
* Indicates the courses used to calculate 2.5 GPA for the major.
+Students must pass the Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English (SPEE) prior to taking these courses.
                         COURSE PREFIXES AND DESCRIPTIONS
                         COURSE PREFIXES AND DESCRIPTIONS
                                PREFIXES FOR COURSE OFFERINGS
                                PREFIXES FOR COURSE OFFERINGS

ART – Art                                          MAC – Mass Communications




                                                                                         COURSE PREFIXES AND DESCRIPTIONS
ART – Art                                          MAC – Mass Communications




                                                                                          COURSE PREFIXES AND DESCRIPTIONS
BAA – Business Accounting                          MAT – Mathematics
BAA – Business Accounting                          MAT – Mathematics
BAM – Business Management                          MIL – Military Science
BAM – Business Management                          MIL – Military Science
BAI – Business/International                       MIS – Management Information System
BAI – Business/International                       MIS – Management Information System
BIB – Bible                                        MUS – Music
BIB – Bible                                        MUS – Music
BIO – Biology                                      NSC – Natural Science
BIO – Biology                                      NSC – Natural Science
BSA – Business Administration                      PAS – Pashto
BSA – Business Administration                      PAS – Pashto
CHE – Chemistry                                    PED – Physical Education
CHE – Chemistry                                    PED – Physical Education
CSC – Computer Science                             PHI – Philosophy
CSC – Computer Science                             PHI – Philosophy
DRA – Drama                                        PHS – Physical Science
DRA – Drama                                        PHS – Physical Science
ECO – Economics                                    PHY – Physics
ECO – Economics                                    PHY – Physics
EDU – Education                                    POS – Political Science
EDU – Education                                    POS – Political Science
ENG – English                                      PSY – Psychology
ENG – English                                      PSY – Psychology
ERD – Reading in Education                         PUR – Public Relations
ERD – Reading in Education                         PUR – Public Relations
ESC – Environmental Science                        REA – Reading
ESC – Environmental Science                        REA – Reading
FRE – French                                       REL – Religion
FRE – French                                       REL – Religion
FRS – Farsi                                        SPA – Spanish
FRS – Farsi                                        SPA – Spanish
GEO – Geography                                    SOC – Sociology
GEO – Geography                                    SOC – Sociology
HED – Health Education                             THL – Theology
HED – Health Education                             THL – Theology
HIS – History                                      TUT – Tutoring
HIS – History                                      TUT – Tutoring
JRN – Journalism
JRN – Journalism
                                             138
                                             138
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                                                                                                     Paine College
                                          COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Art (ART)                                                     and New Testament. Since the Bible ranks among the
                                                              most widely read literature of Western culture, we will
ART 120 - Art Appreciation                                    seek to understand the basics of the geography, examine
This is a survey of the arts and their contributions to       the historical and cultural settings in which the biblical
society. Students learn on a global level that the arts are   documents arose, discuss the types of literature found in
cultural documents that reflect the interests of a society.   the Bible, and explore appropriate ways of interpreting
Studies will include the outstanding works of art of          these documents. It is imperative that we learn the basics
various periods in art history.       They will include       of the critical methods used by scholars to investigate
architecture, painting, sculpture, the decorative arts,       historical questions about the biblical texts. We will also
photography, printmaking, and drawing. (3 hrs)                consider further, general questions about the role of texts
Fall/Spring                                                   and stories in religion. (3 hrs)
                                                              Fall/Spring
ART 121 – Design I
Students are introduced to the study of the principles and    Biology (BIO)
elements of art and how they are used in creating two-
and three-dimensional designs. Students will create           BIO 102 – Principles and Applications of
projects with various media that demonstrate the use of       Biological Science
the elements and principles of design. (3 hrs)                Prerequisite(s): Grade of “S” in REA 099, ENG 099, and
Fall                                                          MAT 099 (if required)
                                                              Designed to introduce fundamental biological principles,
ART 221 – Design II                                           concepts, and processes as illustrated by topics from plant
Prerequisite(s): Art 121 or by permission                     and animal sciences, and demonstrate their significance to
This course is a continuation of Art 121. Students will       humans and their environment. Three hours lecture and
experiment with various materials, with emphasis on two-      two hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
and three-dimensional problems. (3 hrs)                       Fall/Spring
Spring (even years)
                                                              BIO 111 – Principles of Biology I
ART 223 – Basic Drawing and Composition                       Prerequisite(s): Grade of “S” in REA 099, ENG 099, and
Prerequisite(s): Art 221 or by permission                     MAT 099 (if required)
Fundamental principles and techniques in drawing as well      This course is designed to introduce students to the
as basic consideration of line, form, space, and              fundamental concepts of biological principles and
composition are the foci of this course. (3 hrs)              processes. It will survey the cellular and chemical basis
Spring (odd years)                                            of life, cellular metabolism, cell diversity and
                                                              classification will also be given. This course is required
ART 226 – Painting I                                          for science majors and a grade of “C” or better is required
Prerequisite(s): Art 121 or by permission.                    as a prerequisite to BIO112. (4 hrs)
This course introduces painting in various media:             Fall/Spring
watercolor, oils, acrylics, tempera, etc. (3 hrs)
Spring (even years)                                           BIO 112 – Principles of Biology II
                                                              Prerequisite(s): BIO 111 (“C” or better)
ART 228 – Ceramics                                            This course is a continuation of Biology 111 (Principles
The student will learn basic techniques and processes in      of Biology I). Classification of species will be continued
making pottery. (3 hrs)                                       with special emphasis on plant and animal structure and
Spring                                                        function. Additional topics to be covered through lecture
                                                              and laboratory include embryonic development,
ART 325 – Art Education                                       evolution, population genetics and ecology. This course
This course is designed to give future teachers a basis for   is required for science majors and serves as a prerequisite
creating and responding to art by studying the principles     for advanced biology courses. (4 hrs)
and elements of art, which are used in making two - and       Fall/Spring
three - dimensional designs. The course includes the
vocabulary of art along with art projects and techniques      BIO 200 – Theories and Concepts of Nursing
that may be used in the classroom at the appropriate level.   Prerequisite(s): BIO 112
Students will observe how art has been used by every          This course is designed to provide students considering a
culture to enhance daily life and serve as cultural           career in the nursing profession with a basic
documents for all civilizations. (3 hrs)                      understanding of the principles and concepts that are both
Fall                                                          unique to and characteristic of the nursing profession.
                                                              Two hours of class per week. (2 hrs)
Bible (BIB)                                                   Spring

BIB 320 - Introduction to the Bible
Prerequisite(s): REL 230
This course will provide a basic introduction to the
history and literature of the Hebrew Bible, Apocrypha,
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                                                                                                         Page 139
BIO 202 – Scientific and Medical Terminology                  the gene. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory
Basic root words from Latin and Greek, general terms in       per week. (4 hrs)
the sciences, and terminology related to anatomy, diseases    Fall
and patient care. Two hours of class per week. (2 hrs)
Fall                                                          BIO 322 – Cell Biology
                                                              Prerequisite(s): BIO 112 and CHE 121
BIO 220 – Human Anatomy and Physiology I                      Physical and chemical principles underlying cell
Prerequisite(s): BIO 112 and CHE 120                          differentiation, structural organization, membrane
Anatomy of the organ systems of the human body; an            phenomena, and cell structure. Three hours lecture and
intense but interesting study of human body structures and    three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
how they are related to one another. Three hours of           Spring
lecture and three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
Fall                                                          BIO 329 – General Entomology
                                                              Prerequisite(s): BIO 112 and BIO 226
BIO 221 – Human Anatomy and Physiology II                     Morphology, physiology, ecology, taxonomy, economic
Prerequisite(s): BIO 112 and CHE 120                          and medical importance of insects. Three hours lecture
Physiology, or biological function of the organ systems of    and three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
the human body; a thorough investigation of how the           Spring
cells, tissues, and organs of the body work and carry out
their life-sustaining activities. Three hours lecture and     BIO 425 – Ecology
three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                      Prerequisite(s): BIO 112
Spring                                                        Inter-relations of plants, animals, populations,
                                                              communities, and the environment. Three hours lecture
BIO 226 – Invertebrate Zoology                                and three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): BIO 112                                      Spring
Taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, and
ecology of invertebrates. Three hours lecture and three       BIO 431 – General Microbiology
hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                            Prerequisite(s): BIO 112 and CHE 121
Fall                                                          An introductory course designed to survey the functional
                                                              anatomy, metabolism, cultivation, growth, and control of
BIO 227 – Vertebrate Zoology                                  microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria and
Prerequisite(s): BIO 112                                      relationships of these organisms to their environment.
Taxonomy, morphology, physiology, behavior, and               Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.
ecology of vertebrates. Three hours lecture and three         (4 hrs)
hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                            Fall/Spring
Spring
                                                              BIO 441 – Embryology
BIO 303 – Histology                                           Prerequisite(s): BIO 112 and BIO 220
Prerequisite(s): BIO 220                                      Developmental anatomy of the organ systems of the
Microscopic anatomy of the organ systems of the human         human body before birth; a fascinating look at the origin
body; an exploration of the significance of distinctive       and development of a human being from a zygote to the
microscopic features of cells and tissues and their           birth of an infant, including how gametes are formed and
relationship to organ function. Three hours lecture and       the process of fertilization. Three hours lecture and three
three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                      hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
Spring                                                        Fall
BIO 310 – Systematic Botany                                   BIO 450 – Independent Research
Prerequisite(s): BIO 112                                      Prerequisite(s): BIO 112, BIO 322 and CHE 121
Classification of vascular plants, life cycles, ethnobotany   Basic biological or biomedical research. Students must
and the local flora. Three hours lecture and three hours      file an “Independent Study” form detailing the
laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                                  arrangements. (1-4 hrs)
Spring                                                        Fall/Spring
BIO 320 – Plant Physiology                                    BIO 460-469 – Special Topics
Prerequisite(s): BIO 112 and CHE 121.                         Subject to Division and instructor approval. Provides an
Structure and physiology of plant organ systems, mineral      opportunity for Biology students to study a topic of
nutrition, energetic processes, water relations, growth,      interest in the major field under supervision of a Biology
development, transport, and hormonal systems. Three           professor. (1-4 hrs)
hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. (4         Fall /Spring
hrs)
Fall                                                          BIO 470 – Seminar I
                                                              Prerequisite(s): BIO 112 and CHE 121
BIO 321 – Genetics                                            Current biotechnological, medical and related topics are
Prerequisite(s): BIO 112 and CHE 121                          examined. Students present seminar topic orally. Group
                                                              discussion of scientific journal topics is included.
Mendelian genetics, including linkage and crossing-over;      Designed for sophomores and juniors. One seminar per
population genetics; and the nature and biochemistry of       week. Grading: “S” or “U” basis. (0 hrs)
                                                              Fall/Spring
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                                                                                                     Paine College

BIO 471 – Seminar II
Prerequisite(s): BIO 470                                      BSA 226 – COBOL Programming
Expansion of seminar topic presented in BIO 470.              Prerequisite(s): BSA 230
Students present seminar topic orally. Group discussion
of scientific journal topics is included. Designed for        Emphasis is placed on the use of COBOL language for
juniors. One seminar per week. Grading: “S” or “U” (0         business applications. (3 hrs)
hrs)                                                          Fall
Fall/Spring
                                                              BSA 228 – Computer Programming Language
BIO 472 – Seminar III                                         Prerequisite(s): BSA 230
Prerequisite(s): BIO 471                                      Emphasis is placed on problem solving with construction
Introduction and presentation of Senior Major Field Paper     of correct structured program. Topics include data
topic. Students conduct major field research (laboratory,     representation, simple data types, control structures,
field, or clinical) at approved designated site. Students     functions, and subprograms. (3 hrs)
orally present major field research protocol. Designed for    Spring
juniors and seniors. One seminar per week. Grading: “S”
or “U”. (0 hrs)                                               BSA 230 – Business System Applications
Fall/Spring                                                   Prerequisite(s): CSC 100
                                                              The purpose of this course is to develop skills and
BIO 473 – Seminar IV                                          understanding of computer tools and techniques used to
Prerequisite(s): BIO 472                                      solve business problems. Students are guided to learn
Designed for biology seniors. Students complete research      topics covering intermediate to advanced business
projects and report results orally and in written format to   applications: organize data, graph data, enhance decision-
the biology faculty. An acceptable report must be             making, construct advanced formulas, utilize financial
completed at least one month prior to the end of semester     functions, statistical analysis tools, analyzing and sharing
enrolled in course. Grading on an “A, B, C, D or F”           information using databases, publish organized data to the
basis. One seminar per week. (1 hr)                           Web and access real-time data from websites. (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                   Spring/Fall

Business Administration (BSA)                                 BSA 231 – Macroeconomic Principles
Business Administration (BSA)                                 The nature of the economic problem; principles of
BSA 200 – Survey of Business                                  resource allocation; laws of supply and demand; income
Survey course in business administration. Provides            and employment, fiscal policy, money and banking.
overview of accounting, management, information               (3 hrs)
systems, economics, and supporting disciplines. (3 hrs)       Fall/Spring
Fall/Spring
                                                              BSA 232 – Microeconomic Principles
BSA 201 – Introduction to International Business              Analysis of consumer demand; determination of price and
Survey of the International Business area. Provides           output under varying market structures; applications of
overview of the various problems related to accounting,       demand and supply, elasticities, pricing of factors of
management, information systems, economics, and               production. (3 hrs)
supporting disciplines as they impact on the international    Fall/Spring
scene.    A contrast is made between national and
international business operations. (3 hrs)                    BSA 241 – Principles of Finance
Fall/Spring                                                   Prerequisite(s): BSA 204
                                                              Introductory concepts of capital budgeting, with primary
BSA 204 – Accounting I                                        consideration to sources, allocation and utilization of
Concepts of accounting as a measure of reporting a            capital. (3 hrs)
business organization's economic activities, emphasis on      Fall/Spring
the application of principles in preparation and
understanding of financial statements. (3 hrs)                BSA 301 – Principle of Management
Fall/Spring                                                   Prerequisite(s): BSA 200
                                                              Introduction to the structure, organization,            and
BSA 205 – Accounting II                                       management of firms. (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): BSA 204 with a grade of “C” or better        Fall/Spring
This course is a continuation of BSA204 Principles of
Accounting I with emphasis on corporations, providing         BSA 304 – Intermediate Accounting I
financial analysis and managerial accounting. Content         Prerequisite(s): BSA 205 (with a “B” or better).
includes corporation organization and operations,             A thorough understanding of systems of accounting with
earnings per share and dividends, long-term obligations       special emphasis on procedures employed. (3 hrs)
and investments, cost-volume-profit analysis and              Fall
budgeting. (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                   BSA 305 – Intermediate Accounting II
                                                              Prerequisite(s): BSA 304
                                                              This course is the continuation of topics learned in
                                                              BSA304 “Intermediate Accounting I.” The course is a
                                                              comprehensive study in accounting theory and concepts
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Paine College                           Course Prefixes and Descriptions                               Paine College
                                                                                                           Page 141
in corporate accounting. Additional topics include leases,      BSA 332 – Introduction to Investments
pensions, tax allocation, and changes in accounting             Prerequisite(s): BSA 241
principles, stockholders’ equity, and cash flow statements.     Focuses on types of investments, the duties of investment
(3 hrs)                                                         bankers, and how to read and interpret financial reports.
Fall/Spring                                                     Also deals with securities analysis, risk and return trade-
                                                                offs and the functions and regulation of capital markets.
BSA 306 – Business Law I                                        (3 hrs)
Contracts, sales contracts, negotiable instruments,             Spring
common and public carriers; designed to acquaint
students with legal rights and liabilities in the ordinary      BSA 340 – File Processing with COBOL
course of business. (3 hrs)                                     Prerequisite(s): BSA 226
Fall/Spring                                                     Computers and their use in information processing.
                                                                Specific emphasis on file processing techniques. Other
BSA 307 – Business Law II                                       topics include: file organization, file processing
Prerequisite(s): BSA 306                                        environment, sequential indexed, and direct access. (3
This course critically examines real and personal property      hrs)
and creditor-debtor relationships: Focus on this course         Spring
will be on partnership, corporations, real property,            BSA 341 – Principles of Marketing
insurance, trusts and estates, and bankruptcy. (3 hrs)          Prerequisite(s): BSA 200
Spring                                                          The movement of goods and services from producer to
                                                                consumer, with emphasis on the functions of marketing,
BSA 310 – Managerial and Cost Accounting                        the marketing mix, and promotional activities. (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): BSA 205                                        Fall/Spring
Principles of standard cost accounting used for
managerial control. Managerial accounting principles            BSA 342 – Small Business Management
used for decision-making. Emphasis on forecasting with          Prerequisite(s): BSA 301
the Linear Model and Budget preparation. (3 hrs)                Business activity as it applies to small business, with
Fall                                                            emphasis on management, marketing, and finance.
                                                                (3 hrs)
BSA 320 – Theory of International Trade and                     Spring
Investment – Theory of International Trade and
Prerequisite(s): BSA 232                                        BSA 343 – International Marketing
Introduction to the macro and micro economic principles         Prerequisite(s): BSA 341
of international trade. The role of international trade as it   The study of resource allocation and price and output
impacts on the investment sector of the world economy.          problems involved in international markets operating
(3 hrs)                                                         under multi economic systems; comparison and contrast
Spring                                                          between capitalist and non-capitalist economic systems.
                                                                (3 hrs)
BSA 321 – Money and Banking                                     Spring
Prerequisite(s): BSA 231
Historical review of the banking system of the United           BSA 344 Information Systems Analysis & Design
States; other financial institutions; effects of monetary       Prerequisite(s): BSA 230
policy on prices, employment, income, and economic              A study in the analysis, system design, program appraisal
growth (Investment). (3 hrs)                                    and development, and implementation of computer
Spring (even years)                                             information systems. The course concentrates upon the
                                                                study of fact-finding approaches, documentation,
BSA 328 – Data Structures                                       hardware and software specification, I/O design, and
Prerequisite(s): BSA 228                                        implementation of data processing systems. (3 hrs)
Encompasses the study and construction of lists, vectors,       Spring
arrays, searching, sorting, file development and file main-
tenance. (3 hrs)                                                BSA 345 – Entrepreneur Accounting
Fall                                                            Prerequisite(s): BSA 204
                                                                Emphasizes the study and use of accounting principles,
BSA 330 – Statistics for Business Planning                      practice, and software applications pertinent to the small
Prerequisite(s): MAT 122,                                       business/entrepreneurial enterprise. Emphasizes Excel
Descriptive statistics, statistical inference, and regression   Spreadsheets and Includes tax accounting for payroll.
analysis. (3 hrs)                                               (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                     Spring
BSA 331 – Quantitative Methods for Business                     BSA 346 – Sales Management
Prerequisite(s): BSA330                                         Prerequisite(s): BSA 341
Economic models, emphasizing their mathematical                 This course is designed to emphasis the importance of
properties to illustrate the relevance of such topics as con-   personal selling as an integral part of the promotion
strained maxima and minima, partially and simply                process. Topics of discussion will include: the basic sales
ordered systems, theory of probability, and differential        task of salespeople; how the sales manager selects, trains
equations. (3 hrs)                                              and compensate salespeople and the different kinds of
Fall/Spring                                                     sales presentations. This course will cover critical issues
                                                                that may arise. The course will help students to
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                                                                                                    Paine College
understand and develop the oral communication skills         BSA 400 – International Economics
necessary for a successful sales career. (3 hrs)             Prerequisite(s): BSA 232
Fall/Spring                                                  Principles and practices of international trade, balance of
                                                             payments, fixed and flexible exchange rates, tariffs, and
BSA 347 – Retailing                                          operation of international monetary systems. (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): BSA 341                                     Spring
Provide students with an overview of how retailers plan
their marketing strategies. Topics covered will include:     BSA 414 – Management Information Systems
the many kinds of retailers, the differences between the     Prerequisite(s): BSA 230 – Management Information
conventional and non-conventional retailers-including        This course demonstrates how information technology
internet merchants, and other area of retailing such as      can be used to support information management and how
trade-area analysis and retail site selection. (3 hrs)       organizations utilize the information to address the
Fall/Spring                                                  information requirement of organization structure. The
                                                             course recognizes and describes information systems
BSA 350 – Multinational Corporations                         encountered in the business world and analyzes the
Prerequisite(s): BSA 201                                     impact of an information system. Practical, managerial,
Study and analysis of production, value, distribution and    and ethical dilemmas related to the development and use
pricing problems faced by Multinational Corporations         of information are identified. Then alternative ways that
including in-depth study of macro and microeconomic          information systems could be built and used in the
principles that impact on the expansion of the               business environment are suggested. (3 hrs)
Corporations and the role competitive advantage plays.       Fall/Spring
(3 hrs)
Fall                                                         BSA 415 – Computer Architecture and Organization
                                                             Prerequisite(s): BSA 228
BSA 370 – Entrepreneurship                                   Introduces topics in computer architecture and organiza-
Prerequisite(s): BSA 301                                     tion. Emphasis is placed on classification of computers,
Emphasizes the historical aspects of Entrepreneurship, the   memory, I/O systems, software influence on hardware,
procedures associated with starting a business, and          and special purpose architectures. (3 hrs)
entrepreneurial management. (3 hrs)                          Fall (even years)
Fall
                                                             BSA 420 – International Financial Management
BSA 371 – Consumer Behavior                                  Prerequisite(s): BSA 241
Prerequisite(s): BSA 341                                     Analysis of International Financial Markets including the
Focuses in the models of consumer behavior that treats all   International Monitory Fund and the role of the World
of the behavioral influences on consumer buying              Bank in relation to economic stability, employment and
behavior.     This course surveys various analytical         distribution of income. (3 hrs)
frameworks, concepts and theories that assist marketers to   Fall
analyze and explain consumer purchaser decisions. The
course is designed to help students understand how to use    BSA 422 – Data Communication
consumer behavior research data in developing marketing      Prerequisite(s): BSA 228
mix strategy planning. (3 hrs)                               Data Communication is concerned primarily
Spring/Fall                                                  with the exchange of data between two directly-
                                                             connected devices. Key concepts includes all
BSA 372 – Advertising                                        aspects of transmission, interfacing, link control,
Prerequisite(s): BSA 341                                     and multiplexing. (3 hrs)
Examines how managers can effectively use advertising        Fall
as a tool to communicate with their target market. Class
sessions will consist of lectures, and cases from a wide     BSA 423 – Auditing
variety of industries. (3 hrs)                               Prerequisite(s): BSA 304
Spring/Fall                                                  Standards and objectives, reports, internal controls,
                                                             examination of internal and external records, working
BSA 373 – Industrial Marketing                               papers, procedures, and other related topics. (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): BSA 341                                     Spring
This course will examine strategies of marketing products
to industrial and commercial customers.             Upon     BSA 430 – Federal Tax Accounting
completing this course, students will have an                Prerequisite(s): BSA 204
understanding of how industrial products are similar to      Concepts and applications of the federal income tax laws
and differ from consumer products. Course will be taught     with particular emphasis on individual income taxes.
through lectures, presentations and case-study methods.      (3 hrs)
(3 hrs)                                                      Fall
Spring
                                                             BSA 431 – Governmental and Not–for–Profit
BSA 380 – Organizational Behavior                            Accounting
Prerequisite(s): BSA 301                                     Prerequisite(s): BSA 205
Includes the study of major theories in organizational       Principles and methods of accounting in local, state and
behavior and the application of these theories within the    federal governments; includes systems for private and
organizational context. (3 hrs)                              non-profit organizations. (3 hrs)
Spring                                                       Spring
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                                                                                                          Page 143
BSA 440 – Data Base Management                                 BSA 451 – Human Resources Management
BSA 440 – Data Base Management                                 Prerequisite(s): BSA 301
Prerequisite(s): BSA 226                                       The course examines the concepts underlying human
Introduction to the use of computers for business and          resources management and reviews the various Human
other administrative applications.       Methods of data       Resources functional areas in the field. Functional areas
organization, storage and reporting are considered to          of study include planning, staffing and recruitment,
satisfy specific needs for information. (3 hrs)                training and development, practices of personnel
Spring                                                         administration, as well as compensation and benefits.
                                                               Central to this course is how institutions, policies,
BSA 441 – Marketing Research                                   legislations and governmental regulations impact the
Prerequisite(s): BSA 341                                       management of human resources. (3 hrs)
Provide students with a managerial approach to study the       Spring
theories and practices related to activities and function of
marketing. Topics covered will include the marketing           BSA 460 – Special Topics Seminar
management process. This course will demonstrate how           Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
firms use this process in (1) planning marketing activities,   Special interest topics to be explored by majors in general
(2) directing the implementation of the plans, and (3)         or in a specific emphasis. Topics may be expansion in
controlling these plans in developing the whole-company        the area of subjects offered or an experimentation in new
strategic management planning process. (3 hrs)                 topic offerings. (1-3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                    Fall/Spring
BSA 442 – Marketing Research
Prerequisite(s): BSA 341 and BSA 330                           BSA 470 – Internship
Focuses on how marketing managers improve decision-            Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing.
making with marketing research.             In addition to     Provides the opportunity to test students' business skills
traditional methods of collecting research data,               and career aptitudes in a business setting. Students work
nontraditional topics such as the role of intranets and        with    experienced       professionals/    entrepreneurs.
online access to multimedia data, use of search engines to     Admission by application. (3 hrs)
gather information from the Internet for primary data          Spring
collection, including online focus groups and surveys,
interactive questionnaires, and large-scale Internet panels.   BSA 480 – Production Management
(3 hrs)                                                        Prerequisite(s): BSA 301, 331
Fall/Spring                                                    Focuses on the techniques of operations management
                                                               including CPM, PERT, inventory control, quality control,
BSA 443 – Accounting Theory                                    production scheduling, manufacturing methods, job
Prerequisite(s): BSA 305                                       evaluation, purchasing, and economic analysis. (3 hrs)
In depth study of the Generally Accepted Accounting            Fall
Principles and Practices as pronounced by the House of
GAAPP.        Major emphasis is placed on the                  BSA 489 – Management Problems, Policies, and
pronouncements, rulings and interpretations of the             Planning
Financial Accounting Standards Board. (3 hrs)                  Prerequisite(s): BSA 331
Spring (even years)                                            Capstone course in which seniors integrate knowledge
                                                               obtained in previous courses. Computer-based case
BSA 444        –   Consolidation      and    International     analysis is utilized and a comprehensive term project is
Accounting                                                     completed. (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): BSA 305                                       Spring
Focus on preparation and analysis of multi-
corporations financial accounting statements.                  Chemistry (CHE)
Emphasis is on consolidation of both domestic
and international firms. Problems of translating               CHE 120 – General Chemistry I
foreign currency and financial statements into                 Prerequisite(s): Two years of high school algebra with
domestic dollars and financial statements are                  grades of “C” or better or MAT 122. Grade of “S” in
identified with GAAP solutions. (3 hrs)                        REA 099, ENG 099, and MAT 099 (if required).
Fall (odd years)                                               Periodic table of elements, atomic and molecular
                                                               structure, bonding, thermochemistry, gas laws, and
BSA 450 – Capital Structure in Developing Countries            solution chemistry. Three hours lecture and three hours
Prerequisite(s): BSA 201 and 232                               laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
Profiles of the study of theory and practice of capital        Fall/Spring
structure & growth and development in the developing
countries. Problems of capital acquisition, effect on          CHE 121 – General Chemistry II
economic development of population and labor force,            Prerequisite(s): CHE 120
employment, urbanization, and education; and analysis of       Chemical equilibria, acids and bases, kinetics, molecular
monetary and fiscal policies of less-developed countries,      structure, and properties of the more common elements.
role of the capitalistic nations, the world bank, and their    Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.
impact on economic development. (3 hrs)                        (4 hrs)
Fall (odd years)                                               Fall/Spring
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                                                                                                      Paine College
CHE 233 – Quantitative Analysis
Prerequisite(s): CHE 121                                     CHE 437 – Physical Chemistry II
Theory and practice of quantitative analysis. Gravimetric    Prerequisite(s): CHE 436
and volumetric analysis and introduction to modern           Continuation of Chemistry 436. Three hours lecture and
instrumental techniques. Three hours lecture and three       three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                           Spring
Fall
CHE 334 – Organic Chemistry I                                CHE 450 – Independent Research
Prerequisite(s): CHE 121 and MAT 122                         Prerequisite(s): CHE 336
Composition, nomenclature, preparation, reactions, and       Basic chemical or biomedical research. Open to biology
reaction mechanisms of aliphatic hydrocarbons and            and chemistry majors.          Students must file an
functional groups of halogens and oxygen. Three hours        “Independent Study” form detailing the arrangements.
lecture and three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)         Hours and credit to be arranged. (1-4 hrs)
Fall                                                         Fall/Spring
CHE 335 – Organic Chemistry II                               CHE 460-469 – Special Topics
Prerequisite(s): CHE 334                                     Subject to Division and instructor approval. Provides an
Continuation of CHE 334. Functional groups of nitrogen,      opportunity for Chemistry students to study a topic of
aromatic hydrocarbons, and biological molecules. Three       interest in the major field under supervision of a
hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.           Chemistry professor. (1-4 hrs)
(4 hrs)                                                      Fall /Spring
Spring
                                                             CHE 470 – Chemistry Seminar I
CHE 336 – Instrumental Analysis                              Prerequisite(s): BIO 112, CHE 121
Prerequisite(s): CHE 233                                     Topics covering current and advanced chemical processes
Modern       spectroscopic,    chromatographic,     and      and technological applications are examined. Students
electrochemical analyses. Three hours lecture and three      present seminar topic orally. Group discussion of
hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                           scientific journal topics included.      Designed for
Spring                                                       sophomores and juniors. One seminar per week.
                                                             Grading: “S” or “U”. (0 hrs).
CHE 421 – General Biochemistry                               Fall/Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIO 112 and CHE 335
Chemical composition and molecular organization of cells     CHE 471 – Chemistry Seminar II
and tissues. Enzyme action and biochemical reactions of      Prerequisite(s): CHE 470
cellular metabolism. Three hours lecture and three hours     Expansion of seminar topic presented in CHE 470.
laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                                 Students present seminar topic orally. Group discussion
Spring                                                       of scientific journal topics is included. Designed for
                                                             juniors. One seminar per week. Grading: “S” or “U”.
CHE 422 – Inorganic Chemistry                                (0 hrs)
Co-requisite: CHE 437                                        Fall/Spring
Chemistry of representative elements, transition elements
and coordination compounds. Three hours lecture and          CHE 472 – Chemistry Seminar III
three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                     Prerequisite(s): CHE 471
Spring                                                       Introduction and presentation of Senior Major Field Paper
                                                             topic. Students present seminar topic orally. Group
CHE 423 – Organic Analysis                                   discussion of scientific journal is included. Designed for
Prerequisite(s): CHE 335                                     juniors and seniors. One seminar per week. Grading: “S”
Modern analytical methods of organic compounds. Three        or “U” (0 hrs)
hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)   Fall/Spring
Fall/Spring (offered as needed)
                                                             CHE 473 – Chemistry Seminar IV
CHE 425 – Organic Preparations                               Prerequisite(s): CHE 472
Prerequisite(s): CHE 335                                     Designed for chemistry seniors.             Original research
Multi-step synthesis of organic compounds. Nine hours        (laboratory, field, or clinical), the results of which must be
laboratory per week. (3 hrs)                                 reported orally in seminar and in writing to the chemistry
Fall/Spring                                                  and biology faculty. An acceptable report must be
                                                             completed at least one month prior to the expected date
CHE 436 – Physical Chemistry I                               of graduation. One seminar per week. Grading on an “A,
Prerequisite(s): CHE 233 and MAT 221                         B, C, D or F” basis. (1 hr)
Application of physical laws to chemical phenomena.          Fall/Spring
Covers thermodynamics, kinetics, phase equilibria,
electrochemistry, chemical statistics, and spectroscopy.     Computer Science (CSC)
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.
(4 hrs)                                                      CSC 100 – Computer Applications and
Fall                                                         Programming
                                                             Introduction to computers and information processing,
                                                             fundamental concepts and operations.       Computer
                                                             capabilities limitations and applications, system
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                                                                                                          Page 145
components and social impact. Exposure to internet             design of human computer interface. Principles and
applications, e.g., word processing, spreadsheets,             techniques of computer graphics will be addressed.
presentations, graphics, and databases. (3 hrs)                (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                    Fall
CSC 226 – Introduction to Computing                            CSC 362 – Assembly Language Programming
Prerequisite(s): MAT 122                                       Prerequisite(s): CSC 341
Fundamentals of programming concepts, capabilities and         Introduction to assembly language, program linkage,
limitations, history and development of modern                 input-output instructions, and machine organization.
computers and components of the computer system.               Topics include registers, memory instruction formats.
Visual Basic programming including its environment,            character data processing decimal, hexadecimal and
controls, menus, forms, OLE objects, adding internet           binary numerical representation, subroutines and program
access, and providing help systems. (3 hrs)                    linkage. (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                    Fall
CSC 230 – Principles of Programming I                          CSC 446 – Data Communications and Networks
Prerequisite(s): MAT 122                                       Prerequisite(s): CSC 341
Fundamental       procedural     programming     concepts.     Introduction to data communication and networks.
Fundamentals used in design and development of                 Topics include communication protocols, communication
programs using C++ language. Data types, control               environment, local area networks, distributed processing,
structures, functions, arrays, files, and the mechanics of     network management and design, encoding, signaling,
running, and debugging. Historical and social context of       data protocols, data transmission techniques, and
computing.      Overview of computer science as a              topologies control strategies. (3 hrs)
discipline. (3 hrs)                                            Spring
Fall
                                                               CSC 455 – Software Engineering and Development
CSC 231 – Principles of Programming II                         Prerequisite(s): CSC 341
Prerequisite(s): CSC 230                                       The process of analyzing and finding solutions for
More advanced programming concepts. Topics include             organizational problems that require computer-based
control structures, arrays, procedures, files and recursion.   solutions. Includes survey development, metrics, and the
(3 hrs)                                                        study of software techniques use to design and maintain
Spring                                                         solutions. (3 hrs)
                                                               Spring
CSC 250 – Algorithms and Data Structures
Prerequisite(s): CSC 231                                       CSC 460-461 Special Topics
Formal techniques that support the design considerations       Subject to Division and instructor approval, provides an
of efficiency. Asymptotic complexity bounds, techniques        opportunity for computer science students to study a topic
of analysis, algorithmic strategies, and automata theory       of interest in the major field under supervision of a
and its application to language translation. The study of      Computer Science professor.
data structures including trees, stacks, and sorts. (3 hrs)    Fall/Spring
Fall
                                                               CSC 462 – Computer Architecture and Operating
CSC 340 – Object Oriented Programming I                        Systems
Prerequisite(s): CSC 231                                       Prerequisite(s): CSC 341
The concepts of object-oriented programming using Java         Introduces the fundamentals of operating systems design
language. Review of control structures and types with          and implementation. Topics include an overview of the
emphasis on structured data types and array processing.        components of an operating system, mutual exclusion and
The object-oriented programming paradigm, the                  synchronization, implementation of processes algorithms,
definition and use of classes, the fundamentals of object-     memory management, and file systems.
oriented design. (3 hrs)                                       (3 hrs)
Fall                                                           Spring
CSC 341 – Object Oriented Programming II                       Drama (DRA)
Prerequisite(s): CSC 340
The concepts involved in the advanced object oriented          DRA 200 – Fundamentals of Technical Theater
approach to data structure and programming. Topics             Prerequisite(s): Open to students with junior status.
include capturing user actions with a listener, adding         This course surveys the techniques for designing,
buttons and text fields to an interface, arranging             building, painting, costuming, and managing a theatrical
components using the border layout manager, converting         production. Students enrolled in this course will be called
between data types both implicitly and explicitly, finding     upon as needed to assist with Paine College dramatic
the formatting rules for the locale where an applet is run.    productions as partial fulfillment of the requirements of
(3 hrs)                                                        the course.
Spring                                                         (3 hrs)
                                                               Fall/Spring
CSC 352 – Computer Graphics and Multimedia
Prerequisite(s): CSC 230                                       DRA 270 – Theater Performance and Play Production
Introduction to and use of computer graphics as they           Admission by audition/permission only. This is a one-
apply to multimedia, the World-Wide Web, and the               semester course designed to introduce beginning actors to
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                                                                                                     Paine College
the basics required for securing, preparing for, and          equipment, sound design, safety, and equipment
executing a dramatic role before the public in a produced     maintenance. Students will complete a sound design
play. (1 hr) (repeatable to a max. 8 hrs)                     project for a selected play. (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                   Fall/Spring
DRA 271 – Acting I: Acting Workshop                           DRA 381 – Stage Management
This course introduces the student to the craft of acting     Prerequisite(s): Junior Status
including training in voice, movement, emotional              This course will focus on principles of stage management
sensitivity, improvisation, and scene study. The student      for the theater, including cast and crew job descriptions
will develop the necessary skills for preparing and           and responsibilities, time management, planning,
learning dramatic materials suitable for use in an audition   scheduling, prompt book, rehearsals, attitudes, and calling
for a leading role in a dramatic production. (3 hrs)          a show. Students will complete a stage management
Fall                                                          project for a selected play. (3 hrs)
                                                              Fall/Spring
DRA 272 – Acting II: Scene Study
Prerequisite(s): DRA 271                                      DRA 491– Senior Project
This course is a continuation of Acting I with a continued    Prerequisite(s): DRA 273
focus on developing those skills learned in that course.      This project includes an historical/analytical thesis or
Also, it includes studies in text and subtext, scene study,   project in literature, history, theory, design, or
and character analysis. The student will develop the          performance. Written and production components are
necessary skills for preparing and developing dramatic        required for all projects. (6 hrs) (repeatable to max. 12
materials related to working with a scene partner. (3 hrs)    hrs)
Spring                                                        Fall/Spring
                                                              DRA 492 – Internship
DRA 273 – Acting III: Period Style                            Prerequisite(s): Open to students with senior status.
Prerequisite(s): DRA 272.                                     While serving as an intern, students receive in-service
This course introduces the problems of enacting period        learning experiences in the field of drama. Each student is
literature from Greek to early twentieth century. Students     responsible for securing an internship with a local
address problems of deportment and stage movement,            company to work in some area of drama. Under the
diction, and meter. Scenes performed from Greek,              supervision of an Internship Supervisor, the student will
Roman, Renaissance, Restoration, and early Modern             complete a portfolio based on their work experience. (6
repertoires. (3 hrs)                                          hrs) (repeatable to a max. 12 hrs)
Fall (odd years)                                              Fall/Spring
                                                              Economics – (ECO)
DRA 375 – Stage Lighting
This course will focus on lighting design for the theater,    ECO 231 Macroeconomics
including equipment and tools of the lighting designer;       The nature of the economic problem; principles of
drafting techniques in creating a lighting plot; and design   resources allocation; laws of supply and demand; income
analysis and theory. (3 hrs)                                  and employment, fiscal policy, money and banking.
Fall (odd years)                                              (3 hrs)
                                                              Fall/Spring
DRA 376 – Scene Design I
This course will focus on various aspects of scene design     ECO 232 – Microeconomics
for the theatre, including sketching, drafting, rendering     Analysis of consumer demand; determination of price and
and model building techniques, and research. (3 hrs)          output under varying market structures; applications of
Fall (even years)                                             demand and supply, elasticity, and pricing of factors of
                                                              production. (3 hrs)
DRA 377 – Scene Design II                                     Fall/Spring
Prerequisite(s): DRA 376
Students will perfect techniques learned in DRA 376.          ECO 321 – Money and Banking
Additional concentration will be placed on historical         Prerequisite(s): Economic 231
aspects of design, applied research, and design concepts.     Historical review of the banking system in the United
(3 hrs)                                                       States; other financial institutions; effects of monetary
Spring (even years)                                           policy on prices, employment, income and economic
                                                              growth. (3 hrs)
DRA 378 – Directing                                           Spring
This course is a study of the fundamental techniques of
stage directing. It introduces concepts regarding stage       ECO 331 – Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
space, blocking and movement, script analysis and             Prerequisite(s): ECO 232 and MAT 124
interpretation, and style. Reading, discussions, laboratory   Theoretical analysis of production, value, distribution and
work, the directing of scenes and one-act plays, and the      pricing under various economic structures; in depth study
creation of a prompt book are required. (3 hrs)               of microeconomic topics. (3 hrs)
Spring (odd years)                                            Fall/Spring
DRA 380 – Sound Design
This course will focus on various aspects of sound design
for the theatre, including principals of acoustics, sound
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                                                                                                         Page 147
ECO 341 – Contemporary Issues in Economics                     monetary and fiscal policies of less developed countries
Prerequisite(s): ECO 231                                       and the impact of economic development. (3 hrs)
An analysis of economic issues like inflation,                 Fall/Spring
unemployment, income, distribution, pollution, and
productivity monetary and fiscal policy in action. (3 hrs)     ECO 451 – Urban Economics
Fall/Spring                                                    Prerequisite(s): ECO 232
                                                               A study of the economic nature of problems in cities; land
ECO 351 – Public Finance                                       use and transportation problems. (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): ECO 231                                       Fall/Spring
Analysis of local, state, and federal government
expenditure and taxation in relation to economic stability,    ECO 425 – Special Topics in Economics
employment and distribution of income. (3 hrs)                 Seminars focusing on selected economics topics and
Fall/Spring                                                    problems; subject areas will vary according to the
                                                               interests of the students and instructors. (3 hrs)
ECO 361 – Labor Economics                                      Fall/Spring
Prerequisite(s): ECO 232
An analysis of supply and demand for labor, study of           Education (EDU)
philosophy of labor unions, labor legislation, labor
management relationship and current labor problems. (3         EDU 101 – Preparing for Excellence
hrs)                                                           Acquaints new students with aspects of college life and
Fall/Spring                                                    assists them in making adjustments required of all new
                                                               and first time students. (1 hr)
ECO 371 – Consumer Economics                                   Fall/Spring
Prerequisite(s): ECO 232
Topics include economic problems of family, consumer           EDU 220 – Foundations of Education
credit, analysis of various types of insurance, legal rights   This is an introductory course which provides
of the consumer, standard of living and budgeting.             understanding of the teaching profession, emphasizing
(3 hrs)                                                        knowledge and information on various educational issues,
Fall/Spring                                                    concepts, philosophies, trends, ethical behavior and
                                                               research findings. Field experience required. (3 hrs)
ECO 391 – Comparative Economic Systems                         Fall/Spring
Prerequisite(s): ECO 232
The study of resource allocation and price and output          EDU 301 – Educational Media
determination under different economic systems;                Develop competencies in the use of educational media.
comparison and contrast between capitalist and socialist       Emphasis on design and production of classroom
economic systems. (3 hrs)                                      materials. (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                    Fall
ECO 400-International Economics                                EDU 302 – Early Childhood Curriculum and Methods
Prerequisite(s): ECO 232 and ECO 321                           Historical, philosophical, social and pedagogical theories
Principles and practices of international trade, balance of    and principles underlying the early childhood (PK-5)
payments, fixed and flexible exchange rates, tariffs, and      curriculum and “best practices” pedagogy and instruction.
operation of international monetary systems. (3 hrs)           Includes classroom computer use, thinking skills,
Fall/Spring                                                    addressing diversity as well as planning, preparing,
                                                               implementing lessons for diverse students and assessing
ECO 421 – Economic Policy                                      student progress/teacher effectiveness. Field experience
Prerequisite(s): ECO 321                                       required. (3 hrs)
Analysis of macroeconomic models of income                     Fall
determination, historical perspective of fiscal and
monetary policies and their effectiveness in solving           EDU 303 – Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum
inflation, unemployment, and other economic problems.          and Methods
(3 hrs)                                                        Historical, philosophical, social and pedagogical theories
Spring                                                         and principles underlying the middle grades (6-8) and
                                                               high school (9-12) curriculum and “best practices”
ECO 431-American Economic History                              pedagogy and instruction. Includes classroom computer
Prerequisite(s): ECO 232                                       use, thinking skills, addressing diversity and needs and
Study of historical development in agriculture, industry,      nature of early adolescent as well as planning, preparing,
banking, and governmental economic policies. (3 hrs)           implementing lessons for diverse students and assessing
Fall/Spring                                                    student progress/teacher effectiveness. Field experience
                                                               required. (3 hrs)
ECO 442 – Economic Development                                 Fall
Prerequisite(s): ECO 232 and 321
Profiles of the study of theory and measurement of             EDU 308 – Teaching of Language Arts
economic growth and development; developing countries          Addressing   strategies and materials for fostering
effect on economic development of population,                  effective writing, reading, oral and listening
employment, urbanization, and education; and analysis of       communication skills of students from Middle Grades
                                                               through grade twelve. The course will emphasize
                                                               grammar, vocabulary and spelling for developing an
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                                                                                                       Paine College
understanding and use of language.        Field experience      content (e.g., geography, economics, world history,
required. (3 hrs)                                               American history, Georgia history, civics/government,
Fall/Spring                                                     societal influences, and world citizenry issues). Focusing
                                                                on content in planning, designing, preparing,
EDU 312 – Children's Literature                                 implementing, and assessing student achievement in
Types of literature for pre-school and elementary age           social studies. Field experience required. (3 hrs)
groups, including practical experience with children.           Fall/Spring
Field experience required. (3 hrs)
Fall                                                            EDU 345 (Psychology 345) – Developmental
                                                                Psychology
EDU 315 – Mathematics for Elementary Teachers                   Prerequisite(s): PSY 201
Fundamental concepts of geometry, axiomatic systems,            Principles of human development as revealed through
and transformation defined by those systems.                    biology, anthropology, and sociology, covering early life
Emphasizing mathematical content. (Not an elective for          through adolescence. (3 hrs)
mathematics majors). Field experience required. (3 hrs)         Fall/Spring
Fall/Spring
                                                                EDU 393 (Psychology 393) – Educational Psychology
EDU 329 – MG and SEC Mathematics for Teachers                   Prerequisite(s): PSY 201
Strategies and materials for teaching mathematics in            Psychological principles underlying the teacher-learning
Middle and Secondary grades. Fundamental procedures             process including theories of learning and development,
include interpreting data and statistics, patterns, algebraic   individual differences, motivation, readiness, transfer, and
thinking, problem solving, tools of geometry and                measurement of intelligence and achievement. (3 hrs)
measurement, trigonometry, and probability.             Field   Spring
experience required. (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                     EDU 455 (Psychology 455) – Exceptional Children
                                                                Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 and 335 and EDU 393
EDU 332 – Science for Teachers                                  General problems and psychological characteristics
Prerequisite(s): PHS 101 and BIO 102                            involved in the education of exceptional children, with
Underlying concepts and processes in science, science as        emphasis on identification and methods of adjusting
inquiry, physical science, life science, earth/space science,   instruction to the needs of the children. Designed for pre-
science    technology,      science     in    personal/social   service and in-service teachers, counselors, and
perspectives, and history/nature of science as they apply       administrators. (3 hrs)
to the middle grade (6-8) and high school (9-12)                Spring
classroom. Emphasizes content knowledge in planning,
designing, preparing, implementing, and assessing student       EDU 460 – Special Topics
achievement.      Applications include current research         Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
findings as they relate to science content.             Field   Selected areas of Education. (1-3 hrs)
experience required. (3 hrs)                                    Fall/Spring
Fall
                                                                EDU 489 – Assessment Skills in Education
EDU 336 – Science and Social Studies Content                    Co-requisites: EDU 490, 491, or 492
Prerequisite(s): HIS 103, 104, 112, PHS 101, and BIO            Strategies for assessing student growth/teacher
102                                                             effectiveness, collecting/analyzing assessment data,
Emphasizes on content-based science and social studies          synthesizing/interpreting      data      obtained      and
for elementary classroom instruction delineated in              reporting/presenting student growth/teacher effectiveness
national and state standards. Engaging students in              data to a variety of audiences. Includes aspects of
scientific inquiry. Science includes unifying concepts and      norm/criterion       referenced,      traditional/authentic
processes in science, science as inquiry, physical science,     assessment, grading procedures/rubrics and interpreting
life science, earth/space science, science technology,          data available on classroom (PK-12) student
science in personal/social perspectives, and history/nature     progress/teacher effectiveness. (3 hrs)
of science lessons. Social Science content includes             Fall/Spring
aspects of world, American and Georgia history;
American, Georgia history; economics, geography,                EDU 490 – Early Childhood (ECE) Directed Teaching
civics/government, societal influences, and world               and Seminar
citizenry issues. Directed and non-directed field trips are     Prerequisite(s): Completion of all pre-student teaching
an integral part of this course. (3 hrs)                        requirements, Passing Score on Licensure Content
Spring                                                          Examination(s)
                                                                Observation and analysis of teaching, participation and
EDU 339 – Classroom Management                                  student teaching in the Early Childhood field, under
Principles and techniques for the guidance of students and      supervision in selected schools. Weekly seminars and
effective management of a classroom. Field Experience           electronic portfolios are required. (12 hrs)
required. (3 hrs)                                               Fall/Spring
Spring

EDU 340 – Social Studies for Teachers
Prerequisite(s): HIS 103, 104, and 112
Underlying concepts and processes in social studies in
middle and secondary grades. Emphasizes social studies
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                                                                                                          Page 149
EDU 491 – Middle Grades (MGE) Directed Teaching               grammatical language structure that convey thoughts and
and Seminar (Formally EDU 439MG)                              ideas in written form. (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of all requirements, Passing      Spring
Score on Licensure Content Examination(s)
Observation and analysis of teaching, participation and       ENG 232 – Introduction to Literature
student teaching in the Middle Grades field, under            Prerequisite(s): ENG 102 (“C” or better)
supervision in selected schools. Weekly seminars and          This introductory course presents students with different
electronic portfolios are required. (12 hrs)                  types of literature in such a way that the student will learn
Fall/Spring                                                   to read poetry, fiction, and drama with understanding and
                                                              enjoyment. Students will also learn how to write themes
EDU 492 – Secondary (SEC) Directed Teaching and               about literature. (3 hrs)
Seminar                                                       Fall/Spring
Prerequisite(s): Completion of all requirements, Passing
Score on Licensure Content Examination(s)                     ENG 233 – Types of Drama
Observation and analysis of teaching, participation and       Types of Drama present principles of dramatic technique
student teaching in the Grades 9-12 field, under              necessary to the proper evaluation of stage and screen
supervision in selected schools. Weekly seminars and          productions. (3 hrs)
electronic portfolios are required. Two-hour laboratory       Spring
per week. (12 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                   ENG 234 – World Literature in Translation I
                                                              Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)
English (ENG)                                                 This is a course of reading and writing about the main
                                                              currents in western literature of the Continent, from
ENG 099 – Enhancement Writing                                 Ancient Greece to Neoclassicism in the 17th century. It is
Admission based on placement test score. Enhancement          required of all English majors. (3 hrs)
Writing emphasizes syntax and sentence structure, usage,      Fall
diction, punctuation, mechanics, standard spelling, and
grammar. Students must demonstrate the ability to write       ENG 235 – World Literature in Translation II
a five-paragraph college essay. To pass this course,          Prerequisite(s): ENG 234 (“C” or better)
students must achieve a grade of 70% or better in the         This course is a continuation of English 234. Reading
course and pass the English Exit Examination. (5 hrs,         and writing about the masterpieces of Neoclassicism,
Institutional credit only)                                    Romanticism, Realism and 20th Century Impressionism.
Fall/Spring                                                   It is required of all English majors. (3 hrs)
                                                              Spring
ENG 101 – Composition I
Admission based on placement test score. Composition I        ENG 240 – Seminar for the Sophomore Proficiency
focuses on developing skills required for effective writing   Examination in English (SPEE)
in a variety of contexts in academic and professional         This course is a preparatory seminar for the SPEE.
writing. Students in English 101 will write a five-           Students will review the basics of grammar, punctuation,
paragraph expository college-level essay with three           usage and diction, spelling and mechanics, and paragraph
developmental paragraphs that support a thesis statement,     and essay development. Students who fail the SPEE are
contain appropriate concrete details and examples, and        required to complete this remediation course prior to
demonstrate competency in standard English within a           retaking the test. (2 hrs)
specified time period. A review of grammar, usage, and        Fall/Spring/Summer
mechanics is included. A grade of “C” or better is
required to pass this course, and students are required to    ENG 300 – Advanced Composition
take and pass the English Exit Examination. (3 hrs)           Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 102 (both “C” or better)
Fall/ Spring                                                  Emphasis on writing with clarity and effectiveness is the
                                                              major focus of this course. In addition, language
ENG 102 – Composition II                                      proficiency, logical thinking, basic principles and
Prerequisite(s): English 101 (“C” or better)                  techniques of modern communication, including
Composition II focuses on skills required for effective       audience, content analysis and semantics are also a part of
writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on            this course. (3 hrs)
argumentation and the research paper. Students in             Spring
English 102 will write a persuasive college-level essay
with developmental paragraphs that support a thesis           ENG 301 – Technical Writing
statement, contain appropriate concrete supporting details    Prerequisite(s): English 101, 102 (both “C” or better),
and examples, and demonstrate competency in standard          and passing score on the Sophomore Proficiency
English on demand. A review of grammar, usage, and            Examination in English
mechanics is included. A grade of “C” or better is            This course includes the study of the basic issues,
required to pass this course, and students are required to    elements, and genres of technical writing. Technical
take and pass the English Exit Examination. (3 hrs)           Writing will also focus on workplace writing skills,
Fall/Spring                                                   including electronic writing techniques such as .html,
                                                              graphics, and internet application. (3 hrs)
ENG 205 – Teaching of Writing                                 Fall/Spring
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and 102 (both “C” or better)
This course focuses on strategies for teaching writing
elements. Emphasis is placed on writing patterns and
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                                                                leading poets and prose writers of the Romantic Period
ENG 311 – History of English Language                           and the movements and conditions that influenced their
Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)                        writing. (3 hrs)
This course traces the origins and development of English       Fall (odd years)
and its relation to other languages. (3 hrs)
Spring                                                          ENG 335 – Victorian Prose and Poetry
                                                                Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)
ENG 324 – English Literature from Beowulf to 1784               This course is about the political, social, and aesthetic
Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)                        movements that influenced the poets and prose writers of
This course is a historical approach to English literature      the Victorian Period. It includes an intensive study of
from its beginning to the death of Samuel Johnson.              representative writings of these authors. (3 hrs)
(3 hrs)                                                         Fall (odd years)
Spring
                                                                ENG 338 – Women's Literature and Criticism
ENG 325 – English Literature Since 1784                         Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 324 (“C” or better)                        This course is an introduction to the major literary works
This course is a continuation of English 324, covering          by women writers in English, as well as major critical
English literature from Burns through the contemporary          theories introduced by women critics. (3 hrs)
era. It is required of English majors. (3 hrs)                  Spring (odd years)
Spring (odd years)
                                                                ENG 340 – African Literature
ENG 328 – Adolescent Literature                                 Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 232, and ERD 331 (“C” or better            This course is an introduction to representative writings in
for all courses)                                                their historical and social setting of African novelists,
This is a course in the teaching of reading which               poets, and playwrights in English. (3 hrs)
investigates programs for developing readiness and              Fall (odd years)
teaching reading. The course explores representative
literary texts typically used in middle schools. Special        ENG 410 – Literary Criticism
attention will be paid to teaching literature to young          Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)
adults and issues related to the choice and quality of          Principles and methods of leading American and British
samples. (3 hrs)                                                literary critics are studied and critical schools and their
Fall                                                            influences and interactions are traced. The focus is upon
                                                                a clear concept of the development of literary criticism.
ENG 330 – American Literature 1608-1870                         (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)                        Spring (odd years)
This course is about the forces that have shaped American
ideals and the writers who have best set forth these            ENG 421 – Public Speaking
concepts. It is required of all English majors. (3 hrs)         Prerequisite(s): ENG 101, 102 (both “C” or better)
Fall (even years)                                               The selection, arrangement and presentation of speeches
                                                                in a clear and convincing manner are the major emphases
ENG 331 – American Literature Since 1870                        of this course.       Effective, articulate delivery is
Prerequisite(s): ENG 330 (“C” or better)                        emphasized. (3 hrs)
This course examines recent trends in American                  Fall (even years)
Literature. Realism in fiction and the treatment of
American problems are given special attention. It is            ENG 430 – Shakespearean Drama
required of all English majors. (3 hrs)                         Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)
Spring                                                          The analysis of typical plays of various periods in
ENG 332 – Black Literature 1760-1900                            Shakespeare's dramatic career is the major focus of this
Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)                        course. It is also a discussion of the technique of the
This course encompasses the writings of Black American          drama and facts regarding Shakespeare's reaction to his
authors from the beginning to the end of the 19th century.      age and its literature. It is required of English majors.
It treats selected literature, representative of the struggle   (3 hrs)
for the extinction of slavery, and racial adjustment before     Spring (even years)
and after Reconstruction. It is required of all English
majors. (3 hrs)                                                 ENG 432 – Literature of the 18th Century
Fall                                                            This course is about the representative English writers
                                                                in poetry, drama, the essay, and the novel, with specific
ENG 333 – Black Literature of the 20th Century                  attention to the historical and social background from
Prerequisite(s): ENG 332 (“C” or better)                        which the ideas of this century are drawn. (3 hrs)
This course is a survey of the literary voice of the African    Spring (even years)
American of the 20th Century. Representative selections
of all major genres will be studied. It is required of all      ENG 435 – The English Novel of the 19th Century
English majors. (3 hrs)                                         Intensive study of selected novels of Austen, Scott,
Spring                                                          Dickens, Trollope, Thackeray, the Brontes, Eliot, Hardy,
                                                                Meredith, and Conrad is the major emphasis of this
ENG 334 – Romantic Prose and Poetry                             course. (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)                        Spring (even years)
The course is about the representative writings of the
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                                                                                                            Page 151
ENG 436 – Contemporary Drama                                     ERD 307 – MG/SEC Teaching of Reading
Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)                         Prerequisite(s): ENG 101, 102, and 232
Study of outstanding American and European dramatists,           A course designed to explore the reading skills necessary
with emphasis on Ibsen, Shaw, O'Neill, Sartre, Brecht,           for success in middle and secondary grades subject matter
Miller, and Williams. (3 hrs)                                    area.    Emphasis on techniques for evaluation of
Fall (odd years)                                                 adolescent reading skills. A study of the development of
                                                                 vocabulary, comprehension and study skills associated
ENG 437 – The Modern Novel                                       with middle/secondary grades. Focus is on content
Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)                         reading lesson, including teacher and learner strategies.
This course is an introduction to the several major              (Field Experience required) (3 hrs)
American and British novels written since World War I,           Fall
with emphasis on the social movements and literary
trends of the period including works by Hemingway,               ERD 320 – Reading Diagnosis
Fitzgerald, Faulkner, West, Bellow, Lawrence, Forster,           Prerequisite(s): ERD 305
Greene, and Cary. (3 hrs)                                        Analysis of reading diagnostic techniques (informal and
Fall (odd years)                                                 formal instruments), instructional strategies and materials
                                                                 for teaching reading in the school setting will be
ENG 439 – Modern Poetry                                          emphasized. Theories of diagnosis and remediation will
Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better)                         be addressed as well as alignment between assessment
This course introduces the student to Modern American            and literacy instruction. (Field experience required).
and British poetry from World War I to present, with             (3 hrs)
emphasis on Eliot, Yeats, Pound, Frost, and Auden.               Spring
(3 hrs)
Spring (odd years)                                               ERD 322 – Reading Prescription and Recovery I
                                                                 Prerequisite(s): ERD 305, ERD 320
ENG 454 – Senior Seminar in Reading and Research                 Designed to present teaching strategies and materials for
Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 (“C” or better) and passing             instructing and assessing reading content areas based
score on SPEE                                                    upon research related to reading prescriptions and
The student is taught the evaluation of the levels of            standards. The reading process will be implemented
proficiency in English achieved by prospective graduates         across the curriculum. Students will be exposed to
with English as a major and the study of research                strategies for the remediation of problems that prevent
methods. It is required of all English majors. (3 hrs)           students from achieving reading levels. (Field experience
Fall                                                             required). (3 hrs)
                                                                 Spring
ENG 455 – English Research Project
Prerequisite(s): ENG 454 (“C” or better)                         ERD 327 – Reading Prescription and Recovery II
This course is a directed research project on a specific         Prerequisite(s): ERD 305, ERD 320, ERD 322
topic or theme that covers at least three literary periods. It   Continuation of ERD 322. Designed to provide pre-
is required of all English majors. (3 hrs)                       service students with opportunities to implement the skills
Spring                                                           of assessments, prescriptions, reading, remediation
                                                                 strategies and evaluations. (Field Experience required).
ENG 460 – 462 – Special Projects                                 (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 232,300 (both “C” or better), and           Spring
passing score on the SPEE
Provides a junior or senior English major with an                ERD 328 – Adolescent Literature
opportunity to create a literary work or conduct an in-          Investigate literature that is appropriate for adolescent
depth scholarly study of a topic of interest in the major        readers. (3 hrs)
field under the supervision of an English professor. Paper       Fall
or literary work must be presented to the English faculty.
By application. To be arranged. (1 - 3 hrs)                      Environmental Science (ESC)
ENG 470 – Internship                                             ESC 101 – Environmental Science Fundamentals
Prerequisite(s): ENG 232 and passing score on the SPEE           Application of the basic concepts from chemistry, biology
Provides students with an opportunity to test their skills       and other physical sciences to examine environmental
and career aptitudes in a professional setting. Students         issues involving resource conservation and management,
work with experienced professionals. By application. To          conservation of our biodiversity and its relevance to
be arranged. (1 - 3 hrs)                                         natural ecosystems and environmental sustainability.
Fall/Spring                                                      Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.
                                                                 (4 hrs)
Reading Pedagogy (ERD)                                           Fall/Spring
ERD 305 – EC Teaching of Reading                                 ESC 201 – Introduction to Environmental Justice
Teaching strategies and materials for teaching reading,          Introduction to environmental justice; environmental
Pre-K through fifth grade. A study of the development of         racism and environmental ethics. Also included are
vocabulary, comprehension and study skills associated            topics such as toxic releases; toxic waste; effects and
with early childhood education.        (Field experience         cumulative risk assessments; zoning; land use; data
required). (3 hrs)                                               collection and Executive Order 12898. Global issues of
Fall
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                                                                                                       Paine College
environmental injustice and related issues will be              chronic and acute exposures and health effects); human
discussed. (3 hrs)                                              health problems of short and long term pesticide
Fall                                                            exposure; and integrated pest management. Three hours
                                                                lecture and three hour laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
ESC 202 – Waste Management and Pollution                        Fall
Prevention Strategies
Prerequisite(s): ESC 201 or consent of the instructor.          ESC 402 – Introduction of Risk Assessment/Risk
Introduction to ecosystem management and sustainability         Management
concepts; environmental auditing; resource conservation         Prerequisite(s): ESC 210
and recycling; principles of pollution prevention and           The course provides students with the necessary
waste minimization; waste management strategies for             knowledge to perform risk assessment studies. Topics
dealing with solid and liquid wastes; hazardous waste           include: general principles of risk assessment; hazard
management; emergency planning and response, and                identification; dose-response assessment; exposure
compliance planning. (3 hrs)                                    assessment; risk characterization; risk management and
Spring                                                          ecosystem risk assessment. Three hours lecture and three
                                                                hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
ESC 210 – Environmental Statistical Techniques                  Spring
Prerequisite(s): ESC 101.
The course is designed to give students an introductory         Farsi (FRS)
knowledge of statistics and to enable students to read
statistical evidence in journal articles and reports, perform   FRS 220 – Elementary Farsi I
statistical calculations and analyses, and to understand        Basic vocabulary and grammar of Farsi. May emphasize
technical presentations.     The statistical principles and     either the Iranian or the Afghan dialect often called Dari.
methods presented in the course will be applied to              It begins by using a Romanized alphabet or transcription
examples from medicine, business, science, social science       system but will gradually introduce the Farsi alphabet.
and other fields. Topics include frequency distributions;       Special effort is made to integrate information about the
percentage distributions; measures of central tendency;         culture, society, and geography of Afghanistan and Iran.
standard deviation; probability; sampling; chi-square           Primarily intended for online delivery. (3 hrs)
distribution; and variance analyses including t-test and
ANOVA. (3 hrs)                                                  FRS 221 – Elementary Farsi II
Spring                                                          Prerequisite(s): FRS 220
                                                                Continued development of skills in grammar and
ESC 301 – Environmental Policy Management &                     vocabulary of Farsi. Uses both Romanized transcription
Environmental Regulations                                       and Farsi alphabet. Extensive information about the
Basics of air, soil, and ground water contamination;            culture and society where the language is spoken is
contaminant transport and site characterization                 integrated into the course curriculum. May emphasize
techniques, geology, and hydrogeology; data management          either the Iranian or the Afghan dialect often called Dari.
and interpretation; characterization, collection, and           Primarily intended for online delivery. (3 hrs)
transport of municipal solid wastes; recycling, source and
thermal processing; hazardous chemical and radioactive          French (FRE)
waste management; physical, chemical, and biological
treatment; thermal processing and destruction of                FRE 220 – Elementary French I
hazardous waste; project management; liability principles       This course offers the students oral and written practice in
and practices; and the role of enforcement agencies in          French, with emphasis on sentence patterns and
implementing environmental regulations. (3 hrs)                 fundamental principles of structure. Three class meetings
Fall                                                            and two laboratory sessions per week. (3 hrs)
                                                                Fall/Spring
ESC 302 – Environmental Monitoring and
Instrumentation                                                 FRE 221 – Elementary French II
Prerequisite(s): CHE 334                                        Prerequisite(s): FRE 220
The course deals with environmental monitoring                  This course is a continuation of oral and written practice
processes; sampling methods for air, soil, and water;           in French, with emphasis on sentence patterns and
essentials of equipment maintenance methods, equipment          fundamental principles of structure. (3 hrs)
calibration, proper testing methods, proper use of              Fall/Spring
standardized testing forms, and EPA data tolerances; and
an introduction to quality assurance principles; pre-and        FRE 322 – Intermediate French I
post sampling operations. Three hours lecture and three         Prerequisite(s): FRE 221 or equivalent.
hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                              This course is an intensive and extensive oral practice of
Spring                                                          French and varied readings of French texts. (3 hrs)
                                                                Fall
ESC 401 – Environmental Toxicology
Prerequisite(s): CHE 335                                        FRE 323 – Intermediate French II
Toxicologic identification, sampling, measurement,              Prerequisite(s): FRE 322 or equivalent
monitoring, and mitigation. Movement, distribution, and         This course is an intensive and extensive reading of texts
fate of toxins; bioaccumlation and magnification;               of marked literary merit, articles on culture and
mechanisms for minimizing toxic effects; measuring              civilization, current events and readings in the physical
toxicity; risk assessment (definitions, methods,                and social sciences, preparing students to read and
calculations, interpretation of results; exposure pathways      converse in specialized fields and to enter advanced
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                                                                                                        Page 153
courses in conversation, civilization and literature.   (3    HIS 104 – African American History
hrs)                                                          The history of Blacks in America from their African
Spring                                                        origin to the present, and an assessment of their role in
                                                              shaping social, political, and cultural structures.
FRE 342 – Conversational French                               (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): FRE 323 or equivalent                        Fall/Spring
This course introduces the student to varied activities
designed to enhance oral and written expression with          HIS 112 – World History
emphasis on conversation and composition. (3 hrs)             Survey of world civilizations from pre-historic times to
Fall                                                          the present. (3 hrs)
                                                              Fall/Spring
FRE 343 – Advanced Conversation and Composition
Prerequisite(s): FRE 342 or equivalent                        HIS 222 – U.S. History to 1865
This course is a comprehensive review of French               First of a two-semester survey, beginning with the Civil
grammar and syntax with emphasis on vocabulary                War. (3 hrs)
building. (3 hrs)                                             Fall (even years)
Spring
                                                              HIS 223 – U.S. History since 1865
FRE 401 – Teaching Romance Languages                          Prerequisite(s): HIS 222 or by permission
Prerequisite(s): FRE 342                                      Second of a two-semester survey, beginning with
This course instructs the students about the problems,        Reconstruction and ending with the present. (3 hrs)
materials, and techniques of teaching foreign languages at    Spring (odd years)
the elementary and intermediate levels. (3 hrs)
Fall (odd years)                                              HIS 250-254 – Special Topics in History
                                                              Seminars focusing on select historical topics and
FRE 426 – Survey of French Literature I                       problems; subject areas will vary according to the
Prerequisite(s): FRE 220 and 221                              interests of students and instructors. (3 hrs)
This course surveys representative works of prose, poetry,    Fall/Spring
and drama from the French Middle Ages to the French
Revolution. (3 hrs)                                           HIS 310 – Georgia History
Spring (odd years)                                            Prerequisite(s): Pass the Sophomore Proficiency
                                                              Examination in English (SPEE)
FRE 427 – Survey of French Literature II                      The history of Georgia from colonial times to the present.
Prerequisite(s): FRE 426                                      (3 hrs)
This course surveys representative works of prose, poetry,    Spring (even years)
and drama from the French Revolution to the present. (3
hrs)                                                          HIS 311 – Latin America
Fall (even years)                                             Survey of the present scene in the countries south of the
                                                              United States, and an assessment of their history in the
                                                              colonial and national periods. (3 hrs)
Geography (GEO)                                               Fall/Spring
GEO 231 – World and Regional Geography                        HIS 325 – American Military History
Survey of the major world realms and regions with             Prerequisite(s): HIS 103, 222, or 223
special attention to humankind and the physical               A survey of the American military experience to include
environments. (3 hrs)                                         the significant battles and campaigns of its history, the
Fall                                                          application of military principles, and the development of
                                                              the military establishment within the context of U.S.
                                                              political, social, intellectual, and diplomatic history.
Health Education (HED)                                        (3 hrs)
                                                              Fall/Spring
HED 225 – Personal and Community Hygiene                      HIS 330 – Medieval Europe
Introduces students to health methodology based upon          Prerequisite(s): HIS 102 or by permission
most current research and the Natural Health Education        The key personalities and institutions, which have shaped
Standards. It emphasizes health content, curriculum and       European development from the fall of the Roman Empire
concepts related to disease prevention. Analyzes the          in the West to 1500 A.D. (3 hrs)
culture, media, and technology on the health related issues   Fall (odd years)
(home, school, community). (3 hrs)
Fall                                                          HIS 331 – Early Modern Europe
                                                              Prerequisite(s): History 102 or by permission, and pass
History (HIS)                                                 the SPEE
                                                              The political, economic, social, and religious
HIS 103 – Survey of United States History                     development of Europe from 1500 to the fall of Napoleon
Survey of the political, economic, and social development     in 1815. (3 hrs)
of the United States from pre-colonial times to the present   Spring (odd years)
(3 hrs)
Fall/Spring
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HIS 332 – Late Modern Europe                                    HIS 461 – History Research Project
Prerequisite(s): HIS 102 or by permission and pass the          Prerequisite(s): HIS 460 and passing grade on
SPEE                                                            Sophomore Proficiency Examination in English.
The political, economic, social, and cultural development       Directed project in historical inquiry. Required of history
of nineteenth and twentieth century Europe. (3 hrs)             majors in the senior year. Project must be presented to
Fall (odd years)                                                History faculty. (3 hrs)
                                                                Spring
HIS 348 – Women in United States History
Prerequisite(s): Pass the SPEE                                  Journalism (JRN)
A survey of U.S. History focusing on the lives of women
from the colonial period to the present as well as on the       JRN 252 – News Reporting and Writing I
women’s movement for political, social, and economic            Prerequisite(s): ENG 101, 102
equality. (3 hrs)                                               This course is a survey of the basic principles of
Fall (odd years)                                                journalistic writing and the fundamentals and techniques
                                                                of news reporting. (3 hrs)
HIS 402 – History of Sub-Saharan Africa                         Fall
Survey of Sub-Saharan Africa from the medieval period
to the present, with special emphasis on the emergence of       JRN 253 – News Reporting and Writing II
modern political units and the Pan African movement.            Prerequisite(s): JRN 252
(3 hrs)                                                         This is a newsgathering and reporting course. It is a
Fall/Spring                                                     continuation of JRN 252, with emphasis on
                                                                newsgathering, reporting techniques, beat reporting, the
HIS 410 – U.S. Economic History                                 exploration of news sources, and the writing of various
Prerequisite(s): HIS 222 or 223                                 types of news stories. (3 hrs)
The evolution of the United States from an agrarian             Spring
economy to an industrial giant.
(3 hrs )
Offered as needed                                               Mass Communication (MAC)
HIS 420 – Modern Asia                                           MAC 201 – Media and Society
Historical survey of nations in East Asia with emphasis         This course is designed to introduce the student to
on China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Thailand; and a            fundamental concepts, theories, and histories with regard
survey of India, its culture, religion, and impact upon the     to newspapers, magazines, books, radio, recordings,
modern world. (3 hrs)                                           television, movies, advertising, and digital media. Topics
Fall/Spring                                                     also include media as relating to social issues, law and
                                                                regulation, and ethics. (3 hrs)
HIS 426-427 & 429-431 – Special Topics in History               Fall
Seminars focusing on select historical topics and
problems; subject areas will vary according to the              MAC 202 – Film Appreciation
interests of students and instructors. (3 hrs)                  This course introduces the student to principles of film
Spring                                                          theory and criticism. Also included are discussion on
                                                                cinematography, film history, the language of film, film
HIS 428 – Middle East and North Africa                          technology, and film language. The student will learn
A survey of the Middle East and North African history           how to analyze a film to determine relationships between
from ancient times to the present. (3 hrs)                      form and idea and form and function. (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                     Spring (odd years)

HIS 435 – Twentieth Century Russia                              MAC 203 – Introduction to Electronic Media
A study of the decline of Imperial Russia, the                  (formerly MAC 401)
establishment of a Communist regime, and its demise.            Introduction to electronic media is an introduction to the
Includes the study of the political, social, and economic       historical perspectives, principles, philosophies, policies
history that realm to the present. (3 hrs)                      and practices of the broadcast media. Attention is also
Fall/Spring                                                     given to historical perspectives of broadcasting, its
                                                                regulations, communication and change. (3 hrs)
HIS 440 – United States Diplomatic History                      Spring
A historical survey of the foreign relations of the United
States from its foundation to the present. (3 hrs)              MAC 301 – Media, Law, and Ethics
Offered as needed                                               This course examines the idea of free speech as developed
                                                                in the United States. Much of the course will be devoted
HIS 460 – Historical Methodologies                              to mass media law, including topics such as First
Prerequisite(s): Pass the SPEE                                  Amendment issues, libel, free press, copyright, invasion
Theory and methods of historical inquiry. Required of           of privacy, and obscenity. Topics related to media and
history majors in the senior year, after three-fourths of the   ethics will also be examined. The student will develop
program has been completed. (3 hrs)                             the necessary skills for researching major legal cases
Fall                                                            related to the field of mass communications. (3 hrs)
                                                                Fall
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                                                                                                            Page 155
MAC 402 – Radio Production I                                     brochures. Students will obtain the necessary skills for
Radio production I gives students a chance to explore            Running Public Relations Campaigns. (3 hrs)
techniques and procedures in the creation, production, and       Spring
direction of radio programming. Studies include an
introduction to the world of broadcasting on the web, the        MAC 473 – Magazine Writing
latest trends in using standard PC’s to automate radio           This course covers basic techniques and strategies for
production functions, computer editing, analog                   producing a variety of material for magazine writing
programming, and analog editing. The course is designed          including designs, layouts, and graphics. (3 hrs)
for students who may wish to pursue a career on the air,         Spring
in a production capacity, or in a radio management
position. (3 hrs)                                                MAC 480 – Broadcast Announcing
Fall                                                             This course includes the study of theory and practical
                                                                 skills to enhance student understanding and performance
MAC 403 – Advanced Radio Production                              of all types of broadcast material. It covers correct usage
Theory and techniques of computer-assisted editing are           of American English and describes major areas of
studied as well as computers in automation, computers in         specialization within the field with emphasis upon
the programming function, computer applications in on-           articulation, copy interpretation, ad lib or impromptu
air production, and multi-channel recording. This course         speaking, and clear and effective communication. (3 hrs)
is a realistic look at the radio industry in transition, which   Spring
provides the student with necessary knowledge and skill
to work in radio production. (3 hrs)                             MAC 491 – Internship
Spring                                                           Prerequisite(s): Senior status
                                                                 While serving as an intern, students receive in-service
MAC 460 – Special Topics                                         learning experiences in the field of mass communications.
Offered when demand warrants topics in journalism,               Each student is responsible for securing an internship with
broadcasting, public relations, speech, and drama. (1-3          a local company to work in some area of mass
hrs)                                                             communications. An internship supervisor guides the
                                                                 student through completion of a portfolio based on their
MAC 461 – Television Production I                                work experience. (6 hrs)
This course examines techniques and procedures in the            Fall
creation and production of television programs. Emphasis
is on studio production work and techniques including            Mathematics (MAT)
television news reporting and the video editing process. It
focuses on single-camera or camcorder video field                MAT 098 – Enhancement Mathematics I
production with emphasis on portable video, a fusion of          The first of a two–part Enhancement Mathematics
aesthetic and technical concerns, a full discussion of the       sequence designed to develop basic arithmetic and
elements and techniques of video recording and                   algebra skills needed to proceed to MAT 099. Topics
postproduction editing aesthetics. Through a series of           include integers, fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions,
production exercises, students obtain the knowledge and          percents, exponents, polynomials, factoring, solving
competency necessary to work in the field of television          linear equations and inequalities in two variables and
production. (3 hrs)                                              systems of equations. (5 hrs, Institutional credit only)
Spring                                                           Spring/Fall
MAC 462 – Television Production II                               MAT 099 – Enhancement Mathematics II
Prerequisite(s): MAC 461                                         The final enhancement mathematics course is designed to
Application of concepts and practices learned in                 prepare students for MAT 122. Topics include factoring
Television I, students produce and direct portable video         techniques, rational expressions, radical expressions,
exercises. Emphasis is placed on experiences. (3 hrs)            radicals, rational exponents, linear, nonlinear, and
Spring                                                           absolute value equations and inequalities and equations of
                                                                 lines. (5 hrs, Institutional credit only)
MAC 471 – Public Relations Writing                               Fall/Spring
This study examines the basic fundamentals of writing,
editing, and producing communications vehicles for an            MAT 122 – College Algebra
employee, association, trade or industry. Emphasis is on         Admission based on placement test score. Topics include
writing news releases for print, feature stories,                functions and their graphs, properties of functions,
organizational advertising, advertorials, counseling, and        graphing techniques, special attention given to linear,
planning.      The student will obtain the necessary             quadratic; polynomial, rational and radical functions; and
knowledge, skills, and competency to complete public             modeling. (3 hrs)
relations writing assignments. (3 hrs)                           Fall/Spring
Spring
                                                                 MAT 126 – Precalculus
MAC 472 - Public Relations Campaigns                             Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory score on placement
This study explores the fundamentals of gathering and            examination or MAT 122 (“C” or better)
analyzing information and examines the interests,                Topics     include    exponential,    logarithmic,  and
concerns, and attitudes of the various publics that the          trigonometric functions and conic sections. (3 hrs)
client serves. Emphasis is on research, strategies, tactics      Fall/Spring
and trends, print ads, billboards, transit panels, button and
bumper stickers, posters, t-shirts, direct mail, and
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                                                                                                       Paine College
MAT 127 – Calculus with Business Applications                   Students expand the depth of their knowledge of
Prerequisite(s): MAT 122 (“C” or better) or equivalent          Euclidean geometry through informal hands on
Intuitive approach to differential and integral calculus        procedures. Topics covered include congruent triangles,
with applications.       For students in Business               similarity, right triangles, circles, area, volume and total
Administration and the Social Sciences. Not open to             areas of solids, parallelism and coordinate geometry.
mathematics or science majors. (3 hrs)                          (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                     Spring
MAT 220 – Calculus I                                            MAT 334 –Linear Algebra
Prerequisite(s): MAT 126 (“C” or better)                        Prerequisite(s): MAT 309 (“C” or better)
Topics include limits, continuity, theory and applications      Topics include systems of linear equations, matrices,
of differentiation, mean value theorem and anti-                determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, and
derivatives. (4 hrs)                                            eigen values. (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                     Fall
MAT 221 – Calculus II                                           MAT 335 – Probability and Statistics
Prerequisite(s): MAT 220 (“C” or better)                        Prerequisite(s): MAT 122 (“C” or better)
Topics include fundamental theorem of calculus,                 A study of probability and mathematical statistics based
techniques of integration, transcendental functions, area       on set theory, mathematical expectation, and principles of
between curves, and volumes of solids of revolution. (4         statistical inference. (3 hrs)
hrs)                                                            Spring (even years)
Spring
                                                                MAT 340 – Number Systems
MAT 222 – Calculus III                                          Prerequisite(s): MAT 300 (“C” or better)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 221 (“C” or better)                        A course for Early Childhood/Middle Grade Teachers-
L’Hopital’s rule, improper integrals, sequences and series,     Topics include a study of early and modern numeration
vectors, functions of several variables, partial derivatives,   systems, base number systems, the real number system,
multiple integrals and polar graphing. (4 hrs)                  including clock arithmetic, modular systems and
Fall                                                            mathematical systems without numbers. (3 hrs)
                                                                Spring
MAT 300 – Fundamentals of Mathematics
Prerequisite(s): MAT 122 (“C” or better)                        MAT 344 – Number Theory
A course for Early Childhood/Middle Grade Teachers.             Prerequisite(s): MAT 309 (“C” or better)
Students enhance their knowledge of mathematics and its         Topics include Congruences, residue classes, quadratic
applications in such areas as: set theory and set               reciprocity, Diophantine equations, prime numbers, and
operations, elementary number theory, probability and           related topics. (3 hrs)
counting techniques, statistics and data analysis and           Fall (even years)
informal geometry including linear measurement, angular
measurement, area and volume. (3 hrs)                           MAT 442 – Differential Equations
Fall                                                            Prerequisite(s): MAT 221 (“C” or better)
                                                                Topics include ordinary differential equations and
MAT 309 – Discrete Mathematics (Formerly MAT                    applications, Laplace transforms, and series solutions. (3
206)                                                            hrs)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 122 (“C” or better)                        Spring
Topics include logic, sets, techniques of proofs, counting
methods, and probability. (3 hrs)                               MAT 450 – Modern Algebra
Fall                                                            Prerequisite(s): MAT 309 (“C” or better)
                                                                A course exploring the theory of groups, rings, integral
MAT 314 – Problem Solving                                       domains, and fields. (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 300 (“C” or better)                        Spring
A course for Early Childhood/Middle Grade Teachers
designed as a writing intensive course where students are       MAT 460-461 Special Topics
required to communicate and connect mathematical ideas          Subject to Division and instructor approval, provides an
from previous courses in developing problem solving             opportunity for Mathematics majors to study a topic of
strategies and tactics. (3 hrs)                                 interest in the major field under supervision of a
Fall                                                            Mathematics professor.
                                                                Fall/Spring
MAT 322 – Real Analysis
Prerequisite(s): MAT 222 (“C” or better)                        MAT 472 – MAT Seminar I
Topics include axioms for the real numbers, sequences,          Designed for Mathematics seniors. Informal discussion
series, continuity, differentiation, and integration. (3 hrs)   of current ideas and problems in mathematics. Grading:
Spring                                                          “P” or “U” basis. One seminar per week. (0 hrs)
                                                                Fall/Spring
MAT 333 – Introduction to Geometry
Prerequisite(s): MAT 122 (“C” or better)                        MAT 473 – MAT Seminar II
Students analyze characteristics and properties of two and      Designed for Mathematics seniors. Students will be
three-dimensional geometric shapes and develop                  required to write and present a major paper on a
mathematical arguments about geometric relationships.           mathematical topic of interest, illustrating ability to do
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                                                                                                         Page 157
research and present findings. Grading on an “A, B, C, D
or F” basis. One seminar per week. (1 hr)                      MIL 306 – Leadership Training Course
Fall/Spring                                                    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair; 2.5
                                                               GPA for scholarship
Military Science (MIL)                                         A five week summer camp conducted at Fort Knox,
                                                               Kentucky. Students participate in physical training, land
MIL 101 – Foundations of Officership                           navigation, weapons and tactics, and leadership
Introduces students to issues and competencies that are        development. Successful completion qualifies individuals
central to a commissioned officer’s responsibilities.          to validate or compete for a two year scholarship. (3 hrs)
Establish framework for understanding officership,             Fall
leadership, and Army values followed and “life skills”
such as physical fitness and time management. This             MIL 401 – Leadership and Management
course is designed to give the cadet insight into the Army     Prerequisite(s): MIL 302
profession and the officer’s role within the Army. Open        Develops student proficiency in planning and executing
to all students. (3 hrs)                                       complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff,
Fall                                                           and mentoring subordinates. Students explore training
                                                               management, methods of effective staff collaboration, and
MIL 102 – Basic Leadership                                     developmental counseling techniques. (3 hrs)
Establishes foundation of basic leadership fundamentals        Fall
such as problem solving, communications, briefings and
effective writing, goal setting, techniques for improving      MIL 402 – Officership
listening and speaking skills and an introduction to           Focuses on completing the transition form cadet to
counseling. (3hrs)                                             Lieutenant. Study includes case study analysis of military
Spring                                                         law and practical exercises on establishing an ethical
                                                               command climate. Students must complete a semester
MIL 201 – Individual Leadership Studies                        long Senior Leadership Project that requires them to plan,
Students identify successful leadership characteristics        organize, collaborate, analyze, and demonstrate their
through observation of others and self through                 leadership skills. (3 hrs)
experiential learning exercises. Student’s record observed     Spring
traits (good and bad) in a dimensional leadership journal
and discuss observations in small group settings. The          MIL 406 – Leader Development and Assessment
curriculum involves understanding how to build teams,          Course
how to influence, how to communicate, how and when to          Prerequisite(s): MIL 302
make discussions, how to engage in creative problem            A five week summer camp conducted at Fort Lewis,
solving, and how to plan and organize. (3 hrs)                 Washington. Students participate in physical training,
Fall                                                           land navigation, weapons and tactics and leadership
                                                               development. The final camp score is part of the
MIL 202 – Leadership & Teamwork                                student’s accession application for service in the Army.
Study examines how to build successful teams, various          (3 hrs)
methods for influencing action, effective communication        Fall
in setting and achieving goals, the importance of timing
the decision, creativity in the problem solving process,       MIL 495 – Selected Topics
and obtaining team buy-in through immediate feedback.          Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair
(3 hrs)                                                        An intensive study of special areas of Military Science.
Spring                                                         (3 hrs)

MIL 301 – Leadership & Problem Solving                         MIL 496 – Battle Analysis
Students conduct self-assessment of leadership style,          An intensive / detailed study of an U.S. Army military
develop personal fitness regimen, and learn to plan and        battle. Study involves current Army doctrine, tactics,
conduct individual/small unit tactical training while          techniques and procedures and how commanders won or
testing reasoning and problem-solving techniques.              lost battle. (3 hrs)
Students will receive direct feedback on leadership
abilities. Students will also receive an introduction to the   Music (MUS)
basic fundamentals of military map reading and land
navigation. (3 hrs)                                            MUS 105 – Voice Class
Fall                                                           A survey of basic vocal techniques. (1 hr)
                                                               Fall or Spring
MIL 302 – Leadership & Ethics
Examines the role communications, values, and ethics           MUS 109 – Applied Voice I
play in effective leadership. Topics include ethical           Private instruction for first year students, one hour
decision-making, consideration of others, spirituality in      weekly. Progressive aspects of vocal culture, application
the military, and survey Army leadership doctrine.             of proper posture, breath control and vocal diction. End
Emphasis on improving oral and written communication           of semester advisory jury examination required. (1-2 hrs)
abilities and improving land navigation as applied with        Fall
the military small unit leader.        Includes further
development of small unit tactics, leadership skills and
physical conditioning. (3 hrs)
Spring
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                                                                                                     Paine College
MUS 110 – Applied Voice II                                    MUS 485 – Concert Choir VII
Prerequisite(s): MUS 109                                      Fourth year students enroll in an organization of singers
Continuation of private instruction in voice including        open to the entire student body. (1 hr)
development of vocal repertoire, style, and interpretation    Fall
for first year students. End of semester advisory jury
examination required. (1-2 hrs)                               MUS 486 – Concert Choir VIII
Spring                                                        Fourth year students enroll in an organization of singers
                                                              open to the entire student body. (1 hr)
MUS 120 – Music Appreciation                                  Spring
Students learn the development, structure and aesthetic
content of the art of music through reading, aural            Pashto (PAS)
experience, and class discussion. (3 hrs)
Fall and Spring                                               PAS 220 – Elementary Pashto I
                                                              Basic vocabulary and grammar of Pashto and familiarity
MUS 185 – Concert Choir                                       with the culture and traditions of its speakers. Special
First year students. Performance of traditional choral        emphasis is placed on conversational Pashto. While the
literature and general musicianship. Organization of          Pashto alphabet will be introduced, course material will
singers that is open to the entire student body, which        be presented primarily in transcribed texts and audio
performs during weekly Assembly programs and                  format. Primarily intended for online delivery. (3 hrs)
throughout the community. (1 hr)
Fall                                                          PAS 221 – Elementary Pashto II
                                                              Prerequisite(s): PAS 220
MUS 186 – Concert Choir II                                    Completion of the study of basic Pashto grammar,
First year students. Continuation of MUS 185. (1 hr)          vocabulary, and idiomatic expressions. Some attention
Spring                                                        will also be paid to familiarity with the culture of the
                                                              Pashtuns and the social and geographic context of the
MUS 285 – Concert Choir III                                   language. Primarily intended for online delivery. (3 hrs)
Second year students enroll in an organization of singers
open to the entire student body, which sings major choral
works and performs during weekly Assembly and                 Physical Education (PED)
throughout the community. (1 hr)
Fall                                                          PED 120 – Fundamentals and Techniques of
                                                              Activities I
MUS 286 – Concert Choir IV                                    This course is designed to teach beginning fundamental
Continuation of MUS 285. (1 hr)                               skills of the sport. It offers techniques that are necessary
Spring                                                        for appropriate physical performance. Emphasis is placed
                                                              on drills and game simulations. The development of team
MUS 324 – Music for Elementary Teachers                       skills and activities are included in this course. (1 hr)
Techniques and materials necessary for teaching music in      Fall/Spring
grades K-5. Field experience required. (2 hrs)
Fall                                                          PED 121 – Fundamentals and Techniques of
                                                              Activities II
MUS 332 – African-American Music                              This course is designed to help students learn fundamental
Musical and cultural influence of African-Americans           techniques in tennis. It offers sophisticated aspects of
from their mostly West-African roots to the present.          tennis activities.    Topics such as lead-up games,
Special attention is given to the mixing of these             terminology, rules, diagrams, abbreviated history,
components with traditional European-influences creating      strategies and etiquette are projected to assist students
genres such as spirituals, ragtime, blues, jazz, rhythm and   with the fundamental skills of this sport. (1 hr)
blues, rock and roll and others. For music majors or non-     Fall/Spring
majors. (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                   PED 210 – Aerobics
                                                              In this course the student is introduce to exercises that
MUS 385 – Concert Choir V                                     condition the heart and lungs. Toning exercises and
Third year students enroll in an organization of singers      improving cardiovascular fitness are stressed. Reflective
open to the entire student body, which sings major choral     thinking and correct aerobics techniques are included in
works and performs during weekly Assembly programs            class discussions and practices. (1 hr)
and throughout the community. (1 hr)                          Fall/Spring
Fall
                                                              PED 324 – Health and Physical Education Methods
MUS 386 – Concert Choir VI                                    and Materials
Third year students enroll in an organization of singers      This course is designed to help preservice teachers
open to the entire student body, which sings major choral     understand the need for an effective physical education
works and performs during weekly Assembly programs            program. The instructional process deals with planning,
and throughout the community. (1 hr)                          improving    instructional  effectiveness,    classroom
Spring                                                        management, evaluation and teaching all children.
                                                              Examples of topics covered are: developing an effective
                                                              curriculum, liability and safety issues, facilities and
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                                                                                                          Page 159
equipment and how to integrate subject matter into the        PHI 336 –Modern Philosophy
curriculum. Field experience required. (3 hrs)                Prerequisite: PHI 234
Fall                                                          Development of modern philosophy focusing especially o
                                                              Descartes, Hume, Kant, Hegelian Idealism, and selected
Philosophy (PHI)                                              20th Century movements such as analytical philosophy,
                                                              and Existentialism. (3 hrs)
PHI 220 – Values and Society                                  Spring
This course deals with questions of social morality from a
multicultural perspective. (2 hrs)                            PHI 338 – Logic
Fall/Spring                                                   This course deals with nature and methods of clear and
                                                              correct thinking, with emphasis upon deductive and
PHI 230 – Problems of Philosophy                              inductive reasoning. (3 hrs)
Problems of Philosophy is an introductory course              Fall (odd years)
focusing on fundamental issues such as reality and
knowledge, Determinism and Free Will, the nature of           PHI 431 – Ethics
happiness and good life, on the one hand; and a closer        This course is a critical study of the basic ethical theories
look at the nature of philosophical inquiry and the           developed in Western thought and their relevance to
qualities of critical thinking on the other. Various          contemporary problems of individual and social morality.
philosophers and schools of thought will be studied from      Juniors and Seniors only. (3 hrs)
different eras. (3 hrs)                                       Fall/Spring
Fall/Spring
                                                              PHI 432 – Aesthetics
PHI 234 – History of Western Philosophy                       This course is a critical survey of the principal theories of
Pre-Socratic and other Greek philosophers, especially         beauty in nature and art. (3 hrs)
those flourishing in 5th and 4th Centuries BC, as well as     Fall (odd years)
developments in Medieval philosophy including St.
Augustine and Thomas Aquinas. (3 hrs)                         PHI 435 – Contemporary Issues In Philosophy
Fall                                                          Prerequisite(s): One course in Philosophy and consent of
                                                              instructor
PHI 240 – Introduction to Critical Thinking                   The focus of this course is on one issue of immediate and
The course aims at strengthening students’ ability to think   timely concern in Philosophy. The issue will be
through systematically, read critically, identify             announced during the preceding semester. (3 hrs)
inconsistencies, write coherently and argue persuasively.     Fall (even years)
These analytical and problem-solving skills should help
students negotiate the demands of various disciplines,        PHI 436 (REL 436) – Contemporary Issues in Religion
including standardized tests, and prepare them for the        and Philosophy
challenges of the job market. (3 hrs)                         Students must write a Senior Field paper with a clear
Spring                                                        focus that demonstrates the students’ capacity to do
                                                              independent research, using empirical research and data
PHI 330 – African American Philosophy                         when appropriate; clarification of theories that bear on the
Prerequisite(s): SPEE                                         practice; critical and constructive theology in relationship
This course seeks to discover the contributions of black      to that leadership or practice; and development of
philosophers in the American Diaspora such as Cornel          strategies for more faithful enactment to work creatively
West, Sojourner Truth, Lucius Outlaw, Leonard Harris,         and discerningly with the major materials relevant to the
Angela Davis, Louis Farrakhan, and Martin Luther King         paper, and to write in an appropriate, scholarly, and
as we engage traditional philosophic issues such as           engaging style. Students will make an oral presentation
creation versus evolution, feminism, causation,               of their finished manuscript. The combined faculty of the
reparations, death penalty, original sin, Supreme Being,      Humanities Division will evaluate the oral presentation
abortion, determinism versus freedom, affirmative action,     and finished paper. Open to seniors with six hours of
civil rights, peace & war, and more. (3 hrs)                  religion and permission of the department. (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                   Spring (odd years)

PHI 334 – History of Philosophy in the United States          Physical Science (PHS)
Prerequisite(s): Philosophy 230, 234, or 336
This is a critical, comparative study of philosophical        PHS 101 – Principles and Applications of Physical
systems of the United States from the rise of Puritanism      Science
through contemporary movements. Special attention will        Prerequisite(s): MAT 122
be given to Pierce, James, Dewey, Royce, Whitehead, and       The course is designed to introduce fundamental
Santayana. (3 hrs)                                            principles, concepts and processes of the sciences, as
Spring (even years)                                           illustrated by topics from the physical sciences,
                                                              chemistry, earth sciences, and physics. The significance
PHI 335 – Social and Political Philosophy                     of these areas of knowledge to humans and their
This course surveys political philosophy focusing on a        environment is considered and discussed. Offered for
just and free society with emphasis on Plato, Aristotle,      non-science majors. Three hours lecture and three hours
Hobbes, Rousseau, Marx, Rawls, and West. (3 hrs)              laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
Fall                                                          Fall/Spring
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                                                                                                     Paine College
PHS 110 – Introduction to Atmospheric Science                PHY 453 – Modern Physics
Prerequisite(s): MAT 122                                     Prerequisite(s): PHY 202 and MAT 221
The course introduces the basic laws of physics and          Modern physics, atomic physics, theory of relativity, and
chemistry and seeks applications to understand the           nuclear physics. Three hours lecture and three hours
interactions between the earth and other components of       laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
the earth’s dynamic system. The basic laws of physics        Fall (Offered as needed)
will be applied to weather analysis, forecasting and
remote sensing weather phenomena to study real-life          PHY 454 – Quantum Mechanics
scenarios (winter-storms, tornadoes, hurricanes, etc.)       Prerequisite(s): PHY 453 and MAT 442
using online resources. Three hours of lecture and three     Quantum mechanics and atomic structure. Three hours
hours of laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                        lecture and three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                  Spring (Offered as needed)
                                                             PHY 460-469 – Special Topics
PHS 111 – Physical Science                                   Special courses.        Subject to Division approval.
Prerequisite(s): MAT 122                                     Permission of instructor required. Credit hours to be
Geology, astronomy, basics of meteorology, and physical      determined by Division. (1-4 hrs)
ecology. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory      Fall/Spring
per week. (4 hrs)
Spring                                                       Political Science (POS)
Physics (PHY)                                                POS 320 – Introduction to Global Studies
                                                             This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the state
PHY 201 – College Physics I                                  of global/international studies. The main areas of concern
Prerequisite(s): MAT 220                                     are the on-going debate over the nature and growing
Calculus-based physics consisting of statics and dynamics    importance of the discipline and the direction it is taking
of particles, rotational motion, heat, and thermodynamics.   on issues of concern to the world community. (3 hrs)
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.     Fall
(4 hrs)
Fall                                                         POS 330 – United States Government
                                                             The structure, functions, and power of the federal
PHY 202 – College Physics II                                 government with emphasis on its historical development,
Prerequisite(s): PHY 201                                     the constitution, and political parties. ( 3 hrs)
Continuation of PHY 201. Calculus-based physics              Fall
emphasizing electricity, magnetism, sound optics, and
modern physics. Three hours lecture and three hours          POS 331 – State/Local Government
laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                                 An analysis of the organization and functioning of the
Spring                                                       state and local government with emphasis on Georgia.
                                                             (3 hrs)
PHY 311 – Mechanics                                          Fall (odd years)
Prerequisite(s): PHY 202 and MAT 221
Problem-solving and laboratory skills in mechanics.          POS 332 – Policy Analysis
Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.     Prerequisite(s): POS 331 and/or POS 330
(4 hrs)                                                      This course is designed to introduce the student to the
Fall (Offered as needed)                                     study of the forces shaping public policy, the impact of
                                                             policy design, and the role of bureaucrats in the process of
PHY 312 – Electromagnetism                                   decision-making. (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): PHY 202 and MAT 221                         Spring (even years)
Electricity, magnetism, and related topics. Three hours
lecture and three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)         POS 400 – U.S. Constitutional Law
Spring (Offered as needed)                                   The principles of the American constitutional system and
                                                             its development through interpretation, status, and
PHY 313 – Heat and Thermodynamics and Kinetic                Supreme court decisions. (3 hrs)
Theory                                                       (Offered as needed)
Prerequisite(s): PHY 202 and MAT 221
Laws of thermodynamics and applications to physical          POS 410 – International Relations
systems and kinetic theory. Three hours lecture and three    An introduction to the nature of international relations,
hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                           organizations, and law; and an analysis of modern
Fall (Offered as needed)                                     relations between nations. (3 hrs)
                                                             (Offered as needed)
PHY 314 – Geometrical and Physical Optics
Prerequisite(s): PHY 202 and MAT 221                         POS 420 – International Political Economy
Refraction, optical instruments, coherence, interference,    This critical starting point for discussions of globalization
diffraction, and polarization. Three hours lecture and       approaches its subject not in opposition to the local, the
three hours laboratory per week. (4 hrs)                     regional, or the national, but from a perspective that
Spring (Offered as needed)                                   highlights different logics that make the “global.” This
                                                             course explores the logic of flows to better understand the
                                                             much-noted respatialization of our economy and daily
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Paine College                           Course Prefixes and Descriptions                                 Paine College
                                                                                                             Page 161
life, nnd the attendant modes of governance, social             weapons of mass destruction), international terrorism,
belonging, and political concentration. (3 hrs)                 arms races, and arms trade. (3 hrs)
Spring (Offered as needed)                                      Spring (Offered as needed)
POS 430 – Comparative Politics and Government                   POS 448 – Africa in World Politics
Systems                                                         This course examines major developments in the
Examines various types of states and forms of                   international relations of sub-Saharan Africa since
government. It emphasizes the following aspects: state          independence, with a particular concern for the sources of
and civil society, interest groups and political parties, and   international and domestic conflicts, and for the
political leadership and democratic governances. (3 hrs)        relationships between domestic actors and the
Fall (even years)                                               international system. Topics covered include the external
                                                                relations of guerrilla/insurrection movements, global
POS 431 – International Organizations                           governance, state collapse, peacekeeping, humanitarian
Prerequisite(s): POS 410                                        assistance, political and economic conditionality, and the
The course is divided into five parts. The first explores       environment. (3 hrs)
the origins of international institutions. The second           Spring (Offered as needed)
examines the roles played by the international
Secretariats, how they make decisions in the United             Psychology (PSY)
Nations, and how they assess the contribution and
suppressing violence in both inter- and intra-state wars.       PSY 201 – Introduction to Psychology
The fourth part critically explores the work of institutional   Basic concepts, principles and methods of psychological
human rights activities, and the last part considers refugee    investigation (3 hrs)
and displaced persons’ protection. Students taking this         Fall/Spring.
course may be required to participate in either the
National        Model         African        Union         or   PSY 250-254 – Special Topics in Psychology
National/Regional/International Model United Nations.           Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 or by permission.
(3 hrs)                                                         Course content determined by the Psychology Department
Fall (odd years)                                                prior to offering. (1-3 hrs)
                                                                Fall/Spring.
POS 432 – United States Foreign Policy Since 1945
Examines the structure of foreign policy-making in the          PSY 260 – Social Science Statistics
United States and explores the development of foreign           Prerequisite(s): MAT 122 and PSY 201
policy in the post-second world war period. Topics              Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics.
covered include the origins and development of the Cold         (3 hrs)
War, the Korean War, and Vietnam War; Détente; U.S.             Fall/Spring
involvement in regional conflicts in the Middle East,
Africa, Asia, and Central America; the use of arms sales        PSY 300 – Health Psychology
as an instrument of foreign policy; the Second Cold War;        Prerequisite(s): PSY 201
and the development of U.S. foreign policy in the period        An introduction to health psychology and behavior
since the end of the Cold War. (3 hrs)                          medicine, being the application of psychological principle
Fall (even years)                                               towards the development and maintenance of health
                                                                promoting behavior. (3 hrs)
POS 436-441 – Special Topics                                    Fall (even years)
This course is designed to permit the student to pursue
topics of his/her own interest that are not formally offered    PSY 302 – Experimental Design
in the department, including independent research               Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 and 260
projects. The student must request permission from a            Study of statistical methods and design strategies most
political science/international studies program faculty         used in the analysis of psychological data. (3 hrs)
member under whose direction he/she wishes to work.             Fall (odd years)
(3 hrs)
(Offered as needed)                                             PSY 321 – Learning
                                                                Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 and pass the SPEE
POS 442 – The Management of International Conflicts             Survey of theoretical and experimental approaches to
Prerequisite(s): POS 431                                        learning. (3 hrs)
The primary objective of this course is to analyze              Fall
conflicts that have an international dimension, especially
those leading to violence and deaths (genocides), with a        PSY 322 – Experimental Psychology
view to exploring the possibility of reducing the recourse      Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 and 260 or by permission.
to violence. The first part of the course is devoted to an      Experimental principles and procedures in psychology.
examination of different types of conflicts (territorial,       Includes lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory
resources, ethnic, ideological struggle for world               experiences. (3 hrs)
hegemony, etc). The second part examines different              Fall
methods of managing and limiting them from escalating
into violence.        These will include negotiation,           PSY 332 – Behavior Modification
conciliation, mediation and arbitration. The third part         Prerequisite(s): PSY 201
deals with areas relevant to international conflicts (such as   The application of learning theory and research to such
international law, UN peacekeeping, deterrence, and             areas as child rearing, social interactions, attitudes,
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                                                                                                      Paine College
emotions, habits, and deviant behaviors. (3 hrs)               and education, including test construction, administration,
Spring (odd years)                                             scoring, and interpretation of both teacher-made and
                                                               standardized tests. (3 hrs)
PSY 345 – Developmental Psychology                             Spring
Prerequisite(s): PSY 201
Human development through the lifespan with primary            PSY 450 – Introduction to Counseling
concern for physical, social, and cognitive development.       Prerequisite(s): PSY 201
Attention is given to both environmental and hereditary        Survey of theoretical approaches to counseling and their
influences. (3 hrs)                                            application in education, social work, and the mental
Fall/Spring                                                    health field. (3 hrs)
                                                               Fall
PSY 361 – Social Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 and SOC 201                           PSY 451 – Counseling Practicum I
Behavior of human beings as affected by social and             Prerequisite(s): 9 hours of advanced psychology courses,
cultural influences of modern society. (3 hrs)                 including PSY 450, and consent of practicum advisor
Fall/Spring                                                    Observation and experience at a selected community
                                                               agency. Taken on a “S” or “U” basis. (3 hrs)
PSY 371 – Sensation and Perception                             Fall/Spring
Prerequisite(s): PSY 201
Theories and research relevant to sensation and                PSY 452 – Counseling Practicum II
perception. (3 hrs)                                            Prerequisite(s): PSY 451
Spring (even years)                                            Observation and experience at a selected community
                                                               agency. Taken on a Pass or Fail basis. (3 hrs)
PSY 393 – Educational Psychology                               Fall/Spring
Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 and 345
Psychological principles underlying the teaching-learning      PSY 453 – Research Practicum I
process, including theories of learning and development,       Prerequisite(s): PSY 322 and consent of practicum
individual differences, motivation, readiness, transfer, and   advisor
the measurement of intelligence and achievement. (3 hrs)       The student may do a research project with faculty
Fall/Spring                                                    guidance or participate in research elsewhere by
                                                               arrangement with external sponsors. (3 hrs)
PSY 401 – Physiological Psychology                             Fall/Spring
Prerequisite(s): PSY 201
Interrelationship of anatomy, physiology, and chemistry        PSY 454 – Research Practicum II
with such behavioral phenomena as learning, memory,            Prerequisite(s): PSY 453 and consent of practicum
states of consciousness, emotions, motivation, and             advisor
personality. (3 hrs)                                           The student may do a research project with faculty
Spring (odd years)                                             guidance, or participate in research elsewhere by
                                                               arrangement with external sponsors. May be taken
PSY 405 – History & Systems of Psychology                      concurrently with Psychology 453 for 6 hours of
Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 and pass the SPEE                     practicum. (3 hrs)
Survey of the history of psychology with analysis of its       Fall/Spring
major theoretical systems. (3 hrs)
Fall                                                           PSY 455 – Exceptional Children
                                                               Prerequisite(s): PSY 201, 345, and 393
PSY 420 – Theories of Personality                              General problems and psychological characteristics
Prerequisite(s): PSY 201                                       involved in the education of exceptional children, with
Major theories of personality, including structure,            emphasis on identification and methods of adjusting
development, and dynamics. (3 hrs)                             instruction to the needs of the children. Designed for pre-
Spring                                                         service teachers, counselors, and administrators. (3 hrs)
                                                               Fall/Spring
PSY 426-431 – Special Topics in Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 or by permission                      PSY 471 – Senior Research Project I
Course content determined by the Department prior to           Prerequisite(s): PSY 322, pass the SPEE, and consent of
offering. Offered as needed. Credit hours determined by        faculty sponsor
the Department according to course content and                 Successful completion requires a comprehensive literature
requirements. (1-3 hrs)                                        review with an appropriate reference list, as the first
Fall/Spring                                                    portion of the required Senior Field Paper, done under
                                                               faculty direction. May be taken concurrently with
PSY 441 – Abnormal Psychology                                  Psychology 322 or 472, but not both. (1 hr)
Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 and pass the SPEE                     Fall/Spring
Behavior disorders, their etiology, prevention, and
treatment. (3 hrs)                                             PSY 472 – Senior Research Project II
Fall/Spring                                                    Prerequisite(s) or corequisite: PSY 471
                                                               Successful completion requires the writing of the method
PSY 442 – Tests and Measurements                               section of the Senior Field Paper and completion of the
Prerequisite(s): PSY 201 and 260 and pass the SPEE             data collection, under the direction of a consenting faculty
Principles of measurement and evaluation in psychology
Page 164
Paine College                            Course Prefixes and Descriptions                                 Paine College
                                                                                                              Page 163
sponsor. May be taken concurrently with Psychology 471           REL 231 – Religions of the World
or 473, but not both. ( 1 hr)                                    This course is an introduction to the major religious
Fall/Spring                                                      traditions of the world through the writings and
                                                                 perspectives of their twentieth century adherents. The
PSY 473 – Senior Research Project III                            course pays special attention to the question of religious
Prerequisite(s) or corequisite: PSY 472                          pluralism and to the contemporary dialogue between and
Oral presentation and the finished manuscript of the             among religious traditions. The studies are based on the
Senior Field Paper, including all sections (such as results,     assumptions that all of the world’s great faiths possess
discussion, and any appendices). The faculty of the              religious truth and provide valuable insight for human
Psychology Department will evaluate the oral                     life. It is expected that each student will become
presentation and the finished paper. (1 hr)                      conversant with the basic history and principles of one
Fall/Spring                                                      religion other than his/her own. (2 hrs)
                                                                 Fall/Spring
Reading (REA)
                                                                 REL 300 – Pastoral Care
REA 099 – Enhancement Reading                                    Pastoral Care addresses the dynamics of Pastoral
Emphasizes further development of reading and study              Counseling theories, methods, practices, and applications
skills. The student must pass both the class-work and the        of care and healing for the sick, the troubled, and the
standardized post-test to successfully complete the course.      terminally ill. Integration of principles of direct challenge
3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab. (5 hrs, Institutional credit       and theoretical posits, tenets of methodology and direct
only)                                                            human care, as well as nuances of beliefs and practices
Fall/Spring
                                                                 will be engaged in the course work.
Religion (REL)                                                   REL 310 – Theology
                                                                 This study of theology addresses the place of theology in
REL 220 – Old Testament Religion
This course surveys the history and literature of Israel and     the life of the church as well as in personal experience.
will expose the students to the literature of the Hebrew         Contemporary Christian theology, resources for doing
Bible. Students will learn the meaning of Old Testament          theology, and critical analyses of applied theology and
writings as well as about the historical, social, and literary   varied world views will be emphasized because it is
background of the Hebrew Bible. (3 hrs)                          necessary for theology to be authentically expressed from
Fall.                                                            an indigenous viewpoint.
REL 221 – New Testament                                          REL 311 – Church Administration
This course surveys and exposes students to the literature       This course presents leadership principles and use and
of the Christian New Testament. Students are introduced          development of church guidance manuals and other
to the various works within it, the historical, social,          documents and procedures that promote order and
literary background, context, content, and meaning of the        effectiveness in the work of the local Church. Training in
New Testament writings, with special attention to the            social service skills, organizational skills, and church
church’s origin as a sect within Judaism, its separation         programming will be included.
from Judaism, and its movement toward the establishment
of creed, canon and episcopate. They study specific              REL 333 – Hebrew Prophecy and its Modern
passages in detail, literary art/genre, theological              Applications
teachings, and contemporary message of Matthew                   Prerequisite(s): REL 220
through Revelation. Attention will be given to the               This course is designed to do several things: 1) allow the
canonical significance of these writings and to their value      students to research the philosophy of the prophets
for ministry. (3 hrs)                                            through a reading of original texts, 2) provide the students
Spring                                                           with a cross-cultural analysis of the multifaceted
                                                                 phenomenon of prophecy, 3) allow students to examine
REL 230 – Essentials of the Christian Faith                      the characteristics and literary structures of the classical
This course surveys and exposes the student to the history       literature of the prophets, and 4) allow students to assess
of the Christian Church from its origins to the present          examples of prophecy in contemporary society and
time. Within the broad sweep of the four main periods of         culture. The course will examine the varying roles that
the Early Church [Early (50-600); Medieval (600-1500);           prophets played in their respective societies. It addresses
Reformation (1500-1650); and Modern (1650 – Present)],           the different styles of intermediation practiced by
it studies the principal roles of religion in culture,           different types of religious specialists in ancient and
including ritual, religious language, symbol, myth, and          contemporary sociohistorical contexts, and examines
the emergence of instruction and shared scriptures.              specific individuals who have been labeled as prophets by
Students consider key persons, dates, developments,              their respective constituencies in order to assess what
movements, and theological concepts as well as                   functions these prophets served. (3 hrs)
concentrates on key topics such as revelation and                Fall (even years)
scripture, law and gospels, the Trinity, salvation and the
Christian life, all of which demonstrate the importance of       REL 334 – Christian Classics
Christian theology for the work of ministry in the church.       Prerequisite(s): REL 221 or 230, SPEE
(2 hrs)                                                          This seminar is a reading course designed to expose the
Fall/Spring                                                      student to a significant number of major Christian
                                                                 writings from the classical period of the development of
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                                                                                                      Paine College
Christian traditions/Christian thought, in order to discover   America Southeast and seek fresh theological
what these works have to say about religious faith and the     perspectives for the Black church today. (3 hrs)
self. The particular concern in this course is to challenge    Spring (even years)
the student to read texts that have had an enduring impact
upon the church throughout history. Texts from across          REL 435 – Contemporary Issues in Religion
the spectrum of the church’s history shall be chosen with      This course will examine the moral and spiritual values of
an     eye     toward      reading    carefully      through   America in light of a changing and complex society
historical/theological works of a formative theological        within the context of basic Judaeo-Christian beliefs.
character for the church. (3 hrs)                              Keeping the nineteenth century background and the
Spring (even years)                                            emerging theology of the twentieth century clearly in
                                                               view, the course considers the theological issues, names,
REL 335 – Major Religions                                      and movements of current importance of the church.
The purpose of this class is to expose students to the         (3 hrs)
varieties of religious experiences in different parts of the   Spring (odd years)
world as well as how these traditions are a part of
America’s pluralistic society.        This course is a         REL 436 (PHI 436) – Contemporary Issues in Religion
comparative introduction and survey of the fundamental         and Philosophy
doctrines, the religious practices, the origins, the           Students must write a Senior Field paper with a clear
developments, the teachings, and the practices of major        focus that demonstrates the students’ capacity to do
world religions such as Buddhism, Christianity, Islam,         independent research, using empirical research and data
Taoism, Confucianism, Hinduism, and Judaism. (3 hrs)           when appropriate; clarification of theories that bear on the
Spring (odd years)                                             practice; critical and constructive theology in relationship
                                                               to that leadership or practice; and development of
REL 360 – Church History                                       strategies for more faithful enactment to work creatively
Church History traces sacred and secular developments          and discerningly with the major materials relevant to the
and controversies of the church and its influences in          paper, and to write in an appropriate, scholarly, and
historical world events from the first century of the          engaging style. Students will make an oral presentation
common era to post modern periods. Special emphases            of their finished manuscript. The combined faculty of the
will be placed on growth and challenges of the Christian       Humanities Division will evaluate the oral presentation
faith that have resulted in schisms and numerous church        and finished paper. Open to seniors with six hours of
reforms.                                                       religion and permission of the department. (3 hrs)
                                                               Spring (odd years)
REL 370 – Preaching and Missiology
Preaching and Missiology is a study in methods and             Sociology (SOC)
techniques of preparing and delivering varied types of
sermons. Sermons that strongly encourage listeners to          SOC 201 – Introduction to Sociology
engage in missions beyond the church walls upon                Perspectives, methods, and concepts used in
departure from the site of the preached Word. Actualizing      contemporary sociology. Prerequisite(s) for all other
and delivering the Word in mission fields (public              courses in sociology. (3 hrs)
domains) will be emphasized.                                   Fall/Spring
REL 430 – Philosophy of Religion                               SOC 211 – Introduction to Social Work
Prerequisite(s): REL 221 or 230, SPEE                          Prerequisite(s): SOC 201 or permission of the instructor
This course will explore and examine some of the basic         A survey of historical development of social work from
issues in Philosophy and Religion. The course addresses        charity to modern theories. Special attention is given to
the classic questions in the philosophy of religion: the       the diverse functions, processes and aspects of social
existence of God, the problem of evil, free will and           work. (3 hrs)
determinism, the ethics of belief, and faith vs. reason.       Fall
Readings include both traditional and contemporary texts.
(3 hrs)                                                        SOC 250-254 – Special Topics in Sociology
Fall (odd years)                                               Prerequisite(s): SOC 201
                                                               A seminar focusing on selected sociological topics and
REL 432 – Christian Education in the Church                    problems; subject area will vary according to the interest
Prerequisite(s): REL 220, 221 and consent of instructor        of the students and instructors. (3 hrs)
This basic course in Christian Education deals with the
theology and practice of educational ministry in the local     As needed
church. Biblical and theological foundations for Christian
education as a servant ministry for all of the local           SOC 260 – Social Science Statistics
church’s life and mission are examined, and these              Prerequisite(s): SOC 201, MAT 122
foundations are developed into models for faithful and         Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics; it
intentional educational ministry. (3 hrs)                      provides basic statistical literacy and prepares students to
Spring (even years)                                            be intellectual consumers of social research. (3 hrs)
                                                               Fall/Spring
REL 434 – Black Religion
This course seeks to expose students to Black religion         SOC 300 – Social Problems
with specific emphasis on the Black church. While              Prerequisite(s): SOC 201
reading noteworthy modern Black theologians, students          A descriptive and analytical consideration of major social
also investigate the oral tradition of Black churches in the
Page 166
Paine College                          Course Prefixes and Descriptions                               Paine College
                                                                                                          Page 165
problems in modern industrial societies with emphasis on       SOC 382 – Minority Groups
America. (3 hrs)                                               Prerequisite(s): SOC 201
Fall                                                           A survey of minority groups in America. Problems and
                                                               prospects associated with minority group membership.
SOC 310 – Deviant Behavior                                     (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): SOC 201                                       Fall
The nature and causes of deviant behavior and specific
types of socially unaccepted behavior. (3 hrs)                 SOC 390 – Sociology of Aging
Fall                                                           Prerequisite(s): SOC 201
                                                               Changing social role and adjustment problems of aging
SOC 315 – Juvenile Delinquency                                 and the aged in American society. Special emphasis on
Prerequisite(s): SOC 201                                       minority aging. (3 hrs)
Critical assessment of the nature of the delinquency           Spring
problem, major sociological causes, and the implications
for control and administration of justice. (3 hrs)             SOC 395 – Sociology of Health and Medicine
Spring                                                         Prerequisite(s): SOC 201
                                                               Examines the relationship between sociocultural factors
SOC 325 – Demography                                           associated with illness and the treatment of illness, and
Prerequisite(s): SOC 201                                       analysis of health maintenance and medical delivery.
Factors and processes determining population size,             (3 hrs)
composition, and distribution.       Recent trends in          Fall
population changes with resulting problems, policies, and
programs. (3 hrs)                                              SOC 438 – Community and Urban Life
Fall                                                           Prerequisite(s): SOC 201 and pass the SPEE
                                                               Urban and community studies, including urban ecology,
SOC 328 – Sociology of the Black Experience                    power structures, social class, ghetto, and slum problems.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 201                                       (3 hrs)
Examines the cultural patterns, social structures and social   Spring
processes among the African Americans in the context of
the larger society. It also considers the common heritage,     SOC 440 – Sociological Theory
social experience, and various ideas of the descendants of     Prerequisite(s): SOC 201 and pass the SPEE
Africa as they interact in America and the world. (3 hrs)      Survey and analysis of the development of sociological
Fall/Spring                                                    theory from the time of Comte to the present. (3 hrs)
                                                               Fall/Spring
SOC 334 (Psychology 334) – Marriage and the Family
Prerequisite(s): SOC 201                                       SOC 450-454 – Special Topics in Sociology
Historical background of the modern family with                Prerequisite(s): SOC 201 and pass the SPEE
emphasis on the impact of culture and social change.           A seminar focusing on selected sociological topics and
Family disorganization is also considered. (3 hrs)             problems; subject area will vary according to the interests
Fall                                                           of student and instructors. (1-3 hrs)
                                                               Fall/Spring
SOC 338 – The Sociology of Organization
Prerequisite(s): SOC 201                                       SOC 458 – Internship
Intra – and inter-organizational relations, processes and      Prerequisite(s): 4 or more advanced Sociology classes
change (3 hrs)                                                 Provides the opportunity to test students’ skill and career
Fall/Spring                                                    aptitude in an organizational setting, or work with
                                                               experienced agency personnel and to develop potentially
SOC 340 – Criminology                                          viable contacts. (3 hrs)
Prerequisite(s): SOC 201 and pass the SPEE                     Spring
The study of the nature and cause of crime. Review of
crime patterns in the U.S. Analysis of the criminal justice    SOC 460 – Methods of Research
system. (3 hrs)                                                Prerequisite(s): SOC 201 and 260 and pass SPEE.
Spring                                                         Formulating and testing hypotheses, techniques for
                                                               collecting data, and interpreting research findings. (3 hrs)
SOC 361 – (PSY 361) – Social Psychology                        Fall
Prerequisite(s): PSY 20, SOC 201 and pass the SPEE
Behavior of individual human beings as affected by social      SOC 461 – Senior Field Paper
and cultural influences of modern society. (3 hrs)             Prerequisite(s): SOC 460 and pass the SPEE
Spring                                                         First-hand exposure to research methodologies.
                                                               Preparation of a paper or project supervised by an
SOC 365 – Cultural Anthropology                                instructor. The paper must be presented to the sociology
Prerequisite(s): SOC 201                                       faculty. (3 hrs)
Comparative study of cultures, with emphasis on kinship,       Spring
economic and political organization and cultural change.
(3 hrs)
Spring
Page 167
Page 166                               Course Prefixes and Descriptions                                Paine College
                                                                                                       Paine College
Spanish (SPA)                                                  SPA 427 – Survey of Spanish Literature II
                                                               This course surveys representative works of prose, poetry,
SPA 220 – Elementary Spanish I                                 and drama from the eighteenth century to the present. (3
This course focuses on oral and written practice in            hrs)
Spanish, with emphasis on sentence patterns and                Fall
fundamental principles of structure. (3 hrs)
Fall/Spring                                                    SPA 440 – Afro-Hispanic Literature
                                                               This course is a study of the literary masterpieces of
SPA 221 – Elementary Spanish II                                Spanish-speaking Africa, Central and South America, and
Prerequisite(s): SPA 220                                       the Caribbean. (3 hrs)
This course continues the focus on oral and written            Spring
practice in Spanish, with emphasis on sentence patterns
and fundamental principles of structure. (3 hrs)               Theology (THL)
Fall/Spring
                                                               THL 320 –Historical and Theological Research
SPA 322 – Intermediate Spanish I                               Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 and ENG 102
Prerequisite(s): SPA 221 or equivalent                         This course focuses on development of skills necessary
This course provides students with an intensive and            for implementing effective empirical research in
extensive oral practice of Spanish and varied reading of       theological thought, influential historical developments
Spanish texts. (3 hrs)                                         that have affected theological responses, underlying
Fall                                                           principles of social constructs, and other theological
                                                               issues impacting value systems of people and societies.
SPA 323 – Intermediate Spanish II                              Emphasis will be placed on advancing development of
Prerequisite(s): SPA 322 or equivalent                         writing process skills necessary for framing research
This course in an intensive and extensive reading of texts     designs, engaging in empirical processes, and writing
of marked literary merit, articles on culture and              short research papers demonstrating all components of the
civilization, current events and reading in the physical and   writing of research papers. (3 hrs)
social sciences. It prepares students to read and converse     Fall/Spring
in specialized fields and to enter advanced courses in
conversation, civilization, and literature. (3 hrs)            THL 330 – Christian Worship
Spring                                                         Prerequisite(s): REL 230 and REL 231
                                                               A survey course that describes worship practices from a
SPA 342 – Conversational Spanish                               universal standpoint. It provides students with sufficient
Prerequisite(s): SPA 323 or equivalent                         knowledge for them to understand, appreciate, and value
This course exposes the students to varied activities in       their and other religions’ ways of worship. (3 hrs.)
Spanish designed to enhance oral and written expression;       Fall/Spring
emphasis on conversation and composition. (3 hrs)
Fall                                                           THL 350 – A History of Christian Thought
                                                               This course will provide an overview of the development
SPA 343 – Advanced Conversation and Composition                of Christian Thought and practice from its origins in the
Prerequisite(s): SPA 323 or equivalent                         first century to the present. It will further examine these
This course is a comprehensive review of Spanish               beliefs both in their historical context and in the context
grammar and syntax, with emphasis on vocabulary                of current theological interpretations. It will explore
building. (3 hrs)                                              many of the major doctrines or points of belief such as the
Spring                                                         doctrines of the Trinity, the two natures of Christ, original
                                                               sin, and many others. (3 hrs)
SPA 401 – Teaching Romance Languages                           Fall/Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPA 342
This deals with problems, materials, and techniques
of teaching foreign languages at the elementary and            Tutoring (TUT)
intermediate levels. (3 hrs)
Fall                                                           TUT 101 – Tutoring
                                                               Open only to Student Support Services students. It is
SPA 426 – Survey of Spanish Literature I                       designed to assist students in successfully completing all
This course surveys representative works of prose, poetry,     their courses, especially enhancement courses. Study
and drama from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. (3          skills are emphasized. (0 hrs)
hrs)                                                           Fall/Spring
Spring
                                        ONLINE COURSES

                                        ONLINE COURSES
Paine College offers a limited number of 8-                are encouraged to visit/talk with their instructors
week long online courses targeted to non-degree            frequently to ensure academic progress. Regular
seeking and degree-seeking students. Non-                  engagement is mandatory and this requirement
Paine College offers a limited number of 8-                are encouraged to visit/talk with their instructors
degree seeking students must provide evidence              is met when there is evidence that the student
week long online courses targeted to non-degree            frequently to ensure academic progress. Regular
of enrollment in or admission to a regionally              has completed at least four postings each week
seeking and degree-seeking students. Non-                  engagement is mandatory and this requirement
accredited two- or four-year college.                      on four different days. A week for online
degree seeking students must provide evidence              is met when there is evidence that the student
Information about online courses is available at           instruction is defined as 12:00 a.m. Monday till
of enrollment in or admission to a regionally              has completed at least four postings each week
the Online Instruction Office (706 396 8107).              11:59 p.m. Sunday. For the purposes of
accredited two- or four-year college.                      on four different days. A week for online
                                                           attendance, taking an online quiz or sending an
Information about online courses is available at           instruction is defined as 12:00 a.m. Monday till
Degree seeking students can take available                 assignment will also count as posts. A student
the Online Instruction Office (706 396 8107).              11:59 p.m. Sunday. For the purposes of
online courses exclusively or in combination               who accumulates two weeks of “absence” (less
                                                           attendance, taking an online quiz or sending an
with face to face classes as long as they are              than 4 posts) may be administratively
Degree seeking students can take available                 assignment will also count as posts. A student
enrolled at Paine College and their total course           withdrawn from the course. This requirement is
online courses exclusively or in combination               who accumulates two weeks of “absence” (less




                                                                                                                 ONLINE COURSES
load stays within the maximum of 18 credit                 minimal and satisfies attendance only. To
with face to face classes as long as they are              than 4 posts) may be administratively
hours for the duration of a 16-week semester.              ensure achievement in learning, the student will
enrolled at Paine College and their total course           withdrawn from the course. This requirement is
Additional restrictions may apply to make sure             have to fulfill all requirements specified in the




                                                                                                                   ONLINE COURSES
load stays within the maximum of 18 credit                 minimal and satisfies attendance only. To
that the load is not disproportionate for each one         syllabus and adhere to deadlines stipulated by
hours for the duration of a 16-week semester.              ensure achievement in learning, the student will
of the two 8-week sessions. Currently, Paine               the instructor.
Additional restrictions may apply to make sure             have to fulfill all requirements specified in the
College students may not take more than 40% of
that the load is not disproportionate for each one         syllabus and adhere to deadlines stipulated by
their program nor major courses online. This               COSTS
of the two 8-week sessions. Currently, Paine               the instructor.
requirement is subject to change, so please
College students may not take more than 40% of
check with advisors for updates.                           Tuition for online classes is the same as their
their program nor major courses online. This               COSTS
                                                           face to face counterparts. Students taking an
requirement is subject to change, so please
ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS                                    exclusively online load for a 16-week semester
check with advisors for updates.                           Tuition for online classes is the same as their
                                                           will not be charged any additional fees for that
                                                           face to face counterparts. Students taking an
All online classes will have at least one                  semester. Tuition must be paid no later than the
ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS                                    exclusively online load for a 16-week semester
proctored assessment counting at least 30% of              first day of online instruction.
                                                           will not be charged any additional fees for that
the course grade administered either on the
All online classes will have at least one                  semester. Tuition must be paid no later than the
Paine College campus or at an approved site                FINANCIAL AID
proctored assessment counting at least 30% of              first day of online instruction.
outside Augusta. For courses that include an exit
the course grade administered either on the
test (for example English 101 and 102), the                Financial Aid is available to qualified Paine
Paine College campus or at an approved site                FINANCIAL AID
required exit test will substitute the proctored           College students enrolled in online courses. All
outside Augusta. For courses that include an exit
test. The student will be responsible for any              students must All students must be degree
test (for example English 101 and 102), the                Financial Aid is available to qualified Paine
costs incurred for out of town testing. It is the          seeking and academically eligible. Financial aid
required exit test will substitute the proctored           College students enrolled in online courses. All
student’s responsibility to contact the Online             awards may consist of grants and loans.
test. The student will be responsible for any              students must All students must be degree
Instruction Office so that an appropriate proctor          Enrollment in less than 6 hours per academic
costs incurred for out of town testing. It is the          seeking and academically eligible. Financial aid
is located for him or her.                                 semester will result in reduction or elimination
student’s responsibility to contact the Online             awards may consist of grants and loans.
                                                           of financial aid. Contact the Financial Aid
Instruction Office so that an appropriate proctor          Enrollment in less than 6 hours per academic
ATTENDANCE AND ENGAGEMENT                                  Office for additional information.
is located for him or her.                                 semester will result in reduction or elimination
POLICY
                                                           of financial aid. Contact the Financial Aid
ATTENDANCE AND ENGAGEMENT                                  Office for additional information.
Beyond the proctored assessment, no face to
POLICY
face meetings are required, although students
Beyond the proctored assessment, no face to
                                                     168
                                                     168
face meetings are required, although students

                                                     168
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Paine 168
Page College                                 Online Courses                                Page 169
                                                                                       Paine College
WITHDRAWAL POLICY
Students may withdraw from an online class            Students who enroll in online classes must have
without penalty within the first week of the          access to a stable high speed Internet
instruction. Withdrawal after the first week will     connection. Refer to Paine.edu/Online Courses
result in only partial tuition refund or no refund    for details. Familiarity with basic operations of a
at all. Withdrawal (both student initiated and        PC and ability to use the Internet are considered
instructor initiated) after the fourth week of        pre-requisites. When there is a technical
instruction will result in a WF or WP grade. A        problem or the student needs assistance in using
student with excessive W’s or failing grades on       the online delivery platform (currently
his or her online classes may lose the privilege      Blackboard), he or she is encouraged to contact
to register for online courses.                       the Information Technology Office or the
                                                      Online Instruction Office (706 396 8107).
REFUND POLICY
                                                      SUMMER ONLINE
Only students with credit balances are eligible       Online classes during the summer are only six
for refunds, and a student’s refund cannot            weeks long. More condensed schedules may
exceed the credit balance.                            also be available in certain areas. For details,
                                                      consult course schedules.
Minimum Technology Requirements
                         INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PROGRAM
                         INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PROGRAM
Paine College, through its International Studies         1. The Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad
Program, provides opportunities to expand the               Program provides short-term study/travel
global dimension of its its International Studies
Paine College, through educational experiences.                                         Seminars
                                                         1. The Fulbright-Hays U.S. educatorsAbroad
                                                            seminars abroad for                       in the
Program, provides opportunities to expand the
This includes curriculum development, research              Program provides short-term study/travel
                                                            social sciences and humanities for the




                                                                                                                INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PROGRAM
global dimension of its educational experiences.
opportunities for faculty and students, foreign             seminars of improving their understanding
                                                            purpose abroad for U.S. educators in the
This includes curriculum development, research
language and area studies programs, visiting                                      the humanities for of
                                                            social sciencesofand people and culturethe
                                                            and knowledge




                                                                                                                  INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PROGRAM
scholars programs, faculty and foreign
opportunities for faculty and students, student             other countries. There are understanding
                                                            purpose of improving their approximately
language and area studies programs, cultural
exchanges, and other scholarly and visiting                 and knowledge of the people and culture of
                                                            seven to ten seminars annually. Seminars
scholars programs, faculty and student
experiences.                                                other countries. sixteen participants and are
                                                            consist of four to There are approximately
exchanges, and other scholarly and cultural                 seven to ten seminars annually. Seminars
                                                            held in countries outside of Western Europe.
experiences. the International Studies Program
The goals of                                                consist of four to sixteen participants and are
are to:                                                     A short term outside of Western Europe.
                                                         2. held in countriesStudy Abroad Program in
The goals of the International Studies Program              conjunction with the Association of
are to:
1. develop         an     internationally-oriented       2. A short term Study Abroad ProgramThe
                                                            Caribbean Studies (ACS) is available.          in
    curriculum;                                             aims of ACS with
                                                            conjunction are to: the Association of
1. develop         an     internationally-oriented          Caribbean Studies (ACS) is available. The
2. curriculum; deepen students’ understanding
    broaden and                                             aims of ACS are to:
                                                                develop a clear knowledge and
    of global issues, histories and cultures by                 understanding of Caribbean Studies as
2. broaden and deepen students’ understanding
    infusing liberal arts learning with an                      an interdisciplinary knowledge and
                                                                develop a clear discipline through
    of global issues, histories and cultures by
    international perspective;                                  understanding of Caribbean Studies as
                                                                study, research, and travel;
    infusing liberal arts learning with an                      an interdisciplinary discipline through
3. international perspective; as professionals
    prepare students to compete                                 study, research, and travel;
                                                                promote Caribbean Studies at the
    in the global community;                                    academic level in schools, community
3. prepare students to compete as professionals                 promote Caribbean Studies teaching
                                                                colleges, universities, and          at the
4. in the global community; for faculty and
    provide opportunities                                       institutions as in as to community
                                                                academic level wellschools, inform the
    students to conduct full-time research                      colleges, universities, and teaching
                                                                larger society;
4. provide opportunities for faculty and
    abroad;                                                     institutions as well as to inform the
    students to conduct full-time research                      larger society; active
                                                                encourage                  interdisciplinary
5. abroad; opportunities for international
    create                                                      research on Caribbean anthropology, the
    exchange partnerships and programs which                    encourage        active    interdisciplinary
                                                                arts, economics, education, folk culture,
                Diplomatic for
5. create aopportunities Fellows international
    include                           Program, a                geography, Caribbean anthropology, the
                                                                research on history, languages (including
    Visiting partnerships and and faculty and
    exchangeScholars Program, programs which                    arts, economics, education, folk culture,
                                                                Creoles      and      pidgins),    linguistic
    student a Diplomatic Fellows Program, a
    include internships;                                        literature, history, languages (including
                                                                geography, music, politics, psychology,
    Visiting Scholars Program, and faculty and                  Creoles sociology, and all other
                                                                religion, and         pidgins),    linguistic
6. student internships; linkages with overseas
    develop institutional                                       academic music, politics,
                                                                literature, disciplines; and psychology,
    universities; and                                           religion, sociology, and all other
6. develop institutional linkages with overseas                 academic disciplines; and as a cultural
                                                                envision the Caribbean
7. universities; and
    provide other international experiences and                 whole, thereby utilizing its various
    educational and collaborative opportunities                 envision the Caribbean as a Spanish,
                                                                languages English, French, cultural
    abroad other international experiences and
7. providefor faculty and students.                             Portuguese, and utilizing its related
                                                                whole, thereby Dutch as well as various
    educational and collaborative opportunities                 languages English, French, Spanish,
                                                                Creoles.
    abroad for AND and students.
ACTIVITIESfacultyOPPORTUNITIES                                  Portuguese, and Dutch as well as related
                                                                Creoles.
                                                            Papers are solicited from members and non-
ACTIVITIES AND OPPORTUNITIES                                members. A booklet of accepted abstracts is
                                                     170
                                                     170    Papers are solicited from members and non-
                                                            members. A booklet of accepted abstracts is
                                                     170
                                                     169
                                                     170
Paine 170
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                                                                                    Paine College
   published and authors may submit full                  highlight the impact of major power
   papers for consideration to the Journal of             global policies on economic, social and
   Caribbean Studies. Students who participate            political-security issues facing the
   enroll in a special topics course. They                African continent as well as attempts to
   prepare papers for presentation at the                 influence the policies of major powers in
   conference. The class, along with the                  matters of common concern; and
   presentation, is offered for three (3) credit
   hours. If accepted for publication, student            demonstrate the need for effective
   abstracts appear in the ACS abstracts.                 diplomatic, economic, and military
                                                          cooperative action in an unfolding crisis
   All students who wish to study abroad for a            situation.
   semester, a year or a short-term period and
   receive Paine College credit must submit        4. Participation in the Model United Nations is
   appropriate applications to the Office of          available. Each school sends a delegation,
   International Studies.                             which represents a country in simulations of
                                                      the United Nations. The members of the
3. Students may participate in the National           delegation are to represent that nation’s
   Model African Union (NMAU).             The        policies and points of view in the committee
   NMAU, held at Howard University,                   to which they are assigned.          To be
   provides a unique opportunity for university       successful, the students must become
   and college students to study the role,            knowledgeable in the following areas:
   organization and performance of the African
   Union (AU) through simulation augmented                the structure and workings of the Model
   by briefings at the African Embassies in               UN conferences;
   Washington, D.C. More specifically, the
   NMAU is designed to:                                   the goals and accomplishments of the
                                                          particular body to which each delegate is
       increase awareness of the role,                    assigned;
       organization and performance of the
       African Union;                                     the country which the delegation
                                                          represents, the major issues facing it, and
       highlight key economic, social and                 its views on international affairs; and
       political-security issues facing the
       African continent;                                 the views of the other nations
                                                          represented in each U.N. body and the
       demonstrate the patterns of cooperation            use of Parliamentary Rules of Procedure.
       and conflict between the AU and the
       United Nations;                             5. Curriculum development programs provide
                                                      opportunities for college professors and staff
       generate understanding of the multi-           from a broad range of disciplines to come
       various determinants, capabilities, and        together to discuss initiatives for infusing
       constraints that shape the foreign             international      curricula     into      the
       policies of Member States of the African       undergraduate classroom.
       Union;
                                                   Programs, assemblies, convocations and
       demonstrate the patterns of cooperation     Lyceum events have components designed to
       and conflict characterizing intra-African   infuse study of the liberal arts with international
       diplomacy;                                  perspectives.
                                      MILITARY SCIENCE
                                      MILITARY SCIENCE
Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC)
Army Reserveco-educational program dedicated
is a four-year Officer Training Corps (ROTC)               Students enrolled in the Basic Program courses
is a four-year co-educational program dedicated
to developing college-educated men and women               Students enrolled in the Basic Program courses
                                                           incur no obligation to the U.S. Army.
    serve as Army officers in men and Army,
to developing college-educatedthe active women             incur no Program studentsthe U.S. Army.
                                                           Advanced obligation to           are obligated to
to serve as Army officers in the active Army,
Army Reserve, and Army National Guard in                   serve on Program in the are Army for a
                                                           Advanced active dutystudents U.S. obligated to
Army Reserve, and aArmy National Guard in
positions requiring       sense of responsibility,         minimum of duty             the and are paid
                                                           serve on active three inyears U.S. Army for a
positions requiring a sense of responsibility,
dedication, and varied managerial skills. The              minimum of three of $450 and monthpaid
                                                           subsistence allowance years        per are     for
dedication, and varied managerial to contribute
program stresses citizenship skills skills. The            juniors and allowance of $450 per month 20
                                                           subsistence $500 per month for seniors up to for
to the education citizenship skills to contribute
program stresses of both non-career and career-            juniors and $500 per month college. Theyto 20
                                                           academic months while in for seniors up also
to the education of both non-career and career-
oriented individuals. The program is subdivided            academic months while of a 2nd Lieutenantalso
                                                           receive half the base pay in college. They for
oriented individuals. The program is subdivided
into a two-year Basic and a two-year Advanced              receive half the base pay of a 2nd Lieutenant for
                                                           5 weeks (approximately $850) while attending
Program. There is no obligation for Advanced
into a two-year Basic and a two-year any Basic                                               while training
                                                           5 weeks (approximately $850) Other attending
                                                           the Advanced Camp.
Program.course taken. obligation for any Basic
Program There is no                                        the Advanced Camp.                Other training
                                                           opportunities, such as Airborne School, Air
Program course taken.                                      opportunities, such as Airborne School, Air
                                                           Assault School, and Cadet Troop Leadership




                                                                                                                MILITARY SCIENCE
GENERAL                                                    Assault School, andunits, are available on a
                                                           Training in active Cadet Troop Leadership




                                                                                                                 MILITARY SCIENCE
GENERAL                                                    competitive active units, are
                                                           Training in basis each summer. available on a
The Department of Military Science is a Senior             competitive basis each summer.
The Department ofInstructor Science is a Senior
Division, ROTC, Military Group, staffed by                 Academic credit is granted for all military
Division, ROTC, Instructor Group, Component
both Active Army and Reserve staffed by                    science course work. Students in all military
                                                           Academic credit is granted for any major or
                Army and Reserve Component
both ActiveThe Department provides military
personnel.                                                 sciencefield of work. are eligible. any majorthe
                                                           minor course study Students in During or
personnel. The Department full-time students
science curricula available to provides military           minor field of study are eligible. During the
                                                           senior year             (MS IV), the student is
science curricula University, Paine College, and
of Augusta State available to full-time students           offered the of study (MS IV), the student is
                                                           senior year option to select the type of job that
of Augusta State University, Paine College, and
the Medical College of Georgia that ultimately             offered the option the select the type of jobpost,
                                                           he or she desires, to first permanent duty that
the Medical College graduate for that ultimately
qualifies the college of Georgia a commission              and she desires, commission, either Regular
                                                           he orthe type of the first permanent duty post,
qualifies the collegeUnited States Army, United
as an officer in the graduate for a commission             and the Army of commission, either Regular
                                                           Army or type Reserve, that he or she prefers.
States Army in the United United States Army
as an officer Reserve, or theStates Army, United           Army or Army class materials, or she prefers.
                                                           All textbooks, Reserve, that he and necessary
                           the highly coveted
States Army Reserve, or The United States Army
National Guard.                                            All textbooks, class materials, and no charge
                                                           uniforms are provided by the Army at necessary
National Guard. an The highly coveted
commission adds            extra dimension to a            to the individual. Credits earned no charge
                                                           uniforms are provided by the Army atwithin the
student’s employment extra dimension to a
commission adds an capability in that upon                 Military Science Credits earned within the
                                                           to the individual. Department apply toward
student’s employment capability inhas either a
graduation from college, the student that upon             Military Science Department apply toward
                                                           graduation as general electives.
graduation a civilian career employment option.a
military or from college, the student has either           graduation as general electives.
military or a civilian career employment option.           THE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
The curriculum is divided into two parts: the              THE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
The curriculumor Basic Program two parts: the
lower division, is divided into offered on                 The Army Military Science Scholarship
Paine College or Basic Program offered on the
lower division, campus, and the upper division,            The Army Military Science Scholarship
                                                           Program awards full-time, four-, three-, and
Paine College Program, and the upper division,
or Advanced campus, offered under the co-                  Program scholarships to eligible students on a
                                                           two-year awards full-time, four-, three-, and
or Advanced Program, offered under the co-
enrollment program at Augusta State University.            two-year scholarships toDepartment of Military
                                                           competitive basis. The eligible students on a
enrollment program at Augusta State all students
Basic Program courses are open to University.              competitive basis. The Department of Military
                                                           Science accepts applications for two-year and
Basic Program courses are open to allhowever,
enrolled at any of the above colleges; students            Science accepts applications for the year. A
                                                           three-year scholarships throughouttwo-year and
enrolled at any coursesabove colleges; however,
Basic Program of the are normally attended by              student does not have to be currently enrolled A
                                                           three-year scholarships throughout the year. in
Basic Program courses are normally attended by
freshman and sophomore level students.                     student does not have to be currently enrolled in
                                                           Military Science to apply for two-year or three-
Students and sophomore level Program
freshman enrolling in the Advanced students.               Military Science to apply for two-year or three-
                                                           year scholarships. In addition to the National
must have completed the Advanced four (4)
Students enrolling in a minimum of Program                 year scholarships. Department to the National
                                                           Scholarships, the In addition Chair awards
must have completed acourses and of four (4)
Basic military science minimum have prior                  Scholarships, the Department and
                                                           multiple     four-,    three-,              awards
                                                                                               Chair two-year
Basic military the Military Science Department
approval from science courses and have prior               multiple     four-,    three-,    and     two-year
approval from the Military Science Department
Chair.
Chair.
                                                     172
                                                     172
                                                     172
                                                     171
                                                     172
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                                                                                             Paine College
scholarships annually to students.           Each      BASIC PROGRAM CURRICULUM
scholarship pays full tuition, books, lab fees,
and other educational expenses. In addition, all       This curriculum ultimately qualifies the college
Military Science scholarship students receive          graduate for a commission as an officer in the
$350 and $450 per month for up to 10 months of         U.S. Army, Army Reserve, or Army National
each school year the scholarship is in effect.         Guard.
Upon Commissioning as a Second Lieutenant,
most agreements call for graduates to serve            Basic Courses, Freshman Year (MS I)
three or four years of active duty or six years in     MIL 101 Foundations of Officership.................3
the National Guard or Army Reserves.                   MIL 102 Basic Leadership.................................3

BASIC CAMP                                             Basic Courses, Sophomore Year (MS II)
                                                       MIL 201 Individual Leadership Studies ............3
Students who did not participate in the Basic          MIL 202 Leadership and Teamwork .................3
Program and who have at least two years
                                                       Credit for completion of the Basic Program may
remaining before graduation may qualify for the
                                                       be awarded through any one of the methods
Advanced Program through a six-week summer
                                                       listed below:
camp given at Fort Knox, Kentucky, each year.
                                                       1. Attendance and successful completion of the
This program enables students to determine if             above curriculum.
they desire a career in the military and qualifies
them for the Advanced Program. No obligation           2. Leadership Training Course Summer
is incurred by attending Basic Camp. The                  Internship: A student who did not
student is paid half the base pay of a Second             participate in the basic program who has no
Lieutenant plus travel, board, and lodging. The           more than two years remaining before
student also has the opportunity to compete for           graduation may qualify for the advanced
two-year scholarships.                                    program through a five-week summer
                                                          internship given at Fort Knox, Kentucky
                                                          each year. Graduate students are eligible for
WAYS TO QUALIFY FOR THE                                   this program as well; those attending receive
ADVANCED PROGRAM                                          approximately $800 with all meals, lodging
                                                          and transportation paid for while attending
There are five ways to qualify for the Advanced           the summer internship.         This program
Program:                                                  enables the student to determine if he or she
                                                          desires a career in the military and qualifies
1. complete 4 years of JROTC in high school;              the student for the advanced course if he or
                                                          she chooses. No obligation is incurred by
2. complete 2 years of college Basic Program;             attending the Leadership Training Course
                                                          (MIL 306, Leadership Training Course
                                                          Summer Internship). Successful completion
3. be a Veteran of any U. S. Armed Forces;
                                                          of this course can qualify the student for a
                                                          two-year scholarship for the remaining two
4. complete a 90-hour summer Training                     years.
   Program as a sophomore (between
   sophomore and junior year); or                      3. Compression: While the normal sequence
                                                          of course work requires two full academic
5. complete Army Basic Training with a                    years, it is possible to compress the course
   National Guard or Reserve Unit.                        work into less than two years by taking two
Paine College
Paine College                                               Military Science                             Page 174
                                                                                                         Page 173
    Military Science courses during the same                       302. Students will also receive half the base pay
    semester. Compression is not recommended                       of a Sergeant for 5 weeks (approximately $850).
    or desired, but will be considered on an                       Travel, lodging, and meal costs are defrayed by
    individual basis by the Department                             the U.S. Army.        The Summer Internship
    Chairperson.                                                   environment is highly structured and
                                                                   demanding, stressing leadership at small unit
4. Exemption: Credit for all or part of the                        levels under varying, challenging conditions.
   basic course may be granted upon
   presentation of evidence that the student has                   PROFESSIONAL MILITARY
   equivalent training.    Examples of such                        EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
   training are active military service, Senior
   Division Navy or Air Force ROTC credit, or                      The principal element of the Professional
   3 years Junior ROTC credit. In every case,                      Military Education (PME) requirement is the
   exemption credit must be approved by the                        bachelor’s degree. As an integral part of that
   Department Chairperson.        No academic                      undergraduate education, prospective officers
   credit is given for courses exempted under                      are required to take at least one course in each
   this program.                                                   of the fields of study listed below and should
                                                                   consult the department chair of Military Science
ADVANCED PROGRAM CURRICULUM                                        for approved courses in each field:

The Advanced Program is only available under                       COMPUTER LITERACY, MILITARY
the co-enrollment program with Augusta State                       HISTORY, AND WRITTEN
University. The Advanced Program consists                          COMMUNICATIONS SKILLS
usually of the junior and senior years.
                                                                   Cadets will also be required to complete and
Eligibility Requirements for Advanced                              pass the Enhanced Skills Training Program
Course: GPA of 2.00 or higher; completion, or                      (ESTP) prior to completing their junior MS
credit for completion, of the basic course;                        year. The ESTP program is designed to test
meeting Army physical requirements; have no                        cadet’s basic reading, writing, and mathematics
more than two years remaining until graduation;                    skills. This program will be delivered over the
permission of the Department Chairperson.                          Internet. Full exemption is allowed if the cadet
                                                                   earned within the last five years, and in a single
Advanced Courses, Junior Year (MS III)                             sitting, a composite score of 21 or higher on the
MIL 301 Leadership & Problem Solving ..........3                   ACT, with English and Math scores of at least
MIL 302 Leadership & Ethics ...........................3           21 each. However, if the composite score of 21
MIL 306 Leadership Training Course ...............3                is met or exceeded, but one score, English or
                                                                   Math is 20 or lower, then the cadet is required to
Advanced Courses, Senior Year (MS IV)                              complete the ESTP assessment for that deficient
MIL 401 Leadership and Management..............3                   area. Full exemption is allowed if the cadet
MIL 402 Officership ..........................................3    earned within the last five years, and in a single
MIL 406 Leader Development & Assessment...3                        sitting, a composite score of 1100 or higher on
MIL 495 Selected Topics...................................3        the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), with Verbal
MIL 496 Battle Analysis....................................3       and Math scores of at least 550 each. However,
                                                                   if the composite score of 1100 is met or
Leader Development and Assessment Camp                             exceeded, but one score, Verbal or Math is 549
Summer Internship                                                  or lower, then the cadet is required to complete
A thirty-three (33) day camp conducted at Fort                     the ESTP assessments for that deficient area. If
Lewis, WA. Only open to (and required of)                          the low score is in the Verbal category, the cadet
students who have completed MIL 301 and MIL                        is required to enroll in ESTP English and
Paine 174
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                                                                                                 Paine College
Reading. If the low score is in Math, the cadet
is required to enroll in ESTP Math and Reading.       Required Credits............................................15
Full exemption is allowed if the cadet possesses      (Grade of C or better is required in each of these
a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited                courses)
institution of higher education.
                                                      MIL 301 Leadership & Problem Solving ..........3
THE SIMULTANEOUS MEMBERSHIP                           MIL 302 Leadership & Ethics ...........................3
PROGRAM                                               MIL 401 Leadership and Management..............3
                                                      MIL 402 Officership ..........................................3
The Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP)             MIL 406 Leader Development and
allows cadets to be enrolled in the Military             Assessment...................................................3
Science Advanced Course and a local Army              Upper-Division Hours for the Military
National Guard or Reserve unit at the same            Science Minor .................................................15
time. The benefits of this program are that
cadets not only receive $350 for juniors and          MILITARY SCIENCE PROGRAM
$450 for seniors per academic month from the          FEATURES
Military Science Department but also receive
drill pay from their Army National Guard or           Admissions and Incentives: A student enrolled
Army Reserve equivalent to E-5 pay ($235) per         in the basic course incurs no obligation to the
month. Cadets in this program perform the             U.S. Army. Advanced program students are
duties of an officer trainee in their Army            obligated to serve on active duty in the U.S.
National Guard or Army Reserve unit. Some             Army for a minimum of three (3) years and are
National Guard programs offer tuition                 paid a subsistence allowance of $350 per month
assistance as well. This program provides             for juniors and $450 per month for seniors up to
valuable management experiences, which will           20 academic months while in college. They
interest future employers and prepare cadets for      also receive approximately $850 while attending
leadership and management positions after             the advanced camp.               Other training
graduation.                                           opportunities such as Air Assault, Airborne
                                                      School, Arctic Warfare, and Cadet Troop
MINOR IN MILITARY SCIENCE                             Leadership Training (CTLT) in active units are
                                                      available on a competitive basis with military
The Military Science minor is primarily               subsistence and some paid benefits. A student
designed for the student planning a career in the     in any major/minor field of study is eligible.
U.S. Army as a commissioned officer. Military         During the senior year of study (MS IV) the
Science teaches skills that are vital for             student is offered the opportunity to select the
professional success on and off the battlefield,      type of job that he or she desires to perform, the
such as group leadership, management                  first permanent duty post, and the type of
positions, and public speaking. Leadership is         commission, either Regular Army, National
the process of influencing an individual or a         Guard, or Army Reserve, that he or she prefers.
team of people by providing them a purpose,           The Army, at no charge, provides all necessary
direction, and motivation to accomplish               uniforms to the individual. Academic credit,
assigned missions and to improve the team for         applicable toward graduation as general
the future. Courses should be arranged in             electives, is granted for all military science
consultation with the major department and a          course work.
Professor of Military Science.
                                  PAINE COLLEGE




                                                                                                                  PAINE COLLEGE FORT GORDON RESIDENT CENTER
                                  PAINE COLLEGE




                                                                                                                   PAINE COLLEGE FORT GORDON RESIDENT CENTER
                           FORT GORDON RESIDENT CENTER
                           FORT GORDON RESIDENT CENTER

Through the Paine College Fort Gordon                      SERVICEMEMBERS OPPORTUNITY
Through the Paine College Fort Gordon
Resident Center, the College provides lifelong             SERVICEMEMBERS OPPORTUNITY
                                                           COLLEGE (SOC)
learning opportunitiesCollege provides lifelong
Resident Center, the to individuals like those             COLLEGE (SOC)
in the United States Army Signal Centerthose
learning opportunities to individuals like and             Paine College is a member of the
in the United
Fort Gordon. States Army Signal Center and
                                                           Paine College is a member
                                                           Servicemembers Opportunity College of(SOC)       the
Fort Gordon.                                               Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC)
                                                           network, which represents a commitment to
The purposes are to:
                                                           network, for military personnel on active duty.
                                                           education which represents a commitment to
The purposes are to:                                       education for military personnel on active duty.
                                                           As a designated four-year SOC, Paine College is
                                                           As a designated network of Paine College is
                                                           a member of afour-year SOC,institutions with
    extend the borders of Paine’s academic                              of a network transfer,
                                                           a member admissions,         of institutions with
                                                           similar                                   residents
    extend and borders of
    programthe resources; Paine’s academic
    program and resources;
                                                           similar     admissions,       that allowsresidents
                                                           requirements, and policiestransfer,         service
                                                           requirements, and policies that allows service
                                                           members to move from random education
    embody the Mission of the College which                members to program completion education
                                                           activities into move from random efforts. It
    embody interaction with the Augusta
    stresses the Mission of the College which              activities into program completion efforts. It
    stresses interaction with the Augusta                  allows maximum coordination of opportunities
    community; and
    community; and
                                                           allows institutions. Only active opportunities
                                                           among maximum coordination of duty military
                                                           among institutions. Only active duty eligible
                                                           personnel and their family members are military
    provide a senior college option for military           personnel and in the SOC members
                                                           for enrollment their familyprogram. are eligible
    provide a who college option for military
    personnel seniorare interested in acquiring            for enrollment in the SOC program.
    personnel who are interested in skills.
    additional academic knowledge andacquiring             To enroll through the SOC Program, individuals
    additional academic knowledge and skills.              To enroll through the the regular College
                                                           must comply withSOC Program, individuals
The Paine College Fort Gordon Resident Center              must comply with the regular College
                                                           admissions requirements.         Counseling for
The Paine variety of courses in Business
offers a College Fort Gordon Resident Center               admissions requirements.
                                                           service members is available CounselingDOD
                                                                                             from the       for
offers a variety of courses in Business
Administration, and Sociology. The program at                        members at the Fort Gordon DOD
                                                           service counselors is available from the Army
Administration, and Sociology. The program at              career
Fort Gordon is available to active-duty military           career counselors
                                                           Learning Center. at the Fort Gordon Army
                                                                                   To complete a SOC
Fort Gordon is their dependents, military
personnel andavailable to active-duty retirees,            Learning Center.        To complete a SOC
                                                           application and evaluation, submit all necessary
personnel of       their dependents, retirees,
Department andArmy civilians and others with               application and evaluation, submit all necessary
                                                           documents, including an American Army
Department of Army civilians and others with
special circumstances. Courses offered at Fort             documents, including Systems (AARTS)
                                                           Registrar Transcript an American Army
special are normally Courses main at Fort
Gordon circumstances. open to offered campus               Registrar      the Paine Systems (AARTS)
                                                           transcript toTranscript College Fort Gordon
Gordon are normally open to main campus
students only under special circumstances.
students only under special circumstances.
                                                           transcript to the
                                                           Resident Center. Paine College Fort Gordon
                                                           Resident Center.
The same high quality of excellence is                     ADMISSIONS CRITERIA
The same        the quality of excellence is
maintained inhigh Fort Gordon program as on                ADMISSIONS CRITERIA
maintained in the All admissions requirements,
the main campus. Fort Gordon program as on                 Fort Gordon Resident Center students are
the main regulations, and exit procedures,
academic campus. All admissions requirements,              Fort Gordon Resident on the students as
                                                           admitted to Paine College Center same basisare
academic regulations, and exit procedures,
except for minor modifications because of the
except for minor modifications because of the
                                                           admitted at the main on the
                                                           students to Paine Collegecampus: same basis as
                                                                                                    scholastic
nature and experience of the student population,                                      campus:       scholastic
                                                           students at the main potential, educational
                                                           achievement, academic
nature same as those of the student population,
are the and experiencestated in the other sections         achievement,and
                                                           purpose,        academic potential, educational
                                                                                 personal     characteristics.
are the Catalog. The academic calendar varies
of this same as those stated in the other sections         purpose,              personal      characteristics.
                                                           Applications and submitted to the Admissions
                                                                          are
of this Catalog. main campus to better serve
from that of the The academic calendar varies                                                the Admissions
                                                           Applications are submitted to Typically, these
                                                           Office at the main campus.
from that of the main
Fort Gordon personnel. campus to better serve              Office apply to enroll as transfer, transient, or
                                                           studentsat the main campus. Typically, these
Fort Gordon personnel.                                     students apply to enroll as transfer, transient, or
                                                           non-degree students (see the Admissions
                                                           non-degree students (see the Admissions
                                                           section of this Catalog). Additional admission
                                                           section of this Catalog). Additional
                                                           requirements are summarized below. admission
                                                           requirements are summarized below.

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Paine 176
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                                                                                       Paine College
   Fort Gordon students are required to have 28       even years, refer to the year in which the
   credits (semester hours) in order to enroll in     academic year ends. There is also an eight-
   degree programs. (See Director for any             week Summer Session. Students may enter the
   exceptions).                                       College at the beginning of either term or the
                                                      Summer Session.
   Students entering degree programs may
   have to enroll in basic courses or                 LOAD REGULATION
   preparatory courses to build skills necessary
   to complete the Paine College curriculum.          The normal course load for Fort Gordon
                                                      students is six (6) to nine (9) semester credit
   Students taking courses but not in a degree
                                                      hours per term. These nine (9) credits include
   program may enroll in a maximum of 15
                                                      Fort Gordon, main campus, and transient
   credits as transient or non-degree students.
                                                      credits. To receive full financial aid, a student
   Should the student desire to pursue a degree,
                                                      must be enrolled in a minimum of six (6)
   a new application is required and regular
                                                      semester credit hours.
   admissions criteria must be met including
   meeting      basic     skills    competency
                                                      Students who have a minimum cumulative
   requirements.
                                                      grade point average (CGPA) of 2.5 may be
                                                      permitted to take additional semester credit
THE CURRICULUM
                                                      hours for a total of 12 when approved by the
                                                      faculty advisor. If the student’s record permits
The curriculum at the Paine College Fort
                                                      the taking of more than nine (9) hours, the
Gordon Resident Center is designed to allow
                                                      required cost for each additional hour must be
students to complete requirements for degrees in
                                                      paid by the student.
Business Administration, Education, and
Sociology. Therefore, per the Memorandum of
                                                      FEES
Understanding (MOU) between Paine College
and the United States Army Signal Center and
                                                      Fort Gordon Resident Center fees are
Fort Gordon, the College does not offer lower
                                                      determined by the student’s status as either
level courses at its Resident Center that compete
                                                      active duty military or civilian.
with MOU approved program courses at other
installation colleges and universities.
                                                                    Cost of Attendance
                                                                        2009-2011
All colleges and universities with MOU
approved programs on the installation
                                                      Status                        Tuition per
coordinate their course schedules to ensure that
                                                                                   Credit Hour*
prerequisite courses for the Paine College MOU
                                                      Active Duty Military              $180
are offered on a consistent and sequenced basis.
                                                      Civilian                         $185
However, if the other colleges and universities
                                                      * Subject to change without notice
are not able to offer courses that are prerequisite
to the Paine College program after a reasonable
                                                      Civilians incur a deferred payment fee of $84.00
period of time (normally 90 days), Paine
                                                      per term when the tuition is paid in installments.
College has the option of offering the course or
courses in question.
                                                      WITHDRAWAL POLICY
ACADEMIC TERMS
                                                      Fort Gordon students use the same withdrawal
                                                      procedures as main campus students. A student
The academic year at Fort Gordon is divided
                                                      who withdraws from the College and does
into four periods of eight weeks each: Fall I,
                                                      not follow the withdrawal procedures as
Fall II, Spring I, and Spring II. For the odd or
Paine College
Paine College                           Fort Gordon Resident Center                        Page 178
                                                                                           Page 177
outlined is not eligible for a refund. Only           following the student’s registration; however,
after all requirements have been completed will       students will be held responsible for all class
students be eligible for a credit to their account.   work beginning with the first day of class.
When a student is considering withdrawal, the         In case of emergency, students will be allowed
College will provide any necessary counseling         to be absent the equivalent of one class period
or assistance to the student prior to the             (50 minutes) per credit value of the class plus
withdrawal. The following schedule will be            two additional 50-minute periods. Students are
adhered to when applying credit(s) to the             cautioned that classes meeting more than 50
student’s account.                                    minutes result in the equivalent of 1+ absences
                                                      each time they are absent. At Fort Gordon, a
                                        Credit        class that meets for 135 minutes per course
Withdrawal before the 1st day of class   100%         meeting would mean the student could only be
                         st
Withdrawal during the 1 week             100%         absent one day and a portion of a second day.
Withdrawal during the 2nd week            80%         When a student has exceeded the limit, he or she
Withdrawal during the 3rd week            40%         may remain in class only at the discretion of the
                         th
Withdrawal during the 4 week              20%         instructor.   Faculty members will consider
Withdrawal after the 4th week          NO CREDIT
                                                      appropriate documentation for emergencies
                                                      when such documentation is presented on the
There is no reduction in tuition made for days        day the student returns to class.
absent at the beginning of the semester. Any
recipient of Title IV funds that withdraws prior      PROGRAMS
to the end of the term will be subject to the
“Return of Title IV Funds” policy. Refer to the       Students attending the Paine College Fort
Financial Aid Student Consumer Information            Gordon Resident Center may earn a Bachelor of
Guide.                                                Science in Business Administration or Bachelor
                                                      of Arts degree in Sociology.
REFUND POLICY
                                                      BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Any student who wishes to withdraw from the
College must secure a withdrawal form from the        Students may major in business administration
Resident Center, complete it and have the form        with an emphasis in one of the following areas:
approved by the Director of the Fort Gordon
Resident Center, Vice President of Academic              Accounting
Affairs, Chief Fiscal Officer and the Registrar.         International Business
The withdrawal form must be filed in the
                                                         Management
Registrar’s Office.    Only after the above
                                                         Management Information Systems
requirements are met will the student be eligible
for a refund.                                            Marketing

A student who withdraws from the College and          SOCIOLOGY
does not follow the withdrawal procedures as
outlined will not be eligible for a refund.           Students may major in sociology with an
                                                      emphasis in one of the following areas:
ATTENDANCE POLICIES
                                                         Criminology
Fort Gordon students should attend ALL classes           Social Psychology
for courses in which they are registered.                General Sociology
Faculty will begin recording the student’s
absences the class session immediately                These areas along with others provide common
                                                      curriculum and other support courses.      A
Paine 178
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                                                                                      Paine College
Common Curriculum consisting of 56 or 58              4. Fort Gordon designated students will be
credit hours of general courses is required for all      allowed to take a maximum of 9 semester
majors. Most common curriculum courses                   credit hours per term (Fort Gordon plus
should be completed before enrolling at Paine.           Main Campus).
Some courses in Business Administration and
Education as well as required laboratory courses      5. Main Campus designated students who
are not offered at Fort Gordon and must be               desire to take classes at any time at Fort
taken at the main campus.                                Gordon will pay the Main Campus rate.

EDUCATION COURSES

No education degree can be earned through             VETERANS BENEFITS PROGRAMS
the Fort Gordon Resident Center; however,
students may pursue education certification
on the main campus. Most of the courses are
                                                      Students may apply for the following
taken on the main campus and extensive field
                                                      educational assistance programs administered
work in the schools is required.
                                                      by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs:

Students majoring in education may select one            The Montgomery GI Bill—Active Duty
of the following areas for certification:                Educational Assistance Program (MGIB,
                                                         Chapter 30)
   Early Childhood Education
   Middle Grades Education                               The Vocational Rehabilitation (Chapter 31)
   Secondary Education in Biology, English,
   History, and Mathematics                              The     Post-Vietnam   Era     Educational
                                                         Assistance Program (Chapter 32)
CO-ENROLLMENT GUIDELINES
                                                         The     Survivors’    and    Dependents’
Students in attendance at the Paine College              Educational Assistance Program (Chapter
main campus who desire to take courses at the            35)
Fort Gordon Resident Center location or Fort
Gordon students who desire to take courses on            Montgomery GI Bill-Selected Reserve
the main campus should follow the guidelines as          Educational Assistance Program (Chapter
indicated below:                                         106)

1. Submit the Request for Enrollment (Main               Montgomery GI Bill-Reserve Educational
   Campus/Fort Gordon) for approval to the               Assistance Program (Chapter 1607)
   Director of the Fort Gordon Resident
   Center.     The request should include             Detailed information on all assistance programs
   appropriate justification.                         is available on the website of the Department of
                                                      Veterans Affairs:
2. The request will be forwarded to the Office        www.gibill/va.gov/education/benefits.html.
   of Academic Affairs for final approval.

3. Students designated as “Fort Gordon                APPLICATION PROCEDURES
   Students” who desire to take classes at the        Students who are eligible for educational
   main campus will pay the Fort Gordon rate.         benefits from the U.S. Department of Veterans
                                                      Affairs should contact the Paine College
Paine College
Paine College                           Fort Gordon Resident Center                         Page 180
                                                                                            Page 179
Veterans      Affairs     Certifying      Official      Each student must attend all courses for
Representative in the Registrar’s Office. Every         which they are registered or officially
educational assistance program requires                 withdraw before ceasing to attend.
different paperwork and documentation to
process a claim. Initial applications for benefits      Payment of benefits will be disallowed for
may be submitted online directly to the U.S.            any course in which a non-punitive grade
Department of Veterans Affairs.                         (W, WP) is assigned.

AMOUNTS AND METHODS OF                                  Payment of benefits will be disallowed for
PAYMENT                                                 repeating a course for which transfer credit
                                                        has been granted or for which a passing
The amount of money a student may receive               grade of A, B, C, D, P, or S was assigned.
from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
depends on the educational assistance program           Payment of benefits will be disallowed for
for which the student is eligible, the number of        any course that is not a requirement in a
credits for which the student is registered, the        student’s degree plan.
length of the term, and (for certain programs)
the number of dependents the student has.
                                                     EMPLOYER PROVIDED TUITION
Benefits are paid directly to students on a          ASSISTANCE
monthly basis. The money may be used to help
with tuition, books, or other costs of college       If an employer is going to pay for part or all of a
education. Tuition is due upon registration,         student’s tuition, the student must submit copies
regardless of eligibility for benefits.              of appropriate documentation at the time of
                                                     registration. Documents that restrict payment or
                                                     are in any way confidential will not be accepted.
STUDENTS’ RESPONSIBILITIES                           If the employer does not pay Paine College, the
                                                     student is responsible for payment.
Students receiving benefits are expected to
follow all regulations and procedures of the U.S.
Department of Veterans Affairs while attending
Paine College.

At Paine College, all regulations of the U.S.
Department of Veterans Affairs are enforced.
Students should be aware of the following
requirements and consequences:

   Each student is expected to make
   satisfactory progress toward a degree;
   everyone must comply with the academic
   standards of Paine College.

   Each student must report all changes in
   enrollment—including      drops,     adds,
   withdrawals, changes to audit, and changes
   in degree plan.
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                                                        SUPPORT PROGRAMS
                   health counseling, and other referrals.                   www.paine.edu/library.
                   other extracurricular experiences, housing,               are available at the Library website of
                   workshops, financial aid assistance, cultural and         information and access to services and resources
                   COLLINS-CALLAWAY LIBRARY
                   advisement,       peer    mentoring      program,         Fall & Spring Semester Hours
                                                                             one-on-one or group instruction. Additional
                   group tutoring and counseling, academic                   7:45am – 11:00pm Monday – Thursday
                                                                             and instructional sessions may be scheduled for
                   The Collins-Callaway Library seeks to prepare
                   activities include the following: individual and          7:45am – 5:00pm     Friday
                                                                             assist students in person or by phone or email,
                   students for lifelong learning by providing
                   exploration.       The available services and             1:00pm – 5:00pm     Saturday
                                                                             off campus. Librarians and staff are available to
                   scholarly resources and instruction in the use of
                   academic and social skills and career                     4:00pm – 8:00pm     Sunday
                                                                             students twenty-four hours a day, whether on or
                   those resources. Students have full privileges to
                   services and activities designed to enhance their         Holiday and Summer Hours will be posted.
                                                                             books and periodical articles are available to
                   use the services and resources of the Library
                   The participants are provided a variety of                electronic resources of indexes and full-text
                   upon presentation of a current Paine College ID.
                   chosen are among a select group of freshmen.              STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES
                                                                             and an African American collection. Extensive
                   criteria to participate. Therefore, those who are         books, periodicals, indexes, archival materials,
                   The Collins-Callaway Library facility is a
                   accommodate the many students who meet the                The Student Support Services Project is an
                                                                             The physical collections of the Library include
                   spacious two story building housing a variety of          academic support program, funded by the U.S.
SUPPORT PROGRAMS




                   is limited, Student Support Services cannot
                   collections, equipment, individual and group              Department of Education that serves 130




                                                                                                                                  SUPPORT PROGRAMS
                   challenged. Inasmuch as space in the program                throughout the building.
                   study areas, computer and production
                   reasons, or because they are physically                   students annually. The Project began on the
                                                                               and classrooms. Wireless access is available
                   laboratories and classrooms. The Library is
                   because of educational, cultural, and economic            Paine College campus in 1973. Participants are
                                                                               electronic classrooms, a production/media lab
                   named for Dr. Daniel A. Collins, a 1936
                   with academic potential who may face adversity            enrolled at the College and are selected from a
                                                                               Library and includes open computer labs,
                   graduate of Paine College and former Chair of
                   from the College. The Program targets students            pool of eligible freshmen who meet the income
                                                                               staffed and located on the second floor of the
                   the Board of Trustees and Dr. Morgan
                   students in remaining enrolled and graduating             guidelines as specified by the U.S. Department
                                                                               resources. The Learning Resources Center is
                   Callaway, the first President of the College.
                   provide services that will encourage and assist           of Education, and/or are first generation college
                                                                               are available to access the extensive electronic
                   The purpose of Student Support Services is to             students or physically disadvantaged students.
                                                                               provided near the first floor computers which
                   The first floor contains the circulating                  Enrollees must also show need for academic
                                                                               Circulation Desk. Reference services are
                   collections which may be checked out at the
                   support.                                                  support.
                                                                               collections which may be checked out at the
                   Circulation Desk. Reference services are
                   Enrollees must also show need for academic                  The first floor contains the circulating
                   provided near the first floor computers which
                   students or physically disadvantaged students.            The purpose of Student Support Services is to
                   are available to access the extensive electronic
                   of Education, and/or are first generation college         provide services that will encourage and assist
                                                                             Callaway, the first President of the College.
                   resources. The Learning Resources Center is
                   guidelines as specified by the U.S. Department            students in remaining enrolled and graduating
                                                                             the Board of Trustees and Dr. Morgan
                   staffed and located on the second floor of the
                   pool of eligible freshmen who meet the income             from the College. The Program targets students
                                                                             graduate of Paine College and former Chair of
                   Library and includes open computer labs,
                   enrolled at the College and are selected from a           with academic potential who may face adversity
                                                                             named for Dr. Daniel A. Collins, a 1936
                   electronic classrooms, a production/media lab
                   Paine College campus in 1973. Participants are            because of educational, cultural, and economic
                                                                             laboratories and classrooms. The Library is
                   and classrooms. Wireless access is available
                   students annually. The Project began on the               reasons, or because they are physically
                                                                             study areas, computer and production
                   throughout the building.
                   Department of Education that serves 130                   challenged. Inasmuch as space in the program
                                                                             collections, equipment, individual and group
                   academic support program, funded by the U.S.              is limited, Student Support Services cannot
                                                                             spacious two story building housing a variety of
                   The physical collections of the Library include
                   The Student Support Services Project is an                accommodate the many students who meet the
                                                                             The Collins-Callaway Library facility is a
                   books, periodicals, indexes, archival materials,          criteria to participate. Therefore, those who are
                   and an African American collection. Extensive
                              STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES                       chosen are among a select group of freshmen.
                                                                             upon presentation of a current Paine College ID.
                   electronic resources of indexes and full-text             The participants are provided a variety of
                                                                             use the services and resources of the Library
                   books and periodical articles are available to
                        Holiday and Summer Hours will be posted.             services and activities designed to enhance their
                                                                             those resources. Students have full privileges to
                   students twenty-four hours a day, whether on or
                        4:00pm – 8:00pm     Sunday                           academic and social skills and career
                                                                             scholarly resources and instruction in the use of
                   off campus. Librarians and staff are available to
                        1:00pm – 5:00pm     Saturday                         exploration.       The available services and
                                                                             students for lifelong learning by providing
                   assist students in person or by phone or email,
                        7:45am – 5:00pm     Friday                           activities include the following: individual and
                                                                             The Collins-Callaway Library seeks to prepare
                   and instructional sessions may be scheduled for
                        7:45am – 11:00pm Monday – Thursday                   group tutoring and counseling, academic
                   one-on-one or group instruction. Additional
                        Fall & Spring Semester Hours                         advisement,       peer    mentoring
                                                                                      COLLINS-CALLAWAY LIBRARY        program,
                   information and access to services and resources          workshops, financial aid assistance, cultural and
                   are available at the Library website of                   other extracurricular experiences, housing,
                   www.paine.edu/library.               SUPPORT PROGRAMS     health counseling, and other referrals.

                                                                       181
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Paine College
Paine College                                  Support Programs                            Page 182
                                                                                           Page 181
GENERAL EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT                         evaluated on a regular basis. Tutors may
CENTER                                                become certified at three different levels when
                                                      they meet the training and tutoring
The General Education Development Center              requirements.
(GEDC) is a unifying concept for academic and
student development. The Center is a focused          The Tutorial and Enrichment Center offers a
institutional effort aimed at implementing            wide range of services. Its most important
structured orientation, academic testing and          function is to provide tutors who promote
advising, and college survival skills training.       academic confidence and independence through
The Center provides close supervision and             one-on-one and small-group tutoring sessions in
guidance to students in order to allow maximum        virtually all academic areas. The Center further
academic adjustment. It also makes special            supports classroom instruction by offering
provisions for developing the basic skills            seminars and workshops in a variety of areas
competencies essential for students to enter          such as writing and basic composition skills,
specialized fields. Specifically, the GEDC            study skills, test-taking skills, research paper
affords students the opportunity to master the        techniques, and oral presentation to develop and
tools required to function at a higher level, both    strengthen student competency in these areas.
cognitively and affectively, within the               The Center also provides individualized
institution.                                          research paper support by assisting students
                                                      with all stages of the research paper process
                                                      including evaluating sources, using citation
All students who have not earned 28 semester
                                                      styles, and formatting documents. In addition,
hours of college credits with a GPA of at least
                                                      the Center houses an Internet-accessible
1.8 or have not declared a major field of
                                                      computer laboratory that allows students to
concentration are assigned to the GEDC. The
                                                      enhance their computer skills through hands-on
Center’s staff members, administer the
                                                      training and tutorial assistance.
academic advisement components during the
freshman year.
                                                      The Dr. Mack Gipson, Jr., Tutorial and
                                                      Enrichment Center operates during all academic
The Test Skills Development Center (TSDC) is
                                                      terms. Fall and Spring Semester hours are
a unit of GEDC, which provides resources and
                                                      Monday through Thursday from 9:00 AM to
activities for students needing test skills
                                                      8:00 PM and Friday from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM.
improvement.
                                                      Summer hours are Monday through Friday from
                                                      9:00 AM to 5:00 PM.            The Center is
DR. MACK GIPSON, JR., TUTORIAL AND
                                                      conveniently located in the Dr. Mack Gipson,
ENRICHMENT CENTER
                                                      Jr., building just across the driveway from
                                                      Haygood-Holsey Hall. The Center may be
The Dr. Mack Gipson, Jr., Tutorial and
                                                      reached by telephone at (706) 821-8345.
Enrichment Center is a college-wide support
program that provides tutoring in all academic
areas to all Paine College students free of           MATHEMATICS SUPPORT CENTER
charge. Students may request the services of the
Center on their own or may be referred for            The Mathematics Support Center functions as a
services by a faculty member, counselor, or           tutorial and assistance facility for supporting
administrator. Certified by the College Reading       students having difficulty in Mathematics. The
and Learning Association, the Center is staffed       center provides various forms of academic
with a Director, an Education Specialist, an          assistance including one-on-one and small
Administrative Assistant, and a number of             group instruction. Computer assisted instruction
professional and peer tutors.          All tutors     is also available under the watchful eye of the
participate in on-going training activities and are   Director and the Coordinator.
Paine 182
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                                                                                     Paine College
                                                         opportunities throughout their undergraduate
The Mathematics Support Center, open 9:00 –              career.
5:00 daily, except weekends, is staffed by a
Director, a Coordinator, mathematics faculty          2. Students will participate in experiential
and peer tutors. In addition to the tutor sessions,      learning (i.e. internships, study abroad,
it offers many useful software packages which            service learning) opportunities that provide
accompany adopted textbooks and a variety of             opportunities for networking starting in the
assignments and paper and pencil materials               freshman year.
developed locally. Many of the activities are
specifically designed to help students exit           3. Students will receive support in preparing
enhancement courses in mathematics (MAT 098              for standardized assessments used for
and 099) and the College Algebra. The Center             admissions to many graduation and
is located in the Mathematics Support and                professional programs (i.e. Graduation
Fitness Building on Laney Walker Boulevard.              Record Exam (GRE), Medical College
                                                         Achievement Test (MCAT), Law School
UNDERGRADUATE               TO     GRADUATE              Admission Test (LSAT), Dental School
PROGRAM                                                  Admission Test (DCAT), and Miller
                                                         Analogies Test (MAT)).
Paine College established the Undergraduate to
Graduate Program as a structured program of           4. Students will receive assistance with
guidance and assistance related to completing            document preparation (i.e. resumes, personal
all preparations associated with enrolling in            narratives, portfolios, applications
graduate and/or professional school.           The
mission of the Undergraduate to Graduate              5. Students will learn valuable information
Program was expanded to include providing                from graduate school recruiters and other
opportunities for engaged learning experiences           school officials responsible for admissions
that develop those skills necessary for study            and other important considerations.
beyond the baccalaureate degree. The program
supports the College’s strategic goals of             6. Faculty advisors will become aware of and
increasing to 10% the number of students who             provide guidance the critical steps for
engage in experiential learning opportunities            admission to specific graduate and
beyond the campus (i.e. internships, study               professional programs.
abroad), increase visibility and accessibility, and
decrease the overall discount rate by 4% each         7. Programs will identify and collaborate with
year. Program activities promote the idea of             specific graduate and/or professional schools
graduate school attendance as a goal beginning           to build select pipeline programs for
with freshman orientation and include efforts on         students completing their undergraduate
the parts of students, faculty, and staff members        work at Paine College.
throughout the students’ tenure. The outcomes
are                                                   UPWARD BOUND

1. Students will gain awareness of the critical       Paine College, with the assistance of a grant
   steps that are necessary for maximizing their      from the U.S. Department of Education,
   opportunity to gain admission to the               sponsors the Upward Bound Program. Since its
   graduate and/or professional school of their       inception in 1967, Upward Bound has
   choice by engaging in activities such as           functioned as a pre-college program offering
   applying for scholarship and internship            instruction in basic skills; intensive tutoring
                                                      services; comprehensive academic, personal,
                                                      and career counseling; assistance with post-
Paine College
Paine College                           Support Programs                                Page 184
                                                                                        Page 183
secondary school and career selection;             program with a battery of tests to determine
introduction to the college curriculum; and        their strengths and weaknesses.         Some
cultural and other extra-curricular experiences.   instruction is individualized. Individual and
Participants are residents of Richmond County      group counseling is also an important element
and are enrolled in local public high schools.     of the program.
They are selected from among eligible
economically disadvantaged and/or potential        During the academic year, Upward Bound
first-generation college students.                 students receive academic instruction, tutoring,
                                                   and counseling after school and on Saturdays.
During the six-week summer session, Upward         Counselors follow their progress in high school
Bound students live on the College campus and      and the students learn about the college
are involved in an intensive academic study        application process and how to apply for student
program (English, mathematics, science,            financial assistance.
reading, and writing). The students begin the
                                                                                    185
                                                                                    185

                                                                                          awarded for these courses.
                                                         CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAM     (non-credit recognition) or CEU credits will be
                               a course are listed with the course description.           knowledge. Letters or certificates of completion
                               young people and adults. Any prerequisites for             allowing individuals to expand their horizon of
                               Through the Continuing Education Program
                               open to the public. Courses are available for              A CEU is a nationally recognized unit of credit
                                                                                          Many courses are offered for the sole purpose of
Continuing education PROGRAM




                               (CEP), Paine College offers evening and
                               type of course being requested. All courses are            for recording satisfactory completion of many
                               weekend credit and non-credit courses. The
                               appropriate application form depending on the              continuing education classes.
                                                                                          standards to enroll in them.        One CEU
                               program operates as a unit within the Academic             represents 10 contact hours of instruction.




                                                                                                                                               Continuing education PROGRAM
                               Interested participants should complete the                applicants must meet regular admission
                               Affairs module.                                            Continuing education courses taken through the
                                                                                          is granted are taught by credentialed faculty, and
                                               APPLYING FOR A COURSE                      CEP are not calculated in the grade-point
                                                                                          purposes. All courses where college-level credit
                               The mission of the CEP is to provide quality               average. Paine College’s Continuing Education
                                                                                          college credit and those for enrichment or CEU
                               educational activities to support Paine College’s
                               Committee.                                                 Program maintains a permanent record of an
                                                                                          CEP fall under two categories � those for
                               missions of teaching and service and to promote
                               may be cancelled at the discretion of the CEP              individual’s CEU credits. CEU transcripts are
                                                                                          It should be understood that courses in the PC
                               lifelong learning. The central purpose of the
                               of presenting courses. Low enrolled courses                available upon request.
                               CEP at Paine College is to extend the College’s
                               Participant registration fees must cover the costs         along a wide age and knowledge continuum.
                               learning community beyond the core partnership
                               are published when the courses are advertised.             The type of credit (no credit, CEUs, or college
                                                                                          courses designed to meet the needs of students
                               of faculty and degree students, furthering the
                               faculty member and the CEP Committee. They                 credit) to be awarded will depend on the type of
                                                                                          expertise in a wide variety of disciplines, teach
                               general education of Paine’s neighbors in a
                               credit courses are established jointly by the              enrollment or type of course and is determined
                                                                                          work are employed.          Professionals, with
                               welcoming and non-competitive setting.
                               Finances.) The costs for non-credit and CEU-               by the instructor and the CEP Committee. Once
                                                                                          for delivering education where people live and
                               Continuing education programs allow the
                               programs (See Catalog section titled Fees and              a course has begun, the type of credit will NOT
                                                                                          supplemented courses. Technologies that allow
                               College to diversify program offerings.
                               are charged the same rate as those for regular             be changed.
                                                                                          activities including online and media
                               Students enrolled in CEP college-credit courses            PC’s CEP offers a variety of educational
                               COURSE OFFERINGS                                           COSTS
                                                                        COSTS                                    COURSE OFFERINGS
                               PC’s CEP offers a variety of educational                   Students enrolled in CEP college-credit courses
                               activities including online and media
                               be changed.                                                are charged the same rate as those for regular
                                                                                          College to diversify program offerings.
                               supplemented courses. Technologies that allow
                               a course has begun, the type of credit will NOT            programs (See Catalog section titled Fees and
                                                                                          Continuing education programs allow the
                               for delivering education where people live and
                               by the instructor and the CEP Committee. Once              Finances.) The costs for non-credit and CEU-
                                                                                          welcoming and non-competitive setting.
                               work are employed.          Professionals, with
                               enrollment or type of course and is determined             credit courses are established jointly by the
                                                                                          general education of Paine’s neighbors in a
                               expertise in a wide variety of disciplines, teach
                               credit) to be awarded will depend on the type of           faculty member and the CEP Committee. They
                                                                                          of faculty and degree students, furthering the
                               courses designed to meet the needs of students
                               The type of credit (no credit, CEUs, or college            are published when the courses are advertised.
                                                                                          learning community beyond the core partnership
                               along a wide age and knowledge continuum.                  Participant registration fees must cover the costs
                                                                                          CEP at Paine College is to extend the College’s
                               available upon request.                                    of presenting courses. Low enrolled courses
                                                                                          lifelong learning. The central purpose of the
                               It should be understood that courses in the PC
                               individual’s CEU credits. CEU transcripts are              may be cancelled at the discretion of the CEP
                                                                                          missions of teaching and service and to promote
                               CEP fall under two categories � those for
                               Program maintains a permanent record of an                 Committee.
                                                                                          educational activities to support Paine College’s
                               college credit and those for enrichment or CEU
                               average. Paine College’s Continuing Education              The mission of the CEP is to provide quality
                               purposes. All courses where college-level credit
                               CEP are not calculated in the grade-point                  APPLYING FOR A COURSE
                               is granted are taught by credentialed faculty, and
                               Continuing education courses taken through the             Affairs module.
                               applicants must meet regular admission
                               represents 10 contact hours of instruction.                Interested participants should complete the
                                                                                          program operates as a unit within the Academic
                               standards to enroll in them.
                               continuing education classes.       One CEU                appropriate application form depending on the
                                                                                          weekend credit and non-credit courses. The
                               for recording satisfactory completion of many              type of course being requested. All courses are
                                                                                          (CEP), Paine College offers evening and
                               Many courses are offered for the sole purpose of
                               A CEU is a nationally recognized unit of credit            open to the public. Courses are available for
                                                                                          Through the Continuing Education Program
                               allowing individuals to expand their horizon of            young people and adults. Any prerequisites for
                               knowledge. Letters or certificates of completion           a course are listed with the course description.
                               (non-credit recognition) or CEU credits will be
                                                         CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAM
                               awarded for these courses.

                                                                                    185
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                                   BOARD OF TRUSTEES
                                   BOARD OF TRUSTEES
                                     PAINE COLLEGE
                                     PAINE COLLEGE

Rev. Cindy H. Autry, Executive Dr. Eddie R. Cheeks, Chair                TRUSTEES EMERITI
                                    Augusta, R.
Rev. Cindy H. Autry, Executive Dr. EddieGACheeks, Chair
Director                                                                 TRUSTEES EMERITI
Director GA
Carrollton,                         Augusta, GA                          Attorney Robert L. Bell, Chair
Carrollton, GA                      Bishop Othal H. Lakey, Vice Chair    Attorney Robert L. Bell, Chair
                                                                         Washington, DC
Dr. George C. Bradley, President Bishop Othal H. Lakey, Vice Chair
                                    Atlanta, GA                          Washington, DC
Dr. George C. Bradley, President Atlanta, GA
Augusta, GA                                                              Bishop Marshall Gilmore
Augusta, GA                         Dr. Curtis E. Martin                 Bishop Marshall Gilmore
                                                                         Concord, NC
Mr. Clayton P. Boardman, III        Augusta, E.
                                    Dr. CurtisGA Martin                  Concord, NC
Mr. Clayton P. Boardman, III
Augusta, GA                         Augusta, GA                          Reverend William G. Griffin
Augusta, GA                         Dr. Silas Norman, Jr.                Reverend William G. Griffin
                                                                         Rome, GA
Reverend Gary Dean                  Dr. Silas Norman, Jr.
                                    Bloomfield Hill, MI                  Rome, GA




                                                                                                          BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Representative Dean
Reverend Gary of                    Bloomfield Hill, MI




                                                                                                           BOARD OF TRUSTEES
                                                                         Dr. Ora McConner Jones
Representative of Michael Watson Dr. Okoroafor Nzeh, Faculty Rep
Bishop Benjamin                                                          Dr. Ora McConner Jones
                                                                         Grand Rapids, MI
Bishop Benjamin Michael Watson Dr. Okoroafor Nzeh, Faculty Rep
Augusta, GA                         Paine College                        Grand Rapids, MI
Augusta, GA                         Paine College
                                    Augusta, GA                          DISTINGUISHED
Reverend James Cason                Augusta, GA                          DISTINGUISHED
                                                                         TRUSTEES
Reverend James Cason Statesboro Mrs. Harriet Reid
District Superintendent,                                                 TRUSTEES
                                    Mrs. Harriet
District Superintendent, Statesboro Lizella, GA Reid
The United Methodist Church                                              Mr. Mark C. Callaway
The United GA
Statesboro, Methodist Church        Lizella, GA                          Mr. Mark C. Callaway
                                                                         LaGrange, GA
Statesboro, GA                      Dr. Louise Rice                      LaGrange, GA
Dr. Carmichael Crutchfield          Dr. Louise Rice
                                    Augusta, GA                          Dr. Jessye Norman
Dr. Carmichael Crutchfield
Memphis, TN                         Augusta, GA                          Dr. Jessye Norman
                                                                         Crugers, NY
Memphis, TN                         Rev. Dumas Shelnutt, Jr.             Crugers, NY
Mr. Jamar Day, Student Rep          Rev. Dumas Shelnutt, Jr.
                                    Alpharetta, GA
Student Government Association Alpharetta, GA
Mr. Jamar Day, Student Rep
Student Government Association Mr. Fred Thompson
Dr. Varnell Gaines                  Mr. Fred Thompson
                                    Washington, DC
Dr. Varnell Gaines
Augusta, GA                         Washington, DC
Augusta, GA                         Bishop Benjamin Michael Watson
Reverend Dr. Paul Gardner           (Representative: Michael Watson
                                    Bishop BenjaminRev. James Cason)
Williams Dr. Paul
Reverend MemorialGardner            (Representative: Rev. James Cason)
                                    Macon, GA
Williams Memorial Church
Christian Episcopal                 Macon, GA
Augusta, Episcopal Church
Christian GA
Augusta, GA
Dr. Venola Hill
Dr. Venola Hill MD
Fort Washington,
Fort Washington, MD
Mr. Wayne B. Kendall
Mr. WayneGAKendall
East Point, B.
East Point, GA
Bishop James R. King, Jr.
Bishop James R. King, Jr.
Resident Bishop
Resident Bishop
Macon, GA
Macon, GA
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                                                                       Professor; B.A., 1998, Beulah Heights Bible
                                                          FACULTY      LaTangela     Coleman-Crossfield,  Assistant
          College; Ed. D., Mellon University. January 20022009-2011    1990, Ohio University. August 2001
          B.A., Georgia Southern University; M.A. Augusta
          Arthur Holmes, Assistant Professor of History;               Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D.,
                                                                       1974, University of North Florida; M.A., 1977,
          C. P. Abubucker, Associate Professor of                      College,    M.A.      1999,     Interdenominational
                                                                       Don Cleary, Assistant Professor of Drama; B.A.,
          Mathematics; B.S., 1969, University of Kerala;
          January 2003                                                 Theological Center Seminary, D.A. H., 2008, Clark
          M.S., 1971, University of Calicut; M.A., 1982,
          Seminary; Ph. D., 1997, LaSalle University.                  Atlanta University. August 2008
                                                                       2007, Argosy University. August 2000
          Ph.D., 1984, University of Georgia. August 1984
          University; M. Div., 2001, Gammon Theological
                                                                       M.B.A., 2000, Alabama A & M University; D.B.A.,
          B.A., 1962, Paine College; M.A., 1969, Atlanta               Christine Crockett, Instructor of Education and
          Sharon Alber-Honoree, Associate Professor of                 GEDC Counselor/Advisor; B.A., 1970, Paine
          Doris Harvey, Assistant Professor of Religion;               Administration; B.S., 1998, Auburn University;
          Mass Communications; B.A., 1977, Southern                    College; M.Ed., 1981, University of South Carolina.
                                                                       Tina Y. Cardenas, Assistant Professor of Business
          University and A& M College, M.A., 1987,
          1987, Howard University School of Law. May 2008              August 1969
          Southern Univeristy and A&M College, M.A., 1989,
          B.A., 1984, University of North Carolina, J.D.,              August 1999
          University of Iowa, Ph.D., 1995, University of Iowa.
          Administration, Special Assistant to the Provost;            Arvind Darji, Assistant Professor of Physics; B.S.,
                                                                       1987, M.S. Ed., 1997, City College of New York.
          September 2008.
          Ava Greene-Bedden, Assistant Profess or Business             1961, M.SC., 1963, Gujarat University; Ph.D., 1968,
                                                                       Oscar Brown, Assistant Professor of Reading; B.A.,
                                                                       University of Baroda. August 2000
          Komala Balakrishnan, Assistant Professor of
          Carolina State University. September 2000                    Florida State University. August 2007
          Mathematics and Coordinator of Mathematics and
          B.A., 1970, Benedict College; M.Ed., 1981, South             Maria Deal, Assistant Professor of Spanish; B.S.,
                                                                       M.B.A., 1986, Clark Atlanta University, M.S., 2006,
          Computer Science; B.S., 1971, M.S., 1973, Stella
          Associate Director/Counselor of Upward Bound;                1978, University of Panama; B.A., 1996, University
                                                                       Information Systems; B.S., 1981, Purdue University,
          Maris College. August 1989
          Herbert Gerald, Instructor of Education and                  of Panama; M.A., 2004; Florida International
                                                                       Keely Britton-Whigham, Assistant Professor of
                                                                       University; Ph.D., August 2005
          Earnestine H. Bell, Instructor of Mathematics and            Eronini E. Egbujor, Assistant Professor of French;




                                                                                                                              faculty
          January 1980                                                 University of Alberta. August 2005
faculty




          Director of General Education Support Services;
          of Alabama; M.B.A., 1986, Augusta College.                   B.A., 1978, Université - du Benin; M.A., 1980,
                                                                       M.A., 2000, Simon Fraser University; Ph.D., 2007,
          B.S., 1964, Paine College; M.A., 1972, Morgan
          University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 1979, University          Ph.D., 1988, Université de Sherbrooke. September
                                                                       Norwegian University of Science and Technology
          State University. September 1971
          B.A., 1972, University of Cameroon; M.S., 1976,              1998
                                                                       B.A., 1992, University of Ghana; M. Phil., 1997,
          Elias E. Étingé, Associate Professor of Psychology;          Paul Boaheng, Assistant Professor of Philosophy;
          Paul Boaheng, Assistant Professor of Philosophy;             Elias E. Étingé, Associate Professor of Psychology;
          B.A., 1992, University of Ghana; M. Phil., 1997,
          1998                                                         B.A., 1972, University of Cameroon; M.S., 1976,
                                                                       State University. September 1971
          Norwegian University of Science and Technology
          Ph.D., 1988, Université de Sherbrooke. September             University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 1979, University
                                                                       B.S., 1964, Paine College; M.A., 1972, Morgan
          M.A., 2000, Simon Fraser University; Ph.D., 2007,
          B.A., 1978, Université - du Benin; M.A., 1980,               of Alabama; M.B.A., 1986, Augusta College.
                                                                       Director of General Education Support Services;
          University of Alberta. August 2005
          Eronini E. Egbujor, Assistant Professor of French;           January 1980
                                                                       Earnestine H. Bell, Instructor of Mathematics and
          University; Ph.D., August 2005
          Keely Britton-Whigham, Assistant Professor of
          of Panama; M.A., 2004; Florida International                 Herbert Gerald, Instructor of Education and
                                                                         Maris College. August 1989
          Information Systems; B.S., 1981, Purdue University,
          1978, University of Panama; B.A., 1996, University           Associate Director/Counselor of Upward Bound;
                                                                         Computer Science; B.S., 1971, M.S., 1973, Stella
          M.B.A., 1986, Clark Atlanta University, M.S., 2006,
          Maria Deal, Assistant Professor of Spanish; B.S.,            B.A., 1970, Benedict College; M.Ed., 1981, South
                                                                         Mathematics and Coordinator of Mathematics and
          Florida State University. August 2007                        Carolina State University. September 2000
                                                                         Komala Balakrishnan, Assistant Professor of
          University of Baroda. August 2000
          Oscar Brown, Assistant Professor of Reading; B.A.,
          1961, M.SC., 1963, Gujarat University; Ph.D., 1968,          Ava Greene-Bedden, Assistant Profess or Business
                                                                       September 2008.
          1987, M.S. Ed., 1997, City College of New York.
          Arvind Darji, Assistant Professor of Physics; B.S.,          Administration, Special Assistant to the Provost;
                                                                       University of Iowa, Ph.D., 1995, University of Iowa.
          August 1999                                                  B.A., 1984, University of North Carolina, J.D.,
                                                                       Southern Univeristy and A&M College, M.A., 1989,
          August 1969                                                  1987, Howard University School of Law. May 2008
                                                                       University and A& M College, M.A., 1987,
          Tina Y. Cardenas, Assistant Professor of Business
          College; M.Ed., 1981, University of South Carolina.          Mass Communications; B.A., 1977, Southern
          Administration; B.S., 1998, Auburn University;
          GEDC Counselor/Advisor; B.A., 1970, Paine                    Doris Harvey, Assistant Professor of Religion;
                                                                       Sharon Alber-Honoree, Associate Professor of
          Christine Crockett, Instructor of Education and
          M.B.A., 2000, Alabama A & M University; D.B.A.,              B.A., 1962, Paine College; M.A., 1969, Atlanta
          2007, Argosy University. August 2000                         University; M. Div., 2001, Gammon Theological
                                                                       Ph.D., 1984, University of Georgia. August 1984
          Atlanta University. August 2008                              Seminary; Ph. D., 1997, LaSalle University.
                                                                       M.S., 1971, University of Calicut; M.A., 1982,
          Theological Center Seminary, D.A. H., 2008, Clark
          Don Cleary, Assistant Professor of Drama; B.A.,              January 2003
                                                                       Mathematics; B.S., 1969, University of Kerala;
          College,    M.A.      1999,     Interdenominational          C. P. Abubucker, Associate Professor of
          1974, University of North Florida; M.A., 1977,
          Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D.,            Arthur Holmes, Assistant Professor of History;
          1990, Ohio University. August 2001                           B.A., Georgia Southern University; M.A. Augusta
                                                          2009-2011    College; Ed. D., Mellon University. January 2002
          LaTangela     Coleman-Crossfield,  Assistant    FACULTY
          Professor; B.A., 1998, Beulah Heights Bible
                                                                 187
                                                                 186
Page 188
Paine College                              Faculty                                              Paine College
                                                                                                    Page 187
Washington I. Holmes, Assistant Professor of
Music; B.A., 1984, University of South Carolina;             Martin R. Kirby, Professor of English; B.A., 1965,
M.M., 1987, University of Michigan. August 1991              Tulane University; M.A., 1966, Johns Hopkins
                                                             University; Ph.D., 1987, University of South
Matthew Hutcherson, Assistant Professor of                   Carolina. August 1989
Philosophy; B.A., 1980, Atlanta Christian College;
M.A., 1987, Georgia State University; M.T.S., 1988,          William F. Lawless, Professor of Mathematics and
Emory University; Ph. D., 2000, The Union                    Psychology; B.S., 1970, M.S., 1977, Louisiana State
Institute. January 2003                                      University; Ph.D., 1992, Virginia Polytechnic
                                                             Institute and State University. September 1983
Ronald Jenke, Assistant Professor of Biology; B.S.,
1967, Mankota State University; M.S., 1971,                  Noel J. Makidi, Associate Professor of History and
University of Wisconsin. August 2004                         Political Science, Chair, Division of Social Science
                                                             and Director of International Studies ; B.A., 1965,
Linda C. Jolly, Associate Professor and Interim              M.A., 1967, L’Université Official du Congo; M.A.,
Chair, Division of Humanities; M.S., 1973,                   1972, Temple University; Ph.D., 1979, The Union
University of Delaware, Ph.D., United States                 Graduate School. August 1996
International University – San Diego, 1981.
                                                             Tina Marshall-Bradley, Professor of Education,
Frank Johnson, Assistant Professor and                       Special Assistant to the Provost; B.S., 1983, College
Coordinator of Mass Communications; B.A., 1973,              of Charleston, M.S., 1987, Nova Southeastern
Clark College; M.A., 1975 and Ph.D., 1983,                   University, Ph.D., 1992, Iowa State University.
Bowling Greene State University. April, 2009                 January 2008

Richard J. Johnson, II, Instructor of Education;             Curtis E. Martin, Professor of Education and
B.S., 1967, Benedict College; M.Ed., 1982, South             Provost/Vice President of Academic Affairs; B.S.,
Carolina State University; Ed. Sp., 1991, Augusta            1972, Ashland College; M.S., 1973, Ph. D., 1979,
State University. January 1999                               The Ohio State University. August 2003

Cheryl Evans Jones, Associate Professor of                   Rhonda       McCoy,     Information    Curriculum
Psychology and Executive Assistant to the                    Specialist, B.A., 1998, Augusta State University;
President/Title III Coordinator; B.A., 1977, Fisk            M.S.F.E., 2001 Troy State University. August 2001
University; M.A., 1982, Ph.D., 1988, Ohio State
University. January 1993                                     Judy McPherson, Associate Professor of Biology;
                                                             B.A., 1971, Incarnate Word College; M. Ed., 1978,
Robert L. Jones, Assistant Professor of History;             Ph. D., 1982, Texas A&M University. August 2003
B.A.;, 1967, Paine College; M.A., 1973, East Texas
University. August 2003                                      Bibekanada Mohanty, Associate Professor of
                                                             Biology; B.S., 1964, M.S., 1966, Orissa University-
Reuben Kesler, Jr., Associate Professor of                   Agriculture and Technology; M.A., 1970, Oberlin
Mathematics and Chair, Division of Natural                   College; Ph.D., 1976, University of Oklahoma.
Sciences and Mathematics; B.S., 1963, Morehouse              August 1990
College; M.S., 1965, Atlanta University; Ed. D.,
1985, University of Georgia. September 1969                  Purna C. Mohanty, Professor and Coordinator of
                                                             Sociology; B.A., 1963, M.A., 1966, Utkal
Ellen C. King, Instructor of Education and Director,         University; Ph.D., 1977, University of Georgia.
Fort Gordon Resident Center; B.S., 1975, M.A.,               September 1980
1981, Norfolk State University. November 1990
                                                             C.R. Nair, Associate Professor of Chemistry and
Macie King, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of           Director, UNCF/SEEDS Program; B.S., 1964, S.N.
Religion; B.A., 1975, M.A., 1977 Governor’s State            College, Kerala University; M.S., 1966, Ph.D., 1970,
University;    M.     Div.,    1987,     Gammon              Allahabad University. January 1995
Interdenominational Theological Center; D. Min.,
1996, United Theological Seminary. June 1999
                                                       188
Page 189
Page 188                                  Faculty                                             Paine College
                                                                                              Paine College
Fidelia Nzeh, Instructor of Computer Science; B.S.,         Alireza Shekasteband, Assistant Professor of
1982, M.B.A., 1984, Alabama A & M University;               Mathematics and Computer Science; B.S., 1995,
M.S., 1995, Clark Atlanta University. August 2000           University of Carolina M.S., 1999, University of
                                                            South Carolina, Ph. D., 2002, IUT. August 2004
Okoroafor O. Nzeh, Associate Professor of
Information Systems and Chair, Division of                  Elizabeth Sciliano, Instructor of English; B.A.,
Business Administration; B.S., 1980, M.S.,1983,             1974, Augusta State University, M.A., 2005, Seton
M.B.A., 1988, Alabama A & M University; Ph.D.,              Hill University. Augusta 2008
1994, Clark Atlanta University. August 1996
                                                            Alice M. Simpkins, Assistant Professor of
Adeleri Onisegun, Associate Professor and                   Mathematics and Computer Science and Director of
Coordinator of Psychology; B.A., 1973, Fordham              Institutional Research; B.S., 1970, Paine College;
University; M.A., 1979, Ph.D., 1990, Adelphi                M.A., 1972, Morgan State University; M.S., 1985,
University. August 2007                                     Atlanta University. September 1972

Vincent Onyebuchi, Assistant Professor of                   Cathy Simpkins, Counselor of General Educational
Business Administration and Accounting; B.S.,               Support Services; B.S., 2002, Paine College; M.Ed.,
1978, University of Arkansas, Pine Bluff; M.B.A.,           2002, Troy State University. August 2005
1978, East Texas State University; Ph. D., 2004,
Argosy University. August 2000                              Stanley Singleton, Associate Director of General
                                                            Education Support Services; B.A., 2001, Mercer
Carole D. Overton, Instructor of Education and              University; M.P.A., 2004, Troy State University.
Director, Tutorial and Enrichment Center, B.A.,             August 2004
1973, William Smith College; M.A., 1974, Teachers
College, Columbia University; Sixth Year Diploma,           Marva L. Stewart, Assistant Professor and
1987, University of Connecticut; M.A., 1991,                Coordinator of English and Foreign Languages;
Trinity College. August 1992                                B.A., 1974, Paine College; M.A., 1978, Atlanta
                                                            University. September 1979
Edgar T. Rideout Jr., Assistant Professor of Mass
Communications; B.A., 1987, The Pennsylvania                J. Derek Stone, Assistant Professor of Biology;
State University; M.A., 1990, Point Park College.           Coordinator of Biology and Chemistry; and
August 2003                                                 Director, Pre-Professional Sciences Program; B.S.,
                                                            1992, Valdosta State University; Ph.D., 1999,
Major Karen Roe, Major U.S. Army and Chair,                 Medical College of Georgia. August 2000
Department of Military Science (ASU); B.S., 1992,
U. S. Military Academy, M.S.A., 2004, Central               Gabriel Swenson, Assistant Professor of Biology;
Michigan, M.A., 2005, Naval War College. August             B.S., 2003, Augusta State University; M.S., 2006,
2009                                                        Georgia State University. August 2006

Laura      Rychly,     Assistant   Professor  of            A. Ali Syed, Associate Professor of Psychology;
Reading/Education; B.S.Ed., 2004, M.S.Ed., 2005,            B.S., 1958, B. Ed., 1960, M.S., 1961, Dacca
University of Georgia. August 2007                          University; M.A., 1972, Ed. D., 1975, University of
                                                            Northern Colorado. August 1975
Amina Sharif, Assistant Professor of Mathematics
and Director of Mathematics Support Center; B.A.,           Philip Thomas, Professor of Sociology; B.S., 1967,
1975, Kabul University; M. Ed., 1983, University of         University of Kerala; M.A., 1973, Atlanta
South Western Louisiana. January 2003                       University; Ph.D., 1983, Emory University. August
                                                            1976
Jonaid Sharif, Associate Professor of Philosophy
and Religion and Assessment Coordinator; B.A.,              Hui-Lien Tung, Assistant Professor of Mathematics
1972, American University of Beruit; M.A., 1980,            and Computer Science; B.A., 1987, Soochow
University of Iowa; Ph.D., 1984, University of              University; M. Ed., 1990, National Louise
Louisiana. August 2002                                      University; M. S., 2000, University of Albany.
                                                            August 2004
                                                      189
Page 190
Paine College                             Faculty                                             Paine College
                                                                                                  Page 189
                                                            Jacquelyn Wilson, Instructor of Education and
Shafique Warsi, Assistant Professor of Business             Associate Director/Counselor for Student Support
Administration; B.S., 1971, Aligarh Muslim                  Services; B.A., 1979, Clark College; M.A., 1981,
University; M.S., M.B.A., 1977, Atlanta University.         Atlanta University. January 1982
September 1977
                                                            Virginia Wright, Assistant Professor of English and
Ellen White-Khazrai, Assistant Professor of                 Reading; B.A., Paine College, 1966, M.Ed., 1978,
English and SPEE Director; M.A., 1988, B.S., 1982,          Augusta State University. August 1999
AAB, 1981 The University of Toledo. September
2001                                                        Sardar Yousufzai, Assistant Professor of
                                                            Chemistry; B.S., 1967, Agra University; M.S., 1971,
Edward Wilson, Assistant Professor of English;              U. P. Agriculture University; M. Phil., 1975, Ph.D.,
B.A., 1968, Eckerd College; M.A., 1974, University          1977, Aligarh Muslim University. August 2000
of Florida. January 2003


              FACULTY EMERITI

Roy C. DeLamotte, Professor of Philosophy and               Quincy L. Robertson, Instructor of Education and
Religion; A.B., Millsaps College; B.D., Emory               Vice President for Administration and Fiscal
University; Ph.D., Yale University. September               Affairs; B.A., M.S., Tennessee State University.
1961-May 1988                                               June 1968-December 1999

Ellen Hopson Douglas, Assistant Professor of                Vivian U. Robinson, Professor of English; B.A.,
Music; B.S., Fort Valley State College; M.A.,               Lane College; M.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D.,
Columbia University. September 1970-May 1988                University of Nebraska. September 1966-May 1989

Millie M. Parker, Assistant Professor of Library            Julius S. Scott, Jr., Professor of Sociology and
Science and Head Librarian; B.A., Paine College;            President Emeritus of the College; A.B., Wiley
M.S.L.S., Atlanta University. September 1955-May            College; B.D., Garrett Theological Seminary; A.M.,
1992                                                        Brown University; Ph.D., Boston University.
                                                            January 1975-June 1982; August 1988-June 1994

                                                            Ada Williams, Assistant Professor of Library
                                                            Science and Reader Services Librarian; B.S., Fort
                                                            Valley State College; M.S.L.S., Atlanta University.
                                                            September 1965-May 1990




                                                      190
                                                                                      191
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                                                            ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS AND STAFF
                                                            Charles Franklin                         Information Assistant (part-time)
                                                            Madhumita Mohanty, B.A.                 Computer Lab Assistant (part-time)
                                                            Roderick Yarborough, A.A.               Information Services Assistant
                                                                        OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
Administrative Officers and staff




                                                            Rogelio Colon Jr., B.S.                 Computer Lab Technician
                                                            Gloria Brodie, B. A.                    Catalog Assistant
                                    George C. Bradley, Ph. D.                    President




                                                                                                                                                Administrative Officers and staff
                                                            Roosevelt Bridges                       Information Services/Audiovisuals
                                    Juanita Harps           Rosa Martin, B. S.   Administrative Assistant/Office Mgr.
                                                                                                    Learning Resources Center Manager
                                    Theresa Bartley                              Administrative Assistant
                                                            Gilda Brathwaite, B.A.                  Circulation Manager
                                                            Patricia Daniels                        Administrative Assistant
                                    Cheryl Evans-Jones, Ph. D.                   Executive Assistant to the President/ Title III Coordinator
                                                            Rhonda McCoy, M.S.F.E.                  Information Curriculum Specialist
                                    Lois Hayes              Alana Lewis, M.S.L.S.Administrative Assistant
                                                                                                    Collections Management Librarian
                                                            Lyn Dennison, M.L.                      Director
                                    Office of Religious LifeCollins-Callaway Library (and Learning Resources Center)
                                    Luther Felder, D. Min.                       Campus Pastor
                                    Macie King, D. Min.
                                    Administrative Secretary                     Wesley Fellowship Director             Geraldine D’Antignac
                                    Jacqueline Connie                            Administrative Assistant
                                    Admissions Jenzabar Coordinator/Administrative Assistant                            Shirley Bradley
                                    Admissions Counselor/Recruiter                                                      Kellie Tiller, B.A.
                                    Sr. Admissions Counselor/Recruiter      ACADEMIC AFFAIRS                            Alton Walker, B. A.
                                    Director                                                                            Joseph Tinsley, B. A.
                                    Curtis E. Martin, Ph.D.                      Provost/Vice President                 Office of Admissions
                                    Vacant                                       Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs
                                    Ava Greene Bedden, Esq.
                                                 Administrative Assistant        Special Assistant to the Provost     Patrice Oates
                                    Tina Marshall-Bradley                        Special Assistant to the Provost
                                                 Administrative Assistant/Office Manager                              Shannon Gibson
                                    Nichole Evans                                Youth Services Internship Coordinator
                                                 Youth Services Internship Coordinator                                Nichole Evans
                                    Shannon Gibson                               Administrative Assistant/Office Manager
                                                 Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs                         Vacant
                                    Patrice OatesProvost/Vice President          Administrative Assistant             Curtis E. Martin, Ph.D.

                                    Office of Admissions                    ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
                                    Joseph Tinsley, B. A.                        Director
                                    Alton Walker, B. A.                          Sr. Admissions Counselor/Recruiter
                                    Kellie Tiller, B.A.                          Admissions Counselor/Recruiter
                                                                    Administrative Assistant                        Jacqueline Connie
                                    Shirley Bradley                              Admissions Jenzabar Coordinator/Administrative Assistant
                                                                    Wesley Fellowship Director                      Macie King, D. Min.
                                    Geraldine D’Antignac            Campus PastorAdministrative Secretary           Luther Felder, D. Min.
                                                                                                                    Office of Religious Life
                                    Collins-Callaway Library (and Learning Resources Center)
                                    Lyn Dennison, M.L.
                                     Administrative Assistant               Director                              Lois Hayes
                                    Alana Lewis, M.S.L.S.                   Collections Management Librarian
                                     Executive Assistant to the President/ Title III Coordinator                  Cheryl Evans-Jones, Ph. D.
                                    Rhonda McCoy, M.S.F.E.                  Information Curriculum Specialist
                                    Patricia Daniels                        Administrative Assistant
                                                            Administrative Assistant                               Theresa Bartley
                                    Gilda Brathwaite, B.A.                  Circulation Manager
                                                            Administrative Assistant/Office Mgr.                   Juanita Harps
                                    Rosa Martin, B. S.      President       Learning Resources Center Manager      George C. Bradley, Ph. D.
                                    Roosevelt Bridges                       Information Services/Audiovisuals
                                    Gloria Brodie, B. A.                    Catalog Assistant
                                                                        OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
                                    Rogelio Colon Jr., B.S.                 Computer Lab Technician
                                    Roderick Yarborough, A.A.               Information Services Assistant
                                    Madhumita Mohanty, B.A.                 Computer Lab Assistant (part-time)
                                                            ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS AND STAFF
                                    Charles Franklin                         Information Assistant (part-time)
                                                                                      191
                                                                                      190
Page 192
Paine College                   Administrative Officers and Staff       Paine College
                                                                            Page 191


Division of Business Administration
Okoroafor Nzeh, Ph. D.                   Chair
Pamela McLean                            Secretary

Division of Education
Steve Thomas, Ph. D.                     Chair
Nikki Gibbs                              Secretary

Division of Humanities
Linda Jolly, Ph. D.                      Interim Chair
Alberta Dunn                             Secretary

Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
Reuben Kesler, Jr., Ed.D.               Chair
Uzetta Gresham                          Administrative Assistant
Mary Beth Brady                         Administrative Assistant

Division of Social Sciences
Noel Makidi, Ph. D.                      Chair
Jacqueline Dawson                        Secretary

Fort Gordon Resident Center
Ellen Childress King, M. A.              Director
Johnathan Fisher                         Administrative Assistant

General Education Support Services
Earnestine Bell, M. A.                   Director

General Education Development Center
Stanley Singleton, M.P.A.                Associate Director/Counselor
Christine Crockett, M.Ed.                Director/Test Skills Center
Cathy Simpkins, M.Ed.                    Counselor
Jacquelyn Brown                          Secretary

Student Support Services
Jacquelyn Wilson, M. A.                  Associate Director/Counselor
Chellita Williams Carlyle                Administrative Secretary

Upward Bound
Herbert Gerald, M.Ed.                    Associate Director/Counselor
LaKendra Brown, M.Ed.                    Counselor
Nancy English                            Secretary

Honors Program
Tina Marshall-Bradley, Ph.D.             Director

International Studies Program
Noel J. K. Makidi, Ph. D.                Director
Page 193
Page 192                        Administrative Officers and Staff              Paine College
                                                                               Paine College


Military Science (ROTC)
Major Karen Roe                          Chair/ASU
Major Raymond Short                      Scholarships/Enrollment
MST John Wallace                         Senior Military Science Instructor
SFC Tony Davis                           Military Science Instructor

Pre-Professional Sciences Program
J. Derek Stone, Ph.D.                    Director
Mary Beth Brady                          Administrative Assistant

Dr. Mack Gipson, Jr., Tutorial and Enrichment Center
Carole D. Overton, M. A.                 Director
Cynthia Frazier-Edwards, A. A. S.        Administrative Assistant
Sezilee E. Reid, Ph.D.                   Education Specialist
Joyce Kaverenge                          Professional Writing/Reading Tutor
vacant                                   Professional Science Tutor
vacant                                   Professional Math Tutor

Undergraduate to Graduate Program
Tina Marshall-Bradley, Ph.D.             Director
Vacant                                   Secretary


                                     STUDENT AFFAIRS

Eric Jackson, Ph. D.                     Vice President
Lynda Jenkins                            Administrative Assistant

Athletics
Ronnie Spry                              Athletic Director/Head Men’s Basketball Coach
Willie Adams                             Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach
Selina Bynum-Kohn                        Sr. Women’s Administrator/Associate Athletic
                                             Director/Head Women’s Volleyball Coach
Zack Howard                              Head Women’s Softball Coach
Selina Bynum-Kohn                        Head Women’s Volleyball Coach
Zack Howard                              Asst. Women’s Volleyball Coach
Pete Cardenas                            Head Men’s Baseball Coach\Compliance Officer
Carlos McNair, B.A.                      Head Men’s Track/Cross-Country Coach
Kimberly May, B.S.                       Sport Information Director
Hoover Johnson                           Head Men’s Golf Coach\Head Women’s Track/Cross-
                                             Country Coach
Terrance Palmer                          Head Women’s Basketball Coach/Head Softball Coach

Career Services
Deloris Crooms                           Director
Willie Mae Allen                         Administrative Assistant
Page 194
Paine College                Administrative Officers and Staff                 Paine College
                                                                                   Page 193

Counseling Center
Ragan Summers, M.Ed.                 Director
vacant                               Counselor
vacant                               Counselor/International Student Advisor
Valeria Day                          Administrative Assistant

Health Services
Benjamin Rucker, M.D.                College Physician
Harriet Jones, L.P.N.                College Nurse

Residence Life
Michael Grant, M.S.                  Director
Angela Barnes                        Residence Director
Lorna Cherry                         Residence Director
Micah Hines, B.A.                    Residence Director, Coordinator of Special Projects
Telethia Gilbert, M.S.               Residence Director
Ronnie Ingram, B.S.                  Residence Director
Chris Blue, B.S.                     Residence Director/coordinator of Intramural Sports
Nanuh Paye, BA                       Residence Director/Assistant coordinator of Special
                                        Projects
William Stephens                     Residence Director
Valeria Day                          Administrative Assistant

Student Activities
Vacant                               Director
Valeria Day                          Administrative Assistant

                         ADMINISTRATIVE AND FISCAL AFFAIRS

O’Neal Robinson                      Vice President
vacant                               Controller
Larry Floyd                          Assistant Controller/Perkins Loan Officer
Dorothy Allen                        Bookkeeper
Esther B. Clark                      Information/Switchboard Operator
Jacqueline Farrell                   Human Resources/Payroll Manager
Frankie Riley                        Accounts Receivable Clerk
Petula Fluellen                      Administrative Assistant
Zina Diggs                           Accounts Payable Clerk
Burshunda Harden                     Grants Manager/Real Estate Officer/Administrant Assistant

Campus Bookstore
Sonya Jones                          Manager

Campus Safety
James Reid                           Chief
Margaret Whitaker                    Lieutenant
Robert Bauknight                     Sergeant
Darlene Smith                        Sergeant
George Whetstone                     Sergeant
Page 195
Page 194                    Administrative Officers and Staff                 Paine College
                                                                              Paine College

Courtney Gresham                    Sergeant
Lorenzo Heggs                       F.T.O.
Earnest Terry                       F.T.O.
Charlie Woodley                     Officer
Alexcia Curtis                      Officer
Tommie Howard                       Officer
James Jamison                       Officer


Central Processing
Patricia Ramsey                     Director
Samuel Daniels                      Assistant to the Director

Office of Financial Aid
Gerri Bogan, B.B.A.                 Director
Willie M. Boler                     Financial Aid Counselor
Antonia Chapman                     Financial Aid Officer
Angela Mitchell                     Financial Aid Assistant
Melissa Mendez                      Receptionist

Food Services
Kevin Kelly                         Director

Post Office
Willie Thompson                     Manager
Odenathus El                        Assistant Manager

Physical Plant
Yewston Curry                       Director
John Ware                           Assistant Director/Events Coordinator
Calvin Cotledge                     Housekeeping Supervisor
                                    Administrative Secretary

Registration and Records
Carolyn Martin                      Registrar
Gayle McLaughlin                    Administrative Secretary
Felicia Fenner                      Administrative Assistant/Office Manager
Cynthia Hart                        Receptionist


                           INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT

Brandon Brown, B.A.                 Vice President
Francis Wimberly                    Assistant Vice President
Helene Carter                       Assistant Vice President of Development
Reginald Powell                     Research/Development Associate
Cinderella Walker, A.A.             Data Entry Manager
Jennifer Leigh Davis                Administrative Assistant/Office Manager
Page 196
Paine College                Administrative Officers and Staff                Paine College
                                                                                  Page 195

Alumni Relations
Mildred Kendrick, M.A.               Executive Director
Brenda Latson                        Secretary/Data Manager

Institutional Research
Alice M. Simpkins                    Director
Taffica Ryan                         Research and Tracking Assistant

Information Technology Systems
Michael Hicks                        Director
Jeffrey Owens                        Manager
Brody Higgs                          Information Technology Specialist
Tony Wilson                          Information Technology Specialist

Planning and Evaluation
Cheryl Evans-Jones, Ph.D.            Director
Lois Hayes                           Secretary

Public Relations
Natasha Carter                       Director
Vacant                               Assistant Director of Public Relations
Vacant                               Graphics Designer
Kevin Wilson                         Webmaster
                                                         197
                                                         197

                                        NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, OFFICERS



                                                  OFFICERS




                                                                             NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, OFFICERS
                                                      President
                                                    Tampa, FL
                                                 Dr. Silas Norman’62
                                                 Larry Sargent ’69
                                                 Bloomfield Hills, MI
                                              Immediate Past President

                                                  1st Vice President
                                                     Augusta, GA
                                               Sharyn Doanes-Bergin ‘69
                                                 Rev. Leroy James ‘67
                                                     Fairburn, GA
                                                      Chaplain

                                            2nd Vice President, Membership
                                                     Atlanta, GA
                                                 Barbara Burns Hall ‘67
                                                  Charles Mathis ‘55
                                                      Red Oak, GA
                                                  Sergeant-at-Arms

                                               Administrative Secretary
                                                   Hephzibah, GA
                                                 Jacqueline Millender
                                                Rev. Gene R. Dean ‘59
                                                     Augusta, GA
                                                      Treasurer

                                                     Secretary
                                                    Decatur, GA
                                                 Eugene Robinson ‘67
                                                 Eugene Robinson ‘67
                                                    Decatur, GA
                                                     Secretary

                                                      Treasurer
                                                     Augusta, GA
                                                Rev. Gene R. Dean ‘59
                                                 Jacqueline Millender
                                                   Hephzibah, GA
                                               Administrative Secretary

                                                  Sergeant-at-Arms
                                                      Red Oak, GA
                                                  Charles Mathis ‘55
                                                 Barbara Burns Hall ‘67
                                                     Atlanta, GA
                                            2nd Vice President, Membership

                                                      Chaplain
                                                     Fairburn, GA
                                                 Rev. Leroy James ‘67
                                               Sharyn Doanes-Bergin ‘69
                                                     Augusta, GA
                                                  1st Vice President

                                              Immediate Past President
                                                 Bloomfield Hills, MI
                                                 Larry Sargent ’69
                                                 Dr. Silas Norman’62
                                                    Tampa, FL
                                                      President



                                                  OFFICERS
                                        NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

                                                         197
                                                         196
                                                         197
                                                                                    INDEX
                                                                                    INDEX
–A–                                                                                           Church-related Grants..................................................... 30
                                                                                              Church-related Grants..................................................... 85
                                                                                              Clark Atlanta University..................................... 35, 84, 30
–A–
Academic Buildings........................................................18                  Class Attendance ............................................................ 49
                                                                                              Clark Atlanta University..................................... 35, 84, 85
Academic Buildings........................................................18                  Classification (See Student Classification)
                                                                                              Class Attendance ............................................................ 49
Academic Calendars .........................................................3                 Co-enrollment......................................................... 36, 178
Academic Calendars .......................................................54
Academic Dismissal .........................................................3                 Classification (See Student Classification)
Academic Honesty..........................................................52                  College Assembly/Convocation ..................................... 53
                                                                                              Co-enrollment......................................................... 36, 178
Academic Dismissal .......................................................54
Academic Load.......................................................44, 176
Academic Honesty..........................................................52
                                                                                              College Assembly/Convocation ..................................... 18
                                                                                              College Support .............................................................. 53
Academic Programs........................................................61                   Common Curriculum................................................ 46, 47
                                                                                              College Support .............................................................. 18
Academic Load.......................................................44, 176                       Online Courses ........................................................ 28
Academic Progress ...................................................27, 53
Academic Programs........................................................61                   Common Curriculum................................................ 46, 47
Academic Records ..........................................................38                     Online Relations ..................................................... 18
                                                                                              CommunityCourses ........................................................ 28
Academic Progress ...................................................27, 53
Academic Regulations ....................................................44
Academic Records ..........................................................38
                                                                                              Comprehensive Student Fees.......................................... 18
                                                                                              Community Relations ..................................................... 22
                                                                                              Computer Science (See Mathematics/Computer Science)
                                                                                              Comprehensive Student Fees.......................................... 22
Academic Regulations ....................................................44
Academic Standing......................................... 35, 36, 3755
Academic Suspension .........................................37, 55, 56
Academic Standing......................................... 35, 36, 3755
                                                                                              Conceptual Framework,Mathematics/Computer Science)
                                                                                              Computer Science (See The .......................................... 72
Academic Terms ...........................................................176
Academic Suspension .........................................37, 55, 56
                                                                                                  Outcomes................................................................. 72
                                                                                              Conceptual Framework, The .......................................... 72
Accreditation .......................................... 17, 39, 45, 67, 75                       Outcomes................................................................. 74
                                                                                              Conditional Admittance............................................ 34, 72
Academic Terms ...........................................................176                 Conference Course ......................................................... 62
Adding Classes ...............................................................48
Accreditation .......................................... 17, 39, 45, 67, 75                   Conditional Admittance............................................ 34, 74
Administrative Officers and Staff.................................190                         Continuing Education ................................................... 184
                                                                                              Conference Course ......................................................... 62
Adding Classes ...............................................................48
Admissions .............................................................34, 175
Administrative Officers and Staff.................................190
                                                                                              CooperativeEducation ................................................... 184
                                                                                              Continuing Education Program..................................... 63
Advanced Placement ................................................34, 61                     Core Values .................................................................... 17
                                                                                              Cooperative Education Program..................................... 63
Admissions .............................................................34, 175
Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society ....................................59
Advanced Placement ................................................34, 61
                                                                                              Correspondence Courses ................................................ 17
                                                                                              Core Values .................................................................... 64
Appeals ...........................................................................56         Costs ............................. 21, 22, 62, 80, 167, 173, 179, 184
                                                                                              Correspondence Courses ................................................ 64
Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society ....................................59                           Counseling...................................................................... 41
AppealsDisciplinary Actions...........................................52
    Of ...........................................................................56          Costs ............................. 21, 22, 62, 80, 167, 173, 179, 184
    For Academic Dismissals ........................................54
    Of Disciplinary Actions...........................................52
                                                                                                  And Withdrawal ...................................................... 41
                                                                                              Counseling...................................................................... 25
                                                                                              Course Descriptions (alphabetized list) .............................. 140




                                                                                                                                                                                       INDEX
Application Fee.............................................