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Kindergarten

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					Kindergarten
    General Information
• Kindergarten teachers must differentiate to meet the student educational needs
• Students should know all capital and lower case letters by Christmas, along
  with many of the letter sounds, or they are BELOW GRADE LEVEL.
• To be on grade level at the end of kindergarten, students should be reading at
  guided reading level “B” or “C”, preferably “C”
• Teachers must move beyond the “letter a week” format. They should be
  teaching and re-teaching letters, sounds, high frequency words, and blending at
  least three times during a school year. Each time they should focus on them in
  a little different manner. It is the re-visiting that makes mastery happen
• Teachers should be teaching the high frequency words throughout the school
  year, visiting, re-visiting continually, using them as Word Wall Words!
• Kindergarten Writer’s Workshop is a must in every classroom throughout the
  school year
• Teachers should read the Utah State Core for kindergarten at least yearly, and
  construct your curriculum map accordingly. The items in the state core are the
  minimum teaching/learning requirements
• Kindergarten students can be taught in a developmentally appropriate manner,
  and also focus on academic achievement! It’s the HOW and the WHAT
  integrated together!
        DAP in Kindergarten

•What does Developmentally Appropriate Practice
 (DAP) mean?
“Developmentally appropriately practice
  (DAP) means assuring that classrooms,
  instruction, and assessment for young
  children takes into consideration three
  major dimensions: age, individual
  growth patterns, and cultural factors.”
                      Krogh, 1997; Bredekamp & Copple, 1997
            Ray Reutzel


“Some are still back in the 60’s, thinking
  that teaching children to read and write
  in kindergarten is inappropriate; we
  need to eradicate this notion!”
                      Ray Reutzel, Statement May 4, 2007
                Is teaching Reading to
                 Young children DAP?
“Learning to read and write is critical to a child’s
  success in school and later in life. The early
  childhood years, from birth through age eight, are the
  most important period for literacy development. It is
  for this reason that the International Reading
  Association for the Education of Young Children
  (NAEYC) have joined together to formulate a position
  statement regarding early literacy development . . .
IRA and NAEYC are committed not only to helping
  young children learn to read and write but also to
  fostering and sustaining their interest and disposition
  to read and write for their own enjoyment,
  information, and communication.”
 (1998) Learning to read and write. Developmentally appropriate practices for young children. A joint position
                       statement for the IRA and the NAEYC in Young Children, July 1998)
         DAP in Kindergarten
• What should children learn about literacy in
  kindergarten?
  –   Oral Language
  –   Concepts of Print
  –   Letter Names and Sounds
  –   Phonological and Phonemic Awareness
  –   Beginning Phonics (CVC words)
  –   25 Sight Words
  –   Listening Comprehension Strategies
              DAP in Kindergarten
•   If we adopt a literacy and math focus, then what happens to art,
    music, dance, science, and social studies?


The State of Utah has adopted a K-2 Integrated Core Curriculum to
   assure that young children receive opportunities to experience
   these important content subject areas through integrated theme
   unit study. Ideally, these content subject areas will also be
   integrated into literacy and mathematics learning in the other
   grades.
Play should continue in kindergarten. However, it should be
   integrated with literacy, math, and content subject area learning.
                                 Neuman, 2000
                Whole Class Instruction
      Letters, Sounds, High Frequency Words, Blending, etc.

• August through December
  –   Environmental Print
  –   At least one Alphabet book per day
  –   Kinesthetic Alphabet at least once per day
  –   Oral Language
  –   Phonemic Awareness
  –   Letter/sound games, songs, chants
  –   King and Queen of the day
       • Consonants and Vowels
       • Syllabication
  – Informational Texts - building background knowledge
  – Writer’s Workshop
  – Read Alouds
             Whole Class Instruction
   Letters, Sounds, High Frequency Words, Blending, etc.


• January through Mid-February
  – One letter per day for 26 days
     • Proper letter formation/writing practice
     • Making sure that every letter is explicitly taught
     • Making as many connections as possible
  – Continue:
     • Kinesthetic alphabet
     • Oral Language
     • Phonemic Awareness
     • Letter/sound games, songs, chants (connecting to
       specific letter/sound
     • Read Alouds
     • Punctuation
     • Informational Texts - connecting to letter/sound
     • Writer’s Workshop
                 Whole Class Instruction
      Letters, Sounds, High Frequency Words, Blending, etc.


• February through June
  – Back to Alphabet as a whole
     • Work on letter/sound fluency
       •   More focus on blending
       •   More practice with high frequency words
       •   Continue punctuation
       •   Writing whole words and sentences
  –   Constant Review
  –   More Informational Texts connected to Content Core
  –   Focus on Comprehension in shared reading
  –   Continue Read Alouds
  –   More in-depth Writer’s Workshop
    Small Group Instruction
• August through December
  – Guided Reading for those who are ready
  – Differentiated small groups to meet needs
    • i.e., own name, other’s names, first letter of
      name, vowels, letter recognition, sounds, a few
      high frequency words, blending, guided
      reading, etc.
     Small Group Instruction
• January through June
  – Guided Reading groups for all students
     • Some may still be working on own name, other’s names,
       first letter of name, vowels, letter recognition, sounds, a
       few high frequency words, blending
  – Texts for Level A
     • Letter Books, repetitive pattern books, syntactic pattern
       books
     • Focus: concepts of print, patterned text, 1 to 1 matching,
       check the pictures, support predictions, oral language,
       high frequency words (usually not known out of context),
       main idea
• Level B
  – Letter books, repetitive pattern books, syntactic
    pattern books
  – Focus: concepts of print, patterned text, 1 to 1
    matching, check the pictures,oral language high
    frequency words, retelling, cross-checking 1st
    sound/word with pictures
• Level C
  – 1 to 1 matching (eyes only), high frequency words,
    attends to beginning/ending sounds, visual
    phrasing (2-5 words), monitors known words,
    blends cv, vc, cvc, ccvc, words, text with little or no
    repetition
         Suggested Half-Day
             Schedules
• First of year:
 Monday through Thursday
8:25/12:37 - attendance, show and tell, number card flips
8:30/12:42 - Calendar time
9:10/1:20 - Shared reading/Interactive writing
9:30/1:40 - Lesson time: Mondays - Phonics/Phonemic
       Awareness, Tuesday - Sorting/Patterns, Wednesday -
       Content Areas, Thursday - Writer's Workshop
9:50/2:00 - Recess
10:00/2:10 - Centers & small group instruction (CBL)
11:00/3:10 - Cleanup
11:05/3:15 - Story
11:17/3:25 - Home
          Suggested Half-Day
              Schedules
• End of year:
  8:25/12:37 - Attendance/ Show and Tell/Spelling
  8:30/12:42 - Independent Writing/Story Starters
  9:10/1:20 - Lesson Time - all areas of CBL integrated into
          content learning
  9:30/1:40 - Math - addition, subtraction
  9:50/2:00 - Recess
 10:00/2:10 - Guided Reading & Centers
 11:00/3:10 - Cleanup
 11:05/3:15 - Story
 11:17-3:25 - Home
            Another Half-Day Schedule
12:25-12:35    MIR (TRADE TAKE HOME BOOKS & TAKE ROLL)
12:35-12:40    WORD WALL (DIFFERENT ACTIVITY EVERY DAY)
12:40-1:00     WORD WORK (PHONICS—LETTERS, SOUNDS, CHUNKS, HIGH FREQUENCY WORDS, POEMS
                       STUDENT DICTIONARIES
1:00-1:15      CALENDAR
                        ALPHABET CHANT
                        SHARED READING/COMPREHENSION TAUGHT HERE
                        MORNING MESSAGE
1:15-2:00     GUIDED READING /CENTERS
2:00-2:30     INTERACTIVE WRITING/WRITERS WORKSHOP/READ ALOUD SOMETIMES
                        COMPREHENSION SKILLS HERE
2:30-2:45     RECESS
2:45-3:15     MATH
3:15-3:20     DISMISS

•   MUSIC IS USED AS A TRANSITION AND IS OFTEN PART OF A PHONEMIC AWARENESS ACTIVITY

•   SOCIAL STUDIES AND SCIENCE AND ART TAUGHT THROUGH INTERACTIVE WRITING, READ
    ALOUDS, AND SHARED READINGS & REINFORCED IN CENTER TIME; CONNECTED TO LITERACY

•   AT THE END OF THE YEAR MY GUIDED READING AND CENTER TIME INCREASES TO AN HOUR
  Kindergarten Learning Centers
• Learning centers:
  – support the literacy, mathematics, and the integrated K-2
    Core, and enrich oral language and background
    knowledge
  – must encourage self regulation and independence
  – have a designated leader
  – have clear procedures for entry, behavior, clean-up, and
    exit
  – have an overall routine for use
  – must require some kind of accountability for students
  – need clearly posted directions, objectives, and
    expectations or rules
  – must be well organized with sufficient tools for learning
    and exploration
     Learning Centers (cont.)

• Only previously explicitly taught strategies and
  tasks should be found in academic learning
  centers for independent or collaborative practice
• At some point learning tasks must be
  differentiated for children- not the same task/level
  for all students in the center
• If there isn’t sufficient room for stand alone
  centers- they may be transportable!

				
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posted:12/23/2011
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