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					                                      Unit      Thirteen
                                       (编写:于伟)
                        Language Structures & Reading: A Lesson Plan

Level: Pre-intermediate
Time Frame: 2 class periods (100 minutes)
Date of Instruction:
Textbook: A New English Course (Revised Edition) Book Ⅰ
Objectives:
     This lesson is designed to practice modal auxiliaries may/might used to express „possibility‟,
should / ought to express „obligation‟, would rather expressing „preference‟, must and can’t used
to express „strong probability‟ and „impossibility‟; and the training of reading skill through
structure practicing, question and answer and other classroom processes so as to prepare the
students for proficient usage of the language structures and fast reading skill. By the end of this
lesson, the students will be able to:
◆ obtain an understanding of the circumstances in which the language structures are used and
     practice them with the help of the cues in the boxes;
◆ finish the exercises on the workbook and the teacher‟s questions after reading the part
    Reading I without consulting the dictionary.
◆ finish reading the part Reading II quickly and sum up the main idea of the passage with the
    help of the questions listed in the workbook.

Setting the Scene (t =10)
Strategies:
First give a spelling dictation on the new words in Unit Twelve.
1.serial 2.insultation 3.cement 4.laptop 5.submarine 6.peanut 7.radioactive 8.kidney
9.detrimental 10.potential 11.sympathetic 12.catalogue 13.bequest 14.metropolitan 15.
costume 16. bring about 17. benefit from 18. nuclear energy 19. radiation technology
Ask the students to illustrate the circumstances of the new language structures, applies the major
benefits to their personal and academic needs, and explains the functions and purposes of them in
the real world of communication.
Purpose: raising the students‟ awareness in anticipation of full and active learner participation in
classroom activities, and motivating the students to take the initiative in learning the lesson

Link Old to New Knowledge (t =25)
Strategies:
[A] individual work
Briefly explain the language structures.
● Inquiring how certain somebody is of something; expressing how certain/ uncertain one is of
something
--- Will it be fine tomorrow?
--- It may be fine tomorrow.
● Asking for advice on somebody‟s behalf and giving advice
--- What do you think he should/ ought to do?
--- He should/ ought to get up early and take some exercise every day.
● Inquiring about and expressing one's preference
---What do you prefer to do this weekend, do some reading or watch TV?
--- I'd rather do some reading.
● Expressing strong probability or impossibility
--- He must be in the gym./ He can't be there.
Then read to the students the sample dialogues of Language Structure Practice Ⅰ, and Ⅱ. Make
sure that the students write them down correctly. Point out some new words in the boxes if
necessary, for example, strain, serial, swordplay, feature film and documentary film etc.
[B] pair work
Ask the students to do the substitution practice on the book. Tell them to do practices of the basic
structures with their partners with the help of the cues in the boxes. Changes can be made to make
the short dialogues natural. Give them a couple of minutes to practice for each structure.
Then check their dialogs in class.
Purpose: activating the learners‟ prior knowledge of grammar and linking it to oral proficiency.

Understanding New Knowledge (t =25)
Strategies:
[C] individual work
Play the recording of Reading I once or twice and ask the students to listen intently. Then ask a
couple of simple questions to check for their listening.
E.g. Who was Elias Howe?
What was he working on and what was his problem?
[D] individual work
Now let the students read silently the passage Secret Messages to Ourselves. Ask them to do the
True or False questions on the WB. Check answers with them.
Then other questions on this passage can also be asked, for instance,
How did he find a solution to his problem?
Did someone in his dream tell him directly how to solve his problem?
Was he unique in solving problems in this way?
Why are dreams called 'secret messages to ourselves'?
Do you often dream? Can you remember your dream afterwards? Have dreams helped you solve
your problems?
Purpose: cultivating the ability of the students to grasp the main idea of a passage while listening
and their reading comprehension.

Presentation of New Knowledge (t =30)
Strategies:
[E] pair work
Ask the students to read Reading II, Dreaming, silently in several minutes and try to answer the
questions on page 123 on the WB. They can discuss with their partners their ideas. Then check
answers with them.
E.g. Are the dreams we have at night influenced by our waking life?
What does a dream reflect?
[F] group work
Ask students in groups to discuss the main idea of Reading I and to sum up the gist of the passages
with the help of the questions.
Point out some new words and phrases in the reading passages, such as exhaustion, ran into a
problem, toss and turn, fly into a rage, with a start, stimuli, sequential, ongoing, spray, assertive,
perceive etc. Ask the students to look them up in their dictionary.

● He had been working all night on the design of a sewing-machine but he had run into a very
 difficult problem…
 run into a problem
 run into sth.: encounter (difficulties, problems, etc.)
 e.g. He ran into a very serious problem.
     The project is running into financial difficulties.
 Other examples:
     We ran into thick fog just outside Edinburgh. (Meet or enter an area of bad weather while
     traveling.)

  c.f. run into sb.: meet sb. by chance/ meet by accident/ happen to meet/ chance upon
  e.g. I ran into an old school friend at the supermarket today.

● Despite his exhaustion, Howe slept badly.
 exhaustion n. : extreme tiredness
 e.g. The runner collapsed from exhaustion.
     They were in a state of exhaustion after climbing the mountain.
     We are all worrying about the exhaustion of our food supplies.
 exhaust v.: make very tired; use up completely
 e.g. The long trip exhausted me.
       The long-time exhausted my patience.
 exhausted a.: very tired
 e.g. I‟m exhausted.

● He tossed and turned.
 toss and turn: to move about restlessly; twist and turn
 toss v.: move restlessly
 e.g. I couldn‟t sleep, but kept tossing and turning.
       I tossed in my sleep last night.
 2).throw sth. lightly or carelessly
 e.g. He tossed the beggar a coin.

● The king flew into a rage and ordered his soldiers to kill Howe.
 fly into a rage: become suddenly very angry
 e.g. He flew into the rage when he heard the news.
 c.f. fly into a passion/ temper
      get angry

● They advanced towards him with their spears raised.
 advance: v. 1) to move or go forward
 e.g. The mob advanced towards/ on us shouting angrily.
      Our troops have advanced twenty miles.
 2). make progress
 e.g. Has civilization advanced during this century?
 3). to put forward; propose or suggest
 e.g. He advanced a novel theory during the seminar.

  c.f. advance, forward, foster, further, promote
  The central meaning shared by these verbs is “to cause to move ahead, as toward a goal”:
       e.g. advance a worthy cause;
           forwarding their own interests;
           fostered friendly relations;
           furthering your career;
           efforts to promote sales.
  Antonym: retard

● There was a hole in the tip of each spear.
 tip: n. pointed or thing end of sth.
 e.g. the tips of one‟s fingers/ one‟s finger tips
     She is walking on the tip of her toes.

  c.f. have sth. on the tip of one’s tongue: just about to be spoken or remembered
  e.g. His name‟s on the tip of my tongue, but I just can‟t think of it.

      n./v. (give) small sum of money to (a waiter, taxi-driver etc.)
  e.g. He tipped a dollar and felt that it was enough.
       He tipped the porter 50p.
       He left a tip under his plate.

● The inventor awoke from the nightmare with a start...
 with a start: 一惊而, 惊动地
 start n.: a sudden uncontrolled movement because of surprise or fear.

  c.f. for a start: as a first point
  e.g. I‟m not buying this mobile phone- I can‟t afford it for a start.

● Charlotte Bronte also drew on her dreams in writing Jane Eyre.
 draw on/upon sth.: take or use as a source
 e.g. We drew on her experience throughout the project.
     I shall have to draw on my savings.
  c.f. draw sb. on: attract
  e.g. They drew lots of elites on high salary.

● This unconscious, but still active, part digests your experiences and goes to work on the
 problems you have had during the day.
 digest: v.
 1). Change food in the stomach and bowels so that it can be used by the body
 e.g. Sugar digests easily.
      Some girls can't digest fat.
      This food digests well.
 2). take information in mentally; fully understand
 e.g. Have you digested the report yet?
      This conduct is more than I can digest.
 [n.]digestion

● However, the unconscious part expresses itself through its own logic and its own language.
 logic: n. A system or mode of reasoning; valid reasoning
 e.g. Aristotle's logic.
      By that logic, we should sell the company tomorrow.
      Your paper lacks the logic to prove your thesis.
       Your friend doesn't seem to be governed by logic.
       There's no logic in spending money on things you don't need.

Reading II:
● Even films shown just before bed can influence dreams, especially their emotional tone.
  emotional tone: the quality that arouses story feelings

● Stimuli, both external or internal, may modify an ongoing dream, but they do not initiate
 dreams.
 stimuli: the plural form of stimulus
 Stimulus n.:
 1). something which encourages activity or development
 e.g. Works which were in themselves poor have often proved a stimulus to the imagination.
       Light is a stimulus to growth in plants.
       Building new shops will be a stimulus for business in the area.
 2). Something which fills you with new ideas and interest
  e.g. He loves the stimulus of living in a big city.

Purpose: restructuring given knowledge with new information to enhance the learners‟ cognitive
awareness of the new language structures and expressions, and enhancing the fast reading skill of
the students‟.

Assignment (t =5)
Strategies: The teacher gives a brief overview of the lesson today. Ask the students to preview
Dialogue I. Ask the students to try to retell ReadingⅠafter class, and check it next class.
Purpose: helping the students to get the main points of the lesson today and extending student
thinking by giving them assignments

Comment & Feedback (t =5)
Strategies: The teacher checks the students for comments and feedback.
Purpose: checking for understanding
                                       Unit        Thirteen
                                        (编写:于伟)
                                     Dialogues: A Lesson Plan

Level: Pre-intermediate
Time Frame: 2 class periods (100 minutes)
Date of Instruction:
Textbook: A New English Course (Revised Edition) Book Ⅰ
Objectives:
     This lesson is designed to practice the two dialogues fluently and the training of functional
expressions of discussing a trip through structure practicing, question and answer and other
classroom processes so as to prepare the students for speaking proficiency. By the end of this
lesson, the students will be able to:
◆ understand the language points of the dialogues;
◆ fluently speak out the useful expressions in Dialogue I and be able to recite the key part of the
     dialogue;
◆ make dialogues with the functional expressions in Dialogue II;

Setting the Scene (t =10)
Strategies: The teacher plays the recording of the first dialogue once or twice and asks the students
to listen intently. Then ask them a few broad questions on it, such as,
In what respects is the terracotta army spectacular?
What does Ted say was even more fantastic than the terracotta army?
Would you like to go on a trip to Xi'an?
Have the students summarize the content of the dialogue and give an outline.
● Ted tells Bob about his trip to China.
● Ted introduces many world-famous places he visited.
● Ted describes Xi'an's terracotta warriors and horses.
● Ted describes Chinese food and cooking styles, the spicy-hot Sichuan dishes in particular.
Purpose: raising the students‟ awareness in anticipation of full and active learner participation in
classroom activities

Link Old to New Knowledge (t =30)
Strategies:
[A] individual work
Explain the language points and useful expressions of Dialogue I.
● Fancy meeting you here.: It's a surprise to meet you here.
   fancy doing sth.: be surprised at doing sth.
   e.g. Fancy never having seen the sea.
       Fancy him being so rude.

● …I haven‟t had the opportunity so far.
 so far: until now; up to this/ that point, time
  e.g.. So far the work has been easy but things may change.
  c.f. so far, so good: up to now everything has been successful
  e.g. So far, so good. Please do not worry our project.

● Lots of places…the world-renowned places like the capital city Beijing…
 the world-renown places: the world famous places
 renown n.: fame or distinction
 e.g. She won renown as a singer.
       He is an artist of great renown.
 renowned a.: famous; celebrated
 e.g. He is renowned as an actress/ for her acting.

● …the most prosperous city Shanghai, the historic city Xi‟an…
 … and places of historical interest and scenic beauty
 Make distinctions of the usage of historic and historical
 historic: important in history --- a historic city
 e.g. May 4, 1919 is a historic day.
     This is the historic spot on which the first pilgrims landed in America.
 historical: connected with history ---historical interest
 e.g. Mr Thompson gave all the historical papers of his grandfather to the public library
      according to his grandfather's will.
      We have no historical evidence for it.

● –China‟s ancient capital on and off for several hundred years-
 on and off/ off and on: from time to time; now and again
 e.g. It rained on and off all day.

● …the “hot and spicy” Chengdu
 hot adj.: (of spices) producing a burning sensation to the taste
 e.g. Pepper is hot.
       Pepper makes food hot.
       I don't like mustard; it's too hot.
 spicy: adj. flavored with spice
 e.g. Do you like spicy food?

● China‟s huge territory and rich cultural legacy of 5,000 years of civilization have always
 captured my imagination.
 cultural legacy
 legacy: n. inheritance, bequest
 e.g. We should cherish the legacy of religious freedom.
      We Chinese have a great cultural legacy.

  c.f. heritage, inheritance, legacy, tradition
  The central meaning shared by these nouns is “something immaterial, such as a custom, t hat is
  passed from one generation to another”:
  e.g. a heritage of moral uprightness;
        an inheritance of knowledge from the past;
        a legacy of philosophical thought;
        the tradition of noblesse oblige.

● 5,000 years of civilization have always captured my imagination.
 captured my imagination: interested me greatly; fascinated me
 e.g. Her talk captured / stimulated the imagination of the whole class.
     Use your imagination to find an answer.

● inexhaustible: adj. that cannot be used up; endless
 e.g. My patience is not inexhaustible.
      This area offers an inexhaustible supply of coal.
      He is an inexhaustible campaigner.
 c.f. exhaustible a.

●…and all that I have seen is only the tip of the iceberg.
 the tip of the iceberg: small but evident part of a much larger concealed situation, problem,
 etc.
 e.g. Over 50 burglaries are reported every month, and that‟s just the tip of the iceberg, ie many
       more occur but are not reported.
 tip n.: pointed or thing end of sth.
 e.g. the tips of one‟s fingers/ one‟s finger tips
      She is walking on the tip of her toes.

  c.f. have sth. on the tip of one’s tongue: just about to be spoken or remembered
  e.g. His name‟s on the tip of my tongue, but I just can‟t think of it.
  n./v. (give) small sum of money to (a waiter, taxi-driver etc.)
  e.g. He tipped a dollar and felt that it was enough.
        He tipped the porter 50p.
        He left a tip under his plate.

● It was a breathtaking experience walking past them.: Walking past them was an exciting
 experience.
 breathtaking a.: inspiring awe; exciting.
 e.g. This is a breathtaking car race.
       Her beauty was breathtaking. 她艳丽动人。
       I enjoyed the breathtaking view in Hangzhou.

● Well, in that case I’ll ask for your company when I‟ve made up my mind to visit China.
 I’ll ask for your company: I‟ll ask you to go with me.

 company: n. being together with another or others
 e.g. I enjoy his company, i.e. I like being with him.
 c.f. for company: as a companion
 e.g. I hate going out along: I take my dog for company.
 keep sb. company: remain with sb. so that he is not along
 e.g. I‟ll stay here and keep you company.

[B] pair work
Play the tape again. Ask the students to read after the tape twice and then have them in pairs to
read the dialogue aloud.
Purpose: activating the learners‟ prior knowledge of grammar and linking it to oral proficiency.

Understanding New Knowledge (t =20)
Strategies:
[C] individual work
Close their textbooks and ask the students how to criticize. Then let them look at the expressions
listed on the book for a check. Have them read those expressions silently for a while.
John ought to/ should keep his room cleaner.
He's a bore...
She's so clumsy...
[D] pair work
Ask two students to perform Dialogue II as an example.
Explain words and expressions.
● go to the pictures (Br.): see a film; go to the cinema
   (Am.) go to the movies; go to see a movie
   e.g. Let‟s go to the pictures this evening.

● come round/ come over (to…): visit sb. or a place
 e.g. Do come round and see us some time.
      Why don‟t you come round to my flat this evening?
 c.f. come round: (of a regular event) arrive
 e.g. Christmas seems to come round quicker every year.

Purpose: cultivating the ability of the students to understand the useful expressions and to be
familiar with their functions

Presentation of New Knowledge (t =30)
Strategies:
[E] pair work
Ask the students to make their own short dialogues with the help of the cues given on page 149.
They are free to use the phrases and expressions listed on page 149. Changes can be made to make
the short dialogues natural. Give them about ten minutes to practice.
[F] pair work
Check the dialogues, asking several pairs to show their dialogues before the whole class.
Purpose: restructuring given knowledge with new information to enhance the learners‟ cognitive
awareness of the new functional expressions, and enhancing the students‟ speaking skill.

Assignment (t =5)
Strategies: The teacher gives a brief overview of the lesson today. Ask the students to preview
Reading I and to prepare for the reciting of Dialogue Ⅰ after class, and check it next class.
Purpose: helping the students to get the main points of the lesson today and extending student
thinking by giving them assignments

Comment & Feedback (t =5)
Strategies: The teacher checks the students for comments and feedback.
Purpose: checking for understanding
                                       Unit      Thirteen
                                        (编写:于伟)
                          Guided Writing & Comprehensive Exercises

Level: Pre-intermediate
Time Frame: 2 class periods (100 minutes)
Date of Instruction:
Textbook: A New English Course (Revised Edition) BookⅠ
Objectives:
      This lesson is actually a review about this unit after the students have finished the parts of
oral and reading practice. It is designed to have the students do the exercises in the part of Guided
Writing in order to prepare them for the training of more comprehensive writing skills, to do the
comprehensive exercises in WB either independently or together with other students. By the end
of this lesson, the students will be able to:
◆ do the exercises in the part of Guided Writing in both SB and WB correctly;
◆ finish the comprehensive exercises in WB and check answers with other students;
◆ do the interaction activities in SB in order to make a review about the new words and
     language structures.

Setting the Scene (t =10)
Strategies: The teacher makes a review about the lesson learned last time by checking the reciting
of Dialog One or finishing doing the practice of different situations after Dialog Two.
Purpose: raising awareness in anticipation of full and active learner participation in classroom
activities

Benefit to students (t =5)
Strategies: The teacher does the first exercise in the part of Guided Writing in SB together with the
students to ensure that they are clear about what to do today. Then tell the students to do the
following exercises in the part of Guided Writing in order that they are aware of the gradation of
proficiency between the exercises.
The part of Note Writing is quite important. This time the note is making arrangements. Talk about
this part in detail and give the sample message.
Purpose: taking learner‟s proficiency into account and motivating the students to take the initiative
in learning the lesson

Reviewing Old Knowledge (t =20)
Strategies:
[A] individual work
Play the recording of one part of the Dictation in WB. Ask the students to take the dictation to see
if they have understood the passage and if they can write it down correctly.
The passage is read four times. During the first time reading the students need to listen to the tape
carefully for the understanding of the whole passage. During the second and third time reading
they need to write down exactly what they hear from the tape. During the fourth time reading they
have to check what they have written down.
Collect the papers after the students have finished writing.
Purpose: activating the learners‟ prior knowledge of vocabulary and language structures and
linking it to new knowledge of writing and dictation skill training

Doing Comprehensive Exercises (t =55)
Strategies:
Check the answers of the Comprehensive Exercises in WB one by one.
[B] individual work
Play the recording of the Listening Comprehension, E, in WB. Ask the students to do the exercises
while listening.
At first, play the recording as a whole and then play it either sentence by sentence or paragraph by
paragraph for better understanding. Finally play the recording as a whole once again.
Then check the answers of True or False questions with the students.
[C] group work
Tell the students to work in groups to complete such part of the comprehensive exercises as
translation exercise. Have the students compare the translations of each member and choose the
best one or the best part of everyone‟s version.
[D] pair work
Ask students in pairs to finish the following exercises, such as Blank Filling and Vocabulary Work
in WB, and ask them to check the answers with each other. Then the teacher gives them the
correct answers in class.
[E] Discussion
One member of each group reports to the whole class their best version of translation. The teacher
holds discussions about these versions of translation, and chooses the best part of the versions or
gives a referential version.
Purpose: cultivating the ability of the students to do self-study and to cooperate to do tasks within
a group

Assignment (t =5)
Strategies: The teacher gives an overview of the interaction activity in SB to make sure that the
students are clear about the requirements of the oral practice task. Talk with their partner and
exchange information with him or her about the information from a copy of the China Daily. Ask
them to talk about the topic after class in a natural way.
Purpose: helping the students do oral practice more freely by using the new words

Comment & Feedback (t =5)
Strategies: The teacher checks the students for comments and feedback.
Purpose: checking to see if the students have understood the usage of new words and finished the
comprehensive exercises correctly

				
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