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					CAUSES OF THE AMERICAN
     REVOLUTION
     Canadian History 11
       BRAIN POP:
CAUSES OF THE AMERICAN
     REVOLUTION
                  KING GEORGE III



•Ruled Britain from 1760-
1820
•Great Britain thought of
him as a hero
•13 Colonies thought of
him as a tyrant; with the
exception of the Loyalists
                 FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR
                        1754-1763


•This war between Britain and France ended with the
victorious British deeply in debt and demanding more
revenue from the colonies. With the defeat of the
French, the colonies became less dependent on Britain
for protection.
                  PROCLAMATION OF 1763



•This prohibited settlement
beyond the Appalachian
Mountains.
                       SUGAR ACT
                          1764


•This act raised revenue by
increasing duties on sugar
imported from the West
Indies.
•Many colonists began
smuggling in sugar from the
West Indies
                      CURRENCY ACT
                          1764


•Parliament argued that colonial currency had caused a
devaluation harmful to British trade. They banned
American assemblies from issuing paper bills or bills of
credit.
                     QUARTERING ACT
                          1765


•Britain ordered that colonists were to house and feed
British soldiers if necessary
                      STAMP ACT
                         1765


•This required tax stamps on many items and documents
including playing cards, newspapers, and marriage
licenses
                  STAMP ACT CONGRESS
                          1765


•In 1765, 27 delegates from nine colonies met in New
York City and drew up a statement of rights and
grievances thereby bringing colonies together in
opposition to Britain.
                 SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF LIBERTY
                              1765



•Colonists tried to fight back by
imposing non-importation agreements.
The Sons of Liberty often took the law
into their own hands enforcing these
'agreements' by methods such as tar and
feathering.
•Daughters of Liberty encouraged
people to wear colonial-made clothing
and boycott British made clothes
                     TOWNSHEND ACTS
                          1767


•These taxes were imposed to help make the colonial
officials independent of the colonists and included
duties on glass, paper, and tea. Smugglers increased their
activities to avoid the tax leading to more troops in
Boston.
                    BOSTON MASSACRE
                          1770


•The colonists and British soldiers openly clashed in
Boston. This event was used as an example of British
cruelty despite questions about how it actually occurred.
                           BOSTON MASSACRE



•   On March 5, 1770 a small group of colonists were up to their usual sport
    of tormenting British soldiers, calling them Lobsterbacks. Snowballs
    were thrown.

•   Church bells were alarmed and more men joined the mob

•   A riot broke out and Crispus Attucks moved to the front of the
    Americans. He hit a soldier with a stick and the soldier shot him

•   Attucks is considered to be the 1st martyr of the American Revolution

•   4 more people were killed and several wounded

•   Paul Revere, a silversmith, completed an engraving of the incident and
    called it the Boston Massacre.

•   His engraving is often described as a piece of propaganda. It was
    designed to stir up the colonists’ anger toward the British.
THE BOSTON MASSACRE
                       TEA ACT
                         1773


•To assist the failing British East India Company, the
Company was given a monopoly to trade tea in America.
                   BOSTON TEA PARTY
                         1773


•A group of colonists disguised as Indians dumped tea
overboard from three ships in Boston Harbour.
                   INTOLERABLE ACTS
                         1774


•These were passed in response to the Boston Tea Party
and placed restrictions on the colonists including
outlawing town meetings and the closing of Boston
Harbor.
                       QUEBEC ACT
                          1774


•Britain granted the Americans’ interior lands to the
French Canadians for the fur trade.
•For the 13 Colonies, this is the “last straw”
              FIRST CONTINENTAL CONGRESS
                          1774


•In response to the Intolerable Acts, 12 of the 13
colonies met in Philadelphia from September-October,
1774. One of the main results of this was the creation
of The Association calling for a boycott of British
goods.
•Quebec, NS & PEI
were invited but did
not attend
                   LEXINGTON AND CONCORD
                            1775


•In April, British troops were ordered to Lexington and Concord
to seize stores of colonial gunpowder and to capture Samuel
Adams and John Hancock. At Lexington, open conflict occurred
and eight Americans were killed. At Concord, the British troops
were forced to retreat with the loss of 70 men. This was the first
instance of open warfare.
•The rebels who fought the British were called Minutemen
                  SECOND CONTINENTAL CONGRESS
                              1775


•All 13 colonies were represented at this
meeting in Philadelphia beginning May.
The colonists still hoped that their
grievances would be met by King George
III. George Washington was named head
of the Continental Army.
•In that same year, rebels launched an
attack on Quebec. They thought that if
Quebec could be conquered, then all of
the North American colonies could be
pitted against Britain.
•The campaign failed; however, the attack
made Britain even angrier at the colonies.
                      BUNKER HILL
                          1775


•This major victory for the Colonists resulted in George
III proclaiming the colonies in rebellion.
                     OUTBREAK OF WAR



•It is estimated that only one-third of the colonists were
in favor of rebellion. One-third continued to side with
the British. The last third were neutral concerning the
rebellion and break from Great Britain.
                  DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
                              1776


•A committee of the Continental
Congress, headed by Thomas Jefferson,
drew up the Declaration of
Independence.
•In this statement, the colonies stated that
they were free and independent of British
control.
•The colonists were no longer fighting for
their rights as English citizens – they
would be fighting for their freedom as
citizens of a separate country.

				
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