Docstoc

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Document Sample
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Powered By Docstoc
					        FORMAL TECHNICAL REPORT – EXAMPLE


The following report is based on an example in Business
Communication, First Canadian Edition, by Guffey, Rhodes, and
Rogin, published by Nelson Canada in 1996.
  PACIFIC COLLEGE RECYCLING PROGRAM:
COMMUNITY AWARENESS AND PARTICIPATION




                  Prepared for

                   Alice Lan
          Vice-President of Operations
                Pacific College




                      by

                 Alan Bryant
            Student Representative
              School of Business




                April 18, 2007
123 Elm St.
Burnaby BC
V3T 2A2

April 18, 2007


Alice Lan
Vice-President, Operations
Pacific College
3412 Marine Way
Burnaby BC
V5D 1E6

Dear Ms Lan

PARTICIPATION IN PACIFIC COLLEGE'S RECYCLING PROGRAM

Here is the report you requested December 10 on the status of Pacific College's recycling
program, with recommendations for increasing its use. The study includes a survey of
members of the Pacific College campus community as well as secondary research in recent
literature on recycling.

Although the recycling program is progressing, this study shows that an effort must be made
to increase participation if the college is to meet its aim of reducing its waste by 50%.
Recommendations include steps to educate potential users about the program and make the
recycling facilities easier to use.

I am grateful to the Office of the Student Association for helping me pilot test the survey
questionnaire and for distributing it throughout the campus community. Their enthusiasm
and support contributed greatly to the success of this research project.

Please call me at 604-451-6879 and leave a message on my voice mail if I can provide
additional information or answer any questions. I would be happy, at your request, to
organize implementation of any of the recommendations or develop promotional materials
for the recycling program.

Yours sincerely



Alan Bryant
                                              TABLE OF CONTENTS


Summary ................................................................................................................................ iv

1.0 Introduction ...................................................................................................................... 1

2.0 Recycling Habits of Respondents .................................................................................... 2

3.0 Student Awareness and Use of Recycling Facilities ....................................................... 3

4.0 Location of Recycling Bins.............................................................................................. 4
    4.1 Current Locations ..................................................................................................... 4
    4.2 Preferred Locations ................................................................................................... 4

5.0 Conclusions ...................................................................................................................... 5

6.0 Recommendations ............................................................................................................ 5

References ............................................................................................................................... 6

Appendix A: Pacific College Recycling Survey .................................................................... 7



                                    LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES

Tables

1.     Percentage of Respondents Who Regularly Recycle...................................................... 2
2.     Awareness and Use of Recycling Bins ........................................................................... 3
3.     Preference for Placement of Recycling Bins .................................................................. 4

Figures

1.     Ranking of Importance of Materials for Recycling ........................................................ 2
SUMMARY


A questionnaire survey was conducted at Pacific College in order to determine the college
community’s awareness of the campus recycling program and identify ways to increase their
participation in the program.

The survey showed that most students at Pacific College recognize the importance of recycling.
From 45 to 80 percent of the students regularly recycle materials at home or work, even in areas
where municipal recycling programs are not in effect. However, they displayed a low level of
awareness and use of the on-campus program.

The low participation rate in the campus recycling program appears to be due to its low visibility
perceived inconvenience. From 60 to 80 percent of the respondents were unfamiliar with the
location of the bins around campus and, therefore, had not participated in the recycling program.
Other responses indicated that the bins were not conveniently located.

In order to increase participation in the program, the OSA should redesign and relocate the
recycling bins to give them greater visibility. Incentive programs should be developed to gain
encourage the participation of individuals and on-campus student groups. The program should be
given a higher profile through increased advertising and on-campus presentations.




                                                iv
1.0 INTRODUCTION

In 2001, the Office of the Student Association at Pacific College made a formal commitment to
reduce waste disposal on campus by 50% by 2004. The OSA program has been in operation one
year, yet gains are disappointing. Therefore, OSA authorized this study to determine the campus
community’s awareness and use of the program, and to make recommendations for increasing
participation in the program.

Aluminum cans, glass, office and computer paper, and plastic containers are currently being
recycled through this program. Recycling bins are located at various sites around campus, outside
buildings, and in department and administrative offices to facilitate the collection of materials.

A questionnaire survey (Appendix A) of administrators, faculty, staff, and students at Pacific
College campus was conducted to learn about this group’s recycling habits. In all, a convenience
sample of 220 individuals responded to the self-administered survey. The composition of the
sample closely resembles the makeup of the campus population: students, 60%; faculty, 23%;
staff, 10%, and administrators, 7%. As well, current business periodicals and newspapers were
consulted to learn how other organizations are encouraging the use of in-house recycling
programs.

Only aluminium, glass, paper, and plastic are considered in this study, as they are the only
materials being recycled on campus at this time. The costs involved in the program were not
considered in this study, since a recycling program generally does not begin to pay for itself
during the first year. After the first year, the financial benefit is usually realized in reduced
disposal costs (Steelman, Desmond, and Johnson,1996).

This report discusses potential participants’ attitudes toward recycling in general, their awareness
of the campus recycling program, their willingness to recycle on campus, and the perceived
convenience of the recycling bins.




                                                  1
2.0 RECYCLING HABITS OF RESPONDENTS

A major finding of the survey reveals that most respondents are willing to recycle even when not
required to do so. Data tabulation shows that 72 percent of the respondents live in an area where
neither the city nor the region requires separation of trash. Yet 80 percent of these individuals
indicated that they recycle aluminum on a regular basis at home or at work, while another 55
percent said that they recycle paper on a regular basis. Although the percentages are somewhat
smaller, many of the respondents also regularly recycle glass (46 percent) and plastic (45
percent). These results clearly show that campus respondents are accustomed to recycling the
four major materials targeted for the recycling program (Table 1).

                  Table 1: Percentage of respondents who regularly recycle

                               Material               Percentage
                              Aluminum                    80%
                                Paper                     55%
                                Glass                     46%
                               Plastic                    45%


Respondents were asked to rank the importance of recycling the materials collected in the Pacific
College program. Aluminum was considered the most important, although most respondents also
ranked the other materials (glass, paper, and plastic) either “extremely important” or “somewhat
important” to recycle. Respondents were also asked what materials they actually recycled most
frequently, and aluminum again ranked first (Figure 1).




                  Figure 1: Ranking of importance of materials for recycling




                                                2
When asked how likely they would be to go out of their way to deposit an item in a recycling bin,
20 percent of the respondents said “very likely,” and 55 percent said “somewhat likely.” Thus,
respondents showed a willingness, at least on paper, to recycle even if it means making a special
effort to locate a recycling bin.


3.0 STUDENT AWARENESS AND USE OF RECYCLING FACILITIES

For any recycling program to be successful, participants must be aware of the location of
recycling centres and must be trained to use them (de Blanc, 1998). Another important ingredient
in thriving programs is convenience to users. If recycling centres are difficult for users to reach,
these centres will be unsuccessful. To collect data on these topics, the survey included questions
assessing awareness and use of the current bins. The survey also investigated reasons for not
participating and the perceived convenience of current bin locations.

Two of the most significant questions in the survey asked whether respondents were aware of the
CAS recycling bins on campus and whether they had used the bins. Responses to both questions
were disappointing (Table 2).


                         Table 2: Awareness and use of recycling bins

              Location                Awareness of bins at                Use of bins
                                         this location                  at this location

     Cafeteria                                38%                            21%
     Bookstore                                29%                            12%
     Administration building                  28%                            12%
     Computer labs                            16%                            11%
     Library                                  15%                             7%
     Student union                             9%                             5%
     Classrooms                                8%                             6%
     Department and
       administrative offices                  6%                             3%
     Athletic centre                           5%                             3%
     Unaware of any bins; have
     not used any bins                        20%                             7%


Only 38 percent of the respondents were aware of the bins located outside the cafeteria. Even
fewer were aware of the bins outside the bookstore (29 percent) and outside the administration
building (28 percent). Equally dissatisfying, only 21 percent of the respondents had used the most
visible recycling bins outside the cafeteria.




                                                 3
Other recycling bin locations were even less familiar to the survey respondents and, of course,
were little used. These responses plainly show that the majority of the respondents in the Pacific
College campus community have a low awareness of the recycling program and an even lower
record of participation.


4.0 LOCATION OF RECYCLING BINS

Respondents offered several reasons for not participating in the campus recycling program.
Forty-five percent said that the bins are not convenient to use. Thirty percent said that they did
not know where the bins were located. Another 25 percent said that they are not in the habit of
recycling. Although many reasons for not participating were listed, the primary one appears to
centre on convenience of bin locations.

4.1 Current Locations

When asked specifically how they would rate the location of the bins currently in use, only 13
percent of the respondents felt that the bins were extremely convenient. Another 35 percent rated
the locations as somewhat convenient. Over half the respondents felt that the locations of the bins
were either somewhat inconvenient or extremely inconvenient. Recycling bins are currently
located outside nearly all the major campus rooms or buildings, but respondents clearly
considered these locations inconvenient or inadequate.

4.2 Preferred Locations

In indicating where they would like recycling bins placed (see Table 3), 42 percent of the
respondents felt that the most convenient locations would be inside the cafeteria. Placing more
recycling bins near the student union seemed most convenient to another 33 percent of those
questioned, while 15 percent stated that they would like to see the bins placed near the vending
machines. Ten percent of the individuals responding to the survey did not seem to think that the
locations of the bins would matter to them.


                     Table 3: Preference for placement of recycling bins

                                Preferred Location          % of Students
                                                             Surveyed

                          Inside the cafeteria                  42%
                          More in student union                 33%
                          Near vending machines                 15%
                          Does not matter                       10%




                                                  4
5.0 CONCLUSIONS
Most members of the campus community are already recycling at home or at work without being
required to do so. Over half recycle aluminium and paper on a regular basis, and most recycle
glass and plastic to some degree. About three-quarters of the respondents expressed a willingness
to participate in a recycling program on campus, but many seem unwilling to go far out of their
way to make use of recycling facilities.

General awareness and use of the current campus recycling program are low. Only a little over
one-third of the respondents knew of any recycling bin locations on campus, and only one-fifth
had actually used them. Respondents considered the locations of the campus bins inconvenient.
The perceived inconvenience was given as the principal reason for not participating in the
campus recycling program.



6.0 RECOMMENDATIONS

1.   Increase on-campus awareness and visibility by designing an eye-catching logo that
     represents the campus recycling program for use in promotions.

2.   Enhance comprehension of recycling procedures by teaching users how to recycle. Use
     posters to explain the recycling program and to inform users of recycling bin locations.
     Label each bin clearly as to what materials may be deposited.

3.   Add bins in several new locations, particularly more in the food service and vending
     machine areas.

4.   Recruit student leaders to promote participation in the recycling program by giving
     educational talks to classes and other campus groups, informing them of the importance of
     recycling.

5.   Develop an incentive program for student organizations. Offer incentives for meeting
     recycling goals as determined by OSA. On-campus groups could compete in recycling drives
     designed to raise money for the group, the college, or a charity. Money from the proceeds of
     the recycling program could be used to fund the incentive program.




                                                 5
                                REFERENCES


Delbaine, Susan (1998, December). Paper recycling: how to make it effective. Business
    Week, 116-123.

Foster, David (1997, March 15). Recycling: a green idea turns to gold. The Vancouver Sun,
    City: B4.

Freeman, Monique, Recycling Director, Pacific College (2000, November 2). Personal
    Interview.

Steelman, James W., Shirley Desmond, and Lyle Johnson (1996). Facing global limitations.
     New York: Rockford Press.

Tips to reduce, reuse, and recycle (1999, October 25). Environmental Recycling Hotline.
    Retrieved January 5, 2001 from http://www.primenet.com/cgl-bin/erh.pl.

Wilson, Lee (1995). Spirit of the wolf: the environment and Canada's future. Toronto:
    Freeman and Sons Publishing.




                                          6
               APPENDIX A: PACIFIC COLLEGE RECYCLING SURVEY

Pacific College recently implemented a recycling program on campus. Please take a few minutes
to answer the following questions so that we can make this program as convenient and helpful as
possible for you to use.

1.   Please indicate which items you recycle on a regular basis at home or at work.
     (Check all that apply).
     _ Aluminum
     _ Glass
     _ Paper
     _ Plastic
2.   Do you live in an area where the city/municipality requires separation of waste?
     _ Yes _ No
3.   How important is it to you to recycle each of the following?

                           Extremely          Somewhat           Somewhat              Extremely
                           Important          Important         Unimportant           Unimportant
     Aluminum
     Glass
     Paper
     Plastic


4.   How likely would it be for you to go out of your way to put something in a recycling bin?

                Very              Somewhat                Somewhat                  Very
               Likely               Likely                 Unlikely                Unlikely




                                                7

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:12/28/2011
language:
pages:12