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2006 Handbook

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2006 Handbook Powered By Docstoc
					Lautoka Teachers’ College




     Handbook
       2006
Prepared at Lautoka Teachers’ College,
December 2005




Handbook Committee
  B. Cava
  K. Chand
  S. Duber
  R Prasad
  A Prasad
                                            CONTENTS


CONTENTS ................................................................................................... 1
PRINCIPAL’S MESSAGE TO STUDENTS.......................................................... 3
LAUTOKA TEACHERS COLLEGE – ROLE AND MISSION ................................ 5
CALENDAR FOR 2006 ................................................................................... 6
STAFF OF THE COLLEGE ............................................................................... 9
LAUTOKA TEACHERS’ COLLEGE HISTORY..................................................13
INFORMATION FOR PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS ..............................................15
GENERAL INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS ....................................................17
SEXUAL HARASSMENT ...............................................................................27
ENRICHMENT PROGRAM .............................................................................30
PROGRAMS AND COURSES ..........................................................................31
PROGRAM STRUCTURE – DIPLOMA OF PRIMARY EDUCATION ....................32
PROGRAM STRUCTURE – ADVANCED CERTIFICATE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
EDUCATION ................................................................................................33
ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT RULES AND PROCEDURES ...................................34
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE ...........................................................................43
COURSE OUTLINES .....................................................................................45
RESEARCH BASED LEARNING .....................................................................57
CONSTITUTION OF LTC STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION .....................................60




                                                   Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006                       1
2   Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
                 PRINCIPAL’S MESSAGE TO STUDENTS

I extend a warm welcome to those of you commencing your studies at the
College. You have taken your first step in what I know will be a
worthwhile and rewarding career.
I also welcome back all second-year students, and look to you particularly
to help our new students to adjust to tertiary study.
Since it was opened in 1977, the Lautoka Teachers’ College has earned an
enviable reputation for the quality of its graduates. Part of the reason for
this comes from the programs we offer which have been progressively
upgraded since their introduction. The introduction this year of the
Advanced Certificate in Early Childhood Education and the Diploma of
Primary Education marks a very large step in our development. These
new programs have been prepared over the last two years by the staff of
the college, assisted by education specialists from across Fiji, as well as
consultants supported by the AusAID funded LTC Upgrade Project.
Over three thousand primary teachers have now graduated from LTC’s
programs. They have established LTC’s reputation in the community.
Many continue to make a positive contribution to primary education in
schools and occupy key leadership positions in the education system. You
inherit their legacy of service and dedication. I urge you to uphold their
very fine tradition and maintain the reputation which the ‘Lautoka touch’
enjoys.
Getting the most out of your time at College will require self-discipline,
dedication and hard work. The academic program is demanding. It sets
out to equip you with the wide range of skills you need to do your job of
preparing the children of this country to face their future with confidence,
equipped with the skills they need to make their way in the world.
As a teacher, you are expected to make a major contribution to the
communities in which you serve. The College recognises this and the
Enrichment Program, introduced this year, sets out to prepare you, quite
deliberately, for this wider role. Make the most of the opportunities and
challenges that the College provides you. You will be amply rewarded.
This year is an exciting one for the College. In addition to new programs
you will have access to the range of modern facilities which will become
available during the year, including a new library, a computer centre and
a large lecture theatre.



                                    Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006    3
    This handbook has been prepared for you. It provides you with important
    information about the College, and particularly about your program of
    study and its courses. It also contains general information about the staff
    of the college, and academic and other policies and procedures you need
    to know and apply. It contains information that students need to know if
    they are to get the most from their time at LTC.
    In welcoming you once again, I offer you my best wishes for a fruitful and
    rewarding academic year.




    Ambika Prasad
    Principal




4   Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
          LAUTOKA TEACHERS COLLEGE – ROLE AND MISSION


VISION
Excellence in Teacher Education


MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of Lautoka Teachers College is:
     To equip graduates of its programs to begin their job as effective
     beginning teachers, and to recognise and demonstrate that student
     learning is at the hear of everything they do.


STRATEGIES
1.   Implement the policies of Ministry of Education on teacher education.

2.   Formulate Planning and Organisation of Supervisory programs for the
     effective implementation and evaluation of all aspects of College
     activities.

3.   Ensure the effective and efficient preparation and training of primary
     school teachers through teaching, tutoring, counselling and formation.

4.   Make recommendations to the Ministry of Education, through its Board
     of Governors on student selection policies and on effective recruitment
     and selection procedures both of students and staff of the college.

5.   Attend to and evaluate the needs for continuous professional and
     academic development of all staff members.

6.   Ensure the effective and efficient use of both human and material
     resources in the college.

7.   Provide links with various organisations for exchange of ideas and keep
     abreast with the societal views, expectations and aspirations.




                                       Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   5
                                  CALENDAR FOR 2006
    JANUARY
    18      Shortlisting for Diploma interviews completed
    20      CEO to approve interview list
    23      College re-opens/Staff meeting
    24      Academic Board meeting/Hostel meeting
    25      Interview DPE shortlisted applicants
    30      2nd Yr boarders return to college/Leader Group meeting
    31  2nd Yr DPE lectures begin
    FEBRUARY
        7   ACECE/1st Yr DPE enrolment and orientation
    13      Lectures begin for ACECE/1st Yr DPE
    15      Staff meeting
    16      Leader Group meeting
    27  Supplementary exams
    MARCH
    15      Course materials for Semesters 2 and 4 ready for printing
    16      Leader Group meeting
    17      Supplementary exams
    20      2nd Yr DPE Professional Practice begins/Staff meeting
    21    Academic Board meeting
    APRIL
    10      Prophet Mohammed’s Birthday
    13      Leader Group meeting
    14      Good Friday
    17      Easter Monday
    20      Staff meeting
    28  2nd Yr DPE Professional Practice ends/1st Term for schools ends
    MAY
    5       National Youth Day
    10      Exam papers due
    11      Leader Group meeting
    15      2nd Term for schools begins
            ACECE Professional Practice begins
    22      Staff meeting/Course evaluations for Semester 1 due

6   Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
24    Examinations – ACECE/DPE
25    Academic Board meeting
26    ACECE Professional Practice ends
29   Ratu Sir Lala Sukuna Day
JUNE
1     Leader Group meeting
2     End of semester for studies
5     Marking week
8     Academic Board meeting
12   Commencement of break for staff/Queen’s Birthday
JULY
3     College re-opens for Semester 2/Staff meeting
4     Lectures begin for all students
5     Academic Board meeting
20  Leader Group meeting
AUGUST
10    Staff meeting
18    2nd Terms for schools e3nds
19    Staff meeting
24   Leader Group meeting
SEPTEMBER
8     Staff meeting
11    Mid-semester break staff and students
18    1st and 2nd Yr DPE Professional Practice begins
21  Course materials – Semester 1 2007 – revised and submitted for printing/
    Leader Group meeting
OCTOBER
2     ACECE Professional Practice begins/Staff meeting
4     Posting Preference Forms sent to CEO – 2nd Yr DPE + ACECE
5     Exam papers – 2nd Yr DPE
6     1st Yr Professional Practice ends
9     Fiji Day
19    Leader Group meeting
20    1st Yr + ACECE exam papers due
21    Diwali
28    2nd Yr DPE + ACECE Professional Practice ends

                                          Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   7
    NOVEMBER
    2     Semester 2 DPE + ACECE course evaluations completed
    3     Academic Board meeting
    6     2nd Yr examinations
    8     Graduation certificates to CEO for signature
    9     Staff meeting
    10    2nd Yr break/Academic Board meeting
    13    1st Yr + ACECE examinations
    14    Board of Survey
    16    Leader Group meeting
    17    1st Yr vacation begins
    20    Community work week
    23    Academic Board meeting
    24    Graduation Dinner
    28  Graduation/students check out
    DECEMBER
    1     College closes




8   Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
                           STAFF OF THE COLLEGE
PRINCIPAL           AMBIKA PRASAD BSc G Cert Ed S.Pac, PG Cert Mgm’t
                    Flinders PG Cert. Tertiary Teaching S Pac
VICE PRINCIPAL      RAMESHWAR PRASAD , MA S.Pac BA Hons (Geog)
                    Gold Medalist Panjab, ., BA Mangt. S.Pac, BEd S.Pac,, PG
                    Cert in Teaching S Pac, PG Dip.Tertiary Teaching S Pac,
                    PG Dip.Ed S Pac ,Dip.Legal S.Pac, Dip Leadership Florida
                    Cert.Admin.St. S Pac, TCert LTC,,

                       SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
HEAD OF SCHOOL      VILISI WAISALE DipEd, BEd S.Pac, PG DipEd Deakin,
                    PG Cert. Tertiary Teaching S Pac
LECTURERS           UFEMIA CAMAITOGA DipECE. Wellington TC, NZ
                    FKUDip (Early Childhood Education) (Acting)
                    BIU CAVA TCert, NTC, BEd. S.Pac, (Early Childhood
                    Education) (Acting)
                    ANOOP KUMAR TCert NTC, DipEd Admin, BEd S.Pac,
                    Cert Comp Mgt & Mtce, TechEduc Ltka (Audio Visual
                    Aids)
                    LAVINIA TIKO TCert LTC, BEd, G.DipEd Leadership
                    Waikato (Curriculum and Assessment), MA (Education –
                    Early Years) London UK (Acting)
                    SITERI VAKACEREIVALU TCert NTC, PG DipSpEd
                    MSpEd Deakin (Special Education), PG Cert. Tertiary
                    Teaching S Pac
                    TANELA RARATABU BEd (Primary), DipEdEvaluation
                    S.Pac, TCert NTC

                 SCHOOL OF LANGUAGE AND LITERACY
HEAD OF SCHOOL      SAMUELA TUINABUA TCert NTC, BA S.Pac, Dip TESL
                    Victoria
LECTURERS           MOSESE NATUILAGILAGI BA, DipEd, Cert in Pacific
                    Language Study, S.Pac (English) (Acting)
                    KAMLESH K.CHAND TCert, LTC, BEd, DipEd Eval, BA
                    (Education & Pacifc Vernacular) S.Pac, Dip Hindi Delhi
                    (Hindi) PG Cert. Tertiary Teaching S Pac
                    SALA DERENALAGI TCert NTC, BA, PG Dip Mgmt &
                    Pub Admin, PG Cert. Tertiary Teaching S Pac


                                        Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   9
                      SHYAM DEVI DUBER TCert LTC, BA (English), PG Cert.
                      Tertiary Teaching, Cert Basc Computing Skills S Pac
                      SALASEINI MALO TCert NTC, Dip TESL Victoria NZ,
                      BA S Pac, MA App Ling Macquarie
                      USAIA GAUNAVOU TCert NTC, BA (Fijian), PG Cert.
                      Tertiary Teaching S Pac
                      GULSHER ALI DipTertTeach FIT, Cert Computing, BA
                      Karachi (Urdu), Adv Cert IT S.Pac. (Acting)
                      MADHU NAIDU Cert.Tamil Madras (Temporary)
                      ALITI WILLIAME (Rotuman) (Temporary)

                        SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS
  HEAD OF SCHOOL      IOWANE P TIKO BEd Waikato, PG DipEd S.Pac PG
                      Dip.Tertiary Teaching S Pac, TCert LTC, Med (Maths
                      Education) Deakin (Acting)
  SENIOR LECTURER     VIRENDRA KUMAR BSc S.Pac, STTC FCAE, PG Cert.
                      Tertiary Teaching, PG Dip (Mathematics) S Pac (Acting)
  LECTURER            WAHAB ALI M.Ed. S.Pac, MEd (Mathematics) Deakin,
                      BEd, PG DipEd, PG Dip.Tertiary Teaching, DipEd Admin,
                      S Pac TCert LTC, (Acting)

                            SCHOOL OF SCIENCE
  HEAD OF SCHOOL      TEMA MAIWAIKATAKATA , BSc DipEd S.Pac.
  LECTURER            WILI SULUMA, TCert, CCTC, BEd, PG DipEd,           PG
                      Dip.Tertiary Teaching S Pac (Acting)

                      EMELE BIUKOTO DipEd, BEd, PGDipEd S.Pac. (Acting)

                       SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE
  LECTURERS           EMONI LEBAIVALU TCert, LTC, Bed, PG Cert. Tertiary
                      Teaching S.Pac, Cert In Teachers Upgrading [BEMTUP]
                      Griffith (Acting)

                             SCHOOL OF PEMAC
  HEAD OF SCHOOL      PERRY GABRIEL, MA Visual Arts Griffith (Art) TCert
                      CCTC PG Cert. Tertiary Teaching S.Pac
  LECTURERS           SAVITRI DEVI CHAND          BPhEd Otago, TCert LTC
                      (Acting)


10 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
                   NARESH CHAND TCert NTC (Music) (Acting)
                   NAR DEO DUTT TCert, TCert Sec NTC, DipPEMAC
                   FCAE (Art and Craft) (Acting)
                   SERU LAGANI TCert NTC(Acting)
                   KINIVILIAME VUIRA T Cert LTC, Dip PEMAC FCAE
                   (Music) (Acting)


                             VOLUNTEERS
JAPAN              YUKO MATSUMTO – Special Education – TCert (Sec),
                   TCert (Spl.Ed), BA (Music Perform) Osaka; BA (Japanese)
                   Koyoto
                   AKIRA ISHII – IT – BE (Electircal) Tokyo; Cert SCS AT&T
KOREA              HEE SUN CHOI - Library

                      ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
EXECUTIVE          PENIANA MOKOSIRO H1, H2, S, U, E
OFFICER
WELFARE            REV. LASARUSA         WAISALE,     DipEd,   S.Pac,   Dip
OFF/WARDEN         Theology, DipAccSt.
CLERICAL           TARAIVINI NAUGA. H1,H2
OFFICER
STENO-TYPIST       SAVAIRA UTOVOU
STENO/TYPIST       SAIRUL NISHA Dip Com Sec Studies LTCC, Adv.Cert IT
                   S.Pac; Cert Account FNTC
TECHNICAL          KAMAL S. MANI BA Mangt S.Pac, DipMgt, Cert in
ASSISTANT          Admin S.Pac, Cert PCMgt & Mtce TechEduc Ltka
ASSIST LIBRARIAN   RANIKA DEVI KUMAR DipLibInfoStud S.Pac
LIBRARY            VINTOSHNI LATA CertLibInfoStud S.Pac; Cert Basic
ASSISTANT          Comp Skills NZPTC
DOMESTIC           M.RADRODRO
ASSISTANT
CHIEF COOK         WAISEA
COOK               SILIVENO TURUA
COOK               SURYA NARAYAN
COOK               KRISHNA DEWAN
CLEANER-           KANTI KRISHNA
SERVANT



                                      Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   11
  CLEANER-            LAVENIA DRAUNIVASA
  SERVANT
  CLEANER-            SILINA TURUVA
  SERVANT
  CLEANER-            AMRA WATI
  SERVANT
  CLEANER-            PARMA JOESPH
  SERVANT
  CLEANER-            CATHLEEN VITORI
  SERVANT
  CLEANER-            JOKAPECI SORO
  SERVANT
  CLEANER-            MIRIAMA LUALALA
  SERVANT
  CLEANER-            ELENOA CAKAUSESE
  SERVANT
  HANDYMAN            LEVI ROKOVUNA
  MESSENGER-          ARVIND SINGH
  DRIVER
  CLEANER-            JITEN PRASAD
  SERVANT
  CLEANER-            ROBERT MANI
  SERVANT
  CLEANER-            DINESH CHAND
  SERVANT
  WATCHMAN            ILIAISA CAVA
  WATCHMAN            KAMINIELI KAMAKOREWA




12 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
                 LAUTOKA TEACHERS’ COLLEGE HISTORY

Lautoka Teachers’ College is located at Natabua. The College campus is
about half a kilometre from the Nadi-Lautoka highway on Natabua Road
and is roughly 4 kilometres away from Lautoka City. The College land area is
shared with the Natabua Primary School and the Natabua Police Post.
The preparation of teachers at the Natabua site commenced in 1929 when the
Natabua Teachers’ Training Institute was established. Several of the original
buildings survive. Teachers were trained here until 1940 when training was
suspended because of the Second World War. Training was then shifted
temporarily to the Methodist Training Institution near Suva. This relocation
became a permanent one when the government decided to establish Nasinu
Teachers’ College.
The decision to resume teacher training at Natabua was made in 1974
following the release of a government paper that highlighted the shortage of
primary teachers. The teacher unions also contributed to the decision by
pointing out that the Job Evaluation Report of 1973 indicated that the
shortage of qualified teachers, when linked to the lack of training
opportunities, was a key issue to be addressed before the quality of basic
education in Fiji could be improved. Licensed teachers at that time comprised
20% of the teaching force.
Lautoka Teachers’ College opened its doors in 1977. It was to be built in three
phases. Phase I involved providing sufficient classrooms and other facilities
to enable the college to offer a one-year course for non-residential students.
Phase II involved expansion of the teaching facilities and construction of
hostels, dining hall, kitchen and sick bay. For some reason, Phase III was not
undertaken. This would have provided a hostel for women trainees and a
multipurpose hall.
The 1977 enrolment consisted of 120 non-residential students in the one-year
teaching program. The staffing consisted of the principal, Mr Gurmit Singh, a
senior lecturer, and eight lecturers. The first lot of 132 residential students
enrolled in 1978.
From experience over the first two years it was found that the one-year
course was not long enough to cover the course content and to prepare
trainees adequately for their teaching tasks. For this reason, the college began
its two-year pre-service program in 1979 with 72 students. Sixty licensed
teachers in the one-year program were also enrolled that year. This gave the
college a total enrolment of 132 students.


                                       Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   13
   In 1980 the college began a two-year training program for licensed teachers.
   There was no new intake in 1981, however, as schools were now well staffed
   with trained teachers and school rolls had stabilized. When additional
   teachers were required they could be obtained from Nasinu Teachers’
   College and Corpus Christi College. At the end of 1982, the Ministry of
   Education decided that Nasinu Teachers’ College was no longer needed and
   it was closed. All preservice primary teacher training was then shifted to
   Lautoka Teachers’ College.
   After the events of 1987, the intake of students at Lautoka doubled because of
   the shortage of teachers. In 1988, the Ministry of Education put into operation
   a system whereby recruitment of teachers was carried out among school
   leavers. Those who were selected were placed directly into schools to teach.
   During their first year, they attended short vacation courses at the Nasinu
   Residential College. In their second year, they joined the college for a year on
   a full-time basis. This system was operational till the end of 1992.
   There have been several significant developments since that time. Four new
   dormitories, with a capacity of 112 female students, were completed in
   August 1993. One-year in-service programs for teachers in Early Childhood
   and Special schools were introduced in 1999. Upper primary preservice
   curriculum courses were reviewed and upgraded through BEMTUP in 1997,
   in the first review since a major course review in 1984. In 1998, bridging
   courses in Science and Social Science were introduced to strengthen the
   academic background of trainees in those areas. The College now has thirty
   four teaching staff and over three hundred students.
   The College is on the threshold of major change. The change comes from two
   directions. Firstly, the appearance of the campus has been transformed
   through the construction of a new library, large lecture theatre and teaching
   block, and additional dormitories. This construction has been funded by the
   European Union. Secondly, new programs -- a Diploma of Primary
   Education and an Advanced Certificate in Early Childhood Education – will
   be introduced this year to replace existing programs for primary and early
   childhood teachers. These programs and the resources needed to support
   them come through the Australian government funded LTC Upgrade Project.
   Both activities are major milestones in the history of the Natabua site and will
   ensure that the training of teachers will continue through to 2029 and
   beyond.




14 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
               INFORMATION FOR PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Presently the College offers the following teacher training programs:
(a) a two year pre-service Diploma of Primary Education, completion of
    which authorises successful graduates to teach in primary schools in Fiji;
    this program, introduced in 2005, replaces the Teaching Certificate.
(b) a one year in-service certificate Advanced Certificate in Early Childhood
    Education for licensed kindergarten and pre-school teachers; this
    program, introduced in 2005, replaces the Certificate in Early Childhood
    Education.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
Diploma of Primary Education
   a pass in the Fiji Form Seven Examination with at least 50% in each of
    English and Mathematics, or an alternative that is equivalent and
    competence in at least one of Fijian, Hindi, Urdu, Tamil or Rotuman up
    to Form 2 level (Form 4 from 2006).
Advanced Certificate in Early Childhood Education
  a pass in the Fiji Form 7 Examination, or the New Zealand University
   Entrance Examination, or the USP Pacific Pre School Certificate at B+
   average or better
   Applicants should have completed 3 years of pre-school teaching.

APPLICATION
Candidates who are still in school should apply through their school
principals. School leavers can obtain relevant application forms from the
nearest education office and send their application forms together with a
copy of their birth certificates and result of the highest exam passed to reach
the office of the Permanent Secretary for Education by 31 September.

GOVERNMENT COST SHARING SCHEME
All students who are sponsored by the government are required to pay back
one third of the cost of their training to the government. Forms are available
to students on registration day to either apply for a loan or offer to pay in full
or by instalments his/her share of the cost of training. Repayment of loans
would be arranged to commence after completion of the course or
termination of studies. A sponsored student will be bonded for a period
equal to the number of years of training after his/her certification.


                                        Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   15
   PRIVATE STUDENTS
   A limited number of places may be available for private students in a year.
   Those selected will be required to pay their own expenses at the college and
   find their own accommodation. Applicants for private places follow the same
   procedure as all other applicants. They must meet the same entry
   requirements

   ACCOMMODATION
   Accommodation is available on campus.

   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM
   All students are required to participate in the College Enrichment Program.
   This consists of a broad range of activities aimed at preparing teachers for the
   breadth of roles they are expected to play in their schools and communities.

   SOCIAL AND CULTURAL PROGRAMS
   The College places a lot of emphasis on organised activities that enhance
   learning through inter-personal relationships.
   Sporting activities are very important since they constitute a discovery of
   talents hidden or lying dormant within each individual.
   Students are encouraged to organise interest groups that promote the welfare
   of members. Hence, the formation of ex-student's association of a particular
   school, or religious groups.
   Students are encouraged to search for the meaning of life through
   involvement in cultural and religious activities.




16 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
                 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS

THE ACADEMIC YEAR
The academic year at LTC consists of two semesters separated by a break of 4
weeks in June. Each semester is 20 weeks long. Up to two weeks in each
semester will be set aside for revision and examination.
For continuing students, the first semester of the year starts at the end of
January. For commencing students, the start date is three weeks later. The
end of the second semester for all students is usually at the end of the first
week in December.

STRUCTURE OF ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
The Advanced Certificate in Early Childhood Education and the Diploma of
Primary Education are structured around a weekly workload for students of
42 hours, on average. This workload includes scheduled lectures, tutorials,
workshops, and teaching practice placement, as well as lecturer-directed and
self directed study, including assignment preparation.
In the first year of the Diploma and in the Advanced Certificate, students will
undertake 6 courses in each semester, an average weekly workload of 7 hours
per course over 15 weeks.
In the second year of the Diploma, because of the increased time spent in
schools, students will undertake 5 courses in each semester over 12 weeks.
Each course will have an average weekly workload of 9 hours.

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE
In addition to their scheduled classes, early childhood students have
professional practice in both semesters of their program, 2 weeks in the first
semester and 4 weeks in the second.
Primary Diploma students have a three week placement in Semester 2 and a
six-week placement in each of Semesters 3 and 4.
Details of professional practice placement requirements are contained in the
relevant Professional Practice Handbooks.

THE COLLEGE DAY
Classes are held between 8.00 am and 5.00 pm from Monday to Friday. Each
class period is one hour. Lectures and tutorials are, on average, 50 minutes
long.
The cultural program of the College is conducted on Tuesday evenings from
7.30 pm. Other evenings are reserved for students’ private study and


                                        Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   17
   preparation. The College reserves the right to schedule lectures or other
   activities at non-scheduled times as it is thought necessary.
   Students are required to attend all lectures and other activities scheduled for
   their sections, unless they have valid reasons for absence.

   ‘COLLEGE DAY’
   ‘College Day’ is held once a year as advised in the Calendar. The program is
   compulsory for all staff and student members of the College. There will be no
   lectures or school experience on this day. Students on school experience must
   be in attendance at the College Day Program.

   MEETINGS
   College meetings called by the Principal during college time must be
   attended by all students. Any other meetings must receive the prior approval
   of the Principal. Where a person from outside the College is to be invited to a
   meeting, permission must first be obtained from the Principal.

   STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION
   Lautoka Teachers College Students’ Association aims to foster student
   activities in the social, cultural and sporting spheres of College life. It also, in
   consultation with College staff, participates in any other functions which are
   organised to promote the fulfilment of the general aims and objectives of the
   College.
   Membership of the Association is compulsory for all students and the
   subscription is $25.00 a year.

   THE COLLEGE LIBRARY
   The College Library has a selection of books available especially on subjects
   relevant to the academic programs delivered by the College.
   All books in the library are available for loan except reference books and
   those placed on the reserve shelf; those must not be removed from the library
   unless the librarian authorises a student on school practice to borrow a
   particular volume.
   Books may be borrowed in the first instance for a fortnight. The loan may be
   renewed if the books are not in demand.
   A fine will be imposed if a book is not returned on the due date. If a book is
   lost, the student will be required to pay for the loss as determined by the
   librarian.
   A reminder’s list of overdue books will be placed on the notice board.


18 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
LIBRARY HOURS
       Monday/Wednesday            8.30 am - 4.30 pm
                                   7.00 pm - 9.30 pm
       Tuesday/Thursday            8.30 am - 4.30 pm
       Friday                      8.30 am - 4.00 pm

COMPUTER CENTRE
Students will have access to the Computer Centre from the beginning of
2005. The Centre consists of a Teaching Laboratory, a general access
Laboratory and a small, specialist laboratory for staff. Other facilities will be
provided progressively. Students are expected to comply with Centre rules,
which are as follows:
 Students may only be in the Laboratory if a staff member is present
 Only students and staff who have been registered with the Computer
   Laboratory are able to use the Laboratory. No outsiders are permitted in
   the Laboratory except where they have permission from the Computer
   Laboratory Manager.
 Food, drink or smoking is not allowed in the learning spaces.
 Game playing is not permitted on the computers at any time.
 Users must leave their workspace clean at the end of their session
 All users must log into their own account at the beginning of a session
   and log out at the end. It is prohibited to share passwords or use another
   user’s account
 Users must periodically delete any unnecessary file in their folder and at
   the end of their period at the college delete any files. Users must not
   attempt to exceed their storage allocation.
 Only the Manager or the Technical officer may change any system or
   application preferences.
 Inappropriate emails must not be sent to anyone.
 Any CDs or other resources/equipment used (for example, speakers,
   Reference CDs, manuals etc) must be signed for by the user in a record
   kept by the Technical officer and returned and signed back within the
   allocated time.
COMPUTER CENTRE HOURS
       Monday/Wednesday            8.30 am - 4.30 pm
                                   7.00 pm - 9.30 pm
       Tuesday/Thursday            8.30 am - 4.30 pm
       Friday                      8.30 am - 4.00 pm

                                       Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   19
   AUDIO VISUAL CENTRE
   The Audio Visual Centre is a service unit to advise and help produce
   materials and systems used in many of the teaching and non-teaching
   activities of the college. It also has responsibility for storage and maintenance
   of equipment required for teaching purposes by students and staff.
   Services available to students, usually on a cost recovery basis, include book
   binding, tracing, laminating, printing, recording, producing audio-visual
   materials such as OHP transparencies, CDs and videos.
   Equipment may b e available for loan under particular conditions.
   NAMING OF TEACHING GROUPS
   Teaching groups are called sections. These are numerically known and
   numbered by three digits. The first digit indicates the year of the course and
   the other digits, the section to which a student belongs; for example, 101
   refers to first year students in section 1.

   STUDENT DRESS
   Although there is no set College uniform, students are requested to dress
   neatly and in a manner appropriate to the various activities conducted
   during their college program.
   Details of sports uniforms will be given at the commencement of the
   program.

   ATTENDANCE
   Students are required to attend all timetabled activities. All absences are
   noted and taken into consideration when the student’s performance is being
   evaluated. Poor attendance may affect a student’s chance of certification.

   LEAVE
   Residential students may leave for the weekend on Friday after lectures and
   must report for the first lecture on Monday morning.

   SPECIAL LEAVE
   Special leave applies when a student wishes to be absent from the College (or
   from School Experience) during normal teaching sessions or when a student
   would otherwise be expected to be present.
   A student wishing to apply for special leave must make a written application
   to the Principal.

   ABSENCES
   If a student is delayed or cannot return to the College at the time or date
   expected, the Principal must be notified at once. If the absence is prolonged,

20 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
then a note should be sent to the Principal. A medical certificate will be
required in the case of an absence due to illness. A student must report to the
Lecturer On Duty immediately upon returning to the College. If a student
falls sick when away from College, he or she must report to the Matron
immediately after returning.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS OR NAME
Students are advised to keep the College informed promptly and accurately
of any change of home address. The College must also be informed promptly
when a student’s name is changed by marriage or for any other reason.

PLAGIARISM
Plagiarism occurs when other people’s writings and ideas are borrowed and
presented as if they were one’s own. Examples of plagiarism include quoting
directly or indirectly from a text or reference book without acknowledging
the source of the quote, or copying or using another student’s work.
Cheating refers to any practice that gives a student an advantage to which he
or she is not entitled, such as using printed or written material in an
examination without approval from the supervisor, or copying answers from
another person’s work.
Cheating and plagiarism attract severe penalties. These are outlined in the
Academic Assessment Rules contained in this Handbook.

MARRIAGE DURING TRAINING
Women students who decide to get married while on training are required to
see the Principal before their marriage so that the necessary information may
be registered with the College administration. They are also obliged to
produce their marriage certificate for sighting.

COMMUNICATION
There are four main notice board areas in the College. Urgent notices are
posted outside the Bursar’s Office and regular notices are posted on the
notice boards outside A.G.2, A.2.1 and the Dining Hall.
Students must keep themselves informed of matters announced on the notice
boards and must comply with any instructions placed there.
When writing to any member of the staff on official matters students must
clearly indicate their sections and use the names as entered on the section
lists.




                                      Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   21
   TELEPHONE CALLS
   Students personal calls may only be received or made after official College
   hours if the matter is urgent. Call-boxes are installed outside the main office.

   CORRESPONDENCE
   All correspondence from students requiring attention by the College
   administration must be addressed to the Principal.
   Correspondence between a student and the Ministry of Education should be
   sent through the Principal. Letters sent to the Ministry without the Principal’s
   endorsement will be returned to the College and the subject matter will not
   be given any consideration until the proper forwarding procedure has been
   adopted.

   THE USE OF THE COLLEGE PREMISES AFTER LECTURE HOURS
   The College encourages students to hold club meetings and sporting
   activities using College facilities. Any person or group wishing to use any
   part of the premises must first obtain permission from the Principal. The
   exact date, time and the purpose for which a room is to be used must be
   stated in the application. The person responsible for the meeting will be
   required to see that the room is left in order, lights and fans switched off and
   doors and windows locked after use. The key obtained from Lecturer on
   Duty must be returned before 8.00 am the following morning.

   ACCOMMODATION
   Residential accommodation is available in modern hostels which contain
   cubicles with twin beds, Facilities are available for students to study in their
   own rooms. Each student is issued with a mattress, pillow, sheets, blankets
   and towels. All issued linen will be washed and pressed by the College
   laundry free of charge.
   Students are strongly advised to keep their rooms locked when they are not
   there, even if they are in another part of the building. Any loss of property
   should be reported to the Lecturer on Duty. Cases of theft will generally be
   reported to the police.
   Students must report to their Senior Tutor before vacating their rooms. Each
   students is responsible for ensuring that College property is checked and
   handed over, the room locked and the keys returned, before leaving the
   College.




22 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
TUTORS AND MSCS ON DUTY
One member of the Residential staff acts as Lecturer on Duty (LOD) for each
week and is always available to deal with enquiries and emergencies,
weekends included. All problems and complaints must go through LODs.
They will work closely with the MSC (Member of the Students’ Council) who
is on duty.
Among their other duties LODs will conduct checks in the hostels in the
morning, in the evening after lights out and at other times whenever the need
arises.
A duty roster will be drawn up at the beginning of each semester and should
be strictly adhered to. Duty for both staff and students begins at 6.30 am on
Mondays.

SENIOR MEN’S AND WOMEN’S TUTORS
Senior tutors have overall responsibilities for the supervision of hostels,
dining room etc., and students should see them when faced with problems.

ALCOHOL
Consumption of any alcoholic drink is forbidden in dormitories and on the
campus. Any student found drinking on the campus or who appears to be
under the influence of alcohol on the campus will be reported to the Lecturer
On Duty and Principal immediately. Such a student could face expulsion
from the campus without further warning.
If a student under the influence of liquor resorts to disorderly behaviour, the
police may be called and appropriate police action instigated.

DRUGS AND OTHER BANNED SUBSTANCES
Consumption or possession of narcotic drugs and other banned substances is
a criminal offence. Any student consuming these on the campus or found in
possession will be referred automatically to the police for appropriate police
action.

DAMAGE AND LOSSES
Each student will be responsible for any damage or loss of College property
and will be required to pay for the cost of such losses or damage.

ELECTRICAL LIGHTS, FITTINGS, EQUIPMENT, ETC
As a safety measure students are advised not to interfere with any electrical
switches and fittings. Defective fittings should be reported to the Lecturer On
Duty. In the interest of economy, all lights must be switched off when not in
use.

                                      Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   23
   NOISE
   Noise at all times must be kept at a REASONABLE LEVEL. Radios, tape
   recorders etc., may be played quietly but students must remember that other
   in adjoining cubicles may be studying.
   Complaints about noise should be made to a MSC or the LOD.
   Complete silence in the hostels is expected after 9.30 pm on week days.

   VISITORS
   Visitors are allowed on the campus on Saturdays and Sundays between 2.00
   pm and 5.00 pm. They are not permitted in the hostels. Students will be
   responsible for the good conduct of their guests.

   TRAFFIC
   Parking space at the College is limited and students are requested to ask
   relatives and friends who provide transport home for the weekend to drive
   carefully through College property.
   Students also are urged to use the College drive way carefully and sensibly.
   Action cannot be taken against a driver over an accident where a student is at
   fault.

   RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES
   Rugby, soccer, netball, softball, volleyball and cricket are played at the
   College. College teams also take part in the various district sporting fixtures.
   Sports meetings are also arranged with other institutions.

   CULTURAL AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES
   During College time every student is required to join one of the clubs of his
   or her interest and choice. Membership of clubs operating outside College
   time is voluntary. Staff members assist students but the college encourages
   students to run their own affairs. Where no club exists to cater for the interest
   of some students then suggestions are welcomed.
   Group cultural activities led by the Indo-Fijian and Fijian lecturers take place
   each Tuesday evening and, once a month, the groups are combined for a
   cross-cultural session. During this time of cross culture, discussions are held
   concerning those values important to each culture, demonstrations are given
   and reports made by members on selected topics which are of interest to both
   groups e.g. marriage customs. It is a College requirement that all students
   attend cultural activities scheduled for Tuesday evenings.
   The Student Association also organizes dances, musical nights and religious
   meetings.


24 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
INDO-FIJIAN CULTURAL PROGRAM
Objectives
 To enable students to be more aware of their cultural heritage to enable
    them to survive the tides of change.
   To enable students to protect their cultural heritages making them
    conscious to their identity.
   To enable students to respect and be aware of the cultural differences
    that exist within their immediate environment and the community at
    large.
The program is to be carried out in such manner that students go through
formal and informal sessions of discussions, and performing arts. These to be
led by lead lectures from specialists in topics to be covered.
Major Topics
1   Expectations of the society and its members and would be members ;
    values; attitudes; roles; manners etc.
2   Functions of language in the community.
3   Significance of Fine Arts.
4   Religious Teachings / Practices.
5   Impromptu talks on Cultural Topics.

FIJIAN CULTURAL PROGRAM
Objectives
   To enable indigenous Fijians to be more aware of their cultural heritage
    to enable them to survive the tides of changes and
   To enable indigenous Fijians to protect their cultural heritages making
    them conscious to their identity and
   To enable indigenous Fijians to respect and be aware of the cultural
    differences that exist within their immediate environment and the
    community at large.
The program is to be carried out in such a manner that students go through
formal and informal sessions of discussions and performing arts. These to be
led by lead lectures from specialists in topics to be covered.

Major Topics
1 Expectations of the society on its members and would be members.
    Values, Attitudes, Roles, Manners, etc.



                                       Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   25
   2   Traditional and Hierarchal system in the Fiji system. In all basic
       traditional societies, vanes and easiness and the three confederacies
       (Tovata, Burebasaga and Kubuna) and the Yasayasa Vaka-Ra
       conglomerate.
   3   Fijian Mekes and Arts.
   4   Significance, differences and similarities amongst the confederacies in
       Fiji.

   RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES
   It is an expectation of the College that all Christian students will attend
   regular scheduled worship as required on Saturday or Sunday.




26 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
                             SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Lautoka Teachers’ College is committed to ensuring that its working and
learning environment is free from sexual harassment, that sexual harassment
will not be tolerated under any circumstances and that action will be taken
against any staff member or student who breaches this policy.
What is sexual harassment?
Sexual harassment is any unwanted, unwelcome or uninvited behaviour of a
sexual nature which makes a person feel humiliated, intimidated or
offended. Sexual harassment can take many different forms and may include
physical contact, verbal comments, jokes, propositions, the display of
offensive material or other behaviour which creates a sexually hostile
working or learning environment. Sexual harassment can occur between men
and women; women and other women; and men and other men.
Some examples of sexual harassment that could occur in an educational
institution include:
   uninvited touching;
   uninvited kisses or embraces;
   smutty jokes or comments in the workplace or the classroom;
   making promises or threats in return for sexual favours;
   displays of sexually graphic material including posters, pin-ups, cartoons,
    graffiti or messages left on notice boards, computers, desks or lockers, or
    in teaching materials such as overheads, course booklets etc;
   repeated invitations to go out, especially after prior refusal;
   ‚flashing‛ or sexual gestures;
   sex based insults, taunts, teasing or name-calling;
   staring or leering at a person or at parts of their body;
   unwelcome physical contact such as massaging a person without
    invitation or deliberately brushing up against them;
   touching or fiddling with a person’s clothing;
   requests for sex;
   sexually explicit conversation;
   persistent questions or insinuations about a person’s private life;
   offensive phone calls, text messages , emails or letters; computer screen
    savers;
   stalking; sexual insults or taunting.


                                        Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   27
   What is sexual harassment is not
   Sexual harassment is NOT behaviour which is based on mutual attraction,
   friendship or respect. If the interaction is consensual, welcome and
   reciprocated it is not sexual harassment. Behaviour can become sexual
   harassment is the interaction changes from being based on mutual attraction,
   friendship or respect to non-consensual, unwelcomed and unreciprocated
   interactions.
   The circumstances
   A person can be sexually harassed by a supervisor or manager, a co-worker,
   a lecturer, a student or a contractor. Sexual harassment is unlawful at any
   time on the college campus and in any work-related or educationally-related
   context, including conferences, college functions or activities, professional
   practice programs, business or field trips etc. Sexual harassment between
   students is also unlawful if it occurs during any college program or in college
   residences.
   Legal implications
   Sexual harassment in employment and education is against the law and will
   not be tolerated under any circumstances. Forms of sexual harassment that
   constitute a criminal offence include:
      physically molesting a person;
      indecent exposure;
      sexual assault;
      stalking; and
      obscene communications (telephone calls, faxes, letters, emails, text
       messages etc.)
   All college leaders have a duty to prevent sexual harassment in the
   workplace and learning environment and are held responsible if it occurs,
   unless all reasonable steps have been taken to prevent and/or eliminate it.
   Responsibilities of academic and administrative supervisors
      monitor the teaching, learning, working and college residential
       environment to ensure that acceptable standards of conduct are observed
       at all times;
      model appropriate behaviours themselves;
      promote the college sexual harassment policy within the learning and
       working environment;



28 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
   treat all complaints seriously and confidentially and report them
    immediately to the college Principal;
   ensure that no victimisation occurs against the person who makes the
    complaint; and
All staff and students have a responsibility to:
   comply with the college’s sexual harassment policy;
   offer support to anyone who is being harassed and advise them on where
    to seek assistance and support;
   maintain confidentially or information provided during an investigation
    of a complaint. Students and staff need to be aware that spreading gossip
    or rumours may expose them to a defamation action.
What can you do?
Any person (staff member or student) who feels that they are being sexually
harassed or observes incidents of sexual harassment has the right (and
responsibility) to complain and take action. Behaviour which is unwelcome
and unwanted sexual conduct is not permitted anywhere or at any time in
the college or in its associated programs. If you experience the problem you
should:
   Ask the person to stop. While this may be difficult, it can be an effective
    way of stopping the unwelcome behaviour.
   Contact your academic or administrative supervisor; your student
    counsellor; the Taltala; or the college Principal, if the harassment
    continues, or you don’t feel comfortable talking with the person about
    their behaviour. These people can assist you in dealing with the problem
    in a completely confidential manner.
   Report the matter to the Police.
When a complaint is made
All complaints of sexual harassment will be treated seriously, investigated
promptly, impartially and confidentially and in accordance with the
principles of natural justice. If sexual harassment is found to have occurred,
the college will take action to stop the behaviour and depending on the
seriousness of the case, will take appropriate disciplinary action against the
offender(s) under the relevant Ministry/Public Service provisions related to
student of staff misconduct. If the matter is reported to the Police it will be
dealt with by the Police.




                                           Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   29
                             ENRICHMENT PROGRAM

   The Enrichment Program is unique to Lautoka Teachers College. It
   complements the academic programs of the College and has been designed
   to enhance students’ skills in teaching, learning, living and contributing
   within the diverse communities they will teach in and serve. All students are
   required to participate actively in the program. Completion of its
   requirements is a condition for graduation.
   The activities which make up the enrichment program are in five categories:
   (i) Sports: Playing, Coaching, or Refereeing activities
   (ii) Leisure, or Hobby activities;
   (iii) Cultural, or religious Community activities;
   (iv) Leadership and Survival Skills activities; and
   (v) Student Initiated activities.
   Activities are also classified as compulsory, or student-selected, or student-
   initiated. Compulsory activities include First Aid, Rural Teachers Homestay,
   and Leadership.
   Activities, showing semester and times of offering, relative points values and
   the names of the activity coordinators, will be listed each semester. From this
   list students will undertake and complete sufficient activities to meet their
   graduation requirements. Alternatively students may seek to have other
   activities, not on the list, approved by the enrichment committee.
   Activities attract credit points at the rate of 10 credit points for 1 hour per
   week spread over a semester, or its equivalent value in total hours. Activities
   will be rated as worth 10, 20 or 40 credit points. Students wishing to satisfy
   graduation requirements will normally complete 40 credit points for each
   semester of their enrolment in a program. DPE students must obtain a
   minimum of 160 points over the two year program to qualify for graduation.
   Each student will have a logbook to record completed activities, and from
   this logbook the points attained will be entered onto the student’s academic
   transcripts.
   Students may be exempted from certain activities in the enrichment program
   due to health or other factors. They will need to write to the Enrichment
   Program Committee, with supporting evidence, to establish why they should
   be exempted.
   Students who fail to complete requirements will have their results withheld
   and hence will be unable to graduate.


30 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
                        PROGRAMS AND COURSES
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Presently the College offers the following teacher training programs:
(a) a two-year preservice diploma program in primary teaching
(b) a one year in-service certificate program in Early Childhood Education
    for licensed pre-school teachers
LTC GLOSSARY
Program
A program is an approved or accredited pattern of study leading to an
academic award.

Course
At LTC a course refers to one semester length unit of study or component
within an academic strand or overall program. Courses may be compulsory
or elective, or, in the case of vernacular languages, elective within a
compulsory strand.

Course prescription
The course prescription is the detailed description of a course given to
students at the commencement of the semester which summarizes major
content and skills to be covered in the course, resources to be used, and
assessment and other requirements. Teaching/learning approaches and
activities such as the combination of lectures, tutorials, group work, directed
research, practical work, and field studies may also be specified.




                                      Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   31
         PROGRAM STRUCTURE – DIPLOMA OF PRIMARY EDUCATION

    Semester 1                         duration Semester 2                         duration
    DPE100 Child growth and            105 hrs DPE120 Teaching and Learning in     105 hrs
           development                                the Primary School
    DPE101 Communication and Study     105 hrs DPE 122 Language Study 2            105 hrs
           Skills
    DPE102 Language Study 1            105 hrs DPE123 Mathematics Education 1      105 hrs
    DPE103 Foundation Studies in the   105 hrs DPE124 Science Education 1          105 hrs
           Arts
    DPE104 Studies in Physical         105 hrs DPE125 Social Education 1           105 hrs
           Education and Health
    DPE105 Introductory Computer       52 hrs    DPE126 Enterprise Education       105 hrs
            Literacy
    DPE106 Foundation Science          52 hrs

    DPE107 Foundation Social Science   52 hrs
                                                 DPE129 Professional Practice 1    3 weeks


    Semester 3                         duration Semester 4                         duration
    DPE200 Program planning in the     105 hrs   DPE220 The Inclusive Classroom    105 hrs
           multigrade classroom
    DPE201 Language and Literacy 1:    105 hrs   DPE221 Language and Literacy 2:   105 hrs
           English                                      English
    DPE203 Mathematics Education 2     105 hrs   DPE223 The Arts and the           105 hrs
                                                        Curriculum
    DPE204 Science Education 2         105 hrs   DPE224 Curriculum Studies in      105 hrs
                                                        Physical Education and
                                                        Health
    DPE205 Social Education 2          105 hrs   Elective 1                        105 hrs

    DPE 219 Professional Practice 2    6 weeks DPE229 Professional Practice 3      6 weeks




32 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
             PROGRAM STRUCTURE – ADVANCED CERTIFICATE IN
                    EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Semester 1                           duration      Semester 2                         duration

ECE100 Child Development             105 hrs       ECE120 Art for Young Children      105 hrs
ECE101 Communication and Study       105 hrs       ECE121 Working with Families and   105 hrs
       Skills                                             the Community
ECE102 Early Childhood Learning      105 hrs      ECE122 Programming and Planning     105 hrs
       Environments                                      in Early Childhood
ECE103 Early Language and Literacy   105 hrs      ECE123 Management, Leadership       105 hrs
                                                         and Advocacy in Early
                                                         Childhood
ECE104 Music, Movement and Drama     105 hrs      ECE124 Foundations of Maths and     105 hrs
       for Young Children                                Science
ECE105 Language Study 1              105 hrs      ECE125 Health and Nutrition         105 hrs

ECE109 Professional Placement 1      2 weeks      ECE129 Professional Placement 2     4 weeks




                                                Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006      33
              ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT RULES AND PROCEDURES
   GENERAL PROVISIONS
   To be eligible for the award of the Diploma of Primary Education, or the
   Advanced Certificate in Early Childhood Education, a student must exhibit
   satisfactory performance in:
         all academic and practical work specified for the program of study;
         the Enrichment Program;
         attendance at all course and program lectures and other specified
            activities, as well as other official College commitments;
         professional practice (school experience);
         behaviour and attitude.
   Failure to satisfy any one of these at any time during the program may lead
   to suspension, exclusion, or review of the scholarship for scholarship
   holders.

   ENRICHMENT PROGRAM
   Students entering College DPE program from 2005 onward must meet the
   specified requirement of the College Enrichment Program – a minimum of
   160 credit points over the 2 year period; .

   ACADEMIC AND PRACTICAL WORK
   1 Academic progress in each course of study will be monitored through
      assessment of course work including an end-of-semester examination,
      with the exception of Professional Practice courses which will be
      assessed within the period of the practicum. The assessment of course
      work will be a continuous and cumulative process, and will include a
      combination of:
       written assignments;
       periodic class tests/exercises/practical tasks;
       personal study exercises;
       seminars or tutorial papers;
       participation in lectures, tutorials, and other specified activities
   2   Marks allocated to the end-of-semester examination will not be less
       than 20% nor more than 40% of marks for the course; marks allocated
       to the assessment of course work shall not be less than 60% nor more
       than 80% of marks allocated. All assessment plan must be approved by
       the Academic Board by the end of Week 2 of each Semester.



34 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
3   In order to be given a pass grade in a course a student must achieve at
    least half of the marks allocated to both the course work component
    and the end-of-semester examination.
4   Each Head of School will appoint an appropriate second examiner for
    all courses offered by that school. The role of the second examiner is to
    examine any piece of work submitted by a student which has been
    failed by a first examiner. In the event of unresolved disagreement
    between the two examiners, the Head of School or Principal shall
    appoint a third examiner whose decision shall be final.
    It shall be the responsibility of the first examiner to provide for each
    semester course a signed return showing the results for each student
    enrolled in the course. Where the work of any student has been
    assessed by a second examiner, that second examiner will also sign the
    return sheet.
5   A student who, due to illness or injury, or any circumstances beyond
    her/his control, is absent from any examination forming part of the
    final assessment may:
     be offered a deferred written or oral examination where the
         absence is due to illness, injury, or compassionate grounds;
    OR
     be awarded an Aegrotat Pass for up to one-half (50%) of courses
         where performance in course work has been satisfactory.
    A student who, due to illness or injury, or any circumstances beyond
    her/his control, is unable to submit a piece of assignment work by the
    due date may:
       apply to the Head of School for an appropriate revised submission
        date
6   The performance of every student will be reviewed by the Academic
    Board after each semester. A student who has failed 50% of the courses
    taken in that semester, will automatically have her/his studentship
    reviewed.
7   A Student who fails any part of the program more than once will have
    his/her studentship terminated.
8   Where a student is required to repeat a course or part of a program,
    then that will normally be done after completion of all other program
    components




                                    Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   35
  COURSE WORK ASSESSMENT
   1.   Within the first two weeks of the commencement of a course of study,
        students must be informed in writing of assessment procedures and
        requirements for that course. Information must include details of the
        number, nature and scope of assignments, exercises, and examinations
        and other assessable work, as well as expected submission dates.
        Once made known to students in writing, a lecturer may only make
        changes to the work-plan/lecture schedule, assessment procedures, or
        course requirements with majority student consent. Where a lecturer
        fails to gain this consent, students are entitled to appeal over
        assessment grades.
        Each Head of School is required to prepare an examination blueprint,
        which includes a detailed marking scheme and sample answers, for
        each course within his/her School at the time that examination papers
        are submitted to the Vice Principal for approval.
   2.   While scope exists for variation in assessment requirements, students
        will be required to complete at least three and not more than five
        written (and/or practical) assignments, as well as an end-of-semester
        written examination in each course.
   3.   Work to be assessed must be submitted on, or before, the specified
        submission date, unless prior requests for an extension are made in
        writing to course lecturers. Work submitted late will be penalised.
   4.   The failure of a student to tender all assigned work in a course prior to
        the start of the examination period will lead to automatic failure in that
        course, irrespective of the total marks gained; failure to submit all
        assigned work on time may lead to failure in the course.
   5.   All major assessable work will be assessed and returned to students
        within a maximum of fifteen working days from the date of
        submission.
   6.   A student may request, in writing, a reassessment of any assessed work
        within five working days of its return to the student.
   7.   Course work grades must be made known to students five working
        days prior to the commencement of the semester examinations.
   8.   Students will be granted approval to sit the examination only after
        having met all course work assessment requirements, having shown a
        satisfactory record of attendance during the course, and having


36 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
     obtained a minimum of 50% of marks allocated for the course work
     component.
9.   Plagiarism is forbidden and when detected that assignment is allotted
     no marks.
10. Students must be informed of their final grading in a semester course
    at the commencement of the next semester.
11. The semester’s work in each subject area, except for Professional
    Practice, for each student will be assigned a grade on the scale A to F,
    as indicated below:
     Letter grade     Numerical              Description
                      equivalent
            A+              (85-100)         distinction
            A                (80-84)         very good
            B+               (75-79)         good
            B                (65-74)         a pass with credit
            C+               (60-64)         average
            C                (50-59)         pass
            D*           (less than 50)      below pass standard
            F**                              Fail; repeat of course required

            S              Satisfactory      For Professional Practice
            US           Unsatisfactory
     For Professional Practice               For Professional Practice
     Notes:
     D* Students receiving a D grade may be eligible for a supplementary
         examination
     F** Students receiving an F grade must re-enrol in the course
         at the end of their four semesters of initial training, in the
         case of Primary students, and the two semesters of initial
         training in the case of ECE students.
     US Students receiving an US rating will be required to repeat
         the Professional Practice course before being permitted to
         undertake the next Professional Practice program.

Examination Rules
1 All candidates must produce their identification cards during the
   examination to allow supervisors to verify their identities
2    Examination rooms are out of bound for the Examination period unless
     an examination is in progress. Candidates should arrive outside the

                                     Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   37
       examination room at least 10 minutes before the examination is due to
       start. They are not permitted to enter the examination room before
       being advised to do so by the supervisor.
   3   Candidates are not permitted to communicate with any other
       candidate, or to move from their allocated seats during the period of
       the examination. Any communication will be regarded as cheating.
   4   No bags, books, written material or blank paper of any kind, or any
       other item, may be brought into the examination room, except those
       authorised by the examiner. Pencil cases are not allowed in the
       examination room.
   5   Any candidate found in possession of any printed or written
       material/matter in the examination room not authorised by the
       examiners, irrespective of whether she/he had used it or not, shall be
       regarded as having cheated.
   6   Candidates are responsible for providing their own materials such as
       pen, pencils, coloured pencils, rulers, mathematical instruments, and
       silent battery operated non-programmable calculators. No sharing or
       borrowing from other candidates will be allowed under any
       circumstance.
   7   When candidates wish to communicate with a supervisor, they must
       raise their hands until attended.
   8   No candidate will be permitted to enter the examination room after the
       first 30 minutes of the examination has elapsed.
   9   Candidates may leave the examination room after the first 60 minutes
       (first hour) of the examination. They are not permitted to re-enter the
       examination room.
   10 Candidates must not smoke in the examination room.
   11 Candidates must not start writing answers until told to do so by the
      supervisor.
   12 Candidates must not look at or copy other candidates’ answers. To do
      so will be considered to be cheating.
   13 Candidates must stop writing when the supervisor announces the end
      of the examination period.
   14 Candidates must return the examination paper to the supervisor at the
      end of the examination period.



38 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
15 Any breaches of rules will be report to the Principal by the supervisor,
   using the incident report form for disciplinary action.
16 Marked examination scripts will not be returned to examination
   candidates.
Supplementary Examination
1   A student may be eligible for a Supplementary Examination when
    he/she obtained a passing grade for the course work component of a
    course, but did not pass the end-of-semester examination.
2   Supplementary Examinations for all courses will be held in February
    and July every year.
3   A student must obtain a minimum of 50% of marks in the
    Supplementary Examination paper in order to pass the examination.
4   A pass in the Supplementary Examination will result in an overall
    course grade of C.
5   A student who fails a Supplementary Examination paper, will repeat
    the whole of the course that has been failed.
Deferred Examination
1   A student may be eligible for a Deferred Examination in a course if
    he/she missed the end-of-semester examination in that course through
    illness, injury, or other circumstance beyond his/her control.
2   A Deferred Examination may take an oral or written form with the
    prior approval of the Academic Board.
3   Deferred Examinations for all courses will normally be held at the same
    time as Supplementary Examinations, that is, in February and July
    every year.
4   A student must obtain a minimum of 50% of marks in the Deferred
    Examination paper in order to pass the course, the marks from course
    work and the examination being totalled to obtain the overall grade.
Cheating and Plagiarism
1   Cheating and plagiarism attract severe penalties.
    Plagiarism occurs when other people’s writings and ideas are
    borrowed and presented as if they were one’s own. Examples of
    plagiarism include quoting directly or indirectly from a text or
    reference book without acknowledging the source of the quote, or
    copying or using another student’s work.



                                    Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   39
       Cheating refers to any practice that gives a student an advantage to
       which he or she is not entitled, such as using printed or written
       material in an examination without approval from the supervisor, or
       copying answers from another person’s work.
   2   Work submitted for assessment containing plagiarised material will be
       allocated no marks.
   3  Students found cheating on any assessment item will:
       receive no marks for that assessable item;
       be required to apply formally to the Academic Board to undertake
           that course again, at his/her own cost, the next time the course is
           offered after she/he has met all other program requirements
   Special Consideration
   Any student who wishes to apply for special consideration on the grounds
   of illness or other circumstances must apply to the Principal on or before
   the date of the examination or final date for the submission of work. Where
   the application is a result of illness or injury, a medical certificate, certified
   by a medical officer, must be attached.
   A student who misses an examination and who wishes to be considered for
   a Deferred Examination or a Course Semester Pass must do so within
   twenty-four hours of the missed examination.
   Appeals
   Any student who believes that exceptional grounds exist for a suspension
   or waiver of these rules and procedures, may appeal in writing to the
   Academic Board. The appeal will be considered within 7 days, and the
   decision communicated to the student in writing. The decision of the
   Academic Board will be final.
   Appeals based on an ignorance of these Academic Assessment Rules and
   Procedures will not be considered.
                      (Revised and Approved, Academic Board, 26 November 2004)


   PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (SCHOOL EXPERIENCE)
   Students in the Diploma of Primary Education will undertake a minimum
   of 75 days Professional Practice during the program. This will comprise 15
   days of professional practice in Year One, and 60 days in Year Two.
   Students in the Advanced Certificate in Early Childhood Education will
   undertake a minimum of 30 days Professional Practice. This will comprise a
   10 day teaching practice in Semester One and 20 days in Semester Two.

40 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
During each period of Professional Practice, the student’s progress will be
assessed and this assessment will be communicated to the student at the
end of the practice session.
A student who, due to illness or injury, or any circumstances beyond
his/her control, is not able to complete a professional practice session may
be offered a supplementary teaching practice.
1   Assessment of Professional Practice will focus on the development of
    the student’s teaching competence exhibited through school-based
    activities, with particular attention to lesson preparation, presentation,
    and general professional attributes. Specific requirements are detailed
    in the Professional Practice Handbooks.
2   Assessment of a student’s performance on Professional Practice will be
    carried out by the student’s Associate Teacher and college supervisor,
    who will grade students as SATISFACTORY or UNSATISFACTORY,
    where SATISFACTORY indicates that a student has effectively
    demonstrated all prescribed performance competencies.
3   Any student with an unsatisfactory performance during the
    Professional Practice will be referred to the Coordinator, Teaching
    Practice, for assistance in overcoming specified weaknesses. Individual
    tutors, subject departments or lecturers will assist in the remedial
    program when requested to by the student or coordinator.
4   Any student with an unsatisfactory performance in a Professional
    Practice course after being given additional support and assistance and
    extend practice opportunities will be deemed to have failed to meet the
    requirements of the program and will be recommended for termination
    of studentship.

ATTENDANCE
Attendance at course and program lectures and other specified activities, as
well as other official College commitments, is compulsory.
In order to be considered for a pass a student must attend at least 90% of all
programmed activities for each course.
Course lecturers will maintain current attendance records for each course
and will submit a return of student attendance to the Academic Board
together with course results.




                                     Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   41
   BEHAVIOUR AND ATTITUDE
   The behaviour of a student will be continuously reviewed during the
   course in relation to attitude to other people, college rules and regulations,
   and personal and professional conduct. Where a student’s behaviour is
   unsatisfactory in any way, or tends to bring discredit to the college,
   appropriate disciplinary action will be taken which could lead to
   suspension, exclusion, or, for scholarship holders, to the scholarship being
   terminated.




42 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
                        PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

Professional Practice is the integrating component of teacher preparation
programs at Lautoka Teachers’ College. That is, it has been designed to
integrate practice teaching in a variety of educational settings with the
theory, research, and application studies taught in the college.
Professional Practice has the following characteristics:
 it is developmental – student teachers progressively learn and practise
  the attributes, attitudes and competencies required for effective
  classroom practice;
 it is articulated – student teachers’ academic, professional and social
  development are linked through the practicum;
 it depends on shared responsibility of college lecturers, student teachers,
  classroom teachers and Head Teachers in practice teaching schools and
  school experience schools, and
 it produces beginning teachers who are reflective and reflexive in their
   professional practice.
Practicum courses developed are concerned with developing and
competencies in each of the following:
 observation skills;
 teaching skills; and
 critical reflection skills.

The practicum strand in the primary diploma program is organised around
three practice teaching courses:
 Professional Practice 1: Teaching single lessons and managing a class
  group
 Professional Practice 2: Teaching multi-class groups through a number of
  linked lessons
 Professional Practice 3: Teaching to the learning needs of individuals and
  groups across whole days within school and community contexts
The practicum strand in the early childhood advanced certificate program
is organised around two practice teaching courses:
 Professional Practice 1: Teaching single indoor/outdoor activities and
   managing a group of learners
 Professional Practice 2: Teaching session, indoor/outdoor programs for
   whole group, small group and individuals from session to session and
   day to day
Special Provisions

                                    Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   43
   Pre-service and early childhood teachers are expected to provide all
   stationery items (folders, notebooks, pens, adhesives, etc) and the materials
   required to make teaching aids for micro-teaching and practice teaching
   activities.
   Pre-service and early childhood teachers will be provided with a limited
   supply of vanguard sheets, newsprint and pentel pens at the beginning of
   each teaching practice/professional practice program.
   Students placed in a rural/remote school for Teaching Practice 2 will be
   provided with a food ration for the four week period. Students are expected
   to manage this ration and to supplement it with fresh vegetables purchased
   from local markets. Additional rations will not be supplied. Provision of
   toiletries and other personal needs are student responsibilities, as are the
   payment of carrier fares if students wish to travel to/from their school
   during the practicum period.
   Whenever visiting schools or taking part in school-based activities, student
   behaviour should conform to the Student Council Code of Conduct for the
   Practicum.

          STUDENT COUNCIL CODE OF CONDUCT – PRACTICUM
       Lautoka Teachers’ College pre-service teachers agree to observe
       the following personal and professional standards while
       undertaking professional practice programs
        dress in accordance with host school and host community
          expectations;
        behave in ways that bring credit to themselves and to LTC at all
          times;
        be respectful of self, children, peers, colleagues and community
          members at all times;
        be well prepared, in advance, for all learning and teaching
          responsibilities;
          accept the supervision and guidance of visiting LTC
           lecturers and the host school Head Teacher and Associate
           Teachers;
          behave in accordance with the lawful directions of the host
           school Head Teacher while on duty in the host school and
           while living in the host school compound;
          report real infringements of personal rights, as soon as possible,
           to the appropriate authority.



44 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
                            COURSE OUTLINES

DPE100 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
The acquisition of knowledge and understanding of child growth and
development during early and middle years of schooling is vital to the
process of teaching and learning. Students will examine major theories and
approaches to child growth and development as well as cultural factors
that contribute to sound understandings in this area.

DPE101 COMMUNICATION AND STUDY SKILLS
This course is cross-disciplinary and addresses the literacy demands
students will encounter in their studies at Lautoka Teachers College. It
prepares students to be effective and critical users of language across their
studies in the various discipline and curriculum-based courses. Therefore it
concentrates on developing students own literacy skills across spoken,
written and visual (multi-mediated) modes of language within the context
of their courses. Approaches to reading and writing for the purposes of
acquiring, transforming and demonstrating knowledge will be emphasised.

DPE103 FOUNDATION STUDIES IN THE ARTS
This is the first of two sequential courses in arts education. It encourages
students to appreciate the importance of an understanding of the
development of primary school aged children, aesthetically,
physiologically, emotionally, culturally and conceptually in planning arts
education programs. This anticipates and underpins the process of the
second course, in the planning, preparation and presentation of arts
education in schools, through study of arts pedagogy and the curriculum.
Within this broader framework students will be encouraged to engage with
the arts in a variety of ways, and in a range of environmental, social,
cultural and historical contexts.

DPE104 STUDIES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH 1
The course has two main components, physical education and health
education. The purpose and characteristics of the area are explored as well
as the knowledge, skills and characteristics essential for educators.
Movement studies/physical education will focus on participation in
physical activities, the skills necessary for these activities, concepts of
physical fitness from the perspectives of health and activity, and students
will plan and implement a personal fitness strategy. The focus in health

                                    Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   45
   education is on the determinants of health at the individual, community
   and national levels, and in particular on the health concerns of young
   people in Fiji. Students will have the opportunity to study personally
   relevant health issues and to generate a personal health plan.

   DPE105 INTRODUCTORY COMPUTER LITERACY
   This course aims to develop in students an awareness, understanding and
   basic skills in the use of computers. The skills they acquire will assist them
   in their studies of all subjects in the LTC curriculum and help them to cope
   with the technological changes brought about by increasing use of
   computers nationally and internationally. Specifically, the Computer
   Literacy unit aims to:
       promote an understanding of the role of information technology in
        society;
       provide computing skills and knowledge to assist students’ learning,
        and
       develop confidence in the use of computers for problem solving.

   DPE106 FOUNDATION SCIENCE
   Foundation Science is designed to provide primary teachers with the
   necessary knowledge and process skills which will enhance their teaching
   of Science at the primary level. With better understanding of concepts
   covered in this course, it is envisaged that students will be more confident
   to teach Science at any level in the primary school.

   DPE107 FOUNDATION SOCIAL EDUCATION
   Foundation Social Education introduces the students to some of the key
   issues related to an understanding of the Social Sciences and the learning
   teaching processes appropriate to its study. It is a foundation course for
   students deficient in higher secondary school Social Science and is intended
   to ensure a smooth transition from secondary schooling to an
   understanding of the primary Social Science curriculum. The course will
   focus on disciplines like Social Science, Sociology, Geography, History,
   Anthropology, Economics, Law, Politics and their integrative nature on
   social, economical, political and environmental issues experienced by
   people in the Pacific region.




46 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
DPE129 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 1
This three week teaching practice program will be located in single
classes in urban and semi-urban settings during the second semester of
2005. The practice teaching program will focus on developing the skills
of managing single class groups and of planning, teaching and
evaluating learning outcomes of single lessons.
Specific details of single lesson and classroom management teaching
competencies, associated performance indicators and practice tasks are
contained in the Professional Practice 1 Handbook which will be
provided to pre-service teachers and to their Associate Teachers during
the practicum briefing program.

DPE120 TEACHING AND LEARNING IN PRIMARY SCHOOLS
This course explores the concepts of teaching and learning in primary
schools and enables trainees to reflect upon their role as teachers, to
understand the theoretical underpinnings of teaching in order to
contextualise and apply reflective teaching practice in simulated and real
teaching situations. The focus of this course is on the role of teachers,
student’s background, and the relationship between students and teachers.
Trainees will also be introduced to six major teaching strategies. They will
observe practice, practice and reflect on a variety of teacher’s methods
associated with these strategies. Instructional and management skills will
also be explored in this course and students will have challenging
opportunities to apply the techniques and strategies that are covered.

DPE123 MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 1
This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the content
of the mathematics prescriptions for Classes 1 to 8 in Fiji schools. The
course is designed to provide primary teachers with a range of appropriate
teaching strategies to deliver the mathematics curriculum in a meaningful
and challenging manner to pupils.
The content of the course will be presented based upon the following
principles of learning and teaching:
   All content presentation will be clearly related to the current Classes 1
    to 8 of the Fiji mathematics prescriptions.
   The mathematics content will be shown to be relevant to daily living,
    not seen merely as textbook exercises.

                                    Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006     47
      The role of language in developing a clear understanding of
       mathematics, and the need for simple, accurate communication of ideas
       will be emphasized.
      Student participation in workshops, activities, teaching and all
       discussions is expected.
      Co-operative learning, the sharing of ideas and the need to actively
       listen to other points of view will be fostered at all times.
      Students are responsible for their own learning i.e. they must construct
       meaning from the experiences placed before them and the activities in
       which they become involved.
      Feeling competent with the mathematics content will engender a
       positive attitude towards mathematics and the teaching of
       mathematics.
      Ideally, teachers of mathematics must be enthusiastic and supportive in
       exploring new concepts with their students

   DPE124 SCIENCE EDUCATION 1
   Science Education 1 is designed to provide primary teachers with the
   appropriate science knowledge and teaching strategies to teach science in
   Years 1 to 6 in an interesting and challenging way. Pre-service primary
   teachers will engage in activity-based learning and problem solving
   activities along with other forms of pedagogy throughout the course. This
   is intended to improve their content knowledge and model good teaching
   practice in science. Conceptual understanding is further consolidated
   through set readings.

   DPE125 SOCIAL EDUCATION 1
   Social Education 1 is concerned with the nature and role of Social Science
   education within the lower primary school curriculum. This subject
   provides a focus on:
    understanding the way people interact with each other and with
     environments
    investigating approaches and strategies specific to this learning area
    promoting critical thinking
   A range of interrelated concepts, values, skills, knowledge and processes
   underpin the subject. Learning in this area encourages students to
   appreciate and apply different perspectives to their experiences and to

48 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
consider what it means to be active participants in a rapidly changing
world. This area seeks to develop the ability of students to take part in life
as active, reflective and informed citizens.

DPE126 ENTERPRISE EDUCATION
Enterprise Education is a course encompassing the three areas: home
economics, woodwork and agriculture science. The course will be taught
using an integrated approach and each trainee is expected to be confident
in teaching the three areas above using the design process as a strategy to
teach the course. The course will be activity based and student centred
learning will be emphasized throughout the course.

DPE200 PROGRAM PLANNING IN THE MULTIGRADE CLASSROOM
This course provides students with understandings of the principles and
issues that shape curriculum. It will incorporate aspects such as theories
and models of curriculum development, design and implementation. In
addition, students will be developing skills in the preparation and process
of developing sound curriculum plans and interpreting curriculum
prescriptions in a classroom setting. The course provides opportunities for
students to develop and apply the necessary strategies and skills for
teaching in a multi-grade classroom. This course also addresses issues and
challenges of teaching in a multi-grade setting.

DPE201 LANGUAGE AND LITERACY 1: ENGLISH
During this course students are introduced to a socio-cultural and
developmental view of language learning and will examine the literacy
practices essential for young children to develop as effective composers and
comprehenders of texts. Students will study the processes of
comprehending and composing as they develop teaching strategies to
support these processes.

DPE203 MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 2
This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the content
of the mathematics prescriptions for Classes 1 to 8 in Fiji schools. The
course is designed to provide primary teachers with a range of appropriate
teaching strategies to deliver the mathematics curriculum in a meaningful
and challenging manner to pupils.
The content of the course will be presented based upon the following
principles of learning and teaching:


                                     Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   49
   1.   All content presentation will be clearly related to the current Classes 1
        to 8 of the Fiji mathematics prescriptions.
   2.   The mathematics content will be shown to be relevant to daily living,
        not seen merely as textbook exercises.
   3.   The role of language in developing a clear understanding of
        mathematics, and the need for simple, accurate communication of ideas
        will be emphasized.
   4.   Student participation in workshops, activities, teaching and all
        discussions is expected.
   5.   Co-operative learning, the sharing of ideas and the need to actively
        listen to other points of view will be fostered at all times.
   6.   Students are responsible for their own learning i.e. they must construct
        meaning from the experiences placed before them and the activities in
        which they become involved.
   7.   Feeling competent with the mathematics content will engender a
        positive attitude towards mathematics and the teaching of
        mathematics.
   8.   Ideally, teachers of mathematics must be enthusiastic and supportive in
        exploring new concepts with their students
   Students will be timetabled for 5 contact hours per week with an
   expectation that they will carry out directed and independent work
   relevant to the course, for a minimum of 4 hours per week.

   DPE204 SCIENCE EDUCATION 2
   Science Education 2 is designed to provide primary teachers with the
   appropriate science knowledge and teaching strategies to teach science in
   Years 7 and 8 in an interesting and challenging way. Pre-service primary
   teachers will engage in activity-based learning and problem solving
   activities along with other forms of pedagogy throughout the course. This
   is intended to improve their content knowledge and model good teaching
   practice in science. Conceptual understanding is further consolidated
   through set readings.

   DPE205 SOCIAL EDUCATION 2
   This is the second of two courses in the Diploma of Primary Education
   program concerned with curriculum issues in the Social Sciences. It is
   framed around the understanding that learners construct their knowledge

50 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
from previous personal experiences and learning. New knowledge and
understandings are then developed and interpreted through this personal
‘lense’. Understanding of a problem or issue develops over time. Similarly,
relationships and connections with other topics, issues and problems
increasingly develop over time.

DPE220 THE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM
This course takes into account the findings of recent relevant educational
research, which promotes the concept of inclusion. This course provides
students with the necessary knowledge and skills to assist them become
professionally equipped to cope with all children, including those with a
wide range of abilities, from mild impairments to the exceptional/ gifted
child when they encounter them in the classroom. The course covers
aspects of the principles of inclusivity, and an awareness of the strategies
and approaches for inclusive practice . This course also provides students
with a background in diagnosis and planning for students with special
needs. Remediation and intervention approaches and strategies will also be
covered.

DPE221 LANGUAGE AND LITERACY 2: ENGLISH
In this course students study the teaching and learning of English by
examining the meaning systems as represented in the code breaking,
meaning-making, text user and text analyst practices associated with being
literate. They study dominant and emerging genres and language features
of texts and teaching approaches that scaffold the learning of English in a
bilingual society.

DPE223 THE ARTS AND THE CURRICULUM
This, the second of two sequential courses in Arts Education, engages
students with the planning of programs appropriate to the needs of all
students. It incorporates understandings and skills accrued across the
previous course directed towards recognising the arts-related
developmental needs of each and every student in primary classrooms, no
matter what their background, as individuals.

DPE224 CURRICULUM STUDIES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND
         HEALTH
Curriculum Studies in Physical Education and Health builds on the first
Semester Course, Studies in Physical Education and Health and
complements courses in Education studies. The course provides students

                                    Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   51
   with the opportunity to apply their understanding of the concepts,
   processes and skills underpinning Physical Education and Health to
   planning curriculum programs and units of work, and to developing
   effective child centred and inclusive teaching and learning strategies.

   DPE102F LANGUAGE STUDIES 1: FIJIAN
   Language Studies 1 is a foundation course of study preparing students to be
   speakers and teachers of Fijian language. Language- related literacy
   practices will be studied. In this course the relationship among culture,
   context and language will be explored in the Fijian context. It will develop
   students’ own literacy levels as Fijian speakers by introducing them to
   attitudes, knowledge, skills and processes that will promote effective
   language development and communication in spoken, written and visual
   modes, across different language contexts.

   DPE122F LANGUAGE STUDIES 2: FIJIAN
   Language Studies 2 builds on the understandings of teaching and learning
   of Fijian in Language Studies 1. In this course the relationship among
   culture, context and language will be explored more fully by examining the
   genres and textual features of spoken, written and visual texts that are
   found in the Fijian culture. A cross-cultural perspective will be embedded
   in this course.
   Class Contact: Three hours each week, comprising a lecture and tutorials.

   DPE102H LANGUAGE STUDIES 1: HINDI
   Language Studies 1 is a foundation course of study preparing students to be
   speakers and teachers of Hindi. Language-related literacy practices will be
   studied. In this course the relationship among culture, context and
   language will be explored in the Hindi context and in relationship to other
   Pacific cultures. A cross-cultural perspective will be embedded in this
   course. Students’ own literacy levels as Hindi speakers will be developed
   by introducing them to attitudes, knowledge, skills and processes that will
   promote effective language development and communication in spoken,
   written and visual modes, across different language contexts

   DPE122H LANGUAGE STUDIES 2: HINDI
   Language Studies 2 builds on the understandings of teaching and learning
   of Hindi in Language Studies 1. In this course the relationship among
   culture, context and language will be explored more fully by examining the

52 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
genres and textual features of spoken, written and visual texts that are
represented in the Hindi culture. A cross-cultural perspective will be
embedded in this course.
Class Contact: Three hours each week, comprising a lecture and tutorials.

DPE102R LANGUAGE STUDIES 1: ROTUMAN
Language Studies 1 is a foundation course of study preparing students to be
speakers and teachers of Rotuman. Language-related literacy practices will
be studied. In this course the relationship culture, context and language
will be explored in the Rotuman context. It will developing students’ own
literacy levels as Rotuman speakers by introducing them to attitudes,
knowledge, skills and processes that will promote effective language
development and communication in spoken, written and visual modes,
across different language contexts.

DPE122R LANGUAGE STUDIES 2: ROTUMAN
Language Studies 2 builds on the understandings of teaching and learning
of Rotuman in Language Studies 1. In this course the relationship among
culture, context and language will be explored more fully by examining the
genres and textual features of spoken, written and visual texts that are . A
cross-cultural perspective will be embedded in this course and a deeper
understanding of communication in spoken and written language will be
emphasised.

DPE102T LANGUAGE STUDIES 1: TAMIL
Language Studies 1 is a foundation course of study preparing students to be
speakers and teachers of Tamil. Language-related literacy practices will be
studied. In this course the relationship between culture, context and
language will be explored in the Tamil context. It will develop students’
own literacy levels as Tamil speakers by introducing them to attitudes,
knowledge, skills and processes that promote effective language
development and communication in spoken, written and visual modes,
across different language contexts.

DPE122T LANGUAGE STUDIES 2: TAMIL
Language Studies 2 builds on the understandings of teaching and learning
of Tamil in Language Studies 1. In this course the relationship among
culture, context and language will be explored more fully by examining the
genres and textual features of spoken, written and visual texts that are . A
cross-cultural perspective will be embedded in this course.

                                    Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   53
   Class Contact: Three hours each week, comprising a lecture and tutorials.

   DPE102U LANGUAGE STUDIES 1: URDU
   Language Studies 1 is a foundation course of study preparing students to
   be speakers and teachers of Urdu language. Language-related literacy
   practices will be studied. In this course the relationship between culture,
   context and language will be explored in the Urdu context. It will be
   developing students’ own literacy levels as Urdu speakers by introducing
   them to attitudes, knowledge, skills and processes that will promote
   effective language development and communication in spoken, written and
   visual modes, across different language contexts.

   DPE122U LANGUAGE STUDIES 2: URDU
   Language Studies 2 builds on the understandings of teaching and learning
   of Urdu in Language Studies 1. In this course the relationship among
   culture, context and language will be explored more fully by examining the
   genres and textual features of spoken, written and visual texts that are . A
   cross-cultural perspective will be embedded in this course.
   Class Contact: Three hours each week, comprising a lecture and tutorials.

   ECE100 CHILD DEVELOPMENT
   This course focuses on child development, with particular emphasis on the
   period from conception to 8 years of age. It includes a study of
   development in all domains – physical, social, emotional, cognitive and
   spiritual, and requires students to examine a range of related theoretical
   perspectives. Students are encouraged to reflect on these theoretical
   perspectives in relation to children in Fiji and the Pacific region, and to
   consider cultural differences in development. Within the course, students
   will develop understanding and skills in observing and monitoring the
   development and learning of young children. From their learning and
   observations, students will also develop their capacity to identify atypical
   behaviour and development, and knowledge of where to seek advice and
   support.

   ECE102 EARLY CHILDHOOD LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
   The course focuses on the environments in which young children learn,
   beginning with the home and community, and extending to a range of early
   childhood programs and services. It examines the value of play, and other
   ways young children in Fiji learn (e.g. observation, listening, involvement

54 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
in the spiritual and cultural activities of their families and communities).
Within the course, students will design and organise play spaces, and will
learn how to select and make appropriate resources for young children of
various ages. The course is integrated into the campus playgroup, which
will be operated by students on a weekly basis.

ECE103 EARLY LANGUAGE AND LITERACY
The course focuses on the acquisition of first and other languages, and the
development of language and literacy in the early years. Using a socio-
cultural perspective on literacy learning, it encourages students to provide
experiences and resources that build on home language and literacy in all
aspects of their programs.

ECE104 MUSIC, MOVEMENT AND DRAMA FOR YOUNG CHILDREN
The course focuses on developing students’ understanding and
appreciation of the place of music, movement and drama in young
children’s development and learning, and their capacity to provide related
experiences to young children. It includes a personal development strand
for developing students’ own knowledge, skills and confidence.

ECE120 ART FOR YOUNG CHILDREN
The course develops students’ understanding and appreciation of young
children’s Art, and the important role it plays in their development and
learning. The need to share this valuing with families is stressed. While
emphasis is placed on providing young children with basic art materials
and experiences, students will also be encouraged to extend children,
where appropriate, through encouraging them to explore a range of
contemporary, traditional and cross-cultural art materials and processes
adapted for exploration at their level. For this reason, the course includes a
strand for personal development of these processes; the personal
development strand includes a focus on visual literacy.

ECE121 WORKING WITH FAMILIES AND THE COMMUNITY
The course develops students’ interpersonal skills and ability to network
with community organisations and families. It extends students
understanding of early childhood services, to incorporate an Early
Childhood Care and Development (ECCD) perspective, and requires
students to reflect on what this means in practice.




                                     Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   55
   ECE122 PROGRAMMING AND PLANNING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
   The course extends students’ knowledge of the scope of early childhood
   programs, and exposes them to contemporary trends in curriculum
   approaches and teaching/learning practices. An excursion to a range of
   early childhood services and programs is included.

   ECE123 MANAGEMENT, LEADERSHIP AND ADVOCACY IN EARLY
              CHILDHOOD
   The course focuses on the early childhood professional as a leader, manager
   and advocate, and develops important understandings and skills that will
   enhance students’ confidence and capacity to perform these complex roles,
   both locally and nationally.

   ECE124 FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE
   The course focuses on young children’s development of mathematical and
   science concepts, processes and attitudes, and does this through both
   integrated and separate modules. It provides a framework of learning in,
   about and for the environment, and encourages teaching strategies that are
   play-based and experiential.

   ECE125 HEALTH AND NUTRITION
   The course examines the status of infant and child health in Fiji, and related
   risk factors. It considers all aspects of health, including nutrition, hygiene,
   safety, child protection and mental health, and the interaction of these
   elements in the well-being of children. Students’ understanding and
   competence in responding to health issues will be enhanced through
   involvement in community health services during the course.




56 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
                       RESEARCH BASED LEARNING

The need for students to develop effective Information Literacy skills has
become of increasing importance with the explosion of information in the
Internet age.
SELECT AND USE INFORMATION
Students locate, select and use information from a variety of sources.
Students develop the skills to locate and critically select appropriate
information from a range of sources for a specific purpose.
Students develop the ability to analyse information and evaluate its
reliability, validity and point of view.
Students organise the information and choose the best method of using and
sharing it, taking into account audience and purpose.
Students understand the necessity of behaving ethically in their selection
and use of information.
Research based learning is based on the Information Process or the Inquiry
model of learning. Assignments can be designed to be student centered and
open ended tasks.


THE INFORMATION PROCESS
    Defining information needs
    Locating information
    Selecting information
    Organizing information
    Creating, presenting and sharing information

These are the steps to be followed when carrying out research using the
Library


HOW TO CARRY OUT A RESEARCH ASSIGNMENT


Planning the Research

Defining Information Needs

    Brainstorming            What do you already know?


                                     Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   57
                                 What you must find out?
                                 Develop Focus questions
    Students frame and
    clarify questions
                                 List key search terms


   Conducting the Research

   Locating Information

   Students locate and collect information from a range of sources
   Use a search strategy to locate information.
   Searching Tools

   *Research Centre -ALICE (Online Public Access Catalogue)

   Always start your searching using the Resource Centre CATALOGUE.
   These resources are readily available.
   Start by looking in General Reference. Encyclopedia, Dictionary etc
   Locate a suitable text.
   *Use Indexes & contents pages of the texts
   *Use the Chapter headings and sub heading found in the text
   *Networked CD ROM Resources
   These should provide reference material. Encyclopedia - Microsoft Encarta,
   World Book

   Selecting a resource and the information required.
           Use a variety of resources
           Skim & scan resource to locate required information
           Record main idea using keyword Notemaking strategies
           Use appropriate Notemaking Frameworks
       
   Processing and Interpreting the Information

   Once an information source is found, read it and process the information so
   as to select appropriate information and discard irrelevant information


58 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
Organising Information
         organise the information and represent it in ways suited both to the
          type of information and to their purposes
         Use a notemaking framework suitable to task
         Evaluate information for accuracy, fact & opinion [Be critical of
          information from the Web]
         Make judgments, inferences, deductions, generalizations or
          hypothesis.
Evaluating Information, Applying Finding and Presenting
         analyse and interpret information, judge its quality and decide what
          conclusions or inferences might reasonably be drawn from it
         use and share the information with others
Creating, Presenting & Sharing
           Use the various tools available to present information eg Construct
            models, use displays, tables, diagrams and charts
           Use
            * Word/ Excel -Word Process/spreadsheet
            * Publisher Desk top Publishing
            * Scanners / Digital Camera
            * Power Point electronic presentation
Decide on Presentation Format

*Written                           *Oral
Forms of Writing                   Reports
Narrative                          Descriptions &
Recounts                           Comparisons
Procedure
Description
Report
Explanation
Exposition

Use of Multi Media - Video, Audio, PowerPoint etc.

Refer to – DPE101/ECE101 Communication & Study Skills – Modules 2, 3 & 4



                                        Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   59
              CONSTITUTION OF LTC STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION

   AIMS
   To help maintain the well being of its members in all academic and cultural
   activities to achieve the overall objectives of the College.
   MEMBERSHIP
   (i)  All students entering the College to undergo any course of a duration
        of one academic year or more shall be ipso facto members of the
        Student’s Association.
   (ii) All such members shall compulsorily contribute towards the
        Association’s fund and amount as suggested under the finance of
        this Constitution.
   THE COUNCIL
   (i)  The Association shall have a Students’ Council, hereinafter called the
        Council.
   (ii) This Council shall consist of:
        a. 17 representatives from the second year students:
        b. 17 representatives from the first year students.
        Of these 17 representatives, there shall be 8 residential, 8 non
        residential and 1 Island representative.
        Of the 8 residential there shall be 4 Fijian and 4 Indian
        representatives. As far as possible female students shall have equal
        representation on the Council.
   OFFICE BEARERS
   The office bearers who shall form the Executive of the Council shall be :
   (i)   The President
   (ii)  2 Vice-presidents
   (iii) The Secretary
   (iv)   The Assistant Secretary
   (v)    The Treasurer
   (vi)   The Assistant Treasurer
   ELECTION
   General
   (i)  Election shall be by secret ballot.
   (ii) All elections shall be conducted completely by a returning Officer
        who shall be a member of the staff appointed by the Principal. The
        returning Officer shall be assisted by 2 student advisors.
60 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
(iii)  The returning Officer shall invite nominations through a notice
       which shall be posted on the students’ notice board at least ten clear
       days before the day of the election.
(iv) The name of the candidates nominated shall be posted on the
       students’ notice board together with the place at time appointed for
       the election, at least 5 clear days before the day of election.
(v)    Nomination shall show the name of the candidates and two of
       his/her sponsors; the nominator and the seconder duly signed by
       each of the three.
(vi) The nominations shall be screened by the staff.
(vii) Candidates with the highest number of votes shall be duly declared
       the winners of the election.
(viii) In the case of a tie there shall be a fresh election for the candidates to
       decide the winner.
(ix) Only bonafide members of the Students’ Association present at the
       time and place of voting shall have the right to vote.
First Year Council Members
(i)    The election shall be held during the month of April.
(ii)   Members so elected shall hold office until the end of the year of their
       election.
(iii) First year members of the Council shall be eligible for re- elections
       towards the end of the year.
(iv) Members elected from first year Council shall nominate one of the
       Vice-presidents, Assistant Secretary and Assistant Treasurer
(v)    All bonafide members of first year students shall vote for these posts.
Second Year Council Members
(i)   The election shall take place no later than mid-October.
(ii)  Only the first year bonafide students shall be eligible for nominations
      and shall have the right to vote.
(iii) Members elected shall not hold office until the beginning of the next
      academic year.
ELECTION OF OFFICE BEARERS
(i)   Within one week of the election of the council members, under the
      supervision of the Returning Officer, the Office Bearers shall be
      elected by the bonfire first year students.
(ii)  The post contested shall be the President. A Vice President, Secretary
      and Treasurer.


                                      Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   61
   (iii)   A Vice-President, Assistant secretary, Assistant Treasurer shall be
           first year students.
   (iv)    The nominations for these posts shall be from the Councillors elect.
   (v)     Only financial members shall vote for first and second year office
           bearers respectively.
   (vi)    Only financial members shall hold office.
   RESPONSIBILITIES OF OFFICE BEARERS
   THE PRESIDENT
   (i)   shall be the official head of the Student’s Association, the Students
         Council and the Executive Committee.
   (ii)  shall chair all Council meetings, Executive meetings and any other
         general or special meetings.
   (iii) shall work in close consultation and co-operation with the Principal
         for the welfare of the College.
   (iv) shall hold office until graduation.
   THE VICE PRESIDENTS
   (i)  The Vice-Presidents shall work in close association with the
        President and deputies for him/her when and where necessary.
   (ii) The duties given to Vice Presidents shall be delegated at the first
        meeting of the Council.
   THE SECRETARY
   (i)  shall keep written records of all proceedings of the Council and for
        all general meetings.
   (ii) shall prepare an agenda of all Council and Annual General Meetings.
   THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY
   (i)  shall work in close association with the Secretary and deputies for
        him/her when and where necessary.
   (ii) shall note all minutes of the proceedings of the Council.
   THE TREASURER
   (i)  shall be responsible to the Council for all matters dealing with the
        finance of the Association.
   (ii) shall make accounts available for inspection at any time and for the
        Annual General Meeting.
   THE ASSISTANT TREASURER
   (i)  shall work in close association with the Treasurer and deputies for
         him/her when and where necessary.

62 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE COUNCIL
(i)   The Council shall assist the College for the academic, social and
      cultural welfare of its members.
(ii)  The Council shall appoint student representatives on the various
      College committees.
(iii) The Council shall handover all the assets and liabilities of the
      Students’ Association to the Principal after the Annual General
      Meeting.
(iv) The Council shall take charge soon after the election of the office
      bearers and ensure the proper use and maintenance of all students
      Association assets.
SUB-COMMITTEES
(i)  The Council shall have the prerogative of creating sub-committees
     and determining their membership and functions as it thinks fit.
(ii) The sub-committees shall present a written progress report to the
     Council at its Council Meetings.
THE STAFF ADVISERS
(i)   The Council shall recommend three College Tutors as its Advisers.
(ii)  The appointment of the Advisers shall be made by the Principal.
(iii) One of the Advisers shall be responsible for the welfare of the
      Regional students.
(iv) The appointment shall be for one academic year.
MEETING OF THE COUNCIL
Annual General Meeting
(i)   The Annual General Meeting shall be held in the last week of
      October
(ii)  The Agenda shall be prepared and posted on the Students Notice
      Board at least seven clear days before the day of the meeting
(iii) The following reports shall be presented at this meeting:
      a. The Annual Report
      b. Audited Financial Statement
(iv) Matters to be discussed at this meeting shall include:
      a. Any matter raised by the members of the Students Association
      b. Matters pertaining to the amendment of the Constitution
(v)   The Quorum shall be at least 50 per cent for the members of the
      Students’ Association.



                                  Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   63
   General Meeting
   (i)   It shall be convened by the Secretary of the Council as and when
         necessary.
   (ii)  The agenda shall be prepared and posted on the Students’ Notice
         Board seven clear days before the day of the meeting.
   (iii) Any student wishing to raise any matter for discussion during the
         meeting shall give notice to the Secretary in writing two days before
         the agenda is prepared so that it could be included in the agenda.
   (iv) The quorum shall be at least 50 percent of the members of the
         Association.
   Extra-Ordinary Meeting
   (i)   Such a meeting shall be convened by the Secretary on the instruction
         of the Council if it so desires or at the written request of at least two
         thirds of the members of the Students’ Association.
   (ii)  The deliberations shall be restricted to the purpose for which the
         meeting is called.
   Council Meeting
   (i)   It shall be convened by the Secretary of the Council at least once a
         month and shall be presided by the President.
   (ii)  The quorum shall be at least 80 percent of the total members of the
         Council.
   (iii) Any member who misses three consecutive meetings shall cease to
         be a member of the council.
   (iv) A by-election shall be held to fill in the post.
   Other Meetings
   (i)   Any other student meeting to be convened by a Council member
         shall have the prior approval of the President of the Council.
   Cultural, Religious and Sporting Bodies
   (i)   These bodies shall submit to the Council -
         a. Their planned activities for the year no later than April,
         b. Annual reports by the first week of October.
   FINANCES
   (i)   The Students’ Association members shall be levied a subscription at a
         rate agreed by the AGM.
   (ii)  All the members of the Students’ Association shall pay the
         subscription as decided by the AGM on the day of enrolment.



64 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
(iii)  All monies raised through subscriptions, donations and by any other
       means by the Students’ Association shall be deposited in the
       Association Trust Fund.
(iv) The Trustee of the Association Trust Fund shall be the Principal,
       Treasurer and President.
(v)    The Association trust Fund shall be operated by the Treasurer, the
       President and the Principal subject to official financial regulations.
(vi) The funds shall be used only with the approval of the Council and
       the Principal.
(vii) The funds should be utilised for the benefit of the members of the
       Association and for the welfare of the college as a whole.
(viii) The council shall prepare a schedule of expenditure for the year at
       the beginning of each year and shall adhere to it as far as is possible.
(ix) The Executive Officer shall keep proper records of all income and
       expenditure and shall help the Treasurer keep the Council informed
       of its financial position at each Council meeting.
(x)    The financial year shall end two weeks before the AGM.
(xi) The Council shall provide financial assistance to recognised sporting
       clubs, culture and religious bodies of the College.
(xii) The Council shall keep in reserve at least ten percent of the total
       subscriptions collected in any one year.
(xiii) The Council, with the approval of the Students’ Association shall be
       empowered to use its reserve funds for any approved capital
       expenditure.
VACANCIES IN THE COUNCIL
(i) Any vacancy in the Council resulting from death, resignation,
    termination of studentship or dismissal from the Council shall be
    filled through a by-election.
AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION
(i)   This Constitution shall be amended only at an AGM or at an
      extraordinary meeting called for that purpose.
(ii)  Any amendment shall require a vote of at least two-thirds of the full
      membership of the Students’ Association.
(iii) Proposals for amendments shall be submitted in writing to the
      Council fourteen (14) days before the day of the meeting. The
      proposed amendments shall be included on the agenda of that
      meeting.


                                     Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   65
   (iv)   All amendments shall be forwarded to the staff for its consideration
          before they are submitted to the Board of Governors for its
          ratification.




66 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006
Notes




 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006   67
                                       Notes




68 Lautoka Teachers’ College Handbook 2006

				
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