Engineering Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Document Sample
Engineering Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Powered By Docstoc
					272             Engineering: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

292. Seminar in Solid-State Technology (1)                   Fidelis O. Eke, Ph.D., Professor                              Faculty
Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing.             Rida T. Farouki, Ph.D., Professor
                                                             Andrew A. Frank, Ph.D., Professor                             Jean-Jacques Chattot, Ph.D., Professor
Lectures on solid-state technology by various visiting
                                                             Mohamed M. Hafez, Ph.D., Professor,                           Roger Davis, Ph.D., Professor
experts in the field. May be repeated for credit. (S/
                                                                Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award               Jean-Pierre Delplanque, Ph.D., Professor
U grading only.)—III. (III.)
                                                             Ronald A. Hess, Ph.D., Professor                              Fidelis O. Eke, Ph.D., Professor
293. Computer Engineering Research                                                                                         Mohamed M. Hafez, Ph.D., Professor
Seminar (1)                                                  Michael R. Hill, Ph.D., Professor
                                                             David A. Horsley, Ph.D., Associate Professor                     Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award
Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing or                                                                         Ronald A. Hess, Ph.D., Professor
                                                             Mont Hubbard, Ph.D., Professor
consent of instructor. Lectures, tutorials, and seminars                                                                   Sanjay S. Joshi, Ph.D., Associate Professor
                                                             Maury L. Hull, Ph.D., Professor
on topics in computer engineering. May be repeated                                                                         Valeria La Saponara, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
                                                             Sanjay S. Joshi, Ph.D., Associate Professor
for credit up to four times. (S/U grading only.)—II,                                                                       Nesrin Sarigul-Klijn, Ph.D., Professor
                                                             Dean C. Karnopp, Ph.D., Professor
III. (II, III.)                                                                                                            C. P. (Case) van Dam, Ph.D., Professor
                                                             Ian M. Kennedy, Ph.D., Professor
294. Communications, Signal and Image                        Valeria La Saponara, Ph.D., Assistant Professor               Bruce R. White, Ph.D., Professor
Processing Seminar (1)                                       Donald L. Margolis, Ph.D., Professor
Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing.
                                                                                                                           The Aerospace Science &
                                                             Jae Wan Park, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Communications, signal and image processing,                 Bahram Ravani, Ph.D., Professor                               Engineering Undergraduate
video engineering and computer vision. May be                Nesrin Sarigul-Klijn, Ph.D., Professor                        Program
repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III.         Benjamin D. Shaw, Ph.D., Professor                            Aerospace Science and Engineering majors learn to
295. Systems, Control and Robotics                           C. P. (Case) van Dam, Ph.D., Professor                        apply the principles of the physical sciences and
Seminar (1)                                                  Steven A. Velinsky, Ph.D., Professor                          engineering to the design of aerospace vehicles.
Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing.             Anthony S. Wexler, Ph.D., Professor                           Specific objectives include the design, development
Seminars on current research in systems and control          Bruce R. White, Ph.D., Professor                              and manufacture of aerospace vehicles and other
by faculty and visiting experts. Technical presenta-         Kazuo Yamazaki, Ph.D., Professor                              transportation systems through the integration of dis-
tions and lectures on current topics in robotics             Emeriti Faculty                                               ciplines associated with aerodynamics, propulsion,
research and robotics technology. May be repeated                                                                          structures and guidance/control.
for credit. (S/U grading only.)—II. (II.)                    Charles W. Beadle, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus
                                                             James W. Baughn, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus,                   Our Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Sci-
296. Photonics Research Seminar (1)                                                                                        ence and Engineering provides a broad background
                                                                Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award
Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing.             Harry A. Dwyer, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                     and fundamental education in mathematics, the
Lectures on photonics and related areas by faculty           Wolfgang Kollmann, Dr-Ing, Professor Emeritus                 physical sciences, and the engineering sciences.
and visiting experts. May be repeated for credit. (S/        Jerald M. Henderson, D.Engr., Professor Emeritus              These fundamentals, when complemented by the
U grading only.)—II, III. (II, III.)                         Myron A. Hoffman, Sc.D., Professor Emeritus                   required technical courses, prepare students for
298. Group Study (1-5)                                       John D. Kemper, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                     employment in government or industry, while simulta-
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (S/U grading            Lawrence W. Rehfield, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus                neously establishing an excellent foundation for
only.)                                                       Allan A. McKillop, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                  graduate studies.
299. Research (1-12)                                         Affiliated Faculty                                            Aerospace Science and Engineering
(S/U grading only.)                                                                                                        Undergraduate Major
                                                             James Schaaf, Ph.D., Lecturer
Professional Courses                                         Mission. The Department of Mechanical and Aero-               The Aerospace Science and Engineering program is
390. The Teaching of Electrical Engineering                  space Engineering is committed to educating future            not accredited by the Engineering Accreditation
(1)                                                          engineers so they may contribute to the economic              Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite
                                                             growth and well-being of both the state and the               1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 (410) 347-
Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: meet qualifications
                                                             nation and to the advancement of knowledge in the             7700.
for teaching assistant and/or associate-in in Electri-
cal Engineering. Participation as a teaching assistant       mechanical and aerospace sciences.                            Students are encouraged to carefully adhere to all
or associate-in in a designated engineering course.          Objectives. The objectives of the programs offered            prerequisite requirements. The instructor is autho-
Methods of leading discussion groups or laboratory           in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering include               rized to drop students from a course for which stated
sections, writing and grading quizzes, use of labora-        the following: to prepare its graduates to practice           prerequisites have not been completed.
tory equipment, and grading laboratory reports.              mechanical and/or aerospace engineering in a                  Lower Division Required Courses
May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I.           broad range of industries, to enable interested grad-                                                                       UNITS
(I.)                                                         uates to pursue graduate education, to prepare its              Mathematics 21A-21B-21C-21D ............ 16
396. Teaching Assistant Training Practicum                   graduates to participate in research and develop-               Mathematics 22A-22B............................ 6
(1-4)                                                        ment, and in other creative and innovative efforts in           Physics 9A-9B-9C-9D............................ 19
Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated             science, engineering, and technology and to allow               Chemistry 2A-2B or 2AH-2BH ............... 10
for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)    interested graduates to pursue entrepreneurial                  Engineering 4........................................ 3
                                                             endeavors.                                                      Engineering 6 or Mechanical Engineering
                                                             The Mechanical Engineering Programs are                         5 ......................................................... 4
                                                             described after the Aerospace Science and Engi-                 Engineering 17, 35, 45........................ 11
Engineering:                                                 neering Program description. The Mechanical and                 English 3 or University Writing Program 1, or
                                                             Aeronautical Engineering Graduate Program is                    Comparative Literature 1, 2, 3, or 4, or
Mechanical and                                               described after all the undergraduate program                   Native American Studies 5 ..................... 4
                                                             descriptions.                                                   Communication 1 or 3 ........................... 4
Aerospace Engineering                                                                                                        General Education electives .................. 16
                                                             Division of Aerospace Science and                               Minimum Lower Division Units .....93
                                                             Engineering                                                   Upper Division Requirements:
(College of Engineering)
                                                             The Division of Aerospace Science and Engineering
C. P. (Case) van Dam, Ph.D., Chairperson of the                                                                            A broad range of technical elective courses is avail-
                                                             administers both the Aeronautical Science and Engi-
Department                                                                                                                 able. Some students choose these electives from one
                                                             neering Program (no longer open for admittance or
                                                                                                                           area of study in order to begin developing a spe-
Fidelis O. Eke, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson of the               transfer) and the Aerospace Science and Engineer-
                                                                                                                           cialty. Others choose from several areas in order to
Department                                                   ing Program within the Department of Mechanical
                                                                                                                           broaden their background in the sciences and engi-
Department Office. 2132 Bainer Hall                          and Aerospace Engineering. The curricula for both
                                                                                                                           neering. Typical aerospace science and engineering
(530) 752-0580; Fax (530) 752-4158;                          programs are identical.
                                                                                                                           specialties include aero-thermodynamics, propul-
http://mae.ucdavis.edu                                       As of Fall 2009, all students transferring into our           sion systems, aircraft performance, stability and con-
                                                             aero program will be placed into the Aerospace Sci-           trol, aerospace structures and vehicles,
Faculty                                                      ence and Engineering Program. All new students will           aeroelasticity, flight testing, component and mecha-
Ralph C. Aldredge, III, Ph.D., Professor                     be admitted into the Aerospace Science and Engi-              nism design, or space systems design. There are a
Abdul I. Barakat, Ph.D., Professor                           neering Program. This program is not yet accredited           number of electives that could be recommended to
Jean-Jacques Chattot, Ph.D., Professor                       by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of                all aerospace science and engineering students
Harry H. Cheng, Ph.D., Professor                             Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology            regardless of their chosen area of specialization.
Cristina E. Davis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor                (ABET).
                                                                                                                           Suggested technical electives:
Roger Davis, Ph.D., Professor                                All students currently in the Aeronautical Science
Jean-Pierre Delplanque, Ph.D., Professor                                                                                   Aerospace Science and Engineering 139, 141
                                                             and Engineering program can remain in it; this pro-
Raissa D'Souza, Ph.D., Associate Professor                   gram is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation
Paul A. Erickson, Ph.D., Associate Professor                 Commission of ABET
                                        Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses
     General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience
                                                                                                   Engineering: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering                                     273

Suggested Advisers: J.J. Chattot, M. Hafez, R.A.                      Aeronautical Science and Engineering                                 broad background for entering engineering prac-
Hess, S. Joshi, V. La Saponara, N. Sarigul-Klijn, C.P.                126, 127, 129, 130A, 130B, 133, 135,                                 tice.
van Dam, B.R. White                                                   138 ................................................... 32           Students are encouraged to select elective courses
Upper Division Required Courses                                       Select one course from Applied Science                               from among the areas of specialization listed below.
                                                                      Engineering 115, Engineering 180 or
 Engineering 100, 102, 103, 104,                                      Mathematics 128C ................................ 4                  Areas of Specialization
 105.................................................... 19           Engineering 190.................................... 3
 Mechanical Engineering 106, 107A,                                                                                                         Mechanical Design. The creation and improve-
                                                                      Technical electives.................................. 7              ment of products, processes, or systems that are
 107B, 165, 171, 172.......................... 22                     A combined maximum of four units may be
 Aeronautical Science and Engineering                                                                                                      mechanical in nature are the primary activities of a
                                                                      selected from project/independent study                              professional mechanical engineer. The development
 126, 127, 129, 130A, 130B, 133,                                      courses (185A, 185B, 192, 199)
 135, 138............................................ 32                                                                                   of a product from concept generation to detailed
                                                                      General Education electives .................... 8                   design, manufacturing process selection and plan-
 Select one course from Applied Science                               Minimum Upper Division Units .....95
 Engineering 115, Engineering 180 or                                                                                                       ning, quality control and assurance, and life cycle
 Mathematics 128C................................. 4                 Minimum Units Required for Major ..... 188                            considerations are areas of study and specialization
 Engineering 190.................................... 3                                                                                     in the area of mechanical design.
                                                                     The Mechanical Engineering
 Technical electives .................................. 7                                                                                  Solutions to such major social problems as environ-
 A combined maximum of four units may be                             Undergraduate Program                                                 mental pollution, the lack of mass transportation, the
 selected from project/independent study                             The mechanical engineer uses basic science in the                     lack of raw materials, and energy shortages, will
 courses (185A, 185B, 192, 199)                                      design and manufacture of complex engineering sys-                    depend heavily on the engineer’s ability to create
 General Education electives..................... 8                  tems, requiring the application of physical and                       new types of machinery and mechanical systems.
 Minimum Upper Division Units ..... 95                               mechanical principles to the development of
                                                                                                                                           The engineer-designer must have a solid and rela-
Minimum Units Required for Major ..... 188                           machines, energy conversion systems, materials,
                                                                                                                                           tively broad background in the basic physical and
                                                                     and equipment for guidance and control.
                                                                                                                                           engineering sciences and have the ability to synthe-
Aeronautical Science and                                             Work in this broad field of engineering requires a                    size the information from such a background in cre-
Engineering Undergraduate Major                                      thorough knowledge of mathematics, physics, chem-                     ative problem solving. In addition to having
The Aeronautical Science and Engineering program                     istry, material science, fluid mechanics, thermody-                   technical competence, the designer must be able to
is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Com-                  namics, heat transfer, mass transfer, electricity,                    consider the socioeconomic consequences of a
mission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Bal-                  manufacturing processes, and economics.                               design and its possible impact on the environment.
timore, MD 21202-4012 (410) 347-7700.                                The Mechanical Engineering Program is designed to                     Product safety, reliability, and economics are other
                                                                     provide knowledge in mechanical engineering and                       considerations.
This program is no longer open for admission or
transfer. Students previously admitted to this pro-                  associated applied sciences so that graduates may                     Suggested technical electives:
gram who complete all degree requirements will                       practice in a broad range of industries, pursue grad-
                                                                                                                                             Aerospace Science and Engineering 130A,
receive a degree in Aeronautical Science and Engi-                   uate studies, participate in research and develop-
                                                                                                                                             130B, 133, 139
neering.                                                             ment, and/or pursue entrepreneurial endeavors.
                                                                                                                                             Biological Systems Engineering 114, 165
Students are encouraged to carefully adhere to all                   Mechanical Engineering                                                  Applied Science Engineering 115
prerequisite requirements. The instructor is autho-                                                                                          Engineering 111, 121, 122, 160 (only one
                                                                     Undergraduate Program                                                   unit of credit towards Technical Electives
rized to drop students from a course for which stated
prerequisites have not been completed.                               The Mechanical Engineering program is accredited                        requirement)
                                                                     by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of                          Materials Science and Engineering 180,
Lower Division Required Courses                                      ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD                       181, 182
                                                             UNITS   21202-4012 (410) 347-7700.                                              Mechanical Engineering 121, 134, 150B,
 Mathematics 21A-21B-21C-21D ............ 16                                                                                                 151, 152, 161
                                                                     Students are encouraged to carefully adhere to all
 Mathematics 22A-22B ............................ 6
                                                                     prerequisite requirements. The instructor is autho-                   Suggested Advisers: H.H. Cheng, R.T. Farouki, A.A.
 Physics 9A-9B-9C-9D ............................ 19
                                                                     rized to drop students from a course for which stated                 Frank, M.R. Hill, M.L. Hull, B. Ravani, S. Velinsky, K.
 Chemistry 2A-2B or 2AH-2BH................ 10
                                                                     prerequisites have not been completed.                                Yamazaki
 Engineering 4 ........................................ 3
 Engineering 6 or Mechanical Engineering                             Mechanical Engineering Programs                                       Biomedical and Engineering Fluid Mechan-
 5.......................................................... 4                                                                             ics. This field of study is based on the fundamentals
 Engineering 17, 35, 45 ........................ 11
                                                                     Lower Division Requirements:                                          of fluid mechanics and their broad range of applica-
 English 3 or University Writing Program 1, or                       The lower division requirements for the Mechanical                    tions in the biomedical and engineering areas.
 Comparative Literature 1, 2, 3, or 4, or                            Engineering and Mechanical Engineering/Materi-                        Areas of current research include blood circulation
 Native American Studies 5...................... 4                   als Science programs are the same.                                    and its potential role in the regulation of normal
 Communication 1 or 3............................ 4                  Lower Division Required Courses                                       physiological function and in the development of dis-
 General Education electives................... 16                                                                                         ease; groundwater and atmospheric flows and their
 Minimum Lower Division Units ..... 93                               Requirements for the Mechanical Engineering and                       implications for pollutant transport and environmen-
                                                                     Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science and                          tal concerns; aerodynamic flow around transporta-
Upper Division Requirements:                                         Engineering programs.                                                 tion vehicles and its impact on vehicle performance;
A broad range of technical elective courses is avail-                                                                              UNITS   and flow in combustion engines and other energy
able. Some students choose these electives from one                    Mathematics 21A-21B-21C-21D ............ 16                         systems with considerations of efficiency and envi-
area of study in order to begin developing a spe-                      Mathematics 22A-22B............................ 6                   ronmental impact. These areas are investigated both
cialty. Others choose from several areas in order to                   Physics 9A-9B-9C-9D............................ 19                  experimentally and computationally.
broaden their background in the sciences and engi-                     Chemistry 2A-2B or 2AH-2BH ............... 10
neering. Typical aerospace science and engineering                                                                                         Suggested technical electives:
                                                                       Engineering 4........................................ 3
specialties include aero-thermodynamics, propul-                       Engineering 6 or Mechanical Engineering                               Aerospace Science and Engineering 138
sion systems, aircraft performance, stability and con-                 5 ......................................................... 4         Engineering 121, 160 (only one unit of credit
trol, aerospace structures and vehicles,                               Engineering 17, 35, 45........................ 11                     towards technical requirements); Engineering
aeroelasticity, flight testing, component and mecha-                   Mechanical Engineering 50 .................... 4                      180
nism design, or space systems design. There are a                      English 3 or University Writing Program 1, or                         Chemical Engineering 161A, 161B
number of electives that could be recommended to                       Comparative Literature 1, 2, 3, or 4, or                              Civil and Environmental Engineering 144,
all aerospace science and engineering students                         Native American Studies 5...................... 4                     149
regardless of their chosen area of specialization.                     Communication 1 or 3............................ 4                    Mechanical Engineering 161, 163
Suggested technical electives:                                         General Education electives .................. 16                   Suggested Advisers: R.C. Aldredge, A.I. Barakat,
  Aerospace Science and Engineering 139,                               Minimum Lower Division Units .....97                                J.J. Chattot, M. Hafez, I.M. Kennedy, W. Kollmann,
  141                                                                                                                                      B.D. Shaw, C.P. van Dam, A.S. Wexler, B.R. White
                                                                     Mechanical Engineering Upper
Suggested Advisers: J.J. Chattot, M. Hafez, R.A.                     Division Requirements:                                                Combustion and the Environment. Combus-
Hess, S. Joshi, V. La Saponara, N. Sarigul-Klijn, C.P.                                                                                     tion is widely used for energy generation, propul-
                                                                     Students spend their third year in further study of fun-              sion, heating, and waste disposal, as well as for
van Dam, B.R. White
                                                                     damental courses, and in the fourth year they may                     many other applications. Mechanical engineers are
Upper Division Required Courses                                      tailor their studies to their interests by selecting                  often heavily involved with the design of combustion
 Engineering 100, 102, 103, 104,                                     courses in controls and systems analysis, fluid                       systems (internal combustion engines, gas turbines,
 105.................................................... 19          mechanics, heat transfer, mechanical design or ther-                  furnaces, etc.) and deal with aspects of combustion
 Mechanical Engineering 106, 107A, 107B,                             modynamics. Students can either prepare for gradu-                    ranging from increasing efficiencies to reducing pol-
 165, 171, 172.................................... 22                ate study in Mechanical Engineering or obtain a                       lutant emissions. This specialization is for those who
                                                                                                                                           would like to work in fields that use combustion, or

                                         Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses
      General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience
274             Engineering: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

that deal with pollution related to combustion. With         Suggested technical electives:                                   courses (185A, 185B, 192, 199) not used
the current increased emphasis on reducing pollut-             Aerospace Science and Engineering 129,                         in satisfaction of core degree requirements.
ants while maintaining or increasing efficiency, the           139, 141                                                       The remaining units may be selected from
efforts of mechanical engineers in designing and               Engineering 121, 122                                           the technical electives list.
improving combustion systems are becoming more                 Mechanical Engineering 121, 134, 152                           General Education electives ................. 8
important.                                                                                                                  Minimum Upper Division Units .....88
                                                             Suggested Advisers: F.O. Eke, A.A. Frank, R.A.
Suggested technical electives:                                                                                             Minimum Units Required for Major ..... 185
                                                             Hess, M. Hubbard, S. Joshi, D.C. Karnopp, D.L.
  Mechanical Engineering 161, 163                            Margolis.                                                     The Mechanical Engineering/
  Civil and Environmental Engineering 149,                   Ground Vehicle Systems. An important aspect                   Materials Science Undergraduate
  150                                                        of mechanical engineering is the design of more               Program
Suggested Advisers: R.C. Aldredge, P. A. Erickson,           environmentally benign surface vehicles that provide
I.M. Kennedy, W. Kollmann, B.D. Shaw                         efficient individual and public transportation. Innova-       The Mechanical Engineering/Material Science pro-
                                                             tions in the field require competence in vehicle              gram is a combined major that offers students a
Heat Transfer, Thermodynamics, and                                                                                         unique interdisciplinary experience requiring work
Energy Systems. This specialization emphasizes               dynamics, control of vehicle dynamics, power
                                                             sources and power transmission, lightweight struc-            with mechanical engineering and material science
the fundamentals of heat transfer and thermodynam-                                                                         and engineering students. In addition to performing
ics, and their application to the design of advanced         tures and systems, alternatively fueled power sys-
                                                             tems, including electrical drives and fuel cells, and         work in portions of the mechanical engineering pro-
engineering systems. The objective of the program is                                                                       gram described above, this program provides the
to introduce students to the fundamental processes of        mechanical systems.
                                                                                                                           background to understand the structure, properties,
heat transfer and thermodynamics in complex engi-            Transportation Systems. As society recognizes                 and behavior of materials and to pursue these fields
neering systems so that they are able to design more         the increasing importance of optimizing transporta-           in industry and/or graduate scholarship.
efficient, cost effective, and reliable systems with less    tion systems to minimize environmental degradation
environmental pollution and impact. An understand-           and energy expenditure, engineers will need to con-           Mechanical Engineering/Materials
ing of heat transfer and thermodynamics is required          sider major innovations in the way people and                 Science Undergraduate Major
for the design of efficient, cost effective systems for      goods are moved. Such innovations will require
                                                                                                                           The Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science pro-
power generation, propulsion, heat exchangers,               competence in vehicle dynamics, propulsion and
                                                                                                                           gram is not accredited by the Engineering Accredita-
industrial processes, refining, and chemical process-        control, and an understanding of the problems
                                                                                                                           tion Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite
ing. This area of specialization is important to many        caused by present-day modes of transportation.
                                                                                                                           1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 (410) 347-
industries-aerospace, defense, automotive-as well as         Vehicle control requires an understanding of sensors
                                                                                                                           7700.
to the thermal design of electronic and computer             and actuators, and the integration of yet-to-be-pro-
packages.                                                    posed concepts into overall vehicular dynamics.               Students are encouraged to carefully adhere to all
                                                             Competence in these areas allows for the develop-             prerequisite requirements. The instructor is autho-
Suggested technical electives:
                                                             ment of alternative propulsion concepts, such as              rized to drop students from a course for which stated
  Aeronautical Science and Engineering 138                   electric, hybrid, and fuel cell.                              prerequisites have not been completed.
  Engineering 111
                                                             Suggested technical electives:                                Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science
  Mechanical Engineering 161, 163
                                                                                                                           and Engineering Lower Division Required
Suggested Advisers: R.C. Aldredge, R. Davis, P.A.              Aerospace Science and Engineering 127,
                                                                                                                           Courses
Erickson, I.M. Kennedy, J.W. Park, B.D. Shaw                   129
                                                               Biological Systems Engineering 114,                         The lower division requirements for this program are
Manufacturing. Manufacturing is concerned with                 Civil and Environmental Engineering 131,                    identical to those for the Mechanical Engineering
the conversion of raw materials into finished prod-            149                                                         program. See Mechanical Engineering Programs
ucts by a variety of processes, such as machining,             Engineering 121, 122, 160 (only one unit of                 Lower Division Requirements:, on page 273.
forming, casting, and molding. Modern manufactur-              credit towards Technical Electives
ing technology is increasingly dependent upon inte-            requirement)
                                                                                                                           Mechanical Engineering/Materials
gration with computer-aided design systems and                 Mechanical Engineering 134, 150B, 161,                      Science Upper Division
precision computer controls. State-of-the-art laborato-        162, 163                                                    Requirements
ries offer the opportunity for hands-on experience
with a wide spectrum of manufacturing equipment.             Suggested Advisers: P.A. Erickson, A.A. Frank, M.             Students spend their third year in further study of fun-
Manufacturing engineers must have expertise in               Hubbard, J.W. Park, D.C. Karnopp, D.L. Margolis,              damental courses and in their fourth year they may
design, materials, controls, statistical methods, com-       S. Velinsky                                                   tailor their studies to their interests by selecting
puter software, and microprocessor applications.             Mechanical Engineering Upper Division                         courses in materials science, mechanical design, or
                                                             Required Courses                                              manufacturing. Students can either prepare for grad-
Suggested technical electives:                                                                                             uate study or obtain a broad background for enter-
  Electrical and Computer Engineering 160                     Engineering 100, 102, 103, 104,                              ing engineering practice
  Materials Science and Engineering 180, 181                  105.................................................... 19
                                                              Mechanical Engineering 150A and 172; and                     Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science
  Mechanical Engineering 150B, 151, 154                                                                                    and Engineering Upper Division Required
                                                              one course chosen from 185A with 185B
Suggested Advisers: H.H. Cheng, R.T. Farouki, D.A.            (both courses must be taken in consecutive                   Courses
Horsley, V. La Saponara, B. Ravani, K. Yamazaki               quarters), or Aeronautical Science and                        Engineering 100, 102, 103, 104,
Systems Dynamics and Control. Engineers are                   Engineering 130A................................ 12           105 ................................................... 19
increasingly concerned with the performance of inte-          Mechanical Engineering 106, 107A,                             Mechanical Engineering 106, 107A,
grated dynamics systems in which it is not possible           107B, 165, 171.................................. 18           107B, 150A, 165, 171, 172 .............. 26
to optimize component parts without considering the           Engineering 190.................................... 3         Mechanical Engineering 185A & 185B
overall system.                                               Select one course from Applied Science                        (both courses must be taken in consecutive
                                                              Engineering 115; Engineering 180;                             quarters), or Materials Science and
Systems Dynamics and Control specialists are con-
                                                              Mathematics 128C; Statistics 120,                             Engineering 188A & B (both courses must
cerned with the modeling, analysis, and simulation
                                                              131A .................................................. 4     be taken in consecutive quarters) ............. 4
of all types of dynamic systems and with the use of
                                                              Technical electives ................................ 24       Materials Science and Engineering 160,
automatic control techniques to change the dynamic
                                                                Sixteen of the 24 units must be selected                    162, 164, 174 ................................... 16
characteristics of systems in useful ways. The empha-
                                                                from upper division courses in engineering;                 One course chosen from Materials Science
sis in this program is on the physical systems that are
                                                                of these units, one course must be chosen                   and Engineering 172, 180, 181, 182,
closely related to mechanical engineering, but the
                                                                from the following: Engineering 122,                        188A-B (if not used to satisfy above core
techniques for studying these systems apply to
                                                                Mechanical Engineering 121, 150B, 154.                      requirement) .......................................... 4
social, economic, and other dynamic systems.
                                                                Two additional courses must be chosen                       One laboratory course chosen from
Ongoing research includes projects on continuously              from the following design courses:                          Materials Science and Engineering 172L
variable transmissions, active and semi-active sus-             Aerospace Science and Engineering 129,                      or 174L ................................................ 2
pension systems, modeling and control of vehicle                130B, 138, 139, 141, 189A, 189B;                            Select one course from Applied Science
dynamics, electromechanical actuator design, elec-              Materials Science and Engineering 180,                      Engineering 115; Engineering 180;
tronically controlled steering, the analysis of fuel            182; Mechanical Engineering 134, 151,                       Mathematics 128C; Statistics 120,
management systems, and the design of flight-control            152, 161, 163. Students may also choose                     131A ................................................... 4
systems with humans in the loop.                                from Aerospace Science and Engineering                      Engineering 190.................................... 3
An Automotive System Dynamics Laboratory is being               130A, Mechanical Engineering 150B,                          Technical electives................................ 11
used for testing components such as engines, trans-             154, if these courses are not used in                         One course must be chosen from the
missions, brakes, and steering systems as well as               satisfaction of the core design requirement                   following: Engineering 122, Mechanical
testing complete vehicles.                                      above.                                                        Engineering 121, 150B, 154.
                                                                A combined maximum of four units may be                       Two courses must be chosen from
                                                                selected from project/independent study                       Aerospace Science and Engineering 129,
                                        Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses
     General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience
274             Engineering: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

that deal with pollution related to combustion. With         Suggested technical electives:                                   courses (185A, 185B, 192, 199) not used
the current increased emphasis on reducing pollut-             Aerospace Science and Engineering 129,                         in satisfaction of core degree requirements.
ants while maintaining or increasing efficiency, the           139, 141                                                       The remaining units may be selected from
efforts of mechanical engineers in designing and               Engineering 121, 122                                           the technical electives list.
improving combustion systems are becoming more                 Mechanical Engineering 121, 134, 152                           General Education electives ................. 8
important.                                                                                                                  Minimum Upper Division Units .....88
                                                             Suggested Advisers: F.O. Eke, A.A. Frank, R.A.
Suggested technical electives:                                                                                             Minimum Units Required for Major ..... 185
                                                             Hess, M. Hubbard, S. Joshi, D.C. Karnopp, D.L.
  Mechanical Engineering 161, 163                            Margolis.                                                     The Mechanical Engineering/
  Civil and Environmental Engineering 149,                   Ground Vehicle Systems. An important aspect                   Materials Science Undergraduate
  150                                                        of mechanical engineering is the design of more               Program
Suggested Advisers: R.C. Aldredge, P. A. Erickson,           environmentally benign surface vehicles that provide
I.M. Kennedy, W. Kollmann, B.D. Shaw                         efficient individual and public transportation. Innova-       The Mechanical Engineering/Material Science pro-
                                                             tions in the field require competence in vehicle              gram is a combined major that offers students a
Heat Transfer, Thermodynamics, and                                                                                         unique interdisciplinary experience requiring work
Energy Systems. This specialization emphasizes               dynamics, control of vehicle dynamics, power
                                                             sources and power transmission, lightweight struc-            with mechanical engineering and material science
the fundamentals of heat transfer and thermodynam-                                                                         and engineering students. In addition to performing
ics, and their application to the design of advanced         tures and systems, alternatively fueled power sys-
                                                             tems, including electrical drives and fuel cells, and         work in portions of the mechanical engineering pro-
engineering systems. The objective of the program is                                                                       gram described above, this program provides the
to introduce students to the fundamental processes of        mechanical systems.
                                                                                                                           background to understand the structure, properties,
heat transfer and thermodynamics in complex engi-            Transportation Systems. As society recognizes                 and behavior of materials and to pursue these fields
neering systems so that they are able to design more         the increasing importance of optimizing transporta-           in industry and/or graduate scholarship.
efficient, cost effective, and reliable systems with less    tion systems to minimize environmental degradation
environmental pollution and impact. An understand-           and energy expenditure, engineers will need to con-           Mechanical Engineering/Materials
ing of heat transfer and thermodynamics is required          sider major innovations in the way people and                 Science Undergraduate Major
for the design of efficient, cost effective systems for      goods are moved. Such innovations will require
                                                                                                                           The Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science pro-
power generation, propulsion, heat exchangers,               competence in vehicle dynamics, propulsion and
                                                                                                                           gram is not accredited by the Engineering Accredita-
industrial processes, refining, and chemical process-        control, and an understanding of the problems
                                                                                                                           tion Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite
ing. This area of specialization is important to many        caused by present-day modes of transportation.
                                                                                                                           1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 (410) 347-
industries-aerospace, defense, automotive-as well as         Vehicle control requires an understanding of sensors
                                                                                                                           7700.
to the thermal design of electronic and computer             and actuators, and the integration of yet-to-be-pro-
packages.                                                    posed concepts into overall vehicular dynamics.               Students are encouraged to carefully adhere to all
                                                             Competence in these areas allows for the develop-             prerequisite requirements. The instructor is autho-
Suggested technical electives:
                                                             ment of alternative propulsion concepts, such as              rized to drop students from a course for which stated
  Aeronautical Science and Engineering 138                   electric, hybrid, and fuel cell.                              prerequisites have not been completed.
  Engineering 111
                                                             Suggested technical electives:                                Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science
  Mechanical Engineering 161, 163
                                                                                                                           and Engineering Lower Division Required
Suggested Advisers: R.C. Aldredge, R. Davis, P.A.              Aerospace Science and Engineering 127,
                                                                                                                           Courses
Erickson, I.M. Kennedy, J.W. Park, B.D. Shaw                   129
                                                               Biological Systems Engineering 114,                         The lower division requirements for this program are
Manufacturing. Manufacturing is concerned with                 Civil and Environmental Engineering 131,                    identical to those for the Mechanical Engineering
the conversion of raw materials into finished prod-            149                                                         program. See Mechanical Engineering Programs
ucts by a variety of processes, such as machining,             Engineering 121, 122, 160 (only one unit of                 Lower Division Requirements:, on page 273.
forming, casting, and molding. Modern manufactur-              credit towards Technical Electives
ing technology is increasingly dependent upon inte-            requirement)
                                                                                                                           Mechanical Engineering/Materials
gration with computer-aided design systems and                 Mechanical Engineering 134, 150B, 161,                      Science Upper Division
precision computer controls. State-of-the-art laborato-        162, 163                                                    Requirements
ries offer the opportunity for hands-on experience
with a wide spectrum of manufacturing equipment.             Suggested Advisers: P.A. Erickson, A.A. Frank, M.             Students spend their third year in further study of fun-
Manufacturing engineers must have expertise in               Hubbard, J.W. Park, D.C. Karnopp, D.L. Margolis,              damental courses and in their fourth year they may
design, materials, controls, statistical methods, com-       S. Velinsky                                                   tailor their studies to their interests by selecting
puter software, and microprocessor applications.             Mechanical Engineering Upper Division                         courses in materials science, mechanical design, or
                                                             Required Courses                                              manufacturing. Students can either prepare for grad-
Suggested technical electives:                                                                                             uate study or obtain a broad background for enter-
  Electrical and Computer Engineering 160                     Engineering 100, 102, 103, 104,                              ing engineering practice
  Materials Science and Engineering 180, 181                  105.................................................... 19
                                                              Mechanical Engineering 150A and 172; and                     Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science
  Mechanical Engineering 150B, 151, 154                                                                                    and Engineering Upper Division Required
                                                              one course chosen from 185A with 185B
Suggested Advisers: H.H. Cheng, R.T. Farouki, D.A.            (both courses must be taken in consecutive                   Courses
Horsley, V. La Saponara, B. Ravani, K. Yamazaki               quarters), or Aeronautical Science and                        Engineering 100, 102, 103, 104,
Systems Dynamics and Control. Engineers are                   Engineering 130A................................ 12           105 ................................................... 19
increasingly concerned with the performance of inte-          Mechanical Engineering 106, 107A,                             Mechanical Engineering 106, 107A,
grated dynamics systems in which it is not possible           107B, 165, 171.................................. 18           107B, 150A, 165, 171, 172 .............. 26
to optimize component parts without considering the           Engineering 190.................................... 3         Mechanical Engineering 185A & 185B
overall system.                                               Select one course from Applied Science                        (both courses must be taken in consecutive
                                                              Engineering 115; Engineering 180;                             quarters), or Materials Science and
Systems Dynamics and Control specialists are con-
                                                              Mathematics 128C; Statistics 120,                             Engineering 188A & B (both courses must
cerned with the modeling, analysis, and simulation
                                                              131A .................................................. 4     be taken in consecutive quarters) ............. 4
of all types of dynamic systems and with the use of
                                                              Technical electives ................................ 24       Materials Science and Engineering 160,
automatic control techniques to change the dynamic
                                                                Sixteen of the 24 units must be selected                    162, 164, 174 ................................... 16
characteristics of systems in useful ways. The empha-
                                                                from upper division courses in engineering;                 One course chosen from Materials Science
sis in this program is on the physical systems that are
                                                                of these units, one course must be chosen                   and Engineering 172, 180, 181, 182,
closely related to mechanical engineering, but the
                                                                from the following: Engineering 122,                        188A-B (if not used to satisfy above core
techniques for studying these systems apply to
                                                                Mechanical Engineering 121, 150B, 154.                      requirement) .......................................... 4
social, economic, and other dynamic systems.
                                                                Two additional courses must be chosen                       One laboratory course chosen from
Ongoing research includes projects on continuously              from the following design courses:                          Materials Science and Engineering 172L
variable transmissions, active and semi-active sus-             Aerospace Science and Engineering 129,                      or 174L ................................................ 2
pension systems, modeling and control of vehicle                130B, 138, 139, 141, 189A, 189B;                            Select one course from Applied Science
dynamics, electromechanical actuator design, elec-              Materials Science and Engineering 180,                      Engineering 115; Engineering 180;
tronically controlled steering, the analysis of fuel            182; Mechanical Engineering 134, 151,                       Mathematics 128C; Statistics 120,
management systems, and the design of flight-control            152, 161, 163. Students may also choose                     131A ................................................... 4
systems with humans in the loop.                                from Aerospace Science and Engineering                      Engineering 190.................................... 3
An Automotive System Dynamics Laboratory is being               130A, Mechanical Engineering 150B,                          Technical electives................................ 11
used for testing components such as engines, trans-             154, if these courses are not used in                         One course must be chosen from the
missions, brakes, and steering systems as well as               satisfaction of the core design requirement                   following: Engineering 122, Mechanical
testing complete vehicles.                                      above.                                                        Engineering 121, 150B, 154.
                                                                A combined maximum of four units may be                       Two courses must be chosen from
                                                                selected from project/independent study                       Aerospace Science and Engineering 129,
                                        Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses
     General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience
                                                                                        Engineering: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering                                275

   130B, 138, 139, 189A, 189B; Materials                     Research Facilities and Partnerships:                         who have taken Civil and Environmental Engineer-
   Science and Engineering 147, 180, 181,                    • Center for Computational Fluid Dynamics                     ing 141L.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Erickson, Kennedy,
   182; Mechanical Engineering 134, 151,                                                                                   Park, Shaw
   152, 161, 163. Students may also choose                   • Institute of Transportation Studies
                                                                                                                           107B. Experimental Methods (3)
   from Mechanical Engineering 150B, 154 if                  • Center for Advanced Highway Maintenance and                 Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:
   these courses are not used for a core design                Construction Technology                                     Engineering 100 and 102. Open to Mechanical
   requirement above.                                                                                                      Engineering, Aeronautical Science & Engineering
                                                             • GATE Center for Hybrid Electric Vehicles
   A combined maximum of 4 units of courses                                                                                and Mechanical/Materials Science & Engineering.
   Mechanical Engineering 185A & B,                          • Aeronautical Wind Tunnel Facility
                                                                                                                           Experiments to illustrate principles of mechanical sys-
   Materials Science and Engineering 188 A                   Complete Information on our website at                        tems. Theory of measurements; Signal analysis;
   & B or any course numbered 192 or 199                     http://mae.ucdavis.edu/grad_studies/.                         Demonstration of basic sensors for mechanical sys-
   not used in satisfaction of core requirements                                                                           tems; Experimental project design; Experiments
   may be applied to the technical elective                  Courses in Engineering: Mechanical                            involving voltage measurement; strain gauges,
   degree requirement.                                       (EME)                                                         dynamic systems of 0th, 1st and 2nd order. Only
 General Education electives..................... 8          Courses in Mechanical Engineering (EME) are listed            two units of credit for students who have previously
 Minimum Upper Division Units ..... 97                       below; courses in Aerospace Science and Engineer-             taken Biomedical Engineering 111. Only one unit of
Minimum Units Required for Major ..... 194                   ing (EAE) are listed immediately following; graduate          credit for students who have previously taken Biolog-
                                                             courses in Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineer-              ical Systems Engineering 165.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)
The Graduate Program in                                      ing (MAE) follow.                                             Frank, Hill, Horsley, La Saponara
Mechanical and Aeronautical                                                                                                121. Engineering Applications of Dynamics
Engineering                                                  Lower Division Courses
                                                                                                                           (4)
M.S., M.Engr., D.Engr. and Ph.D.                             1. Mechanical Engineering (1)                                 Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:
Professional Certificate                                     Lecture—1 hour. Description of the field of mechani-          Engineering 102. Open to students in the College of
Designated Ph.D. emphasis available in Biotechnol-           cal engineering with examples taken from industrial           Engineering. Technical elective that revisits dynamic
ogy                                                          applications, discussions of the practice with respect        principles with emphasis on engineering applica-
(530) 752-0581                                               to engineering principles, ethics, and responsibili-          tions; stressing importance of deriving equations of
                                                             ties. (P/NP grading only.)—I. (I.)                            motion and setting these into format for computer
The defining element of graduate study in the
Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering Program              5. Computer Programming for Engineering                       solution with computer simulation lab, students gain
is interdisciplinary design. Research within this            Applications (4)                                              experience with solving complex, real engineering
Graduate Program advances design in diverse fields           Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:            applications.—III. (III.) Karnopp, Margolis
such as vehicles, biomechanics, aerostructures, sen-         Mathematics 16A or 21A (may be taken concur-                  134. Vehicle Stability (4)
sors, combustion, and energy systems. Graduate stu-          rently). Structured programming in C for solving              Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:
dents acquire skills to address both fundamental             problems in engineering. Introduction to MATLAB               course 171. Introduction to the static and dynamic
issues in these areas and to design complex, multi-          and comparison study of C/C++ with MATLAB. Not                stability characteristics of transportation vehicles
component systems. The highly collaborative envi-            open for credit to students who have completed                with examples drawn from aircraft, high-perfor-
ronment fosters multidisciplinary research while             course 124.—I. (I.) Cheng                                     mance automobiles, rail cars and boats. Laboratory
drawing on the study of mathematics, electrical engi-        50. Manufacturing Processes (4)                               experiments illustrate the dynamic behavior of auto-
neering, materials science, bioengineering and nan-          Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours.               mobiles, race cars, bicycles, etc.—III. (III.) Karnopp
otechnology in addition to the core areas. Recruiters        Prerequisite: Engineering 4, grade of C- or better;           150A. Mechanical Design (4)
from industry are active here, knowing that, in addi-        Physics 9A. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering,             Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:
tion to having hands-on design experience, our stu-          Aeronautical Science and Engineering, and                     Engineering 45 and 104; Mechanical Engineering
dents are well-grounded in engineering                       Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science Engi-                50 (may be taken concurrently). Principles of engi-
fundamentals. They study with professors who                 neering majors. Modern manufacturing methods,                 neering mechanics applied to mechanical design.
“wrote the book” on their discipline, and work on            safety, manufacturing instructions, computer-aided            Theories of static and fatigue failure of metals.
design projects with researchers who are interna-            manufacturing and their role in the engineering               Design projects emphasizing the progression from
tional authorities in their field. Our graduate students     design and development process.—I, II. (I, II.)               conceptualization to hardware. Experimental stress
are able to work closely with faculty in a friendly but      Farouki, Schaaf, Yamazak                                      analysis and mechanical measurements using strain
demanding environment where teamwork and fac-                92. Internship in Mechanical Engineering                      gages.—I, III. (I, III.) Hill, Hull, Ravani
ulty mentoring are important, as is the cross-disciplin-     (1-5)
ary, collaborative culture that is unique to UC Davis.                                                                     150B. Mechanical Design (4)
                                                             Internship. Prerequisite: lower division standing;            Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:
Research Highlights:                                         approval of project prior to period of internship.            course 150A. Principles of engineering mechanics
• Aeronautics and Aerostructures                             Supervised work-study experience in engineering.              applied to the design and selection of mechanical
                                                             May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)              components. Design projects, which concentrate on
• Space Systems
                                                             99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)                    conceptual design, engineering analysis, methods of
• Flight Dynamics and Control                                Prerequisite: consent of instructor; lower division           manufacture, material selection, and cost. Introduc-
• Computational Fluid Dynamics                               standing. (P/NP grading only.)                                tion to Computer-Aided Design.—II. (II.) Farouki,
                                                                                                                           Ravani
• Dynamic Systems and Controls                               Upper Division Courses                                        151. Statistical Methods in Design and
• Reacting Flows                                             106. Thermo-Fluid Dynamics (4)                                Manufacturing (4)
• Heat Transfer                                              Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 103 and            Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:
• Automotive System Dynamics                                 105. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aero-              courses 107B, 150A. Methods of statistical analysis
                                                             nautical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering/              with emphasis on applications in mechanical design
• Biofluid Mechanics                                         Materials Science Engineering majors. Inviscid                and manufacturing. Applications include product
• Biosensors/Microelectromechanical Systems                  incompressible flow, compressible flow, thermody-             evaluation and decision making, stress-strength inter-
  (MEMS)                                                     namic relations, ideal gas mixtures, psychrometrics,          ference, probabilistic design, systems reliability, and
                                                             reacting mixtures and combustion.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)   fatigue under random loading.—II. (II.) Hull
• Biosolid Mechanics
                                                             Delplanque, Park, Shaw                                        152. Computer-Aided Mechanism Design
• Manufacturing and Mechanical Design                        107A. Experimental Methods (3)                                (4)
• Sports Biomechanics                                        Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—1.5 hours. Prerequi-              Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:
• Energy Systems/Fuel Cell/Hybrid Vehicle Tech-              site: course 106; open to Mechanical Engineering,             course 5 or Engineering 6 and 102. Principles of
  nology                                                     Aeronautical Science & Engineering and Mechani-               computer-aided mechanism design. Computer-aided
                                                             cal/Materials Science Engineering Majors only.                kinematic, static, and dynamic analysis and design
• Robotics                                                   Experiments to illustrate principles of thermal-fluid         of planar mechanisms such as multiple-loop linkages
• Wind Energy                                                systems. Statistical and uncertainty analysis of data;        and geared linkages. Introduction to kinematic syn-
                                                             statistical design of experiments; measurement                thesis of mechanisms.—II. (II.) Cheng
                                                             devices; Experiments involving thermodynamic                  154. Mechatronics (4)
                                                             cycles, combustion, compressible and incompress-
                                                                                                                           Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:
                                                             ible flows. Two units of credit for students who have
                                                                                                                           Engineering 100, 102, course 50. Mechatronics
                                                             previously taken Chemical and Materials Science
                                                                                                                           system concept and overview, control system design
                                                             Engineering 155A. One unit of credit for students
                                                                                                                           overview, control software architecture, control hard-
                                                             who have taken Chemical and Materials Science
                                                                                                                           ware architecture, microcontroller and interface tech-
                                                             Engineering 155B. Two units of credit for students



                                        Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses
     General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience
276              Engineering: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

nology for mechatronics control, sensor for                     199. Special Study for Advanced                             137. Structural Composites (4)
mechatronics systems, actuator drives.—III. (III.)              Undergraduates (1-5)                                        Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—1 hour. Prerequisite:
Yamazaki                                                        Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading          Engineering 104. Overview of materials and tech-
161. Combustion and the Environment (4)                         only.)                                                      nology for creating structures from fiber reinforced
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:                                                                           resin matrix composite material systems. Elementary
course 106. Introduction to combustion kinetics; the
                                                                Courses in Aerospace Science and                            design analysis and case studies emphasizing aero-
theory of pre-mixed flames and diffusion flames; tur-           Engineering (EAE)                                           nautical applications.—II. (II.) Wack
bulent combustion; formation of air pollutants in               Lower Division Courses                                      138. Aircraft Propulsion (4)
combustion systems; examples of combustion                                                                                  Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:
devices which include internal combustion engines,              1. Introduction to Aerospace Science                        Engineering 45, 103, and 105; Mechanical Engi-
gas turbines, furnaces and waste incinerators; alter-           Engineering (1)                                             neering 106. Analysis and design of modern aircraft
native fuel sources.—(III.) Shaw                                Lecture—1 hour. Description of the field of aero-           gas turbine engines. Development and application
163. Internal Combustion Engines and                            space engineering with examples from industry, gov-         of cycle performance prediction techniques for
Future Alternatives (4)                                         ernment, and research. Aerospace engineering                important engine configurations. Introduction to the
                                                                principles, ethics, and responsibilities. (P/NP grad-       operation and design of inlets, compressors, burn-
Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:
                                                                ing only.)—I. (I.)                                          ers, turbines, and nozzles. Cycle design studies for
Engineering 103 and 105. Fundamentals of internal
combustion engine design and performance. Future                99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)                  specific applications.—II. (II.) R. Davis
needs to adapt to environmental concerns, and the               Prerequisite: consent of instructor and lower division      139. Structural Dynamics and
feasibility of better alternatives in the future.—III. (III.)   standing. (P/NP grading only.)                              Aeroelasticity (4)
Erickson                                                                                                                    Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:
                                                                Upper Division Courses
165. Heat Transfer (4)                                                                                                      Engineering 102 and 103. Structural dynamics of
                                                                126. Theoretical and Computational                          flexible structures. Introduction to fluid-structure inter-
Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:
                                                                Aerodynamics (4)                                            action. Design of subsystems or systems under
course 5 or Engineering 6, 103 and 105. Conduc-
tion, convection, and radiation heat transfer. Com-             Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:           aeroelastic constraints. Dynamics instabilities. Con-
putational modeling of heat transfer in engineering.            Mechanical Engineering 106, Engineering 180,                trol effectiveness. Unsteady aerodynamics. Flutter.
Applications to engineering equipment with the use              Applied Science Engineering 115, or Mathematics             Aeroelastic tailoring in design, Applications to aero-
of digital computers.—I, III. (I, III.) Aldredge, Ken-          128C. Development of general equations of fluid             space, mechanical and biomedical systems.—III.
nedy, Shaw                                                      motion. Study of flow field kinematics and dynamics.        (III.) Sarigul-Klijn
                                                                Flow about a body. Thin airfoil theory. Viscous             141. Space Systems Design (4)
171. Analysis, Simulation and Design of                         effects. Applications of numerical methods to wing
Mechatronic Systems (4)                                                                                                     Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; laboratory—3
                                                                analysis and design.—III. (III.) Hafez
Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:                                                                          hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 102, and Mechani-
                                                                127. Applied Aircraft Aerodynamics (4)                      cal Engineering 106. Introduction to space systems
Engineering 100 and 102, upper division standing.
Modeling of dynamic engineering systems in various              Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:           design including space project organization,
energy domains. Analysis and design of dynamic                  course 126. Experimental characteristics of wing            requirements definition and specification, concepts
systems. Response of linear systems. Digital com-               sections. High-lift devices. Lift and drag at high          formulation, system tradeoffs, subsystem design. Pro-
puter simulation and physical experiments.—I, II. (I,           Mach numbers. Drag aerodynamics. Total aircraft             totype space mission concepts are presented and a
II.) Horsley, Karnopp, Margolis                                 drag estimation. Aerodynamic design procedures.—            multidisciplinary mission design is developed that
                                                                I. (I.) Chattot                                             considers all relevant architecture elements. Offered
172. Automatic Control of Engineering
                                                                129. Stability and Control of Aerospace                     in alternate years.—(I.) Joshi
Systems (4)
                                                                Vehicles (4)                                                189A. Rocket Propulsion (4)
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:
course 171, Engineering 100. Classical feedback                 Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:           Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 103 and
control; block diagrams; control systems perfor-                Engineering 102. Restricted to upper division stand-        105, upper division standing. Fluid and thermody-
mance specifications; steady state errors; rise and             ing. Aircraft and spacecraft stability and control.         namics of rocket engines, liquid and solid rocket pro-
settling times; root locus; PID controllers; control            Derivation of fundamental equations of motion for           pulsion. Space propulsion concepts and space
design with Bode and Nyquist plots; stability; phase            aircraft/spacecraft. Specialization of equations for        mission requirements.—Hafez
and gain margin; lead and lag compensators; state               aircraft. Fundamentals of feedback. Aircraft flight         189B. Orbital Mechanics (4)
variable feedback controllers.—II, III. (II, III.) Eke,         control systems. Specialization of equations of
                                                                                                                            Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 102, upper
Farouki, Horsley                                                motion for orbiting spacecraft. Spacecraft attitude
                                                                                                                            division standing. Satellite orbits, multistage rockets,
                                                                control systems.—II. (II.) Hess
185A-185B. Mechanical Engineering                                                                                           current global boosters, and new technologies.
Systems Design Project (2-2)                                    130A. Aircraft Performance and Design (4)                   Design application problems include satellites, tra-
Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:               Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; laboratory—3            jectory optimizations, and interplanetary trajecto-
course 150A, 165, senior standing in Mechanical                 hours. Prerequisite: course 127. Aircraft design            ries.
Engineering or Aeronautical Science and Engineer-               including aerodynamics, performance analysis,               198. Directed Group Study (1-5)
ing. Capstone mechanical engineering design                     weight estimation, and stability and control.—II. (II.)
                                                                                                                            Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading
course; the mechanical engineering design process               van Dam
                                                                                                                            only.)
and its use in the design of engineering systems.               130B. Aircraft Performance and Design (4)
                                                                                                                            199. Special Study for Advanced
(Deferred grading only, pending completion of                   Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; laboratory—3            Undergraduates (1-5)
sequence.)—I-II, II-III. (I-II, II-III.) Velinsky, C. Davis     hours. Prerequisite: course 130A. Aircraft design
                                                                                                                            Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading
189A-L. Selected Topics in Mechanical                           including refinement and iteration of initial design;
                                                                                                                            only.)
Engineering (1-5)                                               cost analysis, detailed design, and analysis of air-
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group             craft structure; propulsion system; aerodynamics, sta-      Courses in Mechanical and
                                                                bility, and control/handling qualities; or
study of selected topics in separate sections in (A)
                                                                manufacturing.—III. (III.) van Dam
                                                                                                                            Aeronautical Engineering (MAE)
Energy Systems and the Environment, (B) Engineer-                                                                           (Formerly courses in Aeronautical Science and Engi-
ing Controls, (C) Engineering Dynamics, (D) Biome-              133. Finite Element Methods in Structures                   neering and Mechanical Engineering.)
chanics, (E) Fluid Mechanics, (F) Manufacturing                 (4)
Engineering, (G) Mechanical Engineering and Prod-               Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequi-              Graduate Courses
uct Design, (H) Mechatronics Systems, (I) MEMS/                 sites: Engineering 104. Open to Engineering stu-            207. Engineering Experimentation and
Nanotechnology, (J) Solid and Structural Mechanics,             dents only. An introduction to the aerospace                Uncertainty Analysis (4)
(K) Thermodynamics, (L) Vehicle and Transportation              structural design process. History of aircraft materi-      Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:
Systems. May be repeated for credit when the topic              als. Effects of loading beyond elastic limit. Deflec-       Mechanical Engineering 107A and 107B. Design
is different.                                                   tions and stresses due to combined loading. Virtual         and analysis of engineering experiments with
192. Internship in Engineering (1-5)                            work principles, and finite element methods. Appli-         emphasis on measurement standards, data analysis,
Internship. Prerequisite: upper division standing;              cations to aerospace structures.—I. (I.)                    regressions and general and detailed uncertainty
approval of project prior to period of internship.              Sarigul-Klijn                                               analysis, including statistical treatment of experimen-
Supervised work experience in mechanical engi-                  135. Aerospace Structures (4)                               tal data intervals, propagation of bias and precision
neering. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading              Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 133. Analysis         errors, correlated bias approximations, and using jit-
only.)                                                          and design methods used in aerospace structures.            ter programs.—(II.) C. Davis
198. Directed Group Study (1-5)                                 Shear flow in open, closed and multicell beam cross-        208. Measurement Methods in Fluid
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading              sections, buckling of flat and curved sheets, tension       Mechanics and Combustion (4)
only.)                                                          field beams, local buckling.—II. (II.) La Saponara          Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:
                                                                                                                            course 165 and Engineering 103. Application of
                                                                                                                            shadow, schlieren and other flow visualization meth-
                                                                                                                            ods. Introduction to optics and lasers. Measurement
                                         Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses
      General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience
                                                                                      Engineering: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering                                  277

of velocity and concentrations in reacting and non-          formance for one advanced concept such as a                  and measurement methods: capacitive, piezoresis-
reacting flows with laser diagnostic techniques              fusion, magnetohydrodynamic, or solar electric pow-          tive, thermal, piezoelectric, and optical techniques.
including LDV, Rayleigh, Raman and fluorescence              erplant. Offered in alternate years.—(I.)                    Review of basic electronics: bridge circuits, ampli-
scattering and CARS. Offered in alternate years.             219. Introduction to Scientific Computing in                 tude modulation; lock-in detection.—(III.) Horsley
210A. Advanced Fluid Mechanics and Heat                      Solid and Fluid Dynamics (4)                                 231. Musculo-Skeletal System
Transfer (4)                                                 Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:           Biomechanics (4)
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:            Engineering 103 and 104. Scientific calculations             Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 102.
Engineering 103, 105 and Mechanical Engineering              with finite element and finite difference methods for        Mechanics of skeletal muscle and mechanical mod-
165. Development of differential equations govern-           multi-dimensional problems in solid and fluid dynam-         els of muscle, solution of the inverse dynamics prob-
ing continuity, momentum and energy transfer. Solu-          ics are performed with examples in C, C++, FOR-              lem, theoretical and experimental methods of
tions in laminar flow for exact cases, low and high          TRAN, and MATLAB script files. Derivation of the             kinematic and kinetic analysis, computation of
Reynolds numbers and lubrication theory. Dynamics            basic equations of motion in finite volume form with         intersegmental load and muscle forces, applications
of inviscid flow.—I. (I.) Aldredge, Barakat, White           applications to elasticity, waves. Offered in alternate      to gait analysis and sports biomechanics. (Same
210B. Advanced Fluid Mechanics and Heat                      years.—(III.) Delplanque                                     course as Biomedical Engineering 231.)—(III.) Hull
Transfer (4)                                                 220. Mechanical Vibrations (4)                               232. Skeletal Tissue Mechanics (3)
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:            Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 122.              Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—1 hour. Prerequisite:
course 210A. Study of stability and transition to tur-       Multiple degrees of freedom; damping measures;               Engineering 104B. Overview of the mechanical
bulence. Introduction to the physics of turbulence.          Rayleigh’s method; vibration absorbers; eigenval-            properties of the various tissues in the musculoskele-
Modeling of turbulence for numerical determination           ues and modeshapes; modal coordinates; forced                tal system, the relationship of these properties to
of momentum and heat transfer.—(II.) Aldredge, Ken-          vibrations; random processes and vibrations; auto-           anatomic and histologic structure, and the changes
nedy                                                         correlation; spectral density; first passage and             in these properties caused by aging and disease.
211. Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer (4)                        fatigue failure; nonlinear systems; phase plane.—III.        The tissues covered include bone, cartilage and syn-
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:            (III.) Hubbard                                               ovial fluid, ligament and tendon. (Same course as
Engineering 103, 105 and Mechanical Engineering              222. Advanced Dynamics (4)                                   Biomedical Engineering 232.)—III. (III.) Fyhrie
165 or the equivalent. Design aspects of selected            Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 102.              234. Design and Dynamics of Road
topics; heat conduction, fins; heat transport in ducts,      Dynamics of particles, rigid bodies and distributed          Vehicles (4)
boundary layers and separated flows; heat exchang-           systems with engineering applications; generalized           Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineer-
ers.—I. (I.) Erickson, Park                                  coordinates; Hamilton’s principle; Lagrange’s equa-          ing 134. Analysis and numerical simulation of road
212. Biomedical Heat and Mass Transport                      tions; Hamilton-Jacobi theory; modal dynamics                vehicles with on design applications. Offered in
Processes (4)                                                orthogonality; wave dynamics; dispersion.—I. (I.)            alternate years.—(III.) Velinsky
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:            Karnopp                                                      236. Aerodynamics in Nature and
Mechanical Engineering 165, Biological Systems               223. Multibody Dynamics (4)                                  Technology (4)
Engineering 125, Chemical Engineering 153 or the             Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 102.              Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 103.
equivalent. Application of principles of heat and            Coupled rigid-body kinematics/dynamics; reference            Introduction to aerodynamics in nature, fundamen-
mass transfer to biomedical systems related to heat          frames; vector differentiation; configuration and            tals of turbulence in atmospheric flows, planetary
exchange between the biomedical system and its               motion constraints; holonomicity; generalized                boundary layers, pedestrian-level winds in urban
environment, mass transfer across cell membranes             speeds; partial velocities; mass; inertia tensor/theo-       areas. Criteria for laboratory modeling of atmo-
and the design and analysis of artificial human              rems; angular momentum; generalized forces; com-             spheric flows, wind-tunnel testing. Offered in alter-
organs. (Same course as Biomedical Engineering               paring Newton/Euler, Lagrange’s, Kane’s methods;             nate years.—(III.) White
212.) Offered in alternate years.—(II.) Aldredge             computer-aided equation derivation; orientation;             237. Analysis and Design of Composite
213. Advanced Turbulence Modeling (4)                        Euler; Rodrigues parameters. (Same course as Bio-            Structures (4)
Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 210B. Meth-            medical Engineering 223.)—II. (II.) Eke, Hubbard             Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:
ods of analyzing turbulence; kinematics and dynam-           225. Spatial Kinematics and Robotics (4)                     Aeronautical Science and Engineering 137. Model-
ics of homogeneous turbulence; Reynolds stress and           Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:           ing and analysis methodology for composite struc-
heat-flux equations; second order closures and their         C Language and course 222. Spatial kinematics,               tures including response and failure. Laminated plate
simplification; numerical methods; application to            screw theory, spatial mechanisms analysis and syn-           bending theory. Introduction to failure processes.
boundary layer-type flows; two-dimensional and               thesis, robot kinematics and dynamics, robot work-           Offered in alternate years.—(III.) La Saponara
three-dimensional hydraulic and environmental                space, path planning, robot programming, real-time           238. Advanced Aerodynamic Design and
flows. Offered in alternate years.—(III.) Aldredge           architecture and software implementation. (Same              Optimization (4)
215. Biomedical Fluid Mechanics and                          course as Biomedical Engineering 225.) Offered in            Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:
Transport Phenomena (4)                                      alternate years.—III. Ravani                                 consent of instructor. Application of aerodynamic
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:            226. Acoustics and Noise Control (4)                         theory to obtain optimum aerodynamic shapes. Both
Engineering 103 or Chemical Engineering 150B or              Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 122.              analytic solutions and solutions obtained with numer-
Civil and Environmental Engineering 141. Applica-            Description of sound using normal modes and                  ical optimization techniques will be examined.
tion of fluid mechanics and transport to biomedical          waves; interaction between vibrating solids and              Includes introduction to the calculus of variations and
systems. Flow in normal physiological function and           sound fields; sound absorption in enclosed spaces;           numerical optimization techniques. Offered in alter-
pathological conditions. Topics include circulatory          sound transmission through barriers; applications in         nate years.—(I.) van Dam
and respiratory flows, effect of flow on cellular pro-       design, acoustic enclosures and sound walls, room            239. Advanced Finite Elements and
cesses, transport in the arterial wall and in tumors,        acoustics, design of quiet machinery. Offered in             Optimization (4)
and tissue engineering. (Same course as Biomedical           alternate years.—(III.) Karnopp, Sarigul-Klijn               Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 180 or
Engineering 215.)—(III.) Barakat                             227. Research Techniques in Biomechanics                     Applied Science 115 or Mathematics 128C. Intro-
216. Advanced Thermodynamics (4)                             (4)                                                          duction to advanced finite elements and design opti-
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:            Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—4 hours; term paper              mization methods, with application to modeling of
Engineering 105. Study of topics important to                or discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Mathematics              complex mechanical, aerospace and biomedical
energy conversion systems, propulsion and other sys-         22B and consent of instructor; Exercise Science 115          systems. Application of states of the art in finite ele-
tems using high temperature gases. Classical thermo-         recommended. Experimental techniques for biome-              ments in optimum design of components under realis-
dynamics and quantum statistical mechanics of                chanical analysis of human movement. Techniques              tic loading conditions and constraints. Offered in
nonreacting and chemically reacting gases, gas mix-          evaluated include data acquisition and analysis by           alternate years. (Same course as Biomedical Engi-
tures, and other substances.—(III.) Shaw                     computer, force platform analysis, strength assess-          neering 239.)—(II.) Sarigul-Klijn
217. Combustion (4)                                          ment, planar and three-dimensional videography,              240. Computational Methods in Nonlinear
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:            data reduction and smoothing, body segment                   Mechanics (4)
Engineering 103 and 105. Review of chemical ther-            parameter determination, electromyography, and               Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Applied Science
modynamics and chemical kinetics. Discussions of             biomechanical modeling. (Same course as Biomedi-             Engineering 115 or Mathematics 128B or Engineer-
reacting flows, their governing equations and trans-         cal Engineering 227/Exercise Science 227.)—II. (II.)         ing 180. Deformation of solids and the motion of flu-
port phenomena; detonations; laminar flame struc-            Williams, Hawkins                                            ids treated with state-of-the-art computational
ture and turbulent combustion. Offered in alternate          229. Design & Analysis of Micro-                             methods. Numerical treatment of nonlinear dynam-
years.—II. Aldredge, Kennedy, Shaw                           Electromechanical Systems (4)                                ics; classification of coupled problems; applications
218. Advanced Energy Systems (4)                             Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor;        of finite element methods to mechanical, aeronauti-
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:            Engineering 45, 100, 104; Engineering 122 recom-             cal, and biological systems. Offered in alternate
Engineering 103 and 105, or the equivalent.                  mended. Mechanical design of micro-electronme-               years. (Same course as Biomedical Engineering
Review of options available for advanced power               chanical systems (MEMS). Device modeling: lumped             240.)—(II.) Sarigul-Klijn
generation. Detailed study of basic power balances,          parameter models; energy methods; nonlinearities;
component efficiencies, and overall powerplant per-          electrical and mechanical noise sources. Actuation

                                        Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses
     General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience
278            Engineering: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

242. Stability of Thin-Walled Structures (4)                 255. Computer-Aided Design and                                268. Wind Power Engineering (4)
Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 104 or            Manufacturing (4)                                             Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:
equivalent. Static stability of thin-walled aerospace        Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:            Engineering 102 and 103, or equivalent, or consent
structures treated from both theoretical and practical       proficiency in a high level programming language              of instructor. Fundamentals for understanding the
design perspectives. Both monolithic and composite           such as Fortran, Pascal, or C. Representation and             conversion of wind power to mechanical power and
construction considered. Buckling of stiffened pan-          processing of geometrical information in design and           electricity. Related engineering, economic and soci-
els, shells, and thin-walled beams, experimental             manufacturing. Numeric and symbolic computa-                  etal issues. Offered in alternate years.—I. van Dam
methods and failure/crippling processes. Offered in          tions. Coordinate systems and transformations.                269. Fuel Cell Systems (4)
alternate years.—III. La Saponara                            Bezier and B-spline curves and surfaces. Interpola-           Lecture—2 hours; discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite:
248. Advanced Turbomachinery (4)                             tion and approximation methods. Intersections, off-           Mechanical Engineering 106, 107, 165, or equiva-
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:            sets, and blends. Path planning for machining,                lent, or consent of instructor; graduate or junior/
Engineering 103 and 105. Preliminary aerody-                 inspection, and robotics applications. Offered in             senior undergraduate as a technical elective. Basics
namic design of axial and radial flow compressors            alternate years.—(III.) Farouki                               of electrochemistry and fuel cell engines in mobile
and turbines. Design of diffusers. Selection of turbo-       258. Hybrid Electric Vehicle System Theory                    and stationary applications. Aspects of fuel cell
machine and configurations and approximations to             and Design (4)                                                energy converters and their subsystems including
optimum dimensions and flow angles. Introduction to          Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:            practice with existing fuel cell and hydrogen systems
through flow analysis. Rotating stall and surge, and         Mechanical Engineering 150B, graduate standing in             on campus. Limited enrollment. Offered in alternate
aeromechanical considerations. Offered in alter-             Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering.                      years.—I. Erickson
nate years.—I. R. Davis                                      Advanced vehicle design for fuel economy, perfor-             271. Advanced Modeling and Simulation of
250A. Advanced Methods in Mechanical                         mance, and low emissions, considering regulations,            Mechatronic Systems (4)
Design (4)                                                   societal demands and manufacturability. Analysis              Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:
Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineer-          and verification of computer design and control of            Mechanical Engineering 172 or the equivalent. Mul-
ing 150A and 150B or the equivalents, or consent             vehicle systems in real vehicle tests. Advanced               tiport models of mechanical, electrical, hydraulic,
of instructor. Applications of advanced techniques of        engine concepts. Offered in alternate years.—(II.)            and thermal devices; bond graphs, block diagrams
solid mechanics to mechanical design problems.               Frank                                                         and state space equations; modeling of multiple
Coverage of advanced topics in stress analysis and           261. Gas Dynamics (4)                                         energy domain systems; three-dimensional mechan-
static failure theories with emphasis in design of           Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:             ics; digital simulation laboratory.—I. (I.) Karnopp,
machine elements. Design projects emphasizing                Engineering 103 or the equivalent. Flow of com-               Margolis
advanced analysis tools for life cycle evaluation.—I.        pressible fluids. Isentropic flow. Flow with friction,        272. Theory and Design of Control Systems
(I.) Ravani                                                  heat transfer, chemically reacting gas and particle           (4)
250B. Advanced Methods in Mechanical                         mixtures. Normal and oblique shock waves, combus-             Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineer-
Design (4)                                                   tion, blast and expansion waves. Method of charac-            ing 172 or the equivalent. Mathematical representa-
Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 250A. Appli-           teristics. Offered in alternate years.—II. Chattot            tions of linear dynamical systems. Feedback
cations of advanced techniques of solid mechanics            262. Advanced Aerodynamics (4)                                principles; benefits and cost of feedback. Analysis
to mechanical design problems. Advanced topics in            Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:             and design of control systems based on classical
variational methods of mechanics with emphasis in            Aeronautical Engineering 126. Study of invicid and            and modern approaches, with emphasis on applica-
design of machine elements. Design projects empha-           viscous flows about aerodynamic shapes at sub-                tions to mechanical and aeronautical systems.—II.
sizing advanced analysis tools.—II. (II.) Hill               sonic, transonic and supersonic conditions. Applica-          (II.) Horsley, Karnopp
250C. Mechanical Performance of                              tion of aerodynamic theory to design for reduced              274. Analysis and Design of Digital Control
Materials (4)                                                drag and increased lift. Offered in alternate years.—         Systems (4)
Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: undergraduate                 II. Hafez                                                     Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:
course in stress analysis and mechanical behavior of         263. Introduction to Computational                            Mechanical Engineering 172. Discrete systems anal-
materials. Occurrence, mechanisms, and prediction            Aerodynamics and Fluid Dynamics (4)                           ysis; digital filtering; sample data systems; state
of fatigue and fracture phenomenon. Use of stress            Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:             space and transform design techniques; quantiza-
and strain to predict crack initiation. Use of fracture      Engineering 103 or consent of instructor. Introduc-           tion effects; multi-input, multi-output systems. Offered
mechanics to predict failure and crack propagation.          tion to numerical methods for solution of fluid flow          in alternate years.—(III.) Hess
Effects of stress concentration, manufacturing, load         problems. Discretization techniques and solution              275. Advance Aircraft Stability and Control
sequence, irregular loading, and multi-axial loading.        algorithms. Finite difference solutions to classical          (4)
Offered in alternate years.—(III.) Velinsky                  model equations pertinent to wave phenomena, dif-             Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Development
251. Mechatronics System Design (4)                          fusion phenomena, or equilibrium. Application to the          and analysis of aircraft equations of motion. Flexible
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:            incompressible Navier-Stokes equation. Offered in             modes. Response to control actuation. Random
Mechanical Engineering 154 and 172 or Electrical             alternate years.—(II.) Chattot                                inputs and disturbances. Stability and control aug-
and Computer Engineering 157A, 157B. Motion                  264. Computational Aerodynamics (4)                           mentation system design. Handling qualities.
mechanism design, electric actuator, power electron-         Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Aeronautical Sci-              Offered in alternate years.—III. Hess
ics motion control, sensor technologies, personal            ence and Engineering 126, Engineering 180, or                 276. Data Acquisition and Analysis (4)
computer-based control systems design, motion con-           consent of instructor. Numerical methods for aerody-          Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Application of
trol general operating system and real time operat-          namics flow simulation in the transonic regime. Solu-         computers for data acquisition and control. Topics
ing systems, motion control software design, discrete        tions of steady and unsteady potential and                    include computer architecture, characteristics of
event control software design. Offered in alternate          compressible boundary layer equations. Numerical              transducers, hardware for laboratory applications of
years.—II. Yamazaki                                          schemes for mixed type equations and shock                    computers, fundamentals of interfaces between com-
252. Information Processing for                              waves/numerical grid generation. Viscous/inviscid             puters and experimental equipment, programming
Autonomous Robotics (4)                                      interaction and coupling procedures. Offered in               techniques for data acquisition and control, basic
Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:            alternate years.—(II.) Hafez                                  data analysis. Offered in alternate years.—II. Hill
Engineering 6, Mechanical Engineering 5, or equiv-           266. Advanced Wind-Tunnel Testing (4)                         290C. Graduate Research Conference (1)
alent programming experience, Mechanical Engi-               Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; laboratory—3              Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instruc-
neering 154, 171, or consent of instructor.                  hours. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in fluid            tor. Individual and/or group conference on prob-
Computational principles for sensing, reasoning,             dynamics. Aspects of low-speed wind-tunnel testing            lems, progress, and techniques in mechanical and
and navigation for autonomous robots. Offered in             for solving aeronautical and non-aeronautical prob-           aeronautical engineering research. May be
alternate years.—(II.) Joshi                                 lems including tunnel corrections, scale effects, force       repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III.
254. Engineering Software Design (4)                         and moment measurements, and flow visualization.              (I, II, III.)
Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite:           Offered in alternate years.—(III.) van Dam
                                                                                                                           297. Seminar (1)
Mechanical Engineering 5, Engineering 180. Princi-           267. Parallel Computations in Fluid/
                                                                                                                           Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instruc-
ple and design of engineering software. Advanced             Thermal Sciences (4)
                                                                                                                           tor. Current topics in engineering including develop-
topics in engineering software design, applications          Lecture—2 hours; discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite:            ments in mechanical and aeronautical engineering
of object-oriented programming, very high-level lan-         Mechanical Engineering 106, 165, Engineering                  with presentations by students, faculty, and visitors.
guages, real-time multi-thread computing and sensor          180 or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Program-         May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I,
fusion, Web-based network computing, graphics,               ming languages and constructs for engineering anal-           II, III. (I, II, III.)
and GUI in engineering. Offered in alternate                 ysis on parallel computers including MPI
years.—(III.) Cheng                                          (distributed), OpenMP (shared), and Fortran95.                298. Group Study (1-5)
                                                             Graduate or junior/senior undergraduate as a tech-            299. Research (1-12)
                                                             nical elective—(I.) R. Davis                                  Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (S/U grading
                                                                                                                           only.)


                                        Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses
     General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience
                                                                                                                                                            English            279

Professional Courses                                         David Van Leer, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                         Please note that while some courses are
                                                                Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award                   identified as fulfilling more than one
390. The Teaching of Aeronautical Science                    Raymond B. Waddington, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                  distribution requirement, a given course can
and Engineering (1)                                          James L. Woodress, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                      only fulfill one such requirement.
Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: meet qualifications         Karl F. Zender, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                         Area of Emphasis (choose one) .....12
for teaching assistant and/or associate-in in Aero-                                                                            Literature, Criticism, and Theory
nautical Science and Engineering. Methods of lead-           The Major Program                                                 One upper division English elective
ing discussion groups or laboratory sections, writing        The study of English develops skills in reading analyt-           Two advanced courses, one of which can be
and grading quizzes, use of laboratory equipment,            ically and perceptively and in writing clearly and                a Seminar:
and grading laboratory reports. May be repeated              effectively.                                                         English 149, 153, 159, 165, 177, 187A,
for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)                                                                         188A, 189, 194H, 195H
                                                             The Program. The English department offers three
396. Teaching Assistant Training Practicum                                                                                     Creative Writing
                                                             kinds of courses: composition courses, undergradu-
(1-4)                                                                                                                             Three sections of English 100F, 100P,
                                                             ate courses, and graduate courses. Composition
Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated                                                                                  100NF, 100FA, 100PA
                                                             courses develop skills in reading analytically and in
for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)    writing persuasively. Undergraduate and graduate                Total Units for the Major .......................64
                                                             courses cover the entire range of English and Ameri-            English Majors. Up to four upper division units in
                                                             can literature, as well as creative writing. Students           a national literature other than English or American,
English                                                      majoring in English may elect a creative writing
                                                             emphasis or a literature, criticism, and theory
                                                                                                                             or in Comparative Literature, may count toward the
                                                                                                                             requirements of the major.
                                                             emphasis. All majors take courses introducing them
                                                                                                                             Major Advisers. D. P. Abbott, G. Bloom, N.
                                                             to the literatures of various periods and places, to
(College of Letters and Science)                                                                                             Brown, S. Chaganti, J. Clover, L. Corin, J.F. Diehl,
                                                             critical theory, and to frontiers of literary expression,
Scott Simmon, Ph.D., Chairperson of the Department                                                                           G. Dobbins, F. Dolan, M. Ferguson, K. Frederickson,
                                                             such s the relationship of literature to environmental-
                                                                                                                             L. Freed, E. Freeman, W.J. Hicks, P. Houston, H.
Department Office. 176 Voorhies Hall                         ism or the emergence of new media. The creative
                                                                                                                             Hsu, M. Jerng, A. Johns, R.A. Levin, Y. Li, C. Loar, D.
(530) 752-2257; http://english.ucdavis.edu                   writing emphasis focuses on fiction, poetry, and arti-
                                                                                                                             Martín, J. Marx, C. Milburn, E. Miller, T. Morton, P.
                                                             cle writing. The literature, criticism, and theory
Faculty                                                                                                                      Roy, S. Shershow, S. Simmon, D. Simpson, M. Strat-
                                                             emphasis focuses on advanced critical analysis and
                                                                                                                             ton, C. Waters, E. Watkins, J. Wenderoth, A.B. Wil-
Don P. Abbott, Ph.D., Professor                              research. All majors have the opportunity to work
                                                                                                                             liamson, M. Ziser
Gina Bloom, Ph.D., Associate Professor                       with distinguished writers, critics, scholars, and
Nathan Brown, Ph.D., Assistant Professor                     teachers.                                                       Meeting for Majors. All new and prospective
Seeta Chaganti, Ph.D., Associate Professor                                                                                   English majors are invited to attend a general meet-
                                                             Career Alternatives. Graduates have found the
Joshua Clover, M.F.A., Associate Professor                                                                                   ing for majors at the beginning of each year; all Eng-
                                                             major excellent pre-professional training for gradu-
Lucy Corin, M.F.A., Associate Professor                                                                                      lish majors should see the undergraduate staff
                                                             ate study in English, as well as for careers in teach-
Joanne F. Diehl, Ph.D., Professor                                                                                            adviser, individually, in the spring quarters of their
                                                             ing, writing, law, medicine, and library work. Many
Gregory Dobbins, Ph.D., Assistant Professor                                                                                  sophomore and junior years.
                                                             graduates are employed in journalism, publishing,
Frances E. Dolan, Ph.D., Professor                           advertising, and public information. Others have                Foreign Languages. Students who contemplate
Margaret W. Ferguson, Ph.D., Professor                       worked in local, state, and federal government                  advanced study in English should prepare for for-
Kathleen Frederickson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor            agencies, as well as in industry and agriculture.               eign language requirements for higher degrees and
Lynn R. Freed, Ph.D., Professor                              Some have established their own businesses.                     should consult with the graduate adviser.
Elizabeth S. Freeman, Ph.D., Associate Professor                                                                             Undergraduate Adviser. See Department web-
Danielle Heard, Ph.D., Assistant Professor                   A.B. Major Requirements:                                        site at http://english.ucdavis.edu or the Departmen-
W. Jack Hicks, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer                                                                                UNITS   tal Advising Office in 177 Voorhies Hall.
Pam Houston, B.A., Professor                                 Preparatory Subject Matter................... 20
Hsuan Hsu, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
                                                              English 3 or University Writing                                Minor Program Requirements:
Mark Jerng, Ph.D., Assistant Professor                                                                                                                                            UNITS
                                                              Program 1............................................. 4
Alessa Johns, Ph.D., Associate Professor
                                                              One course from ENL 40, 43, 44, 45 ..... 4                     English..................................................20
Richard A. Levin, Ph.D., Professor
                                                              English 10A, 10B, 10C ........................ 12               Five upper division courses, at least four of
    Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award
Yiyun Li, M.F.A., Assistant Professor                        Depth Subject Matter ............................ 44             which will be literature courses ...............20
Christopher Loar, Ph.D., Assistant Professor                  English 110A or 110B ........................... 4             Honors and Honors Program. A Senior Hon-
Desirée Martín Ph.D., Assistant Professor                     Please note that English 110A or 110B is a                     ors Program is available to an invited group of Eng-
John Marx, Ph.D., Associate Professor                         prerequisite for advanced study in the major.                  lish majors, who prepare and write a Senior Thesis
Colin Milburn, Ph.D., Associate Professor                     Historical Distribution                                        (either a research paper or creative writing) in their
Elizabeth Miller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor                  Requirements ...............................20                 final year. The critical honors program consists of
Timothy Morton, D. Phil., Professor                           Three courses focusing on literature written in                four units of 194H and four units of 195H, normally
Parama Roy, Ph.D., Professor                                  English before 1800, at least one of which                     taken during Winter and Spring quarters of the
Scott C. Shershow, Ph.D., Professor                           must be on literature written primarily before                 senior year. The creative writing honors program
Scott Simmon, Ph.D., Professor                                1500:                                                          consists of four units of 100FA or 100PA, normally
David Simpson, Ph.D., Professor                                  Before 1500                                                 taken during Spring quarter of the junior year, and
Matthew Stratton, Ph.D., Assistant Professor                     English 111, 113A, 113B                                     four units of 195H, normally taken Winter quarter of
Claire Waters, Ph.D., Associate Professor                        1500-1800                                                   the senior year. Completion of the program is a pre-
Evan Watkins, Ph.D., Professor                                   English 115, 117, 122, 123, 142, 150A,                      requisite for High or Highest Honors at graduation.
Joe Wenderoth, M.F.A., Professor                                 155A                                                        Eligibility criteria and application materials may be
Alan B. Williamson, Ph.D., Professor                          One course focusing on literature written in                   obtained at the Undergraduate Advising office in
Michael Ziser, Ph.D., Assistant Professor                     English between 1800 and 1900:                                 177 Voorhies Hall. For more details, see Graduation
                                                                 English 130, 133, 143, 144, 152, 155B,                      Honors, on page 81.
Emeriti Faculty                                                  158A, 181A
                                                                                                                             Education Abroad options. The department
Max Byrd, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                           One course focusing on literature written in
                                                                                                                             strongly encourages interested students to pursue
Peter Dale, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                         English between 1900 and present:
                                                                                                                             their studies abroad. It is possible for students to
Sandra M. Gilbert, Ph.D., Professor Emerita                      English 137N, 138, 146N, 147, 150B,
                                                                                                                             complete significant portions of the English major
Thomas A. Hanzo, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                       155C, 156, 158B, 166, 167, 168, 181B
                                                                                                                             provided that the course is evaluated as at least four
John O. Hayden, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                     Non-Historical Distribution
                                                                                                                             UC Davis units; the course is considered upper divi-
Peter L. Hays, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                      Requirements .................................8
                                                                                                                             sion by the standards set forth by the Education
Michael J. Hoffman, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                 One course on literature and ethnicity,
                                                                                                                             Abroad Center; the student presents copies of the
Robert H. Hopkins, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                  literature and gender, or literature and
                                                                                                                             coursework, syllabus, and writing assignments to the
Clarence Major, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                     sexuality:
                                                                                                                             department’s advising staff.
Sandra J. McPherson, B.A., Professor Emerita                     English 139, 166, 167, 178, 179, 181A,
Linda A. Morris, Ph.D., Professor Emerita                        181B, 185A, 185B, 186                                       Teaching Credential Subject Representative.
James J. Murphy, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                    One course in film and media studies,                          See the Teacher Education program.
Marijane Osborn, Ph.D., Professor Emerita                     language studies, cultural studies and                         Graduate Study. The Department of English offers
David A. Robertson, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                 contexts, literature and science/technology,                   programs of study and research leading to the M.A.
   Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award               or literature and the environment:                             in literature and creative writing and the Ph.D. in lit-
Winfried Schleiner, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                    English 105, 106, 107, 160, 161A, 161B,                     erature. Detailed information may be obtained from
Gwendolyn Schwabe, M.S., Senior Lecturer Emerita                 162, 164/STS 164, 171A, 171B, 173,                          the graduate adviser or the Chairperson of the
Daniel Silvia, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus                         180, 182, 183, 184                                          Department.
Gary Snyder, B.A., Professor Emeritus
                                        Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses
     General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:32
posted:12/30/2011
language:English
pages:9