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					ERIC_NO: ED428983 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: "Letting Go": Rethinking Teaching World History at the Secondary
Level. A Plan for a One-Year Thematic World History Course.
AUTHOR: Pike, Ellen Leader
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997

ABSTRACT: This paper examines the shortcomings of the area studies
approach and the comprehensive chronological world history survey
approach to teaching world history courses. The study notes the increasing
interdependence of the world and its people and advocates a thematic world
history approach. By teaching a few important themes in world history,
students will develop a keener understanding of world historical processes
and their interrelationships. In the process students will become more
involved and interested in world history. The paper examines the research
related to history instruction and students' knowledge about world history. A
thematic approach to world history teaches for understanding and develops
meaning for world events today. Themes identified for study include: (1)
historiography; (2) patterns of human organization; (3) systems of faith; (4)
revolution; and (5) technology.


ERIC_NO: EJ340612 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Defining A Global education by Its Content.
AUTHOR: Kniep, Willard M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1986
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Education; v50 n6 p437-46 Oct 1986
ABSTRACT: Provides a four-part framework for thinking about the content of
global education. The elements are the study of: (1) diverse human values;
(2) global economic, political, ecological, and technological systems; (3)
global problems and issues; and (4) the history of contact and
interdependence among peoples, cultures, and nations.


ERIC_NO: ED360193 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Maine's Approach to Global education.
AUTHOR: Broyles, India L.; Krawic, Joanne
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: This study of Maine schools inquires into efforts that have been
made to internationalize the curriculum. Specifically, the researchers were
interested in how curricular goals and organization contribute to an
understanding of global society. The efforts to internationalize the curriculum
upon which the researchers focused included the organizational factors: (1)
time allotment; (2) teacher involvement; (3) relationship to other subjects or
disciplines; and (4) scope of focus on other countries/themes. Five widely
accepted goals of global education also guided the research: (1) to learn
about the culture and customs of other countries; (2) to address global
problems; (3) to compare the similarities and differences the world's peoples
share; (4) to analyze international organizations and national, state, and city
governments; and (5) to focus on the interrelatedness of human beings. The
frequency and range of foreign languages included in the curriculum are
described including a comparison of intent--exploration versus proficiency. A
Survey was conducted of all Maine schools, both public and private. A 22-
item list of references is included.



ERIC_NO: ED207915
TITLE: Multicultural and Global education: Relationships and Possibilities.
World Education Monograph Series Number Three.
AUTHOR: Haipt, Mildred M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1980
ABSTRACT: This paper examines the relationships between multicultural and
global education, especially their impact on curriculum, and presents some
possibilities for future development. First, definitions are provided and
discussed. The paper then goes on to examine multicultural and global
education as emerging concepts in schools. Multicultural education appears
in programs such as ethnic studies, intergroup studies, and bilingual and
bicultural education. Global education often comes under the rubric of area
studies or international relations. The curriculum models of James Banks
which show how curriculum reform is contributing to the evolution of
multicultural and global education in the schools are examined. The
relationship between multicultural and global education can be summarized
by saying that although each can be represented by a different curriculum
model, one develops quite naturally from the other and is compatible with it.
The striking similarities between multicultural goals identified by Banks and
those of global education proposed by the Global Perspectives Project are
examined. Future action steps suggested include the following: (1) discuss
with students the many ways in which cultural differences and global issues
impinge on our lives; (2) develop a new course, such as environmental
studies, and introduce it into the curriculum; and (3) devote an entire school
day to a global or cultural theme.


ERIC_NO: EJ645960
TITLE: What Does Globalization Mean for Educational Change? A
Comparative
Approach. Guest Editorial Essay.
AUTHOR: Carnoy, Martin; Rhoten, Diana
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2002
JOURNAL_CITATION: Comparative Education Review; v46 n1 p1-9 Feb
2002
ABSTRACT: Globalization provides a new empirical challenge and a new
theoretical frame for comparative education. The global economy is
dependent on knowledge resources and information technology and
increasingly intertwined in international institutions promulgating particular
ideologies and strategies for educational change. Comparative education
must examine how globalization and its ideological packaging affect overall
delivery of schooling at international, national, and local levels.


ERIC_NO: ED265107
TITLE: Global education: Why? For Whom? About What?
AUTHOR: Alger, Chadwick F.; Harf, James E.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1985
ABSTRACT: Human beings can not have a fulfilling life on this planet without
global education. All educators, whatever their field, have a role to play in
global education. An adequate understanding of the global relationship can
be obtained by focusing on five chosen themes: values, transactions,
actors, procedures, and mechanisms. Each of these themes offers a window
of opportunity for grasping a piece of the essential nature of the globe.
Together, these themes represent a coherent foundation for global
understanding that can lead to thoughtful participation.


ERIC_NO: ED410376
TITLE: Adult Learning: A Key for the 21st Century. CONFINTEA V
Background Papers (Hamburg, Germany, July 14-18, 1997).
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
JOURNAL_CITATION: Adult Education and Development; spec iss 1997
ABSTRACT: The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Jakob Horn,
Paul
Belanger); "Internationalization and Globalization" (Ove Korsgaard); "Adult
Learning and the Challenges of the 21st Century" (Marc-Laurent Hazoume);
"Diversity in Adult Education: Some Key Concepts in Minority and Indigenous
Issues" (Linda King de Jardon); "The Culture of Peace: The UNESCO (United
Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization) Perspective"
(David Adams); "Literacy on the Eve of CONFINTEA: Observations,
Questions and Action Plans" (Jean-Paul Hautecoeur); "Learning Gender
Justice: The Challenge for Adult Education in the 21st Century" (Carolyn
Medel-Anonuevo); "Adult Education and the Changing World of Work. Focal
Points of Change" (R. Barry Hobart); "Environmental NGOs
(Nongovernmental Organizations) and Adult Education as 21st Century
Partners in Civil Society--from the Local to the Global Level" (Rene Karottki);
"The Environment: A Unifying Theme for Adult Education" (Walter Leal Filho);
"From Words to Action: Environmental Adult Education" (Darlene E. Clover);
"Environmental Adult Education: A Factor in Sustainable Development on the
Eve of the 3rd Millennium" (Adoum N'Gaba-Waye); "Health Education and
Health Promotion" (Health Education and Health Promotion Unit, Division of
Health Promotion, Education and Communication, World Health
Organization); "Population Education for Adults" (O.J. Sikes); "Adult Learning,
Media, Culture and New Information and Communication Technologies"
(Chris Cavanagh); "Adult Education and Aging. Trends and Critical Issues"
(Paul Belanger, Rosa M. Falgas); "Moving across Borders, Cultures and
Mindsets: Prospects for Migrant and Refugee Education in the 21st Century"
(Carolyn Medel-Anonuevo); "Education in Prisons: Key Words for Freedom"
(Marc De Maeyer); "Economics of Adult Education and Training" (Albert C.
Tuijnman); "Economics of Non-Formal Education" (Manzoor Ahmed);
"Enhancing International Cooperation and Solidarity" (Paul Fordham). Also
included is "Adult Learning: Empowerment for Local and Global Change in
the Twenty-First Century: A Discussion Guide."


ERIC_NO: ED385459
TITLE: Teaching about International Conflict and Peace.
AUTHOR: Merryfield, Merry, Ed.; Remy, Richard C., Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This book is designed to help social studies educators better
understand international conflict management as they learn about
instructional methods and begin to teach. The book brings together current
scholarship on major topics in the management of international conflict and
methods for teaching that are especially important in globally-oriented social
studies education. International topics and instructional methods have been
selected that are critical for preparing secondary social studies teachers for
globally-oriented curriculum innovations in an era of school reform and
restructuring. Divided into two parts, part 1, "Linking Content, Methods, and
Educational Goals," explains the relationships between substantive content
about international conflict management and exemplary teaching practice in
secondary social studies classrooms. Chapters in part 1 include: (1)
"Choosing Content and Methods for Teaching about International Conflict and
Peace" (Merry M. Merryfield; Richard C. Remy); and (2) "A Case Study of
Unit Planning in the Context of School Reform" (Steve Shapiro; Merry M.
Merryfield). Part 2, "Essays in International Conflict Management and Peace,"
eminent scholars provide substantive essays on major themes in international
conflict management. Chapters in part 2 include: (3) "Building Peace: A
Global Learning Process" (Chadwick F. Alger); (4) "The Use and Control of
Military Power" (Peter D. Feaver); (5) "Diplomacy, Negotiation, and Peaceful
Settlement" (David P. Barash); (6) "Economic Cooperation" (Karen Mingst);
(7) "Human Rights in International Perspectives" (David P. Forsythe); (8)
"Self-Determination" (Dov Ronen); and (9) "Resolving Conflict over the Global
Environment" (Marvin S. Soroos). An appendix on resources for teachers
(Yasemin Alptekin-Oguzertem) provides additional insights into organizations,
instructional materials, computer networks, and other scholarly works.


ERIC_NO: EJ609017
TITLE: This Issue: Global education.
AUTHOR: Pike, Graham
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
JOURNAL_CITATION: Theory into Practice; v39 n2 p62-63 Spr 2000
ABSTRACT: Introduces a theme issue on global education, noting that
interpretations and perceptions of the nature and purpose of global education
differ from one country to another and sometimes within countries. Articles in
this issue illustrate some of the strands of national distinctiveness that are
found in five countries and note dominant themes common to several
countries.


ERIC_NO: ED300309
TITLE: Positioning Global education for the 1990s: Strategies for Higher
Education.
AUTHOR: Scott, Robert A.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1988
ABSTRACT: All colleges and universities should be considering how they will
incorporate global aspects of education and society into their curricula. The
degree of program development will depend upon the goals and missions of
each campus, but the programs should build from each campus' strength.
The purpose of this paper is to discuss: (1) the principles for program
development for global education at the Ramapo College of New Jersey
(Mahwah); (2) the strategies that may be used for attracting the professional
interests of its faculty; (3) the criteria for assessing the impact of such
programs; and (4) how individual states can influence the program. At
Ramapo College international and multicultural themes are to be included
throughout the curriculum, and extracurricular activities such as internships
and field studies are to reflect these themes while faculty participation is
encouraged through research programs. Assessment of the program's impact
can be seen through the Board of Trustees' commitment and the participation
of faculty and students. Several states have issued recommendations for
global education to schools and colleges, and these recommendations may
be included when developing the program.


ERIC_NO: ED404328
TITLE: Preparing Teachers To Teach Global Perspectives. A Handbook for
Teacher Educators.
AUTHOR: Merryfield, Merry M., Ed.; And Others
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
ABSTRACT: This book provides a conceptual framework that encourages
exploration of global perspectives; it provides teacher educators with a guide
for establishing goals, objectives, rationale, and a working definition for global
education. The chapters are: (1) "A Framework for Teacher Education in
Global Perspectives" (Merry M. Merryfield); (2) "Earth Systems Education: A
Case Study of a Globally Oriented Science Education Program" (Victor J.
Mayer); (3) "Teachers' Perspectives on School/University Collaboration in
Global education" (Timothy Dove, James Norris, and Dawn Shinew); (4)
"Cross-Cultural Experiences in Teacher Education Courses: Reflections and
Advice from American and African Teachers" (Cynthia Tyson, Patricia L.
Benton, Barbara Christenson, Anku Gollah, and Ousmane Mamourne
Traore); (5) "Assessing Teachers for Learner-Centered Global education"
(Giselle O. Martin-Kniep); (6)"Student Teaching Overseas" (Craig Kissock);
(7) "Infusing Global Perspectives Throughout a Secondary Social Studies
Program" (Angene H. Wilson); (8) "Professional Development in Global
education" (Jane A. Boston); (9) Building Faculty Commitment for Global
education" (Roland Case and Walter Werner); and (10) "The Dean's Role in
Infusing Global Perspectives Throughout a College of Education" (Elaine
Jarchow). The appendix contains: "Global education Infoguide" (Sarah
Pickert)--an extensive list of references, bibliographies, electronic resources,
organizations, and funding resources.




ERIC_NO: EJ450803
TITLE: Children's Rights in the Social Studies Curriculum: A Critical
Imperative.
AUTHOR: Fernekes, William R.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Education; v56 n4 p203-04 Apr-May 1992
ABSTRACT: Argues that childrens' rights should be taught in the social
studies curriculum. Suggests that study of the components of the U.N.
convention on childrens' rights (provision, protection, and participation) is
integral to achieving major citizenship goals. Includes global education,
interdependence, culture, change, scarcity, and conflict as curricular themes
to that can relate to social problems.


ERIC_NO: EJ510882
TITLE: Educating for Social Competence: A Conceptual Approach to Social
Studies Teaching.
AUTHOR: Mathison, Carla
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Studies Review; v34 n2 p40-47 Win 1995
ABSTRACT: Maintains that the broad arenas of the social sciences bind
multiple areas of study together, giving added breadth and depth to each.
Identifies the basic tenets of multicultural, global, and civic education.
Includes suggested learning activities on the theme of individual versus
community rights and responsibilities in U.S. history.



ERIC_NO: ED394876
TITLE: Effective Teaching in Elementary Social Studies.
AUTHOR: Savage, Tom V.; Armstrong, David G.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
ABSTRACT: This book is designed for use in elementary social studies
methods classes, as a source for discussion in advanced curriculum classes,
and as a personal reference for elementary social studies teachers. This book
has four major divisions with each division offering a list of lesson ideas. Part
1, "Contexts for the Social Studies," includes: (1) "Defining The Social
Studies"; (2) "The Content Sources: History, Geography, and Economics"; (3)
"The Content Sources: Political Science, Sociology, Anthropology, and
Psychology"; and (4) "Planning For Instruction." Part 2, "Fundamental
Approaches To Instruction," contains: (1) "Concepts, Generalizations, and
Individualized Learning"; (2) "Group Learning"; (3) "Developing Thinking
Skills"; and (4) "Developing Prosocial Behavior." Part 3, "A Selection Of
Themes" includes: (1) "Law-Related Education"; (2) "Global education"; (3)
"Multicultural and Gender-Equity Education"; and (4) "Environmental and
Energy Education." Part 4, "Supporting And Assessing Social Studies
Learning," contains: (1) "Technology and the Social Studies"; (2)
"Understanding Map and Globe Skills"; (3) "Social Studies and the Integrated
Curriculum"; (4) "Social Studies for Limited English Proficient Learners"; and
(5) "Evaluating Learning."


ERIC_NO: ED387366
TITLE: Women in Cross-Cultural Transitions.
AUTHOR: Bystydzienski, Jill M., Ed.; Resnik, Estelle P., Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1994
ABSTRACT: This series of 14 essays focuses on experiences of women who
have made cross-cultural transitions. Cross-cultural transitions refer to
moving across cultures, usually from one country to another or across
subcultures within one society. The essays document what individual women
perceived, how they felt when in the process of moving from one culture to
another, and what the consequences of the transition were for them. This
volume presents common themes and issues raised by accounts of cross-
cultural transition. Women's experiences, collectively, differ from men's due to
socialization. There are three parts in the volume. Part 1, "Reflections of
Mature Women," contains the following essays: (1) "Parental Variations in a
Hungarian Immigrant Experience" (Marga Kapka); (2) "Proud to Be a
Japanese-American" (Jean Umemura); (3) "A Francophone Korean in
America" (Irene Kwanghye Lee Olivier); (4) "A Palestinian's Struggle with
Cultural Conflicts" (Rima Najjar); (5) "A Zanzibari Woman's Realization of Her
Mother's Dream" (Alwiya S. Omar); (6) "Exploring Cultural Homelessness: At
Home Here, There, and Nowhere" (Mercedes Morris Garcia); and (7) "Lost
and Found" (Dagrun Bennett). Part 2, "Perception of College Women,"
contains the following: (1) "A Divided Life: Wanting to Be in Two Cultures at
Once" (Nicolina Cobo); (2) "Trying to Understand: A Sri Lankan in an
American College" (Rika Franke); (3) "Learning to Value One's Heritage"
(Xing Chun Zheng); (4) "Most Difficult but Most Valuable Experience" (Yuko
Kanda); (5) "Caribbean-American Transitions" (Charmaine Barnard); and (6)
"Black and White" (Shirley Ann Williams, Jr.). Part 3 contains the essay
"Reflections of a Cultural Commuter" (Birgit Brock Utne).



ERIC_NO: ED406271
TITLE: Tune in Japan: Approaching Culture through Television. A Teacher's
Guide.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This book is designed to accompany a videotape comprised of
numerous television and video clips, many from actual Japanese broadcasts,
to help teach about Japan. The video and book are divided into three
thematic segments. Included in each part of the guide are a background
essay on the featured theme, an annotated script that includes additional
information about the material in each segment, related classroom activities
and handouts, and suggestions about other relevant sources. The
background essays include: (1) "Approaching Other Cultures through
Television" (Jackson H. Bailey); (2) "Teaching the Geographic Character of
Japan" (James M. Goodman); (3) "Holidays and Festivals in Japan"
(Theodore Bestor); and (4) "Continuity and Change in Japanese Culture"
(Barbara
Finkelstein).


ERIC_NO: ED392723
TITLE: Educating for Peace and Justice: Religious Dimensions, Grades 7-12.
8th Edition.
AUTHOR: McGinnis, James
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
ABSTRACT: This manual examines peace and justice themes with an
interfaith focus. Each unit begins with an overview of the unit, the teaching
procedure suggested for the unit and helpful resources noted. The volume
contains the following units: (1) "Of Dreams and Vision"; (2) "The Prophets:
Bearers of the Vision"; (3) "Faith and Culture Contrasts"; (4) "Making the
Connections: Social Analysis, Social Sin, and Social Change"; (5)
"Reconciliation: Turning Enemies and Strangers into Friends"; (6) "Interracial
Reconciliation"; (7) "Interreligious Reconciliation"; (8) "International
Reconciliation"; (9) "Conscientious Decision-Making about War and Peace
Issues"; (10) "Solidarity with the Poor"; and (11) "Reconciliation with the
Earth." Seven appendices conclude the document.


ERIC_NO: ED247149 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Understanding Our Cultural Diversity: A Theme Guide to K-12 Curricular
Resources, Activities, and Processes.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1983
ABSTRACT: Presented in matrix form, this guide presents sample activities and resources
for teaching cross-cultural studies and global education in a variety of content areas in the
K-12 curriculum. Five goals are presented: to develop increased self-awareness and a
positive self-concept among students of all ethnic groups; to develop an understanding
and appreciation of the linguistic and cultural pluralism of the United States; to develop an
understanding of image formation and stereotyping and their impact on individual and
group dynamics; to recognize the commonalities shared by all human beings; and to
create an awareness of how world events affecting a root culture also affect ethnic groups
in the United States. For each of these goals, a matrix presents a content focus; sample
activities for grade levels K-3, 4-6, 7-8, and 9-12; skills; and resources. Topics covered in
these lessons are self-concept, ethnic and national heritage, the significance of names,
social roles, national games, folk tales, interdependence, and special education.


ERIC_NO: ED407313
TITLE: With Respect for Others: Activities for a Global Neighborhood.
AUTHOR: Manthey, Cynthia M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This volume contains primary theme units to be used by early childhood
teachers to foster children's sense of respect for self, others, and the world. Several
multicultural units are presented along with units on sensory awareness and self-esteem.
The intent of the book is to inspire teachers to incorporate multiculturalism into their
lessons on an ongoing basis. The 10 units contain 117 different activities. The units focus
on: (1) "Self Empowerment & Self-Esteem"; (2) "African Cultural Aspects"; (3)"Mexican
Cultural Aspects"; (4) "French Cultural Aspects"; (5) "Amish Cultural Aspects"; (6) "Touch";
(7) "Taste"; (8) "Hearing"; (9) "Smell"; and (10) "Sight." An appendix contains general
multicultural resources, resources for each unit, and related resource books.


ERIC_NO: ED238269
TITLE: Doing the Unthinkable in the Second-Language Classroom: A
Process for the Integration of Language and Culture.
AUTHOR: Crawford-Lange, Linda M.; Lange, Dale L.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1984
ABSTRACT: An integrative process combining language instruction with
cultural education is described and discussed. The process is integrative in
two ways because it relates target and native languages, cultures, and
perceptions, and also relates the teaching of culture to the teaching of
language. This approach incorporates eight stages; the first five are teacher-
directed and the last three are student-directed. They are: (1) identification of
a cultural theme; (2) presentation of cultural phenomena; (3) dialogue relating
target and native cultures; (4) transition to language learning by discussing
language needs discovered through use of the materials; (5) incorporation of
language learning and practice; (6) verification of perceptions of the target
and native cultures; (7) exercises in cultural awareness; and (8) evaluation of
language and cultural proficiency. A sophomore French class's pursuit of
"organization of adolescent sports programs" as a theme is given as an
example of the progression of stages. Other issues discussed include
limitations of the integrative process, models of culture within the language
curriculum, integration of culture-learning strategies, the integrative process
and global education, and evaluation within this process.


ERIC_NO: ED422213
TITLE: Global Winners: 74 Learning Activities for Inside and Outside the Classroom.
AUTHOR: Drum, Jan; Hughes, Steve; Otero, George
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1994
ABSTRACT: This book provides 74 learning activities to help K-12 students, college
students, and even seniors develop the global perspective needed for the 21st century.
Each learning exercise is preceded by an introduction that sets the theme of the activity
and states its purpose or objective. Appropriate age or grade use and gives instructions on
how to implement the activity in a variety of ways are given. The exercises are clustered
around six themes: (1) increasing state-of-the-planet awareness (9 activities); (2)
developing
perspective consciousness (17 activities); (3) valuing diversity (11 activities); (4) living
responsibly with others (13 activities); (5) understanding world issues and trends (16
activities); and (6) expanding the capacity to change .


ERIC_NO: ED414225 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Teaching World History: A Resource Book.
AUTHOR: Roupp, Heidi, Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
ABSTRACT: This resource book provides essays on relevant topics, conceptual
overviews, courses of study, successful lessons and other ideas by individuals widely
recognized for their expertise in teaching world history. Lessons illustrate cross-cultural
exchange, global themes, and comparative analyses to teach the skills of thinking
historically. The book is divided into three major sections and contains 50 articles by
philosophers, historians and practitioners. Part 1, "Approaches," presents various methods
to teaching world history and curricular models. Part 2, "Articles," covers such themes in
world history as art, gender, religion, environment, civilizations, cities, political systems,
philosophy, literature, trade, and technology. Part 3 provides strategies and lessons for the
classroom incorporating many of the topics addressed in Part 2.


ERIC_NO: ED362467 lit
TITLE: Learning To Live in the Global Community: A Case Study.
AUTHOR: Peters, Richard
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
ABSTRACT: This document presents a curriculum plan for social studies for
each grade from kindergarten through high school. Each unit is designed to
utilize community resources in teaching students a global approach. Three
possible approaches to using resources are suggested: (1) to introduce a unit
of study, to focus students' attention on planned activities and related
experiences; (2) to develop the concepts, knowledge, and skills related to the
unit theme or topic during the formative stage; or (3) as an end of unit
culminating activity, providing students with opportunities to apply acquired
concepts, knowledge, and skills to field based activities. An example is given
from a sixth grade class to illustrate each approach. This curriculum is based
on a Texas curriculum program described as eco/social studies, in which
student attention is focused on several social science disciplines and
stressing concepts and content, or knowledge and skills acquisition,
application, reinforcement, and refinement. The units deal primarily with
social studies, Texas, and United States history. Different aspects of human
relations are emphasized in each grade level. For instance, the second grade
unit emphasizes relating self with significant others in the context of
community and the world of work. The third grade unit deals with proximity or
the physical distance between two or more people and community and
lifespace phenomena. These concepts reappear throughout the curriculum.
The high school units focus on citizenship attitudes, skills, and values, Texas,
the United States, and world history, and world geography.



ERIC_NO: ED369668
TITLE: To Live in a Multicultural World.
AUTHOR: Wilson, Angene; And Others
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
ABSTRACT: To live in a multicultural world, students need to deal with stereotyping, learn
about other cultures, and understand multiple perspectives. Especially appropriate for use
by social studies and foreign language teachers, this unit puts the multicultural society of
the United States in the context of the multicultural world. The unit covers nine lessons that
each fit into a class period of less than 55 minutes. The methodology for the lessons
includes the use of videotapes, reading, discussion, role playing, and research projects.
The themes of the lessons are: (1) recognizing stereotypes of other cultures; (2)
recognizing stereotypes within the United States; (3) counteracting stereotypes; (4)
learning about other cultures; (5) continuing to learn about other cultures; (6)
understanding Japanese and Mexican perspectives; (7) developing a dual perspective; (8)
listening to multiple perspectives; and (9) "visiting" other cultures. Seven handouts and six
teacher aids support the lessons objectives.


ERIC_NO: EJ541898
TITLE: From Cape to Cairo: Stressing Africa's Geographical Heritage.
AUTHOR: Nelson, Jennifer
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
JOURNAL_CITATION: Southern Social Studies Journal; v21 n2 p41-50 Spr
1996
ABSTRACT: Presents a series of questions and activities designed to teach
the geography of Africa. The activities relate to, and are collected under the
five themes of geography: Location, Place, Human/Environment Interactions,
Movement, and Regions. Includes four maps and a list of resources.


ERIC_NO: ED405269 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Gender Issues: An Activity File.
AUTHOR: Fountain, Susan
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1991
ABSTRACT: This activity file grew out of research of an "Images of Women in
Development" project of the Centre for Global education at the University of York,
England. The activities are intended for students in the 8- to 13-year-old range to learn
more about gender issues. The activities are divided into four sections: (1) awareness-
raising activities in which stereotyping, including unconscious stereotyping, can be
confronted and examined; (2) research activities that allow children to discover gender
discrimination in their own
environment; (3) group discussion activities that can be used in conjunction with the above
activities; and (4) role plays and simulations that place participants in situation that enable
them to experience the effects of gender inequalities, to take alternative perspectives, and
to develop possible
strategies and solutions for dealing with discrimination. Cross-curricular themes are
encouraged.


ERIC_NO: ED405271 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Global/Local Linkages: A Thematic K-12 Social Studies Curriculum.
AUTHOR: Haakenson, Paul; And Others
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This practicum paper presents a thematic K-12 social studies curriculum to
meet an expressed need of social studies teachers of a school corporation to upgrade the
teaching of social studies. The teachers wanted the subject to be more relevant to
students' lives and to incorporate a more holistic approach. Content overview of the K-12
currriculum include: (1) Grades K-3: "Fundamentals of Social Studies"; (2) Grade 4: "State
History, Geography: Continuity and Change"; (3) Grade 5: "Issues Around Us"; (4) Grade
6: World Studies, Asia and Oceania"; (5) Grade 7: "World Studies, Europe and Africa"; (6)
Grade 8: "World Studies, The Americas"; (7) Grades 9 and 10: "American Studies"; (8)
Grade 11: "World Civilizations"; and (9) Grade 12: "Principles of American Democracy"
(one semester) and "Social Action" (one semester). The six themes identified as the focus
of study are resources, interdependence, adaptation, identity/culture, citizenship/social
action, and conflict resolution. Includes recommendations for each grade level's course of
study.


ERIC_NO: ED389642 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Getting Along: Activities for Teaching Cooperation--Responsibility--Respect.
AUTHOR: Schilling, Dianne
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
ABSTRACT: This book provides activities to introduce or reintroduce students to conflict
resolution skills in a deliberate, enjoyable fashion and to elevate their awareness of each
person's responsibility to create a cooperative environment wherever they may be.
Interdependence is a central theme as is the awareness that dissent and conflict are
natural and productive elements in society. Activities are grouped into seven topic areas
with accompanying handouts. The topic areas include: (1) "Appreciating Differences"; (2)
"Communicating Effectively"; (3) "Developing Friendship Skills"; (4) "Helping and Being
Helped"; (5) "Including Others"; (6) "Resolving Conflict"; and (7) "Working Together."


ERIC_NO: ED244889
TITLE: American Education and the World Economy: Controversial Themes.
AUTHOR: Morrissett, Irving
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1984
ABSTRACT: Viewpoints about world economic problems and descriptive and
prescriptive views on the treatment of related controversial issues are
presented. Following a section describing three types of controversial issues
(issues of fact, causation, and values), the paper is arranged into six sections,
each dealing with an aspect of the world economy with particular emphasis
on economic development and militarization. These sections are concerned
with the division and grouping among the nations of the world; the
distribution of wealth among and within nations; the requisites for economic
progress; relationships between more developed countries (MDC's) and less
developed countries (LDC's); militarization, the arms race, and the arms
burden; and the consequences of peace. Following each section is a
suggested list of factual, causal, and values issues. In addition, the paper
presents a brief discussion on the status of American education (with respect
to world problems), a rationale for encouraging controversy in the classroom,
and suggestions for managing controversy in the classroom. The document
concludes that while the United States and other MDC's have a powerful
influence on the world economy, a major responsibility for economic progress
lies within the LDC's. Moreover, global education is prescribed as necessary
for alleviating ignorance of world economic problems.


ERIC_NO: EJ427768
TITLE: Thinking Globally by Promoting Geographic Investigations.
AUTHOR: Bock, Judith K.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
JOURNAL_CITATION: Councilor; v50 p47-52 Oct 1990
ABSTRACT: Suggests enhancing geographic education by teaching geography as a
relationship between humans and the environment. Explores how to use the geographic
themes of location, place and relationships, movement, and regions in the classroom.
Provides suggestions for teaching geographic skills and developing geographic tools.
Argues geographic awareness is an essential component of a global perspective.


ERIC_NO: ED328496
TITLE: Land and Freedom--Issues in World History.
AUTHOR: Rubenstein, Stan
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1988
ABSTRACT: This series of self-contained lessons in land use features activities that can
be used with any high school world history, global education, or European history social
studies classes. The fifteen lessons included are : (1) Rome's Landed Estates; (2) The
Gracchian Revolution; (3) The Feudal Land System; (4) The Domesday Book; (5)
Mercantilism; (6) The Enclosure Movement; (7) The Old Regime in France; (8) Malthus:
Populations and Poverty; (9) Emancipation of the Russian Serfs; (1) The Forerunner of
Germany: Zollverein; (11) Sun Yat-Sen's Three Principles; (12) The Soviet Five-Year
Plans; (13) Chinese Land Reform Under Communism; (14) American Occupation and
Land Reform in Japan; and (15) Land Ownership in Latin America. Each lesson provides a
theme, a sub-theme, background, concepts, performance objectives, and a list of related
texts.


ERIC_NO: EJ500775
TITLE: Developing Student Global Perspectives through Undergraduate
Family Resource Management.
AUTHOR: Crawford, Glinda
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
JOURNAL_CITATION: Journal of Home Economics; v85 n2 p9-15 Sum 1993
ABSTRACT: An undergraduate home economics program at the University of
North Dakota infuses global concepts in courses on consumer issues,
personal and family finances, and family management. Substantive themes
center around values, family resource management patterns,
interdependence, global issues/problems, critical thinking, and global actors.


ERIC_NO: EJ533353
TITLE: Starting Points for Global education.
AUTHOR: Werner, Walt
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
JOURNAL_CITATION: Canadian Social Studies; v30 n4 p171-73 Sum 1996
ABSTRACT: Recommends integrating global education objectives in a low-key manner
through the questions and examples that the teacher interjects into classroom discussions.
Articulates four foci that can serve as entry points for global education in many
discussions. These include moral issues, systems approach, and reflexive inquiry.


ERIC_NO: ED395890
TITLE: Current Issues: Critical Issues Confronting the Nation and the World. 1996 Edition
[and Teacher's Guide.]
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This book accompanied by the Teacher's guide, focuses on policy issues
being discussed and debated by U.S. policymakers. The book provides essays on current
issues facing the nation and the world. Ten chapters highlight domestic policy issues and
10 chapters are about foreign policy issues. This book informs readers about important
concerns of today and leaves judgments up to the individual. The book is divided into three
sections. Part 1, "The Federal Government", includes: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "The Clinton
Administration"; (3) "The 104th Congress"; (4) "The Supreme Court"; and (5) "The Federal
Budget". Part 2, "Domestic Policy Issues", contains: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "The Economy";
(3) "Education"; (4) "Women and Minorities"; (5) "Poverty"; (6) "Health Care"; (7)
"Immigration"; (8) "Energy"; (9) "Environment"; (10) "Constitutional Rights"; and (11)
"Crime and Drugs". Part 3, "Foreign Policy Issues", includes: (1) "Introduction"; (2)
"Russia"; (3) "Defense"; (4) "Latin America"; (5) "The Middle East"; (6) "International
Trade"; (7) "Europe"; (8) "Nuclear Proliferation"; (9) "World Poverty"; (10) "Sub-Saharan
Africa"; and (11) "East Asia." Each chapter provides basic background information,
identifies key questions, and gives arguments from both sides of the issue.


ERIC_NO: ED422224
TITLE: Issues-Centered Instruction in Teaching International Issues to Low
Achieving High School Students.
AUTHOR: Rossi, John Allen
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
ABSTRACT: This paper investigates issues-centered instruction looks in two
ninth grade classrooms composed of large numbers of low achieving high
school students. The key principles of issues-centered instruction are
described with an examination of the barriers of the approach with low
achieving students. The paper reports on two world geography classrooms of
low achievers who studied Latin America and the Caribbean using an issues-
centered approach. The researcher worked with classroom teachers and
planned an eight-day unit on Latin America and the Caribbean based on the
principles of issues-centered instruction. Field notes from observations and
interviews provided the qualitative data.




ERIC_NO: ED381346
TITLE: A Two Way Approach to Understanding: Issues in Global education. Second
Edition.
AUTHOR: McDaniel, Rick, Comp.; Petrie, Jim, Comp.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
ABSTRACT: By focusing on issues, global education provides students with a better
understanding of the country and the world in which they live. The issues approach
stresses that global education is a two-way approach to understanding: it is both a way of
teaching and a way of learning. This book provides resources for the teacher who has
decided to teach development by the issues method. Activities presented range in grade
level appropriateness from grade 4-12. An introduction discusses effective global
education and development education. Fifty-seven activities focus on differences that
exist in wealth and power between nations; assumptions about development; ways in
which other cultures are "interpreted;" trading relationships between North and South;
poverty and population; refugees and migrants; aid; food; water; literacy; environment; and
women.


ERIC_NO: ED454141
TITLE: Weaving Connections: Educating for Peace, Social and Environmental Justice.
AUTHOR: Goldstein, Tara, Ed.; Selby, David, Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
ABSTRACT: This collection of essays by Canadian educators seeks to achieve two goals.
First, it documents educational philosophies and approaches that are directed toward
equity, justice, peacefulness, and earth awareness. Second, it challenges current
directions in Canadian school reform that promote "back to basics," centralization of
control, a conformist concept of citizenship, corporate intrusion, deprofessionalization of
the teacher, "doing more with less," "learning for earning," and performance measurability.
Following an introduction by the editors, essays are: (1) "Anti-Homophobia Initiatives at the
Former Toronto Board of Education" (T. McCaskell; V. Russell); (2) "Multicultural and Anti-
Racist Education: The Issue Is Equity" (O. M. Wright); (3) "Black Education in Canada:
Past, Present and Future" (M. Bramble); (4) "Educating for Citizenship in Canada: New
Meanings in a Changing World" (M. Evans; I. Hundey); (5) "Development Education:
Making Connections North and South" (L. Cronkhite); (6) "Education for Gender Equity:
Origins and Development" (L. Mofatt); (7) "Navigating the Waters of Canadian
Environmental Education" (C. L. Russell; A. C. Bell; L. Fawcett); (8) "A Tapestry in the
Making: The Strands of Global education" (G. Pike); (9) "Reading between the Lines:
Examining Assumptions in Health Education" (G. Smith; L. Peterat); (10) "Humane
Education: Widening the Circle of Compassion and Justice" (D. Selby); (11) "Law-Related
Education: Promoting Awareness, Participation and Action" (W. Cassidy); (12) "Media
Education in Canada" (B. Duncan; J. Pungente; R. Shepherd); (13) "Molded Images: First
Nations People, Representation and the Ontario School Curriculum" (S. D. Fletcher); and
(14) "Educating Towards a Culture of Peace" (T. Swee-Hin; V. Floresca-Cawagas).


ERIC_NO: ED315353 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: The Global Ecosystem: Using the Global education Curriculum to Expose Students
to Contemporary Conflicts, Issues, Problems, and Situations Affecting Natural/Social
Environments.
AUTHOR: Peters, Richard
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1989
ABSTRACT: Students must clearly understand that every living thing on earth exists within
the context of a system of interlocking dependency. Through the use of audio-visual
materials, books, magazines, newspapers, and special television reports, as well as direct
interaction with people, places, and things, students begin to develop a cognitive frame of
reference to their world. Typically, global education programs focus on natural/social
geography, history, economics, government, and sociology. Few attempts are made to
fuse topics of study into a logical sequence of inquiry, stressing the interrelationships
between natural and social environments and pointing out the conflicts, issues, and
situations that confront nature and humankind. Ten sample lesson plans for grades 4
through 12 are included, covering such concepts as pollution, waste disposal, forest
degradation, the greenhouse effect, urbanization, and endangered species. Some lessons
include maps. It is hoped that these will serve as models that each teacher can use to
create learning experiences unique to a particular class, at a particular setting, and in a
particular point in time. Appended are various news clippings that deal with the concepts in
the lesson plans, a list of selected international organizations, a fact sheet about Global
Horizons, and 14 selected references.


ERIC_NO: ED440673
TITLE: Charting the Future of Global education in Community Colleges. New Expeditions:
Charting the Second Century of Community Colleges. Issues Paper No. 12.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
ABSTRACT: This document is part of the New Expeditions series, published by the
American Association for Community Colleges. It addresses technology, meeting the
needs of a diverse student body, and remaining economically viable and locally
responsible in a global community. The paper asserts that, as community colleges
transform from teaching to learning institutions, they will build on a new definition of
community that is not place-centered but learner-centered. Therefore, community can no
longer be defined as local. Discussed is how global education will affect the following
issues at community and two-year colleges: (1) access and equity; (2) faculty role; (3)
finance; (4) governance; (5) leadership development; (6) market forces; (7) student needs;
(8) technology; and (9) teaching and learning. The article also explores the expansion from
local to global communities, and the resulting change in the community college's civic role.
Contained in the appendices are a community colleges and global education executive
summary, the New Expeditions survey on global education in community colleges, a list of
providers of testimony at the New Expeditions hearing in Washington, DC, a list of
participants at the New Expeditions Conference, and the hearing testimony.


ERIC_NO: ED354206 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Global education: Educating for Our Common Future.
AUTHOR: Randall, Ruth E.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: Minnesota plays an integral role in the worldwide increase in the exchange of
goods, services, and ideas. It is imperative that the state's citizens be able to relate to an
increasingly interrelated world and to gain the skills, attitudes, and knowledge needed to
participate intelligently in such
exchanges. Educating to these ends is essential. International/global education is the
carefully designed elementary and secondary program that helps students develop in such
a way as to contribute effectively to an interdependent world. Students must learn a sense
of responsibility for the needs of all people and a commitment to the just and peaceful
resolution of global issues. Minnesota's global education efforts seek to enable citizens to
participate more actively at local, state, national, and international levels. The task of
global education becomes more difficult each year, as technological developments yield
an ever expanding profusion of data and problems. The survival of "Spaceship Earth" and
the quality of life of its inhabitants will depend on the extent to which young people develop
the ability to think, feel, and act from a global perspective. Teachers can instill in students
an appreciation of the global nature of issues that affect their lives and the
interrelationships that bind them to other regions and peoples. Educators must prepare the
young to meet the responsibilities and demands of an interdependent and complex world.


ERIC_NO: ED171622 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: A Guide to Four Essential Themes. School Improvement through Global education.
AUTHOR: Kinghorn, Jon Rye; And Others
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1979
ABSTRACT: To aid high school classroom teachers as they develop and implement
programs on global issues, the guide outlines basic elements of an ideal global education
program. Major themes are: valuing diversity; understanding the world as an
interdependent system; developing effective working relationships with others; and
understanding prevailing world conditions, the process of change, and emerging trends.
For each theme, information is presented on background, goals, implications for global
education, implications for school improvement, and learning activities. Specific objectives
include developing skills to identify and understand various beliefs, values, and cultures,
knowing that differences in people's values are often due to history and geography,
identifying how individual activities affect the earth, understanding that actions often lead
to unanticipated consequences, acquiring and using information about world issues,
increasing understanding of self, and recognizing the humanness of all people. Suggested
activities involve students in class discussion, reading and writing assignments, listing
cultural differences among various age groups and cultures, brainstorming, listing cultural
preferences, and arranging for class visitors. Activities involve teachers in cooperative
lesson planning with other staff members, analyzing student behavior, visiting student
homes, reporting on current international issues, and reordering the classroom
environment to increase effectiveness with students.


ERIC_NO: EJ476641
TITLE: Humane Education and Global education.
AUTHOR: Selby, David
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
JOURNAL_CITATION: Australian Journal of Environmental Education; v9 p115-33 Sep
1993
ABSTRACT: Presents and explains model representing four dimensions of global
education: temporal, spatial, issues, and inner. Presents six principal areas covered by
humane curricula; the relationships between humane education, environmental education,
and human rights education; and two humane education activities for the secondary and
elementary/secondary levels.



ERIC_NO: ED335246
TITLE: Human Ecology: A Suprastructure for Global education.
AUTHOR: Riggle, Richard
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1989
ABSTRACT: Descriptions of global education tend to be either fragmented or nebulous.
Consequently, the educator is left with little tangible basis for developing instructional
programs. As a corrective measure, this paper advocates using fundamental ideas from
the disciplines of geography and environmental sociology that collectively contribute to the
formation of 'human ecology' as a suprastructure for the analysis of current issues that are
critical to global well-being. By arranging related concepts on a flow chart and factoring out
secondary issues, the resulting cohesive structure reveals interrelated human and
environmental factors that interface with the social, physical, and natural sciences.


ERIC_NO: ED460930
TITLE: Concepts and Trends in Global education.
AUTHOR: Sutton, Margaret, Ed.; Hutton, Deborah, Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2001
ABSTRACT: This publication addresses trends and issues in global education,
providing information about what global education is and how to teach it. The publication
emphasizes ERIC resources. It offers ERIC Digests about global education and selected
items from the ERIC database that exemplify different viewpoints and approaches to
global education. It contains a directory of key organizations and World Wide Web sites
that provide teacher resources. Designed as a guide for educators who want to include
global education across the various subjects of the curriculum, the volume is divided into
four parts: (1) "Overview of Global and International Education"; (2) "Institutionalizing
Global education"; (3) "Curriculum, Methods, and Approaches"; and (4) "Appendices."
Information about documents in the ERIC database and how to submit documents for the
database is appended.


ERIC_NO: ED340674
TITLE: Implementing Global education in the Elementary School: Getting Teachers
beyond Lists of Goals.
AUTHOR: Wright, Audrey E.; Van Decar, Patricia
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: Four groups of midwestern teachers (N=103) enrolled in graduate courses in
elementary curriculum and comparative education were asked to register their degree of
support for a list of goals of global education. Most teachers registered support for the
goals but had little to offer in the way of implementation of the goals in their own
classrooms. A process was initiated with these inservice teachers to: get teachers to value
global education and incorporate it into classroom time when possible; and give teachers
confidence in their ability to teach with a global approach, to select materials for
understanding other cultures, and to identify opportunities to infuse a global perspective
into the entire elementary curriculum. Steps in the process included: (1) finding out what
the teachers were already doing; (2) identifying key features of their own culture(s); (3)
imposing a structure on culture through categorization by economics, educational systems,
family, religion, geography, cultural diversity, ethnic groups, political systems, and
recreation; (4) extending conclusions to other cultures; (5) identifying global issues; and (6)
identifying opportunities for interdisciplinary study.


ERIC_NO: ED386047
TITLE: Coherence and Continuity in the Task-Centred Language Curriculum:
Global education as a Framework for Task-Based Language Teaching.
AUTHOR: Bushell, Brenda; Dyer, Brenda
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1994
ABSTRACT: An assessment of the English-as-a-Second-Language
curriculum at International Christian University (Japan) looked at: (1) the kind
of English language study perceived by students as important for their
success; (2) how students' perceived needs compare to the professors'
assessments of required academic tasks, as measured by a previous task
analysis; (3) the support available for a global education curriculum within the
English language program; and (4) whether the environmental studies unit
presently in place in the program is compatible with the results of the needs
analysis. It was found that students' perceptions of their language needs were
close to those of both their teachers and the program's goals and objectives,
and that content-based global studies were perceived as appropriate to
students' immediate academic needs and visions of the future. A task-based
curriculum design model based on the findings is outlined. Problems yet to be
resolved include assessment of task difficulty and the degree to which
learners' perceived needs should guide curriculum design. A list of further
resources, the student questionnaires, and excerpts from student comments
on global issues are appended.


ERIC_NO: ED340631 ‫للنتائج‬
TITLE: Social Studies Reform and Global education: California, New York, and the Report
of the National Commission on Social Studies.
AUTHOR: Fleming, Dan B.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: There has been a movement in social studies education in recent years to
provide greater emphasis on global education. This paper evaluates efforts undertaken in
this regard by the states of California and New York and by the National Commission on
Social Studies in the Schools. California adopted a History-Social Science Framework for
their public schools in July, 1987. The study of history is the linchpin of this K-12
curriculum. A significant amount of time is devoted to world history, with courses taught in
grades 6, 7, and 10. In two places, grades 10 and 12, the curriculum focuses on problems
and issues of the world today in an open-ended approach. The State of New York's
revised social studies curriculum was implemented in stages over the course of the 1980s.
While not as far-reaching in its emphasis on global education as California's curriculum,
New York's program devotes significant time to developing a global perspective. The main
global education thrust of the curriculum is found in grades 9 and 10 under the title of
"global studies." The New York program seems to have more of a "citizenship" building
and contemporary flavor to it than does California. The National Commission on the Social
Studies in the Schools Report, "Charting a Course: Social Studies for the 21st Century,"
was issued in November 1989. The cornerstone of the report is the 3-year (grades 9-11)
world and U.S. history and geography sequence. The goal is to integrate national and
historical change to allow students to connect the national past with its larger international
setting. However, the report fails to give adequate attention to the contemporary world.


ERIC_NO: ED268052
TITLE: Global education for National and International Survival.
AUTHOR: Heywood, Stanley J.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1985
ABSTRACT: This paper discusses cognitive maps of the world that an individual needs to
be considered educated. A cognitive map is the filing structure within the brain that allows
an individual to encode, give meaning, and retrieve information relating to a variety of
world matters. The first requisite is a cognitive map of the world of differences, whereby
differences are seen as opportunities, as incorporating codes rather than exclusive codes.
The next requisite is a cognitive map of where places are located and what the natural
conditions are. A cognitive map of the world should include the religions and the
languages of the world. A cognitive time frame of the world is another need. The educated
individual should have some specific subordinate cognitive maps, e.g., the role of women
might be a sub-classification in knowledge of the social differences of the world. To be
educated, one needs a cognitive map of the humor of the world, as well as a cognitive
map in political and economic terms. A final cognitive map is one of sources of current
information on global affairs. Specific sources are discussed.


ERIC_NO: EJ241282
TITLE: Viewpoints in Global education.
AUTHOR: Wilson, Donald C.; Werner, Walter
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1980
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Studies; v71 n6 p250-53 Nov-Dec 1980
ABSTRACT: Examines two viewpoints that secondary students can adopt when studying
world people and issues. First is the insider perspective of the individual who lives and
experiences a situation as a participant, and whose interpretations are subjective and
practical. Second is the outsider perspective of the observer whose outlook is objective
and detached.


ERIC_NO: EJ607598
TITLE: Global education: Relevant Learning for the Twenty-First Century.
AUTHOR: Selby, David; Pike, Graham
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
JOURNAL_CITATION: Convergence; v33 n1-2 p138-49 2000
ABSTRACT: Presents four dimensions of a model of global education: inner, temporal,
spatial, and issues related. Outlines key ideas, knowledge, skills, and attitudes


ERIC_NO: ED365577
TITLE: The Development and Implementation of an Interdisciplinary Global
education Program at Seacrest Country Day School.
AUTHOR: Powell, Lynne M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
ABSTRACT: This report describes the process used by a fully accredited
private school (Sea Crest County Day School, Florida) of prekindergarten
through grade eight to develop and implement an interdisciplinary global
education program. Areas of need that were addressed included: differences
in definition of the concept by the teachers, inconsistencies in the scope and
areas of the curriculum where global concepts were addressed, teacher
concerns about adding more to an already full curriculum, teacher concerns
over lack of student knowledge about global concepts, and student reluctance
to participate in community service projects. Intervention strategies included:
in-service workshops for teachers; workshops for parents; development of a
definition, philosophy, goals, objectives, and curriculum for a global education
program; development of a catalog of local, national, and international
resources and opportunities for global education; and a schoolwide
implementation of the program. Global education became a central theme in
the school environment. Parents and members of the community became
actively involved in the program, and the community became a learning
laboratory for the students. The paper is divided into seven chapters: (1)
Problem statement and community background; (2) Problem definition and
evidence; (3) Influence in the problem context bearing on solutions and
outcomes; (4) Problem conceptualization, solution strategy, and project
outcomes; (5) Implementation history; (6) Evaluation of results and process;
and (7) Decisions on future of intervention.


ERIC_NO: ED340631
TITLE: Social Studies Reform and Global education: California, New York,
and the Report of the National Commission on Social Studies.
AUTHOR: Fleming, Dan B.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: There has been a movement in social studies education in
recent years to provide greater emphasis on global education. This paper
evaluates efforts undertaken in this regard by the states of California and
New York and by the National Commission on Social Studies in the Schools.
California adopted a History-Social Science Framework for their public
schools in July, 1987. The study of history is the linchpin of this K-12
curriculum. A significant amount of time is devoted to world history, with
courses taught in grades 6, 7, and 10. In two places, grades 10 and 12, the
curriculum focuses on problems and issues of the world today in an open-
ended approach. The State of New York's revised social studies curriculum
was implemented in stages over the course of the 1980s. While not as far-
reaching in its emphasis on global education as California's curriculum, New
York's program devotes significant time to developing a global perspective.
The main global education thrust of the curriculum is found in grades 9 and
10 under the title of "global studies." The New York program seems to have
more of a "citizenship" building and contemporary flavor to it than does
California. The National Commission on the Social Studies in the Schools
Report, "Charting a Course: Social Studies for the 21st Century," was issued
in November 1989. The cornerstone of the report is the 3-year (grades 9-11)
world and U.S. history and geography sequence. The goal is to integrate
national and historical change to allow students to connect the national past
with its larger international setting. However, the report fails to give adequate
attention to the contemporary world.


ERIC_NO: ED433291
TITLE: Understanding Vietnam in the 21st Century: Political, Economic, and
Security Issues in the Asia/Pacific Region. Part III, U.S. and Japanese
Relations with Vietnam: Liberalization and Integration.
AUTHOR: Mukai, Gary; Chenette, Sara; Cheng, Amy; Cheng, Yu Wen;
Fairbrother,
Greg; Midling, Michael; Nordquist, Silvy; Tan, Kwee Foon
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
ABSTRACT: This curriculum unit is part three of a three-part series. Each of
the three parts can be taught independently. The lessons include
perspectives from each of the countries under study. This unit introduces
students to policy options for U.S. and Japanese relations with Vietnam at the
turn of the century. By identifying and examining these options during
Vietnam's growing liberalization and integration into the world community,
students will gain an awareness of U.S., Japanese, and Vietnamese
perspectives on political, economic, and security issues. Provided is a
rationale and introduction to the lessons, along with unit goals, materials, time
required, suggested sequence of activities, small group roles, subjects,
equipment needed, icons, and policy study references. The six lessons
include: (1) "Historical Legacies: The Vietnamese Refugee Experience"; (2)
"Vietnam's Politics in Transition: Creating Interest in the News"; (3)
"Vietnam's Economy in Transition"; (4) "U.S. Relations with Vietnam: The
Debate Over Normalization"; (5)"Japanese Relations with Vietnam: With a
Focus on Foreign Aid"; and (6) "ASEAN--Association of Southeast Asian
Nations."


ERIC_NO: ED433290
TITLE: Understanding the Korean Peninsula in the 21st Century: Political,
Economic, and Security Issues in the Asia/Pacific Region. Part II, U.S. and
Japanese Relations with the Korean Peninsula: Opportunities and
Challenges.
AUTHOR: Mukai, Gary; Cheng, Amy; Amar, Jasmine; Donahue, Dave;
Fisher, Grace; Klein, Emily; Lee, Joanne
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
ABSTRACT: This curriculum unit is part two of a three-part series. Each of
the three parts can be taught independently. The lessons include
perspectives from each of the countries under study. This unit introduces
students to challenges and opportunities presented by policy options for U.S.
and Japanese relations with the Korean Peninsula at the turn of the century.
Identifying and examining these options, students will gain an awareness of
U.S., Japanese, and Korean perspectives on political, economic, and security
issues. Provided is a rationale and introduction to the lessons, along with unit
goals, materials, time required, suggested sequence of activities, small group
roles, subjects, equipment needed, icons, and policy study references. The
seven lessons include: (1) "Historical Legacies: The Japanese Colonization of
Korea"; (2) "Historical Legacies: The Korean War - Perspectives from
Leaders"; (3) "Korea's Contemporary Political Situation: A News Conference";
(4) "Korea's Contemporary Economic Situation: Where to Build a Factory"; (5)
"U.S. Relations with the Korean Peninsula: With a Focus on Security"; (6)
"Japanese Relations with the Korean Peninsula: With a Focus on Civil Rights
of Koreans in Japan"; and (7) "Korean Reunification: Selected Scenarios."
ERIC_NO: ED433289
TITLE: Understanding China in the 21st Century: Political, Economic, and
Security Issues in the Asia/Pacific Region. Part I, U.S. and Japanese
Relations with China: Case Studies of Cooperation and Competition.
AUTHOR: Mukai, Gary; Moore, Carey; Young, Jocelyn; Cheng, Amy;
Fairbrother, Greg
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This curriculum unit is part one of a three-part series. The unit
introduces students to policy options for U.S. and Japanese relations with
China at the beginning of the 21st century. By identifying and examining
these options, students gain an awareness of U.S., Japanese, and Chinese
perspectives on political, economic, and security issues. Provided is a
rationale and introduction to the lessons, along with unit goals, materials, time
required, suggested sequence of activities, small group roles, subjects,
equipment needed, icons, and policy study references. Lessons included in
the unit are: (1) "Historical Legacies"; (2) "China's Political Situation"; (3)
"China's Economy in Transition"; (4) "U.S.-Sino Relations: With a Focus on
Human Rights"; (5) "SINO-Japanese Relations: With a Focus on Security
Issues in the South China Sea"; and (6) "Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation."
Handouts and primary source documents have been provided with each
lesson to present students with a range of perspectives on the topic being
studied.


ERIC_NO: ED395862
TITLE: History in the Global Age.
AUTHOR: Kang, SunJoo
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This paper attempts to clarify: (1) the need to educate citizens to
cope with contemporary global challenges and (2) the purpose of history and
to examine the way to organize history in the global age. The document
suggests that the purpose of world history and national history is to enable
students to develop a global perspective and that world history should be
viewed in all its aspects from a global perspective. The paper contends that
the goal of history teaching must change from the focus of U.S. citizenship to
that of world citizen. The text is divided into six parts: (1) "Introduction"; (2)
"The Age of Global Interdependence"; (3) "Citizen Education in the Global
Age"; (4) "Global Perspective in History"; (5) "History for Global Perspective";
and (6) "Conclusion."


ERIC_NO: ED389634
TITLE: Increasing Student Awareness of Global and Future Issues through a Secondary
Level Mini-Course.
AUTHOR: Decker, Dianna K.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This study examines the problem of high school students as future leaders
entering the adult world unprepared in the areas of global and international issues. The
study was conducted with 145 students, teachers, and administrators in a private high
school with university affiliations in a large suburban area. Eventually two students
became the central focus for the stated practicum outcomes. The goal was to increase
student awareness of critical global and future issues that would lead to an appreciation for
the interdependency among nations and raise tolerance levels for differences in others. A
mini-course in global studies was designed based on global issues least addressed in the
school. Telecommunications were established to link
students to other students around the world to enable group discussions and project
exchanges for students. Electronic mail, study kits, simulated role playing, and current
topics of global consequence were used to instruct students on world trade, world hunger,
international business, environmental protection, energy, and nuclear proliferation. The
results showed an increase of student awareness of global issues and students were
motivated by using telecommunications as a part of the mini-course requirement.
Appendixes include the student questionnaires, student quiz, and computer ethics and
security agreement.


ERIC_NO: ED401187
TITLE: Educating for Human Dignity: Learning about Rights and
Responsibilities. Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights.
AUTHOR: Reardon, Betty A.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This book is written for both teachers and teacher educators to
use in addressing issues of human rights. The conceptual development
approach used throughout the book makes it suitable for a full human rights
curriculum; the grade-level discussions and sample lesson plans also can be
used in individual classes or to enrich ongoing programs. The book is divided
into seven chapters and subdivided by grade level examples. Chapters
include: (1) "Introduction: Purposes and Approaches"; (2) "A Developmental
Sequence for Presentation of the Core Concepts"; (3) "The Early Grades:
Laying the Foundation for an Appreciation of Human Dignity--Kindergarten to
Grade Three"; (4) "The Middle Grades: Introducing Standards and Principles-
-Grades Four to Six"; (5) "Junior High School: Reflecting and Valuing--Grades
Seven to Nine"; (6) "Senior High School: Confronting the Problems, Taking
Responsibility--Grades Ten to Twelve"; and (7) "Resources for Human Rights
Education." Flexibility is built in to adjust the curriculum for schools with other
grade divisions. A useful feature of this book is the Appendix, which makes
critical human rights documents available to the classroom teacher, including
the "Universal Declaration of Human Rights," the "Convention of the
Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women," and the
"Convention on the Rights of the Child." This book is an essential tool for
implementation of the goals set by the United Nations and the People's
Decade for Human Rights Education.


ERIC_NO: ED457002
TITLE: In the Global Classroom: Book 1.
AUTHOR: Pike, Graham; Selby, David
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1999
ABSTRACT: Global education is a relatively new term in the education world.
It brings together two strands of educational thinking: world-mindedness and
child-centeredness. This document offers strategies for implementing global
education into the curriculum by considering its infusion and integration.
Activities presented in the book offer ideas and strategies for providing a
participatory learning environment in the global classroom and focuses on
different goals such as building self-esteem, encouraging students to
exchange personal information, and contributing to the learning process.
Chapters include: (1) "A Friendly Classroom for a Small Planet"; (2)
"Interconnections"; (3) "Environment and Sustainability"; (4) "Health"; (5)
"Perceptions, Perspectives and Cross-cultural Encounters"; (6) "Technology";
and (7) "Futures."


ERIC_NO: ED439061
TITLE: Learning about Our World: Germany. Volume 1: Elementary School.
AUTHOR: Baker, Reid E., Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
ABSTRACT: Developed to help young people prepare for 21st-century
challenges, this book is part of a project to produce a series of instructional
units about German for implementation in K-12 classrooms and to offer staff
development activities that facilitate the implementation of these units. This
volume's main focus is Germany and social studies, but it comfortably
integrates language arts, foreign language, mathematics, science, and the
arts to promote its educational goals in the elementary grades via
multidisciplinary activities. Teaching activities in the book are intended to be
teacher-friendly and to make planning easy; they aim at integrating global
studies into the existing curriculum, and at serving as a vehicle for addressing
current issues, such as the integration of Europe, radicalism, and pollution.
The following units are included: (1) First Day of School in Germany; (2) A
Family Study; (3) How Did We Get Here? Community Origins; (4) Cultural
Patterns; (5) Letter Exchanges; (6) The Bremen Town Musicians (Bremer
Stadtmusikanten); (7) Strike the Pan (Topfschlagen); (8) Music, Music, Music;
(9) A Bit of This and a Bit of That (Ein Bifschen Dies und Ein Bifschen Das);
(10) December Celebrations; (11) Community Sayings; (12) Geography and
Cultural Diversity; and (13) Suleiman the Elephant.
ERIC_NO: ED460883
TITLE: Meiji Japan: The Dynamics of National Change. A Humanities
Approach to Japanese History, Part II.
AUTHOR: Parisi, Lynn; Thompson, Sara; Stevens, Anne
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This curriculum unit focuses on the Meiji period (1868-1912), a
pivotal period in Japanese and world history. Each lesson in this unit uses art,
literature, primary sources, or a combination to help students understand
Japan's emerging sense of nationhood within the context of the rapid change
taking place during this important period. Lessons explore Japan's
modernization and emerging national identity from multiple social and
economic perspectives within Japan during the Meiji period, with special
attention to the role of artists in helping to shape and promote a national
identity. Lessons include: (1) "Introduction to Meiji Japan"; (2) "The Meiji
Restoration: Defining Government Goals and Policies"; (3) "Bunmei Kaika:
The Role of Art in Promoting Government Policy"; (4) "The Meiji Constitution
of 1889"; (5) "Education and National Identity"; (6) "Good Wife, Wise Mother:
The Role of Women in Meiji Modernization"; (7) "Female Factory Workers
and the 'Meiji Miracle'"; and (8) "Japan Takes a Bow on the World Stage: The
1893 World's Fair." The eight lessons build upon each other and may be used
as a complete curriculum unit or used in combination with the textbook or
other supplementary materials to enrich the study of this period in Japanese
history.


ERIC_NO: EJ340608
TITLE: Global education: The Road Ahead.
AUTHOR: Kniep, Willard M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1986
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Education; v50 n6 p415 Oct 1986
ABSTRACT: Introduces the articles in this issue, and reports five critical
needs required to strengthen global studies in our schools. The needs are: (1)
adoption of state and local policies; (2) encouragement of local curriculum
development; (3) better teacher training; (4) bringing global studies into the
educational mainstream; and (5) establishment of school and university
partnerships.


ERIC_NO: ED130962
TITLE: Global Studies: Problems and Promises for Elementary Teachers.
AUTHOR: Overly, Norman V., Ed.; Kimpston, Richard D., Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1976
ABSTRACT: This publication identifies rationale, content, and materials for
teaching about world problems in the elementary school. Intended
predominantly for use by classroom teachers and supervisors, the publication
is also a useful resource for teacher training. It contains four chapters.
Chapter I, A Perspective on Global Studies, reviews the historical precedent
of global education, focuses on the individual in world affairs, and explains
why global studies belongs in the elementary curriculum. Chapter II, An
Approach to Global Studies: Balancing Problems and Promises, suggests
organizing themes for teaching international affairs with an integrated
approach. In this section selected problems such as food crisis and hunger,
war and conflict, and pollution are described. Chapter III, Who's In Charge--
How to Proceed, explains how to develop and implement a global studies
curriculum and how to assess curriculum materials. Chapter IV, Resources
for Teachers, suggests background materials on population, resource
shortages, food crises, environmental pollution, war, conflict and nuclear
proliferation, income disparity and poverty, urbanization and urban
deterioration.


ERIC_NO: EJ500775
TITLE: Developing Student Global Perspectives through Undergraduate
Family Resource Management.
AUTHOR: Crawford, Glinda
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
JOURNAL_CITATION: Journal of Home Economics; v85 n2 p9-15 Sum 1993
ABSTRACT: An undergraduate home economics program at the University of
North Dakota infuses global concepts in courses on consumer issues,
personal and family finances, and family management. Substantive themes
center around values, family resource management patterns,
interdependence, global issues/problems, critical thinking, and global actors.


ERIC_NO: ED401249
TITLE: In the Global Classroom: Teacher Decision-Making and Global Perspectives in
Education.
AUTHOR: Merryfield, Merry M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1994
ABSTRACT: Classroom teachers and teacher educators involved in implementing global
education in schools have described their efforts as making connections across cultures
and civilizations and across global issues instead of teaching them separately; identifying
historical antecedents to current world issues and problems; linking global content to the
lives of one's students; and teaching tolerance and appreciation of cultural differences.
Research was undertaken to learn: the major principles guiding teachers' instructional
decision-making as they teach about the world and the contextual factors identified as
most important in influencing these principles. The study began with observation of 6
teachers (2 elementary, 2 middle, and 2 secondary) from a large urban district and 6
teachers from a small, affluent, suburban district during the 1990-91 academic year.
Follow-up interviews were held after each class with each teacher. Several guiding
principles were found: (1) study diverse cultures and emphasize multiple perspectives,
comparisons, and tolerance; (2) use major themes to organize and integrate global
content; (3) have students make connections across time and space; (4) connect content
to students' lives; (5)
emphasize skills in higher level thinking and research; and (6) employ a variety of teaching
strategies and instructional resources. Underlying these approaches was a common belief
in cultural diversity as positive and a focus on skills in higher level thinking, research, and
decision-making.


ERIC_NO: EJ193290
TITLE: Toward Global Perspectives.
AUTHOR: Cornbleth, Catherine; and Others
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1979
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Studies Journal; v8 p5-8 Spr 1979
ABSTRACT: Identifies common themes underlying various approaches to
global education. Four characteristics of global perspectives programs are
that they are holistic, humanistic, conceptually based, and issue oriented.
Journal available from Pennsylvania Council for the Social Studies, P.O. Box
6637, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19149.


ERIC_NO: ED423150
TITLE: Windows to the World: Themes for Cross-Cultural Understanding.
Grade 4-8.
AUTHOR: Kepler, Phyllis; Royse, Brooke Sarno; Kepler, John
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
ABSTRACT: The purpose of this book is to help equip students with some of
the concepts, attitudes and skills for successful cross-cultural understanding.
The emphasis is on the exploration of cultural perspectives, both of
themselves and others. The book is divided into chapters devoted to
particular themes and uses the kaleidoscope of various world cultures as
examples for each of the themes. The focus is on the culture only insofar as it
illustrates the central theme and is not an exhaustive study of any one
culture. The chapters include: (1) "Language"; (2) "Space"; (3) "Time"; (4)
"Relationships"; (5) "The Individual and the Group"; (6) "Moral Values"; and
(7) "Work and Leisure." The activities of the book illustrate the cultural
information and concepts offered in each lesson. The activities are
considered to be collaborative, interpretive, constructive or cross-cultural.
Each chapter consists of a general introduction, some exercises to explore
the concept, and three to six lessons.


ERIC_NO: ED240218
TITLE: "Toward the Year 2000." An Examination and Discussion of Critical
Multicultural Education Issues and Strategies Related to Washington State's
Preparation for Entry into the 21st Century and Its Increasing Multi-Ethnic
Population.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1983
ABSTRACT: In February 1983, a symposium was held to ensure that
multicultural and equity education issues are not left unattended in
Washington State's public schools as new educational challenges present
themselves. Participants were 80 individuals representing a cross section of
geographic areas, ethnic groups, and key professions from 21 different
school districts and 21 different institutions. This report contains papers on
the eight themes addressed by these participants: (1) "Discipline: Policies,
Practices and Minority Students"; (2) "Computers, Minority Students and a
Technology Gap Acceleration"; (3) "The Street Life Alternative" (which deals
with the dropout phenomenon); (4) "Multicultural/Global education in the
Schools"; (5) "Multicultural/Basic Education"; (6) "Effective Schools within a
Pluralistic Society"; (7) "Teacher Readiness in a Complex Multicultural
Education Setting"; and (8) "Students Who Speak a Language Other than
English, Bilingualism and a Need for State Direction." Each paper examines
its theme by asking five related questions: (1) What hard data exist to
substantiate the issue? (2) What factors create or contribute to the issue? (3)
What are the probable consequences if the issue is left unattended? (4) What
strategies would be appropriate to respond to the issue? (5) What resources
are currently available for educators to use in responding to the issue?


ERIC_NO: ED351219
TITLE: Group Portrait: Internationalizing the Disciplines.
AUTHOR: Groennings, Sven, Ed.; Wiley, David S., Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: This book presents a collection of essays in seven academic
disciplines on the topic of international perspectives in those academic fields.
The disciplines represented are geography, history, political science,
sociology, psychology, journalism and mass communication, and philosophy.
The book includes the following essays: "Higher Education, International
Education, and the Academic Disciplines" (Sven Groennings); "Geography
and International Knowledge" (Association of American Geographers);
"Culture and Nationality" (Marvin W. Mikesell); "Technology as a Central
Theme for World History" (L. S. Stavrianos); "Commonly Articulated Goals for
World History Courses" (Kevin Reilly); "Politics: American and Non-American"
(Suzanne Berger); "Cutting Across the Institutional Grain: the Study of
Political Parties" (Leon D. Epstein); "How Can We Get There from Here?
Thoughts on the Integration of American and Comparative Politics" (Susanne
Hoeber Rudolph; Lloyd I. Rudolph); "The Bifurcation of American and Non-
American Perspectives in Foreign Policy" (Ole R. Holsti); "Teaching
International Relations to American Students" (George H. Quester);
"Teaching How to Ask Questions about International Relations" (Robert
O. Keohane); "Sociology's Great Leap Forward: The Challenge of
Internationalization" (Edward A. Tiryakian); "Sociology for Undergraduates:
Social Systems as World Systems, World Systems as Historical Systems"
(Immanuel Wallerstein); "The Deparochialization of American Sociology" (J.
Michael Armer); "Cross-Cultural Psychology" (Harry C. Triandis; Richard W.
Brislin); "Psychology in Its World Context" (Roger W. Russell); "American
Psychologists and Psychology Abroad" (Virginia Staudt Sexton; Henryk
Misiak); "Annotated Bibliography of Materials to Add an International
Dimension to Undergraduate Courses in Developmental and Social
Psychology" (Judith Torney-Purta); "Integrating International Perspectives
into the Research Methods Course" (L. John Martin); "Covering the World
from Villages" (Richard Critchfield); "Learning from African Models" (Sharon
M. Murphy; James F. Scotton); "The Case of the Athenian Stranger:
Philosophy and World Citizenship" (Peter Caws); "Reflections on the
Mutual Benefits of Philosophical and Global education" (Anita Silvers);
"Overcoming Ethnocentrism in the Philosophy Classroom" (Ofelia Schutte);
"Socrates, Meet the Buddha" (David A. Hoekema); and "A Bibliography:
International Perspectives in the Undergraduate Curriculum."


ERIC_NO: ED381346
TITLE: A Two Way Approach To Understanding: Issues In Global Education. Second
Edition.
AUTHOR: McDaniel, Rick, Comp.; Petrie, Jim, Comp.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
ABSTRACT: by focusing on issues, global education provides students with a better
understanding of the country and the world in which they live. The issues approach
stresses that global education is a two-way approach to understanding: it is both a way of
teaching and a way of learning. This book provides resources for the teacher who has
decided to teach development by the issues method. Activities presented range in grade
level appropriateness from grade 4-12. An introduction discusses effective global
education and development education. Fifty-seven activities focus on differences that
exist in wealth and power between nations; assumptions about development; ways in
which other cultures are "interpreted;" trading relationships between north and south;
poverty and population; refugees and migrants; aid; food; water; literacy; environemnt; and
women. An appendix provides 15 international games.




ERIC_NO: EJ646883
TITLE: Using Literature To Teach Global education: A Humanist Approach.
AUTHOR: Bender-Slack, Delane
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2002
JOURNAL_CITATION: English Journal; v91 n5 p70-75 May 2002
ABSTRACT: Believes that students must be able to make a basic connection
to the collective humanity. Notes that teenagers especially care about
injustice and through exploring the global picture of human rights violations,
they become aware and have desire to act on that awareness. Uses the
humanistic approach to make 16th- to 20th-century British literature more
accessible to students.


ERIC_NO: ED404222 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Global education.
AUTHOR: McCoubrey, Sharon
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1994
JOURNAL_CITATION: BCATA Journal for Art Teachers; v34 n2 Sum 1994
ABSTRACT: This theme issue focuses on topics related to global ISSUES.
(1)
"Recycling for Art Projects" (Wendy Stephenson) gives an argument for
recycling in the art classroom; (2) "Winds of Change: Tradition and Innovation
in Circumpolar Art" (Bill Zuk and Robert Dalton) includes profiles of Alaskan
Yupik artist, Larry Beck, who creates art from recycled items, and Inuit artist,
Alootook Ipellie; (3) "Honouring the Environemnt through Art" (Sharon
McCoubrey) makes connections between art and environemntal concerns
and offers suggestions for classroom related projects; (4) "The Electronic
Environemnt: A Revolution in Image Production and Consumption" (Don
Bergland) describes some specific technologies including the man made
environemnt, virtual reality; and (5) "Diamonds are Forever: The Use of
Metaphorical Art to Help Students Develop an Environemntal Ethic" (Gloria
Snively Corisglia) provides sample lessons of metaphor used to integrate
environemntal studies and art education.


ERIC_NO: EJ340612 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Defining A Global education by Its Content.
AUTHOR: Kniep, Willard M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1986
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Education; v50 n6 p437-46 Oct 1986
ABSTRACT: Provides a four-part framework for thinking about the content of
global education. The elements are the study of: (1) diverse human values;
(2) global economic, political, ecological, and technological systems; (3)
global problems and ISSUES; and (4) the history of contact and
interdependence among peoples, cultures, and nations.


ERIC_NO: ED360193
TITLE: Maine's Approach to Global education.
AUTHOR: Broyles, India L.; Krawic, Joanne
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: This study of Maine schools inquires into efforts that have been made to
internationalize the curriculum. Specifically, the researchers were interested in how
curricular goals and organization contribute to an understanding of global society. The
efforts to internationalize the curriculum upon which the researchers focused included the
organizational factors: (1) time allotment; (2) teacher involvement; (3) relationship to other
subjects or disciplines; and (4) scope of focus on other countries/THEMES. Five widely
accepted goals of global education also guided the research: (1) to learn about the
culture and customs of other countries; (2) to address global problems; (3) to compare the
similarities and differences the world's peoples share; (4) to analyze international
organizations and national, state, and city governments; and (5) to focus on the
interrelatedness of human beings. The frequency and range of foreign languages included
in the curriculum are described including a comparison of intent--exploration versus
proficiency. A Survey was conducted of all Maine schools, both public and private. A 22-
item list of references is included.



ERIC_NO: ED243152 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Teaching Worldmindedness through Children's Literature.
AUTHOR: Stoddard, Ann H.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1983
ABSTRACT: Children's literature is an excellent medium to introduce global concepts and
bridge multicultural understanding. Through the use of books, children can be helped to
appreciate the commonalities and differences among cultures, to become aware of a
relationship with self, others, and the environemnt, and to identify with the human
condition. An initial point of departure for global education with young children is
increasing their sense of dignity and self-worth. This theme in books helps children to gain
self-acceptance. The concept of acceptance of others can help increase the child's
understanding of cause-effect relationships in social interaction. Books should also be
selected to teach worldmindedness, to show children that various cultures have more
similarities than differences. The use of animal stories and folktales, on the other hand,
can help children to grasp the concept of diversity among cultures. High interest books that
are either picture books or easy to read can provide children with a perspective of the
world according to another's point of view. And, books that address world problems can be
used as a consciousness-raising exercise. The paper lists and describes children's books
for each of the concepts addressed.


ERIC_NO: EJ645960
TITLE: What Does Globalization Mean for Educational Change? A
Comparative
Approach. Guest Editorial Essay.
AUTHOR: Carnoy, Martin; Rhoten, Diana
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2002
JOURNAL_CITATION: Comparative Education Review; v46 n1 p1-9 Feb
2002
ABSTRACT: Globalization provides a new empirical challenge and a new
theoretical frame for comparative education. The global economy is
dependent on knowledge resources and information technology and
increasingly intertwined in international institutions promulgating particular
ideologies and strategies for educational change. Comparative education
must examine how globalization and its ideological packaging affect overall
delivery of schooling at international, national, and local levels.
ERIC_NO: ED363541 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Focus on Current Affairs: A Monograph for Secondary Social Studies Teachers.
AUTHOR: Clarke, Margaret A.; Zelinski, Victor
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
ABSTRACT: This document suggests that the main purpose of the study of current affairs
in the social studies program in Alberta, Canada, is to add relevance, interest, and
immediacy. It defines current affairs as the study of news events presented by the media.
Because the study of current affairs must be tied to the achievement of social studies
objectives, the general purpose of the monograph is to provide suggestions for teachers
on how current affairs can be used in order to attain these important objectives. In
discussing the study of controversial topics, the argument is made that issues related to
the study of curriculum topics have a defensible place and purpose. This monograph
presents examples to illustrate what is meant by "structured and disciplined" inquiry.
Current affairs issues, by their very nature, are more likely to be relevant, meaningful, and
of interest to students, yet directly linked to the required course objectives. The study of
current affairs in social studies provides a rich field for the development of abilities and
dispositions toward critical thinking. Although emotional discussions may do more to
reinforce or confuse, rather than clarify or change, existing beliefs, teachers who are
critical minded in their approach to current affairs will more likely be able to promote critical
mindedness in their students. The teaching of critical thinking has a natural place and role
in social studies instruction. The accumulation of knowledge alone is training. The
application of critical thinking to a field of knowledge is education. Two approaches to the
study of current affairs are explored.


ERIC_NO: EJ611937
TITLE: Indigenous Peoples, Globalization, and Education: Making
Connections.
AUTHOR: St. Denis, Verna
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
JOURNAL_CITATION: Alberta Journal of Educational Research; v46 n1 p36-
48 Spr 2000
ABSTRACT: Globalization pushes aside social, cultural, and ethical goals of
education in favor of marketplace goals. Two stories of the indigenous
Ju/'hoansi tribe in Botswana illustrate how even well-intentioned multicultural
education programs can marginalize indigenous people, and how
"globalization from below," fueled by communities of sentiment, can redirect
globalization toward advancing social justice in a sustainable future.



ERIC_NO: ED267002
TITLE: Economics in the School Curriculum, K-12.
AUTHOR: Schug, Mark C., Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1985
ABSTRACT: Intended to help economics educators in grades K-12 foster in
students the thinking SKILLS and substantive economic knowledge
necessary to become effective and participating citizens, this book is
organized around four THEMES. Part I presents an introduction by Mark C.
Schug and a section on "The Current Status of Economics in the K-12
Curriculum" (William Walstad and Michael Watts). Next, Leon Schur
summarizes the key concepts and principles that are fundamental and most
appropriate in the K-12 curriculum. In Part II, Mark C. Schug and Beverly
Jeanne Armento discuss research on how children think about economic
ideas as a basis for numerous teaching ACTIVITIES for elementary children.
Ronald A. Banaszak then notes the importance of economic understanding
for early adolescents and presents appropriate learning ACTIVITIES.
Similarly, Judith Brenneke and John C. Soper discuss the role of economics
education at the high school, offering specific teaching suggestions. In Part
III, Robert B. Woyach challenges teachers with a rationale for global
education and offers practical teaching suggestions that introduce young
people to the interdependence of our economy and the global economic
system. Then Steven Haessler and Mark C. Schug identify practical ways to
enhance citizenship knowledge and SKILLS by studying the economy and the
local community. In the final section, Margaret A. Laughlin introduces
numerous resources to help improve economic understanding of both
teachers and students.


ERIC_NO: ED316159 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Making the Curriculum More Global.
AUTHOR: Scott, Robert A.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1989
ABSTRACT: ISSUES related to the implementation of the policy decision to
make curriculum more global are discussed with examples from programs at
the Ramapo College of New Jersey. Five principles for program
development include a strategy incorporating both international and
multicultural THEMES, and comprising research and training as well as
undergraduate teaching. Six broad objectives are identified: professional
development for faculty and staff; curriculum development; skill development;
experiential learning; programmatic partnerships with schools, colleges,
community organizations, and corporations; and recruitment and retention of
students. Among 10 specific criteria for assessing program impact are the
number of faculty and staff participating in professional development,
enrollment in courses related to the goals and objectives, and the number
and quality of international and minority students recruited and retained.
Initiatives of Ramapo College of New Jersey in global education are
summarized (e.g., Ramapo's initiatives in global education were greatly
assisted by a special 3-year grant of $3.4 million from the State of New
Jersey's Governor's Challenge for Excellence Grant Program). Finally, public
influences on program development are briefly addressed.




ERIC_NO: ED398119
TITLE: Reclaiming Our Pasts: Equality and Diversity in the Primary History
Curriculum.
AUTHOR: Claire, Hilary
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
ABSTRACT: This book guides teachers through the British Core Units and
each Extension Study category of the National Curriculum Programme of
Study. The volume explores possibilities for extending children's perspectives
on the past and the present to avoid exclusively Eurocentric or male-centered
approaches to history and to consider how to include working class history.
The book shows how stories, topics, and the lives of famous people can set
pupils on an inclusive and intellectually rigorous study of history. Original
research into historical events and figures provides a valuable resource along
with the substantial resource section containing accounts of the lives of
people relevant to Key Stage (KS) 1 and 2 History, plus annotated booklists
of relevant historical fiction and non-fiction for juniors. Chapters include: (1)
"An Introduction to the ISSUES"; (2) "THEMES and Topics in Key Stage 1";
(3) "Using Stories to Support Key Stage 1 History"; (4) "A Place in the Hall of
Fame"; (5) "The Key Stage 2 Curriculum"; (6) "Study Unit 1: Romans, Anglo-
Saxons, and Vikings in Britain"; (7) "Study Unit 2: Life in Tudor Times"; (8)
"Study Unit 3a: Victorian Britain"; (9) "Study Unit 3b: Britain Since 1930"; (10)
"Study Unit 5: Local History"; (11) "Study Unit 6: A Past Non-European
Society, General ISSUES, and an Examplar: Benin"; (12) "Lives of Distinction
Connected with Britain, Resources for KS 1 'Famous People' and KS 2--
Study Units 3a and 3b"; (13) "Annotated Resources"; and (14) "Organisations
and Bookshops." Two appendices and an index conclude the volume.




ERIC_NO: ED440192
TITLE: Black Economic Advancement in the New Millennium: Globalization,
Education, and Technology. Special Report: National Policy Institute (8th,
Washington, DC, January 20-22, 2000).
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
JOURNAL_CITATION: Focus; Feb 2000
ABSTRACT: This special issue presents, in capsule form, presentations from
workshops at the Eighth National Policy Institute. The conference theme of
black economic advancement in the new century focused on globalization,
education, and technology. Ten workshops were the core of the conference,
and their topics were: (1) overcoming the 2000 Census undercount; (2)
redistricting and voter mobilization; (3) promoting selfsufficiency and
preserving the safety net; (4) SKILLS development in the workplace; (5)
economic and community development in the new millennium; (6) housing
and community development; (7) education; (8) wealth accumulation and
economic parity; (9) learning and earning (racial discrimination); and (10) the
information technology revolution. A special section was held to discuss
HIV/AIDS in the African American community. Among the plenary
presentations was "The Courage To Demand Change" by Johnnie Cochran.
Also featured were "Building a Public Health Infrastructure" by Donna Shalala
and "The Importance of the Next Presidency" by Mary Frances Berry. A final
plenary presentation was "Transporting Jobs, Education, and Freedom" by
Rodney E. Slater.




ERIC_NO: EJ588775
TITLE: Hiroshima: A City with Peace as Its Purpose.
AUTHOR: Nesbitt, Donna
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1998
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Studies and the Young Learner; v10 n3 p21-23
Jan-Feb 1998
ABSTRACT: Employs a summary of the story "Sadako and the Thousand
Paper Cranes" by Eleanor Coerr as an introduction to the city of Hiroshima's
(Japan) quest for world peace, peace education, and strong opposition to
nuclear warfare. Discusses various symbols of peace, such as paper cranes
in Japanese culture, and offers five teaching ACTIVITIES.


ERIC_NO: EJ636124
TITLE: Environemntal Education in Guangzhou in the People's Republic of
China:
Global Theme, Politically Determined.
AUTHOR: Stimpson, Philip; Kwan, Francis Wong Bing
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2001
JOURNAL_CITATION: Environemntal Education Research; v7 n4 p397-412
Nov 2001
ABSTRACT: Studies environemntal education in southern China with regard
to factors that have determined the nature of environemntal curricula in
secondary schools. Describes the nature and curriculum history of
environemntal education in Guangzhou.


ERIC_NO: ED410138
TITLE: Around the World. Windows on Social Studies: Multiculutural
Adventures through Literature.
AUTHOR: Westley, Joan; Melton, Holly
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1994
ABSTRACT: This resource book is one in a series containing lesson plans for
grades 1-3 designed to support children's literature books sharing familiar
social studies THEMES. "Around the World" presents eight different children's
books related to the theme. For each book social studies concepts are
presented, followed by four ACTIVITIES called "windows." Some of these
ACTIVITIES are cooking, making music, performing drama, creating art, and
constructing landscapes and maps. These allow for discussion and
comparison by the students of the lives of diverse people, past and present. A
word bank, follow-up questions, and a synthesis section allow students to
process information about the story characters and their own lives.
Illustrations and a materials list conclude each activity section. The
background readings used in this resource book include: (1) "A Balloon for
Grandad" (Nigel Gray); (2) "The Village of Round and Square Houses" (Ann
Grifalconi); (3) "The Chalk Doll" (Charlotte Pomerantz); (4) "Our Home Is the
Sea" (Riki Levinson); (5) "Abuela's Weave" (Omar S. Castaneda); (6) "Where
the Forest Meets the Sea" (Jeannie Baker); (7) "Tonight is Carnaval" (Arthus
Dorros); and (8) "Galimoto" (Karen Lynn Williams).


ERIC_NO: ED231409
TITLE: "Only Connect..." A Passionate Plea for an Integrated Curriculum. An
Issue Paper.
AUTHOR: Conkright, Alice M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1982
ABSTRACT: Arguing that a successful general education program depends
upon an integrated curriculum, this paper urges community colleges to take a
strong leadership role in developing a curriculum that is consistent with
historical, cultural, and biological realities. After underscoring the need for
interdisciplinary education, the paper provides a historical summary of the
development of discipline-centered studies, stressing their advantages and
limitations. Next, an overview of the current status of interdisciplinary studies
is presented, examining the increase of interdisciplinary humanities
enrollments; the forms in which interdisciplinary courses are offered (e.g.
courses within the humanities, interdivisional courses, heritage-based
courses, theme courses, and weekend classes); the various purposes served
by these courses; and the interdisciplinary curriculum cores of Miami-Dade
Community College and Los Medanos Community College. Cohen and
Brawer's MODEL for an integrated curriculum, which is organized around
divisions in culture, communication, institutions, and environemnt, is then
described and criticized for its failure to bridge the chasm between science
and the arts. Finally, the urgency for developing an integrated curriculum is
stressed given the risks and dangers facing society and the importance of
broad understanding in the survival of the species. A list of global,
educational and administrative ISSUES related to the development of
integrated curricula is appended.



ERIC_NO: EJ541898
TITLE: From Cape to Cairo: Stressing Africa's Geographical Heritage.
AUTHOR: Nelson, Jennifer
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
JOURNAL_CITATION: Southern Social Studies Journal; v21 n2 p41-50 Spr
1996
ABSTRACT: Presents a series of questions and ACTIVITIES designed to
teach the geography of Africa. The ACTIVITIES relate to, and are collected
under the five THEMES of geography: Location, Place, Human/Environemnt
Interactions, Movement, and Regions. Includes four maps and a list of
resources.


ERIC_NO: ED393102
TITLE: Authentic Multiculturalism and Nontraditional Students: Voices from
the "Contact Zone."
AUTHOR: Flores, Juan
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: New multicultural anthologies too often end up looking
suspiciously like the color palate of a paint-by-numbers kit. Canonical
tokenism is quickly seen as a ruse by minority students and teachers who are
circumspect and adept at uncovering counterfeits. As an alternative to
tokenism, one recommendation is to use Patricia Bizzell's "contact zone" as a
major theme in constructing a year-long pedagogical application of
legitimizing cultural literature, seeking not only to impart a global education
to students but also to foster cognitive grace by reconstructing Western study
to naturally include historic participants of color in the loci of chronicled events
and thereby authenticate their contributions. The course gives due weight to
the study of the mainstream, traditional canon. Entering community college
students have little grasp of history and hardly any knowledge concerning
Western thought. Hence, comparative readings and discussions involve
philosophy, religion, commercialization, industry, politics, and the
revolutionary ethics instrumental in the West's political and economic
metamorphosis. In the first portion of the course, specific authors include Max
Weber, Charles Darwin, Frederic Jameson, E. L. Doctorow, Maxine Hong-
Kingston, and John Fowles. Having established that ordinate relationships
exist, the course's second section examines examples of cultural negotiation
and authentication. In the third section, the course initiates a study of Latino
and Native American Folk stories and poems.


ERIC_NO: ED405269
TITLE: Gender ISSUES: An Activity File.
AUTHOR: Fountain, Susan
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1991
ABSTRACT: This activity file grew out of research of an "Images of Women in
Development" project of the Centre for Global education at the University of
York, England. The ACTIVITIES are intended for students in the 8- to 13-
year-old range to learn more about gender ISSUES. The ACTIVITIES are
divided into four sections: (1) awareness-raising ACTIVITIES in which
stereotyping, including unconscious stereotyping, can be confronted and
examined; (2) research ACTIVITIES that allow children to discover gender
discrimination in their own
environemnt; (3) group discussion ACTIVITIES that can be used in
conjunction with the above ACTIVITIES; and (4) role plays and simulations
that place participants in situation that enable them to experience the effects
of gender inequalities, to take alternative perspectives, and to develop
possible
strategies and solutions for dealing with discrimination. Cross-curricular
THEMES are encouraged.


ERIC_NO: EJ645961
TITLE: The Varying Effects of Regional Organizations as Subjects of
Globalization of Education.
AUTHOR: Dale, Roger; Robertson, Susan L.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2002
JOURNAL_CITATION: Comparative Education Review; v46 n1 p10-36 Feb
2002
ABSTRACT: Examines the noneconomic role of three regional international
organizations--the European Union, the North American Free Trade
Agreement, and the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation. Describes
differences in organizational structure and purpose, dimensions of
organizational power, policies and intentions toward education, direct impact
on national education systems, and indirect impact via politics of education.


ERIC_NO: ED405271
TITLE: Global/Local Linkages: A Thematic K-12 Social Studies Curriculum.
AUTHOR: Haakenson, Paul; And Others
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This practicum paper presents a thematic K-12 social studies
curriculum to meet an expressed need of social studies teachers of a school
corporation to upgrade the teaching of social studies. The teachers wanted
the subject to be more relevant to students' lives and to incorporate a more
holistic approach. Content overview of the K-12 currriculum include: (1)
Grades K-3: "Fundamentals of Social Studies"; (2) Grade 4: "State History,
Geography: Continuity and Change"; (3) Grade 5: "ISSUES Around Us"; (4)
Grade 6: World Studies, Asia and Oceania"; (5) Grade 7: "World Studies,
Europe and Africa"; (6) Grade 8: "World Studies, The Americas"; (7) Grades 9
and 10: "American Studies"; (8) Grade 11: "World Civilizations"; and (9)
Grade 12: "Principles of American Democracy" (one semester) and "Social
Action" (one semester). The six THEMES identified as the focus of study are
resources, interdependence, adaptation, identity/culture, citizenship/social
action, and conflict resolution. Includes recommendations for each grade
level's course of study.



ERIC_NO: ED401215
TITLE: Social Studies: Bringing the World Closer to Home.
AUTHOR: Richardson, Helen W., Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This yearbook provides teaching strategy topics of general
interest to social studies teachers of all grade levels. This first annual
yearbook focuses on using social studies to bring the world closer to home.
There are 17 papers, including: (1) "Getting Ready for the World" (Angene H.
Wilson); (2) "Making Cultural Connections: A Cultural Resource Center for
Unity and Diversity" (Dennis Kreps; Carolyn Diener; Claudia Crump); (3) "The
Template of the Investigative Reporter" (Clark Johnson); (4) "Connecting with
the Global Community" (Richard Oakes Peters); (5) "Bringing the World
Closer to Home" (Clark Johnson); (6) "Coming Down the Road: Exploring
Local History with Six, Seven and Eight Year Olds" (Robert W. Maloy; Sharon
A. Edwards); (7) "Teaching About Other Cultures" (Julia Mitcham; Peggi
Joyner; Peggy Puryear; Julie Kunce); (8) "Champagne Wishes and Caviar
Dreams" (Darlene Stewart Young); (9) "ACTIVITIES for Studying Ecuador
Through the Five THEMES of Geography" (Mary E. Haas; Cynthia Szymanski
Sunal; Lois McFadyen Christensen); (10) "Geography: Passport to the World"
(Robert M. McCann); (11) "Scotland Map Game" (Audrey C. Rule); (12)
"Environemntal Crises in Benin, Lesotho, and Senegal" (Christine Pratt-
Consoletti); (13) "The Mercantile System: A Simulation for High School
History Classes" (Neil Nichols); (14) "From Ostrich Eggshells to Soda Pop
Cans! Cultural Change and Adaptation of the !Kung San: A Lesson Plan"
(Michael J. Berson); (15) "Comparing Ourselves to Others: What Do
Teenagers in the United States and Korea Think about Family Obligations,
Future Employment, and Their National Economy?" (Jo Ann Cutler Sweeney;
Stuart Foster; Yonjoo Choo); (16) "Japan's Feminists: Resisting the Policies
of the Meiji Government" (Lyn Reese); and (17) "Who Were the Kamikaze
Pilots? A Short-Term Inquiry Experience" (Jack M. Sheridan).


ERIC_NO: ED389642
TITLE: Getting Along: ACTIVITIES for Teaching Cooperation--Responsibility--
Respect.
AUTHOR: Schilling, Dianne
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
ABSTRACT: This book provides ACTIVITIES to introduce or reintroduce
students to conflict resolution SKILLS in a deliberate, enjoyable fashion and
to elevate their awareness of each person's responsibility to create a
cooperative environemnt wherever they may be. Interdependence is a central
theme as is the awareness that dissent and conflict are natural and
productive elements in society. ACTIVITIES are grouped into seven topic
areas with accompanying handouts. The topic areas include: (1)
"Appreciating Differences"; (2)
"Communicating Effectively"; (3) "Developing Friendship SKILLS"; (4)
"Helping and Being Helped"; (5) "Including Others"; (6) "Resolving Conflict";
and (7) "Working Together."


ERIC_NO: ED244889
TITLE: American Education and the World Economy: Controversial THEMES.
AUTHOR: Morrissett, Irving
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1984
ABSTRACT: Viewpoints about world economic problems and descriptive and
prescriptive views on the treatment of related controversial ISSUES are
presented. Following a section describing three types of controversial
ISSUES
(ISSUES of fact, causation, and values), the paper is arranged into six
sections, each dealing with an aspect of the world economy with particular
emphasis on economic development and militarization. These sections are
concerned with the division and grouping among the nations of the world; the
distribution of wealth among and within nations; the requisites for economic
progress; relationships between more developed countries (MDC's) and less
developed countries (LDC's); militarization, the arms race, and the arms
burden; and the consequences of peace. Following each section is a
suggested list of factual, causal, and values ISSUES. In addition, the paper
presents a brief discussion on the status of American education (with respect
to world problems), a rationale for encouraging controversy in the classroom,
and suggestions for managing controversy in the classroom. The document
concludes that while the United States and other MDC's have a powerful
influence on the world economy, a major responsibility for economic progress
lies within the LDC's. Moreover, global education is prescribed as necessary
for alleviating ignorance of world economic problems.


ERIC_NO: EJ427768
TITLE: Thinking Globally by Promoting Geographic Investigations.
AUTHOR: Bock, Judith K.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
JOURNAL_CITATION: Councilor; v50 p47-52 Oct 1990
ABSTRACT: Suggests enhancing geographic education by teaching
geography as a relationship between humans and the environemnt. Explores
how to use the geographic THEMES of location, place and relationships,
movement, and regions in the classroom. Provides suggestions for teaching
geographic SKILLS and developing geographic tools. Argues geographic
awareness is an essential component of a global perspective.


ERIC_NO: ED328496
TITLE: Land and Freedom--ISSUES in World History.
AUTHOR: Rubenstein, Stan
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1988
ABSTRACT: This series of self-contained lessons in land use features
ACTIVITIES that can be used with any high school world history, global
education, or European history social studies classes. The fifteen lessons
included are : (1) Rome's Landed Estates; (2) The Gracchian Revolution; (3)
The Feudal Land System; (4) The Domesday Book; (5) Mercantilism; (6) The
Enclosure Movement; (7) The Old Regime in France; (8) Malthus:
Populations and Poverty; (9) Emancipation of the Russian Serfs; (1) The
Forerunner of Germany: Zollverein; (11) Sun Yat-Sen's Three Principles; (12)
The Soviet Five-Year Plans; (13) Chinese Land Reform Under Communism;
(14) American Occupation and Land Reform in Japan; and (15) Land
Ownership in Latin America. Each lesson provides a theme, a sub-theme,
background, concepts, performance objectives, and a list of related texts.


ERIC_NO: ED418908
TITLE: Why Not Here? Teaching Geography to a New Standard.
AUTHOR: Gersmehl, Philip J.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
ABSTRACT: This booklet is designed to help teachers in geography
instruction, dealing with "where" things are located, "why" they are located
there, and "what" difference their location makes. The first three chapters
describe a spatial perspective, examine two different kinds of maps, and
examine how geography deals with three strands of meaning at the same
time. Each chapter uses maps or diagrams to illustrate the points in the text.
ACTIVITIES are designed to provide examples for a book on teaching
geography, not a stand-alone course. Chapters are: (1) Introduction; (2) "One
Perspective: A Way of Looking at the World"; (3) "Two Blades of a Scissors:
A Cooperative 'Split' within Geography"; (4) "Three Strands of Meaning:
Cognitive Psychology and Geography"; (5) "Four Cornerstones: Foundation
Ideas of Geography"; (6) "Five THEMES of Geography: Meeting the
Standards"; (7) "A Four-Wheeled Cart: Resistance to Educational Change";
(8) "Three Kinds of Tests for Three Kinds of Meaning"; (9) "Pairs of Tools,
Working with Each Other"; and (10) "A Single Discipline: A Window on the
World."


ERIC_NO: ED460055
TITLE: Schooling and Citizenship in a Global Age.
AUTHOR: Bragaw, Don, Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2001
JOURNAL_CITATION: ISSUES in Global education; n164 2000-2001
ABSTRACT: This newsletter highlights the significant contributions made by
the late Lee F. Anderson to the field of global education. Excerpts were
selected from a life's work of deep thought and creative literary output
regarding the constantly changing world in which people live. While
Anderson's intellectual prowess ranged across several domains (political
science, history, and education), one of his major concerns was the education
of young people in a rapidly changing world. His advocacy of global
education was in the category of "founding member" and freelance "guru."
The excerpts are: "Defining Global education"; "The Emergence of the
Global Age and the Globalization of the Human Condition"; "The Growth of
Global Culture"; "Citizenship and Education in a Global Age"; "Educational
Change and the Development of Citizen Competence in a Global Age"; and
"The Challenge of Globalizing the Content of Education." Contains 16 reading
suggestions.


ERIC_NO: ED401215
TITLE: Social Studies: Bringing the World Closer to Home.
AUTHOR: Richardson, Helen W., Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This yearbook provides teaching strategy topics of general
interest to social studies teachers of all grade levels. This first annual
yearbook focuses on using social studies to bring the world closer to home.
There are 17 papers, including: (1) "Getting Ready for the World" (Angene H.
Wilson); (2) "Making Cultural Connections: A Cultural Resource Center for
Unity and Diversity" (Dennis Kreps; Carolyn Diener; Claudia Crump); (3) "The
Template of the Investigative Reporter" (Clark Johnson); (4) "Connecting with
the Global Community" (Richard Oakes Peters); (5) "Bringing the World
Closer to Home" (Clark Johnson); (6) "Coming Down the Road: Exploring
Local History with Six, Seven and Eight Year Olds" (Robert W. Maloy; Sharon
A. Edwards); (7) "Teaching About Other Cultures" (Julia Mitcham; Peggi
Joyner; Peggy Puryear; Julie Kunce); (8) "Champagne Wishes and Caviar
Dreams" (Darlene Stewart Young); (9) "ACTIVITIES for Studying Ecuador
Through the Five THEMES of Geography" (Mary E. Haas; Cynthia Szymanski
Sunal; Lois McFadyen Christensen); (10) "Geography: Passport to the World"
(Robert M. McCann); (11) "Scotland Map Game" (Audrey C. Rule); (12)
"Environemntal Crises in Benin, Lesotho, and Senegal" (Christine Pratt-
Consoletti); (13) "The Mercantile System: A Simulation for High School
History Classes" (Neil Nichols); (14) "From Ostrich Eggshells to Soda Pop
Cans! Cultural Change and Adaptation of the !Kung San: A Lesson Plan"
(Michael J. Berson); (15) "Comparing Ourselves to Others: What Do
Teenagers in the United States and Korea Think about Family Obligations,
Future Employment, and Their National Economy?" (Jo Ann Cutler Sweeney;
Stuart Foster; Yonjoo Choo); (16) "Japan's Feminists: Resisting the Policies
of the Meiji Government" (Lyn Reese); and (17) "Who Were the Kamikaze
Pilots? A Short-Term Inquiry Experience" (Jack M. Sheridan).


ERIC_NO: EJ500775
TITLE: Developing Student Global Perspectives through Undergraduate
Family Resource Management.
AUTHOR: Crawford, Glinda
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
JOURNAL_CITATION: Journal of Home Economics; v85 n2 p9-15 Sum 1993
ABSTRACT: An undergraduate home economics program at the University of
North Dakota infuses global concepts in courses on consumer ISSUES,
personal and family finances, and family management. Substantive THEMES
center around values, family resource management patterns,
interdependence, global ISSUES/problems, critical thinking, and global
actors.


ERIC_NO: EJ533353
TITLE: Starting Points for Global education.
AUTHOR: Werner, Walt
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
JOURNAL_CITATION: Canadian Social Studies; v30 n4 p171-73 Sum
1996
ABSTRACT: Recommends integrating global education objectives in a
low-key manner through the questions and examples that the teacher
interjects into classroom discussions. Articulates four foci that can
serve as entry points for global education in many discussions. These
include moral ISSUES, systems approach, and reflexive inquiry.


ERIC_NO: ED395890
TITLE: Current ISSUES: Critical ISSUES Confronting the Nation and the
World. 1996 Edition [and Teacher's Guide.]
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This book accompanied by the Teacher's guide, focuses on
policy ISSUES being discussed and debated by U.S. policymakers. The book
provides essays on current ISSUES facing the nation and the world. Ten
chapters highlight domestic policy ISSUES and 10 chapters are about foreign
policy ISSUES. This book informs readers about important concerns of today
and leaves judgments up to the individual. The book is divided into three
sections. Part 1, "The Federal Government", includes: (1) "Introduction"; (2)
"The Clinton Administration"; (3) "The 104th Congress"; (4) "The Supreme
Court"; and (5) "The Federal Budget". Part 2, "Domestic Policy ISSUES",
contains: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "The Economy"; (3) "Education"; (4) "Women
and Minorities"; (5) "Poverty"; (6) "Health Care"; (7) "Immigration"; (8)
"Energy"; (9) "Environemnt"; (10) "Constitutional Rights"; and (11) "Crime and
Drugs". Part 3, "Foreign Policy ISSUES", includes: (1) "Introduction"; (2)
"Russia"; (3) "Defense"; (4) "Latin America"; (5) "The Middle East"; (6)
"International Trade"; (7) "Europe"; (8) "Nuclear Proliferation"; (9) "World
Poverty"; (10) "Sub-Saharan Africa"; and (11) "East Asia." Each chapter
provides basic background information, identifies key questions, and gives
arguments from both sides of the issue.


ERIC_NO: ED422224
TITLE: ISSUES-Centered Instruction in Teaching International ISSUES to
Low Achieving High School Students.
AUTHOR: Rossi, John Allen
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
ABSTRACT: This paper investigates ISSUES-centered instruction looks in
two ninth grade classrooms composed of large numbers of low achieving high
school students. The key principles of ISSUES-centered instruction are
described with an examination of the barriers of the approach with low
achieving students. The paper reports on two world geography classrooms of
low achievers who studied Latin America and the Caribbean using an
ISSUES-centered approach. The researcher worked with classroom teachers
and planned an eight-day unit on Latin America and the Caribbean based on
the principles of ISSUES-centered instruction. Field notes from observations
and interviews provided the qualitative data.
ERIC_NO: ED454141
TITLE: Weaving Connections: Educating for Peace, Social and
Environemntal Justice.
AUTHOR: Goldstein, Tara, Ed.; Selby, David, Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
ABSTRACT: This collection of essays by Canadian educators seeks to
achieve two goals. First, it documents educational philosophies and
approaches that are directed toward equity, justice, peacefulness, and
earth awareness. Second, it challenges current directions in Canadian
school reform that promote "back to basics," centralization of control, a
conformist concept of citizenship, corporate intrusion, deprofessionalization of
the teacher, "doing more with less," "learning for earning," and performance
measurability. Following an introduction by the editors, essays are: (1) "Anti-
Homophobia Initiatives at the Former Toronto Board of Education" (T.
McCaskell; V. Russell); (2) "Multicultural and Anti-Racist Education: The
Issue Is Equity" (O. M. Wright); (3) "Black Education in Canada: Past, Present
and Future" (M. Bramble); (4) "Educating for Citizenship in Canada: New
Meanings in a Changing World" (M. Evans; I. Hundey); (5) "Development
Education: Making Connections North and South" (L. Cronkhite); (6)
"Education for Gender Equity: Origins and Development" (L. Mofatt); (7)
"Navigating the Waters of Canadian Environemntal Education" (C. L. Russell;
A. C. Bell; L. Fawcett); (8) "A Tapestry in the Making: The Strands of Global
education" (G. Pike); (9) "Reading between the Lines: Examining
Assumptions in Health Education" (G. Smith; L. Peterat); (10) "Humane
Education: Widening the Circle of Compassion and Justice" (D. Selby); (11)
"Law-Related Education: Promoting Awareness, Participation and Action" (W.
Cassidy); (12) "Media Education in Canada" (B. Duncan; J. Pungente; R.
Shepherd); (13) "Molded Images: First Nations People, Representation and
the Ontario School Curriculum" (S. D. Fletcher); and (14) "Educating Towards
a Culture of Peace" (T. Swee-Hin; V. Floresca-Cawagas).


ERIC_NO: ED315353
TITLE: The Global Ecosystem: Using the Global education Curriculum to
Expose Students to Contemporary Conflicts, ISSUES, Problems, and
Situations Affecting Natural/Social Environemnts.
AUTHOR: Peters, Richard
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1989
ABSTRACT: Students must clearly understand that every living thing on earth
exists within the context of a system of interlocking dependency. Through the
use of audio-visual materials, books, magazines, newspapers, and special
television reports, as well as direct interaction with people, places, and things,
students begin to develop a cognitive frame of reference to their world.
Typically, global education programs focus on natural/social geography,
history, economics, government, and sociology. Few attempts are made to
fuse topics of study into a logical sequence of inquiry, stressing the
interrelationships between natural and social environemnts and pointing out
the conflicts, ISSUES, and situations that confront nature and humankind.
Ten sample lesson plans for grades 4 through 12 are included, covering such
concepts as pollution, waste disposal, forest degradation, the greenhouse
effect, urbanization, and endangered species. Some lessons include maps. It
is hoped that these will serve as MODELs that each teacher can use to
create learning experiences unique to a particular class, at a particular
setting, and in a particular point in time. Appended are various news clippings
that deal with the concepts in the lesson plans, a list of selected international
organizations, a fact sheet about Global Horizons, and 14 selected
references.




ERIC_NO: ED440673
TITLE: Charting the Future of Global education in Community Colleges.
New Expeditions: Charting the Second Century of Community Colleges.
ISSUES Paper No. 12.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
ABSTRACT: This document is part of the New Expeditions series, published
by the American Association for Community Colleges. It addresses
technology, meeting the needs of a diverse student body, and remaining
economically viable and locally responsible in a global community. The paper
asserts that, as community colleges transform from teaching to learning
institutions, they will build on a new definition of community that is not place-
centered but learner-centered. Therefore, community can no longer be
defined as local. Discussed is how global education will affect the following
ISSUES at community and two-year colleges: (1) access and equity; (2)
faculty role; (3) finance; (4) governance; (5) leadership development; (6)
market forces; (7) student needs; (8) technology; and (9) teaching and
learning. The article also explores the expansion from local to global
communities, and the resulting change in the community college's civic role.
Contained in the appendices are a community colleges and global
education executive summary, the New Expeditions survey on global
education in community colleges, a list of providers of testimony at the New
Expeditions hearing in Washington, DC, a list of participants at the New
Expeditions Conference, and the hearing testimony.


ERIC_NO: ED354206
TITLE: Global education: Educating for Our Common Future.
AUTHOR: Randall, Ruth E.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: Minnesota plays an integral role in the worldwide increase in the
exchange of goods, services, and ideas. It is imperative that the state's
citizens be able to relate to an increasingly interrelated world and to gain the
SKILLS, attitudes, and knowledge needed to participate intelligently in such
exchanges. Educating to these ends is essential. International/global
education is the carefully designed elementary and secondary program that
helps students develop in such a way as to contribute effectively to an
interdependent world. Students must learn a sense of responsibility for the
needs of all people and a commitment to the just and peaceful resolution of
global ISSUES. Minnesota's global education efforts seek to enable citizens
to participate more actively at local, state, national, and international levels.
The task of global education becomes more difficult each year, as
technological developments yield an ever expanding profusion of data and
problems. The survival of "Spaceship Earth" and the quality of life of its
inhabitants will depend on the extent to which young people develop the
ability to think, feel, and act from a global perspective. Teachers can instill in
students an appreciation of the global nature of ISSUES that affect their lives
and the interrelationships that bind them to other regions and peoples.
Educators must prepare the young to meet the responsibilities and demands
of an interdependent and complex world.


ERIC_NO: ED442677
TITLE: The Global education Industry: Lessons from Private Education in
Developing Countries. IEA Studies in Education.
AUTHOR: Tooley, James
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1999
ABSTRACT: This book focuses on the impact of private education in
developing countries, such as Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, India, Indonesia,
Peru, Romania, Russia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. The private education
sector is large and innovative in the countries studied and not the domain of
the wealthy. Contrary to popular opinion, private education in developing
countries does not foster economic inequality, instead it provides social
responsibility programs, subsidized placements, and student loan schemes.
Factors are identified that impede or facilitate private education with a special
focus on the role of regulatory regimes. Finally, ways the existence of an
innovative private education sector could influence education policy as
practiced by international agencies and national governments are explored.
Chapter titles include: (1) "Case Studies of Private Education"; (2) "Factors
for Success"; (3) "Equity ISSUES"; (4) "Regulation and Investment Climate";
and (5) "Conclusions and Policy Proposals."
ERIC_NO: EJ476641
TITLE: Humane Education and Global education.
AUTHOR: Selby, David
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
JOURNAL_CITATION: Australian Journal of Environemntal Education; v9
p115-33 Sep 1993
ABSTRACT: Presents and explains MODEL representing four dimensions of
global education: temporal, spatial, ISSUES, and inner. Presents six
principal areas covered by humane curricula; the relationships between
humane education, environemntal education, and human rights education;
and two humane education ACTIVITIES for the secondary and
elementary/secondary levels.




ERIC_NO: ED335246
TITLE: Human Ecology: A Suprastructure for Global education.
AUTHOR: Riggle, Richard
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1989
ABSTRACT: Descriptions of global education tend to be either fragmented
or nebulous. Consequently, the educator is left with little tangible basis for
developing instructional programs. As a corrective measure, this paper
advocates using fundamental ideas from the disciplines of geography and
environemntal sociology that collectively contribute to the formation of 'human
ecology' as a suprastructure for the analysis of current ISSUES that are
critical to global well-being. By arranging related concepts on a flow chart and
factoring out secondary ISSUES, the resulting cohesive structure reveals
interrelated human and environemntal factors that interface with the social,
physical, and natural sciences.



ERIC_NO: EJ645961
TITLE: The Varying Effects of Regional Organizations as Subjects of
Globalization of Education.
AUTHOR: Dale, Roger; Robertson, Susan L.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2002
JOURNAL_CITATION: Comparative Education Review; v46 n1 p10-36 Feb
2002
ABSTRACT: Examines the noneconomic role of three regional international
organizations--the European Union, the North American Free Trade
Agreement, and the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation. Describes
differences in organizational structure and purpose, dimensions of
organizational power, policies and intentions toward education, direct impact
on national education systems, and indirect impact via politics of education.



ERIC_NO: ED460930
TITLE: Concepts and Trends in Global education.
AUTHOR: Sutton, Margaret, Ed.; Hutton, Deborah, Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2001
ABSTRACT: This publication addresses trends and ISSUES in global
education,
providing information about what global education is and how to teach it.
The publication emphasizes ERIC resources. It offers ERIC Digests about
global education and selected items from the ERIC database that exemplify
different viewpoints and approaches to global education. It contains a
directory of key organizations and World Wide Web sites that provide teacher
resources. Designed as a guide for educators who want to include global
education across the various subjects of the curriculum, the volume is
divided into four parts: (1) "Overview of Global and International Education";
(2) "Institutionalizing Global education"; (3) "Curriculum, Methods, and
Approaches"; and (4) "Appendices." Information about documents in the
ERIC database and how to submit documents for the database is appended.


ERIC_NO: ED340674
TITLE: Implementing Global education in the Elementary School: Getting
Teachers beyond Lists of Goals.
AUTHOR: Wright, Audrey E.; Van Decar, Patricia
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: Four groups of midwestern teachers (N=103) enrolled in
graduate courses in elementary curriculum and comparative education were
asked to register their degree of support for a list of goals of global
education. Most teachers registered support for the goals but had little to
offer in the way of implementation of the goals in their own classrooms. A
process was initiated with these inservice teachers to: get teachers to value
global education and incorporate it into classroom time when possible; and
give teachers confidence in their ability to teach with a global approach, to
select materials for understanding other cultures, and to identify opportunities
to infuse a global perspective into the entire elementary curriculum. Steps in
the process included: (1) finding out what the teachers were already doing;
(2) identifying key features of their own culture(s); (3) imposing a structure on
culture through categorization by economics, educational systems, family,
religion, geography, cultural diversity, ethnic groups, political systems, and
recreation; (4) extending conclusions to other cultures; (5) identifying global
ISSUES; and (6) identifying opportunities for interdisciplinary study.


ERIC_NO: ED386047
TITLE: Coherence and Continuity in the Task-Centred Language Curriculum:
Global education as a Framework for Task-Based Language Teaching.
AUTHOR: Bushell, Brenda; Dyer, Brenda
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1994
ABSTRACT: An assessment of the English-as-a-Second-Language
curriculum at International Christian University (Japan) looked at: (1) the kind
of English language study perceived by students as important for their
success; (2) how students' perceived needs compare to the professors'
assessments of required academic tasks, as measured by a previous task
analysis; (3) the support available for a global education curriculum within
the English language program; and (4) whether the environemntal studies
unit presently in place in the program is compatible with the results of the
needs analysis. It was found that students' perceptions of their language
needs were close to those of both their teachers and the program's goals and
objectives, and that content-based global studies were perceived as
appropriate to students' immediate academic needs and visions of the future.
A task-based curriculum design MODEL based on the findings is outlined.
Problems yet to be resolved include assessment of task difficulty and the
degree to which learners' perceived needs should guide curriculum design. A
list of further resources, the student questionnaires, and excerpts from
student comments on global ISSUES are appended.


ERIC_NO: ED340631
TITLE: Social Studies Reform and Global education: California, New York,
and the Report of the National Commission on Social Studies.
AUTHOR: Fleming, Dan B.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: There has been a movement in social studies education in
recent years to provide greater emphasis on global education. This paper
evaluates efforts undertaken in this regard by the states of California and
New York and by the National Commission on Social Studies in the Schools.
California adopted a History-Social Science Framework for their public
schools in July, 1987. The study of history is the linchpin of this K-12
curriculum. A significant amount of time is devoted to world history, with
courses taught in grades 6, 7, and 10. In two places, grades 10 and 12, the
curriculum focuses on problems and ISSUES of the world today in an open-
ended approach. The State of New York's revised social studies curriculum
was implemented in stages over the course of the 1980s. While not as far-
reaching in its emphasis on global education as California's curriculum, New
York's program devotes significant time to developing a global perspective.
The main global education thrust of the curriculum is found in grades 9 and
10 under the title of "global studies." The New York program seems to have
more of a "citizenship" building and contemporary flavor to it than does
California. The National Commission on the Social Studies in the Schools
Report, "Charting a Course: Social Studies for the 21st Century," was issued
in November 1989. The cornerstone of the report is the 3-year (grades 9-11)
world and U.S. history and geography sequence. The goal is to integrate
national and historical change to allow students to connect the national past
with its larger international setting. However, the report fails to give adequate
attention to the contemporary world.


ERIC_NO: ED268052
TITLE: Global education for National and International Survival.
AUTHOR: Heywood, Stanley J.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1985
ABSTRACT: This paper discusses cognitive maps of the world that an
individual needs to be considered educated. A cognitive map is the filing
structure within the brain that allows an individual to encode, give meaning,
and retrieve information relating to a variety of world matters. The first
requisite is a cognitive map of the world of differences, whereby differences
are seen as opportunities, as incorporating codes rather than exclusive
codes. The next requisite is a cognitive map of where places are located and
what the natural conditions are. A cognitive map of the world should include
the religions and the languages of the world. A cognitive time frame of the
world is another need. The educated individual should have some specific
subordinate cognitive maps, e.g., the role of women might be a sub-
classification in knowledge of the social differences of the world. To be
educated, one needs a cognitive map of the humor of the world, as well as a
cognitive map in political and economic terms. A final cognitive map is one of
sources of current information on global affairs.


ERIC_NO: EJ241282
TITLE: Viewpoints in Global education.
AUTHOR: Wilson, Donald C.; Werner, Walter
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1980
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Studies; v71 n6 p250-53 Nov-Dec 1980
ABSTRACT: Examines two viewpoints that secondary students can adopt
when studying world people and ISSUES. First is the insider perspective of
the individual who lives and experiences a situation as a participant, and
whose interpretations are subjective and practical. Second is the outsider
perspective of the observer whose outlook is objective and detached.
Examples of classroom ACTIVITIES are provided.
ERIC_NO: EJ607598
TITLE: Global education: Relevant Learning for the Twenty-First Century.
AUTHOR: Selby, David; Pike, Graham
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
JOURNAL_CITATION: Convergence; v33 n1-2 p138-49 2000
ABSTRACT: Presents four dimensions of a MODEL of global education:
inner, temporal, spatial, and ISSUES related. Outlines key ideas, knowledge,
SKILLS, and attitudes.


ERIC_NO: ED365577
TITLE: The Development and Implementation of an Interdisciplinary Global
education Program at Seacrest Country Day School.
AUTHOR: Powell, Lynne M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
ABSTRACT: This report describes the process used by a fully accredited
private school (Sea Crest County Day School, Florida) of prekindergarten
through grade eight to develop and implement an interdisciplinary global
education program. Areas of need that were addressed included: differences
in definition of the concept by the teachers, inconsistencies in the scope and
areas of the curriculum where global concepts were addressed, teacher
concerns about adding more to an already full curriculum, teacher concerns
over lack of student knowledge about global concepts, and student reluctance
to participate in community service projects. Intervention strategies included:
inservice workshops for teachers; workshops for parents; development of a
definition, philosophy, goals, objectives, and curriculum for a global
education program; development of a catalog of local, national, and
international resources and opportunities for global education; and a
schoolwide implementation of the program. Global education became a
central theme in the school environemnt. Parents and members of the
community became actively involved in the program, and the community
became a learning laboratory for the students. The paper is divided into
seven chapters: (1) Problem statement and community background; (2)
Problem definition and evidence; (3) Influence in the problem context bearing
on solutions and outcomes; (4) Problem conceptualization, solution strategy,
and project outcomes; (5) Implementation history; (6) Evaluation of results
and process; and (7) Decisions on future of intervention.


ERIC_NO: ED340631
TITLE: Social Studies Reform and Global education: California, New York,
and the Report of the National Commission on Social Studies.
AUTHOR: Fleming, Dan B.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: There has been a movement in social studies education in
recent years to provide greater emphasis on global education. This paper
evaluates efforts undertaken in this regard by the states of California and
New York and by the National Commission on Social Studies in the Schools.
California adopted a History-Social Science Framework for their public
schools in July, 1987. The study of history is the linchpin of this K-12
curriculum. A significant amount of time is devoted to world history, with
courses taught in grades 6, 7, and 10. In two places, grades 10 and 12, the
curriculum focuses on problems and ISSUES of the world today in an open-
ended approach. The State of New York's revised social studies curriculum
was implemented in stages over the course of the 1980s. While not as far-
reaching in its emphasis on global education as California's curriculum, New
York's program devotes significant time to developing a global perspective.
The main global education thrust of the curriculum is found in grades 9 and
10 under the title of "global studies." The New York program seems to have
more of a "citizenship" building and contemporary flavor to it than does
California. The National Commission on the Social Studies in the Schools
Report, "Charting a Course: Social Studies for the 21st Century," was issued
in November 1989. The cornerstone of the report is the 3-year (grades 9-11)
world and U.S. history and geography sequence. The goal is to integrate
national and historical change to allow students to connect the national past
with its larger international setting. However, the report fails to give adequate
attention to the contemporary world.


ERIC_NO: ED433291
TITLE: Understanding Vietnam in the 21st Century: Political, Economic, and
Security ISSUES in the Asia/Pacific Region. Part III, U.S. and Japanese
Relations with Vietnam: Liberalization and Integration.
AUTHOR: Mukai, Gary; Chenette, Sara; Cheng, Amy; Cheng, Yu Wen;
Fairbrother,
Greg; Midling, Michael; Nordquist, Silvy; Tan, Kwee Foon
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
ABSTRACT: This curriculum unit is part three of a three-part series. Each of
the three parts can be taught independently. The lessons include
perspectives from each of the countries under study. This unit introduces
students to policy options for U.S. and Japanese relations with Vietnam at the
turn of the century. By identifying and examining these options during
Vietnam's growing liberalization and integration into the world community,
students will gain an awareness of U.S., Japanese, and Vietnamese
perspectives on political, economic, and security ISSUES. Provided is a
rationale and introduction to the lessons, along with unit goals, materials, time
required, suggested sequence of ACTIVITIES, small group roles, subjects,
equipment needed, icons, and policy study references. The six lessons
include: (1) "Historical Legacies: The Vietnamese Refugee Experience"; (2)
"Vietnam's Politics in Transition: Creating Interest in the News"; (3)
"Vietnam's Economy in Transition"; (4) "U.S. Relations with Vietnam: The
Debate Over Normalization"; (5)"Japanese Relations with Vietnam: With a
Focus on Foreign Aid"; and (6) "ASEAN--Association of Southeast Asian
Nations."




ERIC_NO: ED433290
TITLE: Understanding the Korean Peninsula in the 21st Century: Political,
Economic, and Security ISSUES in the Asia/Pacific Region. Part II, U.S. and
Japanese Relations with the Korean Peninsula: Opportunities and
Challenges.
AUTHOR: Mukai, Gary; Cheng, Amy; Amar, Jasmine; Donahue, Dave;
Fisher, Grace; Klein, Emily; Lee, Joanne
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
ABSTRACT: This curriculum unit is part two of a three-part series. Each of
the three parts can be taught independently. The lessons include
perspectives from each of the countries under study. This unit introduces
students to challenges and opportunities presented by policy options for U.S.
and Japanese relations with the Korean Peninsula at the turn of the century.
Identifying and examining these options, students will gain an awareness of
U.S., Japanese, and Korean perspectives on political, economic, and security
ISSUES. Provided is a rationale and introduction to the lessons, along with
unit goals, materials, time required, suggested sequence of ACTIVITIES,
small group roles, subjects, equipment needed, icons, and policy study
references. The seven lessons include: (1) "Historical Legacies: The
Japanese Colonization of Korea"; (2) "Historical Legacies: The Korean War -
Perspectives from Leaders"; (3) "Korea's Contemporary Political Situation: A
News Conference"; (4) "Korea's Contemporary Economic Situation: Where to
Build a Factory"; (5) "U.S. Relations with the Korean Peninsula: With a Focus
on Security"; (6) "Japanese Relations with the Korean Peninsula: With a
Focus on Civil Rights of Koreans in Japan"; and (7) "Korean Reunification:
Selected Scenarios."


ERIC_NO: ED433289
TITLE: Understanding China in the 21st Century: Political, Economic, and
Security ISSUES in the Asia/Pacific Region. Part I, U.S. and Japanese
Relations with China: Case Studies of Cooperation and Competition.
AUTHOR: Mukai, Gary; Moore, Carey; Young, Jocelyn; Cheng, Amy;
Fairbrother, Greg
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This curriculum unit is part one of a three-part series. The unit
introduces students to policy options for U.S. and Japanese relations with
China at the beginning of the 21st century. By identifying and examining
these options, students gain an awareness of U.S., Japanese, and Chinese
perspectives on political, economic, and security ISSUES. Provided is a
rationale and introduction to the lessons, along with unit goals, materials, time
required, suggested sequence of ACTIVITIES, small group roles, subjects,
equipment needed, icons, and policy study references. Lessons included in
the unit are: (1) "Historical Legacies"; (2) "China's Political Situation"; (3)
"China's Economy in Transition"; (4) "U.S.-Sino Relations: With a Focus on
Human Rights"; (5) "SINO-Japanese Relations: With a Focus on Security
ISSUES in the South China Sea"; and (6) "Asia-Pacific Economic
Cooperation." Handouts and primary source documents have been provided
with each lesson to present students with a range of perspectives on the topic
being studied.



ERIC_NO: ED395862
TITLE: History in the Global Age.
AUTHOR: Kang, SunJoo
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This paper attempts to clarify: (1) the need to educate citizens to
cope with contemporary global challenges and (2) the purpose of history and
to examine the way to organize history in the global age. The document
suggests that the purpose of world history and national history is to enable
students to develop a global perspective and that world history should be
viewed in all its aspects from a global perspective. The paper contends that
the goal of history teaching must change from the focus of U.S. citizenship to
that of world citizen. The text is divided into six parts: (1) "Introduction"; (2)
"The Age of Global Interdependence"; (3) "Citizen Education in the Global
Age"; (4) "Global Perspective in History"; (5) "History for Global Perspective";
and (6) "Conclusion."


ERIC_NO: ED389634
TITLE: Increasing Student Awareness of Global and Future ISSUES through
a Secondary Level Mini-Course.
AUTHOR: Decker, Dianna K.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This study examines the problem of high school students as
future leaders entering the adult world unprepared in the areas of global and
international ISSUES. The study was conducted with 145 students, teachers,
and administrators in a private high school with university affiliations in a large
suburban area. Eventually two students became the central focus for the
stated practicum outcomes. The goal was to increase student awareness of
critical global and future ISSUES that would lead to an appreciation for the
interdependency among nations and raise tolerance levels for differences in
others. A mini-course in global studies was designed based on global
ISSUES least addressed in the school. Telecommunications were established
to link students to other students around the world to enable group
discussions and project exchanges for students. Electronic mail, study kits,
simulated role playing, and current topics of global consequence were used
to instruct students on world trade, world hunger, international business,
environemntal protection, energy, and nuclear proliferation. The results
showed an increase of student awareness of global ISSUES and students
were motivated by using telecommunications as a part of the mini-course
requirement. Appendixes include the student questionnaires, student quiz,
and computer ethics and security agreement.




ERIC_NO: ED401187
TITLE: Educating for Human Dignity: Learning about Rights and
Responsibilities. Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights.
AUTHOR: Reardon, Betty A.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This book is written for both teachers and teacher educators to
use in addressing ISSUES of human rights. The conceptual development
approach used throughout the book makes it suitable for a full human rights
curriculum; the grade-level discussions and sample lesson plans also can be
used in individual classes or to enrich ongoing programs. The book is divided
into seven chapters and subdivided by grade level examples. Chapters
include: (1) "Introduction: Purposes and Approaches"; (2) "A Developmental
Sequence for Presentation of the Core Concepts"; (3) "The Early Grades:
Laying the Foundation for an Appreciation of Human Dignity--Kindergarten to
Grade Three"; (4) "The Middle Grades: Introducing Standards and Principles-
-Grades Four to Six"; (5) "Junior High School: Reflecting and Valuing--Grades
Seven to Nine"; (6) "Senior High School: Confronting the Problems, Taking
Responsibility--Grades Ten to Twelve"; and (7) "Resources for Human Rights
Education." Flexibility is built in to adjust the curriculum for schools with other
grade divisions. A useful feature of this book is the Appendix, which makes
critical human rights documents available to the classroom teacher, including
the "Universal Declaration of Human Rights," the "Convention of the
Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women," and the
"Convention on the Rights of the Child." This book is an essential tool for
implementation of the goals set by the United Nations and the People's
Decade for Human Rights Education.
ERIC_NO: ED460883
TITLE: Meiji Japan: The Dynamics of National Change. A Humanities
Approach to Japanese History, Part II.
AUTHOR: Parisi, Lynn; Thompson, Sara; Stevens, Anne
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This curriculum unit focuses on the Meiji period (1868-1912), a
pivotal period in Japanese and world history. Each lesson in this unit uses art,
literature, primary sources, or a combination to help students understand
Japan's emerging sense of nationhood within the context of the rapid change
taking place during this important period. Lessons explore Japan's
modernization and emerging national identity from multiple social and
economic perspectives within Japan during the Meiji period, with special
attention to the role of artists in helping to shape and promote a national
identity. Lessons include: (1) "Introduction to Meiji Japan"; (2) "The Meiji
Restoration: Defining Government Goals and Policies"; (3) "Bunmei Kaika:
The Role of Art in Promoting Government Policy"; (4) "The Meiji Constitution
of 1889"; (5) "Education and National Identity"; (6) "Good Wife, Wise Mother:
The Role of Women in Meiji Modernization"; (7) "Female Factory Workers
and the 'Meiji Miracle'"; and (8) "Japan Takes a Bow on the World Stage: The
1893 World's Fair." The eight lessons build upon each other and may be used
as a complete curriculum unit or used in combination with the textbook or
other supplementary materials to enrich the study of this period in Japanese
history.


ERIC_NO: ED130962
TITLE: Global Studies: Problems and Promises for Elementary Teachers.
AUTHOR: Overly, Norman V., Ed.; Kimpston, Richard D., Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1976
ABSTRACT: This publication identifies rationale, content, and materials for
teaching about world problems in the elementary school. Intended
predominantly for use by classroom teachers and supervisors, the publication
is also a useful resource for teacher training. It contains four chapters.
Chapter I, A Perspective on Global Studies, reviews the historical precedent
of global education, focuses on the individual in world affairs, and explains
why global studies belongs in the elementary curriculum. Chapter II, An
Approach to Global Studies: Balancing Problems and Promises, suggests
organizing THEMES for teaching international affairs with an integrated
approach. In this section selected problems such as food crisis and hunger,
war and conflict, and pollution are described. Chapter III, Who's In Charge--
How to Proceed, explains how to develop and implement a global studies
curriculum and how to assess curriculum materials. Chapter IV, Resources
for Teachers, suggests background materials on population, resource
shortages, food crises, environemntal pollution, war, conflict and nuclear
proliferation, income disparity and poverty, urbanization and urban
deterioration. Of the background resources listed, 49 are briefly annotated
and 35 are indexed but not annotated. A list of films and a directory of project
supporters are included in the document.


ERIC_NO: EJ500775
TITLE: Developing Student Global Perspectives through Undergraduate
Family Resource Management.
AUTHOR: Crawford, Glinda
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
JOURNAL_CITATION: Journal of Home Economics; v85 n2 p9-15 Sum 1993
ABSTRACT: An undergraduate home economics program at the University of
North Dakota infuses global concepts in courses on consumer ISSUES,
personal and family finances, and family management. Substantive THEMES
center around values, family resource management patterns,
interdependence, global ISSUES/problems, critical thinking, and global
actors.


ERIC_NO: ED401249
TITLE: In the Global Classroom: Teacher Decision-Making and Global
Perspectives in Education.
AUTHOR: Merryfield, Merry M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1994
ABSTRACT: Classroom teachers and teacher educators involved in
implementing global education in schools have described their efforts as
making connections across cultures and civilizations and across global
ISSUES instead of teaching them separately; identifying historical
antecedents to current world ISSUES and problems; linking global content to
the lives of one's students; and teaching tolerance and appreciation of
cultural differences. Research was undertaken to learn: the major principles
guiding teachers' instructional decision-making as they teach about the world
and the contextual factors identified as most important in influencing these
principles. The study began with observation of 6 teachers (2 elementary, 2
middle, and 2 secondary) from a large urban district and 6 teachers from a
small, affluent, suburban district during the 1990-91 academic year. Follow-up
interviews were held after each class with each teacher. Several guiding
principles were found: (1) study diverse cultures and emphasize multiple
perspectives, comparisons, and tolerance; (2) use major THEMES to
organize and integrate global content; (3) have students make connections
across time and space; (4) connect content to students' lives; (5) emphasize
SKILLS in higher level thinking and research; and (6) employ a variety of
teaching strategies and instructional resources. Underlying these approaches
was a common belief in cultural diversity as positive and a focus on SKILLS
in higher level thinking, research, and decision-making.


ERIC_NO: EJ193290
TITLE: Toward Global Perspectives.
AUTHOR: Cornbleth, Catherine; and Others
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1979
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Studies Journal; v8 p5-8 Spr 1979
ABSTRACT: Identifies common THEMES underlying various approaches to
global education. Four characteristics of global perspectives programs are
that they are holistic, humanistic, conceptually based, and issue oriented.




Introduction:
glob·al·ism n the belief that political policies should take worldwide issues
into account before focusing on national or state concerns, or the advocacy of
this belief (Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2002).
glob·al·i·za·tion n 1. the process by which social institutions become adopted
on a global scale 2. the process by which a business or company becomes
international or starts operating at an international level (Microsoft® Encarta®
Encyclopedia 2002).
glob·al vil·lage n the whole world considered as a single community served
by electronic media and information technology (Microsoft® Encarta®
Encyclopedia 2002).

ERIC_NO: EJ611934
TITLE: Globalization and Education: Exploring Pedagogical and Curricular
Issues and Implications. Introductory Essay.
AUTHOR: Smits, Hans
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
JOURNAL_CITATION: Alberta Journal of Educational Research; v46 n1 p1-6
Spr 2000
ABSTRACT: A continuation of colonialism, globalization's narrow focus on
economics and free-market thinking reinforces modernist rationality and
individualism and discounts how deeply all life is interconnected. Its effects on
education are reflected in high stakes testing, emphasis on information
technologies, and a discounting of non-Western cultures. Globalization in
education is an ethical issue that is both local and global
ERIC_NO: ED461176
TITLE: School Administration and Globalization.
AUTHOR: Howley, Craig
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2001
ABSTRACT: This document discusses globalization as a worldwide economic
process and its impact on school administration. Globalization is about
economics, which is a perpetual concern of school administrators. Actions
that take place across the world can have significant direct and indirect
effects on schools and school districts. The history of globalization is looked
at as a continuation of economic development with roots in 15th century
colonialism and imperialism. Examples are given that demonstrate
globalization's ability to deVALUE local cultures and traditional
education by imposing homogenizing practices such as high-stakes
testing and school accountability. School leaders need to consider the
extent to which school reforms are driven by the agenda of
globalization, need to listen carefully to the rhetoric of globalization in which
so many reform efforts are couched, and need to ask difficult questions about
the way local schooling works to prepare students to conduct maximally
thoughtful lives. A case study is presented involving a monthly meeting of four
principals with a superintendent to illustrate the impact of globalization on
local educational practices. The paper concludes with a list of resources.

ERIC_NO: EJ592928
TITLE: Specifying Globalization Effects on National Policy: A Focus on the
Mechanisms.
AUTHOR: Dale, Roger
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1999
JOURNAL_CITATION: Journal of Education Policy; v14 n1 p1-17 Jan-Feb
1999
ABSTRACT: Clarifies the concept of globalization and explores how
globalization affects national education systems. Compares eight
mechanisms of external effects (borrowing, learning, teaching,
harmonization, dissemination, standardization, interdependence, and
imposition) and organizations associated with them. Effects have been largely
indirect, the result of nation-states' responses to globalization. Contains 32
references. (MLH)

ERIC_NO: EJ622322
TITLE: Globalization and Education: Demonstrating a "Common World
Educational Culture" or Locating a "Globally Structured Educational Agenda"?
AUTHOR: Dale, Roger
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
JOURNAL_CITATION: Educational Theory; v50 n4 p427-48 Fall 2000
ABSTRACT: Discusses how globalization might affect national educational
policies and practices in the context of: appreciating the force of extranational
effects, specifying what may be affected, and exploring how that effect might
occur. The paper describes a theory of the relationship between globalization
and education, examining two contrasting APPROACHes: the Common
World Educational Culture and the Globally Structured Agenda for Education.

ERIC_NO: ED336075
TITLE: The Place of Global Reality in Interdisciplinary Settings: Using Modern
Technology to Link Classrooms for Globalization.
AUTHOR: Morton, Chris; Mojkowski, Charles
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1991
ABSTRACT: The Global education Model (GEM) Project, an undertaking of
the Putnam-Northern Westchester Board of Cooperative Educational
Services, is part of a larger effort to link students throughout the United States
with their counterparts in other countries. GEM's educational technology is
augmented by implementing, testing and analyzing nationally recognized
programsto investigate the educational application of international
telecommunications in classrooms, its effect on instruction, and the strategies
required for successful, expanded school-based use. The model is based on
the assumption that a global APPROACH to education, with attention paid to
cultural differences and an emphasis on interdisciplinary studies, will better
prepare children to live, learn, and work as twenty-first century citizens.
Formative evaluation of the GEM Project reinforces the importance of
structured planning, educational applications, and coordination. The National
Geographic Society's KidsNet and the University of Maryland's ICONS
constitute the formal part of the GEM research process; informal programs
have also been developed in the New York/Moscow Schools'
Telecommunications Project using experience gained from the formal
programs. Developing a telecommunications support system for a global
education program requires attention to a comprehensive global education
curriculum, powerful communications processes, and appropriate technology
connections; staff development is a key ingredient of all three components.
Global education provides a motivating experience for students and teachers
to connect with the larger world of learning and work that is outside the
school, and often outside their own community and country.



ERIC_NO: ED455138
TITLE: Globalization and Its Implications for Civic Education.
AUTHOR: Branson, Margaret S.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1999
ABSTRACT: Given the sweeping changes taking place in the world and their
potential impact on the life of the individual, it is hard to explain why U.S.
citizens have not been as attentive as they should to international and
transnational developments. Recent research indicates that U.S. citizens lag
behind residents of many Western nations in their awareness of key political
actors, institutions, and events in the world. In this era of globalization, the
study of civics and government must include international and transnational
dimensions. To restrict the study of civics and government to the domestic
concerns of the United States is to fail to prepare students for the world in
which they must live, work, and function as citizens. This paper, although it
does not present a fully developed curriculum or a set of standards, draws
attention to what Richard Stanley calls the "Global Triad" of business, civil
society, and government. The paper contends that awareness of these
realignments is essential to student understanding of what globalization is
and why it has meaning for them as individuals and as citizens. It discusses
the three major changes in the global economy, the rise of global civil society,
and globalization and democracy. It concludes by asking if the benefits of
globalization outweigh the costs, finding no certain answer to that question as
yet. It recommends that teachers help their students acquire the civic skills
and the will necessary to direct globalization in ways that will protect and
promote democracy.

ERIC_NO: ED453119
TITLE: Beyond Multiculturalism: Towards a Unification Theory for the
Improvement of Cross-Cultural Communication.
AUTHOR: Jongewaard, Steve
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2001
ABSTRACT: This paper discusses an emerging unification theory of
multiculturalism and global education called "transcultural universalism." The
paper considers a "universal citizenship profile," of what it consists, and how
it is formed. The paper asks four questions: (1) What key citizenship
characteristics are essential for today's highly diverse, complex classrooms?
(2) What can we draw from a convergence of the fields of multiculturalism
and global education that will help us derive a new theoretical understanding
of cross-cultural interaction? (3) What knowledge, skills and dispositions
comprise the essential components of this synthesis? and (4) How can
this theory and these components be taught, practiced, and measured? The
paper identifies six characteristics of transcultural universalism: cross-
cultural adaptability, geographical global awareness, contextual global
awareness, empathetic activism, shared VALUEs, and trans-cultural
awareness. It also presents a model for transcultural universalism, and
reports on a study of the effectiveness of combining certain teaching
techniques with selected content for student attainment of key
characteristics of transcultural/universal citizenship.

Definition
ERIC_NO: ED315361
TITLE: A Guide for Integrating Global education across the Curriculum.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1989
ABSTRACT: The Iowa State Board of Education mandated the teaching of
global education across the curriculum, effective July 1, 1989. This guide is
intended to point the way for school districts developing their own MODELS
of global education defined as an APPROACH to learning that promotes
greater understanding of the world as an interconnected aggregate of human
and natural systems. These systems operate within a single planetary life-
support system on which the destiny of all humankind depends. The purpose
of global education is to promote long-term human survival by developing
greater respect for and cooperation between fellow human beings and
greater concern for the environemnt on which all people depend for their very
existence. A rationale for global education is offered, and suggests that
content be structured around five basic themes: (1) global interdependence;
(2) human resources, VALUEs, and culture; (3) the global environemnt and
natural resources; (4) global peace and conflict management; and (5) change
and alternative futures. Broad goals derived from these five basic themes are
presented. Checklists for identifying elements of these themes that a school
system may already include in its curriculum are provided. Examples of how
global perspectives can be infused at every grade level and in every subject
area are given.

ERIC_NO: ED407013
TITLE: Internationalizing the Curriculum: A Case Study in the Business
Division.
AUTHOR: Warzyn, Dee
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
ABSTRACT: Internationalizing the business curriculum means
integrating the processes of international culture into an educational
setting to give students a more comprehensive understanding of the
business world. As part of its efforts to internationalize the curriculum,
Wisconsin's Waukesha County Technical College established an Associate
degree in international trade. The International Trade Division (ITD), which
assists businesses with marketing and international trade, helped the college
to develop technicians with international skills and to understand
international practices related to import and export. Funding for the ITD
was obtained through two grants, which allowed the college to hire a grant
facilitator and implement such strategies for internationalization as sending
resistant decision makers on international experiences to help them
understand the benefits of internationalization, enrolling faculty in
conferences, and bringing businesses to the college to discuss their needs
and problems with international trade. The grants also covered faculty trips to
foreign countries and stipends for curriculum development. Outside the
grants, the ITD developed export training videos and catalogs for other
institutions and businesses, and other countries were invited to send
students, faculty, and administrators to the United States. Other programs
included a statewide summer institute held in 1996 and a Developing a
Curriculum (DACUM) process.

ERIC_NO: ED447714
TITLE: Biliteracy for a Global Society: An Idea Book on Dual Language
Education.
AUTHOR: Lindholm-Leary, Kathryn
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
ABSTRACT: This document asserts that dual language education is a
program that has the potential to promote the multilingual and multicultural
competencies necessary for the new global business job market while
eradicating the significant achievement gap between language majority and
language minority students. The appeal of dual language programs is that
they combine successful educational MODELS in an integrated classroom
composed of both language majority and language minority students, with the
goals of bilingualism and biliteracy, academic excellence for both groups, and
multicultural competencies. Topics covered include the following: the
educational needs of students in the global economy, dual language
education programs and their key features, the three research-based
premises underlying dual language education (a second language is best
acquired by language minority students when their first language is firmly
established and that a second language is best developed by language
majority children through immersion in that language; knowledge learned
through one language paves the way for knowledge acquisition in the second
language; students need to reach a certain level of native language
proficiency to promote higher levels of second language development and
bilingual proficiency), different dual language education MODELS, the
effectiveness of dual language education programs, and considerations in
their implementation. Results demonstrate that the model works because
students learn the communications skills and multicultural competencies to
work on multicultural teams--the kind of skills prized in a global economy.
Dual language education is not a panacea; variations in outcomes
demonstrate the importance of carefully planned programs, well-trained
teachers, strong leadership, and administrative support.

ERIC_NO: EJ549894
TITLE: GLOBAL CONNECTIONS: Infusing a Global Perspective into Our
Schools.
AUTHOR: Nelson, J.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Studies Journal; v26 n p52-57 Spr 1997
ABSTRACT: Defines global education as learning about those problems and
issues that cut across national boundaries and the interconnectedness of
systems--ecological, economic, cultural, political, and technological. Briefly
reviews some of the issues and APPROACHes of global education. Includes
a list of 11 suggestions for creating global awareness in schools.

ERIC_NO: ED406245
TITLE: Developing and Implementing a Model for Improving Global
Awareness in the Secondary School with Collaborative Learning Groups
through the Aid of a Multimedia APPROACH.
AUTHOR: Angry, Raymond
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
ABSTRACT: This practicum aimed to improve global awareness among
middle school students. One specific goal was to increase the students'
concept of the world and their global perspective. A second goal was to
increase the students' geographic knowledge, enabling them to locate sites of
current world events and affairs on a map or globe.

ERIC_NO: ED367575
TITLE: Model for Infusing a Global Perspective into the Curriculum.
AUTHOR: Thorne, Bonnie Baker, Comp.; And Others
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
ABSTRACT: Global education is an APPROACH to learning that
transcends national boundaries and involves the interconnection of
cultural, ecological, economic, political and technological systems. This
perspective promotes multicultural sensitivity that enables young
people to see more clearly their own responsibilities and opportunities
in today's world. This model has been developed to be used by school
personnel of Texas to infuse a global perspective into the K-12 curriculum. It
is designed to serve as a proposal to direct the thinking of a group and to
serve as a launching pad. The paper lists 10 benefits to be gained by
students from a curriculum with a global perspective, and 11 benefits for
teachers. The model is divided into five sections: (1) cultural systems;
(2) ecological systems; (3) economic systems; (4) political systems; and
(5) technological systems. Each section includes suggested goals,
objectives, strategies, bibliographies, and resources. Cultural systems are
explored through genealogy, folktales, mythology, the arts, language,
clothes, food, customs, holidays, habitat, religion, education,
geography, family, sports, games, and medical practices. Ecological
systems are studied with ACTIVITIES grouped under three different
objectives. Economic systems are compared through international
trade, economic systems, tourism, careers, and natural resources.
Under the section for political systems students learn to understand
and evaluate various political systems and processes in order to
acquire the skills necessary to participate as responsible citizens. The
section on technological systems uses various media including video,
laserdisc, computer software and hardware, electronic encyclopedia, CD-
ROM products, electronic database, online database, and
telecommunications

Aims:
The major goal was to increase global awareness in all five first grade
classrooms by advocating the similarities of self and the cultural differences
of others using a thematic, integrated APPROACH.


ERIC_NO: ED344823
TITLE: Elementary Core Curriculum Standards, Levels K-6. Social Studies.
Revised Edition.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1991
ABSTRACT: These Utah core standards are designed to help prepare
students for the changing times that will require knowledge and skills
for living and competition in the information age. Six qualities are
emphasized (1) higher level thinking and process skills; (2)
citizenship/character practices and principles; (3) basic U.S. VALUEs; (4)
economic literacy; (5) American democratic governance; and (6) global
awareness and geography skills. The remainder of the document outlines
social studies goals, and course descriptions, for each individual grade from
kindergarten through grade 6.

ERIC_NO: EJ446357
Debeauvais, Michel (1992). Outcasts of the Year 2000: A Challenge to
Education in Europe. Comparative Education; v28 n1 p61-69 1992
ABSTRACT: Argues that social exclusion, as evidenced by unemployment
and educational failure, is a persistent structural feature in European
countries. Suggests that multicultural education and other educational
strategies should provide global awareness of the world's major
problems and the solidarity of mankind and training in nonviolent
democratic conflict resolution.


ERIC_NO: ED349915
TITLE: Incorporating International Business Concepts into the High School
Curriculum.
AUTHOR: Kruzel, Sandra L.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
JOURNAL_CITATION: Balance Sheet; p10-12 May-Jun 1988
ABSTRACT: This document is comprised of a journal article ("Business
Education with an International Flavor") and conference presentation
handouts describing a 2-year course in international business
management available to high school juniors and seniors in Toldeo Ohio.
This program is a 2-year vocational business program for juniors and seniors
in high school. The course was designed to develop students' global
awareness and understanding of various cultures as they relate to American
business. A survey of 20 Toledo-areas companies taken in the early stages of
developing the course of studies showed 100 percent support for the
program. Some business leaders worked with the schools to develop the
program and to work on promotion, recruitment, curriculum development, and
student requirements. Members of the International Studies Institute of the
University of Toledo also helped with curriculum development. The overall
course of study involves a combination of business administration subjects
and international world trade concepts. Each student in the program has a
sponsor who is a business professional in an international division of a
Toledo-area company and who serves as a mentor for the 2 year period.
Students are required to be fluent in or studying a foreign language. Two local
universities also offer courses open to the students in the program. The
handouts include various course materials including the course outline,
guidelines for sponsors, and locations of program inquiries. (JB)




ERIC_NO: ED338528
TITLE: Living in Our Global Society--New Directions for Social Studies
Education in the 21st Century.
AUTHOR: Peters, Richard O.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1991
ABSTRACT: One of the main goals of social studies education should
be to help students to understand that as U.S. citizens they are also
citizens of a global community. This compilation of discussion and lesson
plans is designed to foster debate among social studies educators and to
help classroom teachers educate globally aware citizens. The included
materials examine the following topics: why students need to develop a
global perspective; living in a global society--new directions for
education in the 21st century; helping students perceive their real life
world(s); putting students in touch with their worlds; introducing young
learners to their lifespace environemnt(s); developing real life world(s)
comprehension among middle school students; role playing social
scientists in classroom and field-based environemnts of a real or true-to-life
nature; using documents and primary source materials to develop an
awareness of cultural diversity among middle school students; global
citizenship--new directions for education in the 21st century; and an
economic alliance of the Americas for the 1990s and beyond) an instructional
unit.

ERIC_NO: ED440901
TITLE: The Global Classroom: A Study in Appreciation, Awareness, and
Acceptance of Different Cultures and People in Our Ever Changing World.
AUTHOR: Demovsky, Sandra; Niemuth, Judy
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1999
ABSTRACT: An action research project developed and implemented a
program for increasing global skills and awareness of ethnic diversity in
the classroom so that students could better understand others. The
targeted population at two midwestern sites consisted of middle school sixth
graders and high school learning disabled students in social studies classes.
Lack of understanding of multicultural groups is documented through teacher-
constructed questionnaires, teacher surveys, and tests. Analysis of probable
cause data indicated that students and teachers lacked understanding of
ethnic diversity and perspective in the classroom due to inadequate
teacher training and school support, low tolerance for each other, lack
of social skills, and superficial curriculum materials. A review of solution
strategies suggested by knowledgeable others, combined with analysis of the
problem setting, resulted in three major areas of intervention: use of
cooperative learning, global understanding, and tolerance. Given the many
opportunities to develop a better understanding of global issues,
students showed an improved respect for cultural differences in their
community and the world. They were able to communicate with each other
and had a newfound awareness of geography and the application of its five
themes. A comparison of the results of a pretest and a posttest showed an
increased number of correct responses. Analysis of posttest results indicated
a majority of students had a better understanding of human geography. Direct
teaching of map skills, tolerance, and current events is strongly
recommended.


topics:
why students need to develop a global perspective; living in a global society--
new directions for education in the 21st century; helping students perceive
their real life world(s); putting students in touch with their worlds; introducing
young learners to their lifespace environemnt(s); developing real life world(s)
comprehension among middle school students; role playing social scientists
in classroom and field-based environemnts of a real or true-to-life nature;
using documents and primary source materials to develop an awareness of
cultural diversity among middle school students; global citizenship--new
directions for education in the 21st century; and an economic alliance of the
Americas for the 1990s and beyond) an instructional unit.



Themes:
ERIC_NO: EJ533354
TITLE: Promoting "Global" ATTITUDEs.
AUTHOR: Case, Roland
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
JOURNAL_CITATION: Canadian Social Studies; v30 n4 p174-77 Sum 1996
ABSTRACT: Discusses and illustrates three ways to promote prosocial
ATTITUDEs towards global issues among students. Includes classroom
environemnts that reinforce desired ATTITUDEs; facilitating direct "emotional"
experiences that influence ATTITUDEs; and engaging students in thoughtful
deliberation about global issues.

ERIC_NO: ED331493
TITLE: Telecommunications: Working To Enhance Global Understanding
and Peace Education.
AUTHOR: Schrum, Lynne M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1991
ABSTRACT: This paper describes educational ACTIVITIES that make use of
microcomputers and information networks to link elementary and secondary
students electronically using telecommunications, i.e., communication across
distances using personal computers, modems, telephone lines, and computer
networks. Efforts to promote global understanding and awareness are
also described, with emphasis on teacher and educator cooperation in
international distance education projects that focus on cultural
similarities and differences as well as issues of importance such as
world peace, the Gulf War, management of global water resources, and
the plight of the homeless. It is noted that students from Australia, the
Soviet Union, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Israel, the United States,
Norway, and many other countries have engaged in dialogues via
telecommunication media, and that, in most countries, the primary obstacle
to participating in an international project is funding. Other obstacles cited
include technical difficulties, fear of misuse, lack of understanding, and
government policies controlling information. It is concluded that, although
current research on the effectiveness of the projects is scarce,

ERIC_NO: ED423209
TITLE: Effective Elementary Social Studies.
AUTHOR: Hoge, John Douglas
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
ABSTRACT: This book advocates providing high-quality K-6 social studies
instruction. The text provides practical information on how teachers can
conduct high-quality social studies programs in their classrooms. The volume
is divided into three parts. Part 1 offers an overview of the formal and informal
social studies curriculum, its history, current status, and content. Part 2
provides a broad overview of the social science and humanities disciplines
that form the foundation of social studies. Part 3 develops an understanding
of special social studies topics and methods including inquiry instruction,
conflict resolution, citizenship education, and multicultural education.
Chapters include: (1) "The Nature and Mission of Social Studies"; (2) "The
Social Studies Curriculum: Past and Present"; (3) "Content in the Social
Studies Curriculum"; (4) "Planning for Social Studies"; (5) "Fostering
Learning Involvement"; (6) "History: The Roots of Knowledge"; (7)
"Geography: Making Sense of the Environemnt"; (8) "Economics:
Explaining Money and More"; (9) "Political Science: Government, Law, and
Politics"; (10) "Psychology and Social Psychology: Understanding
Ourselves"; (11) "Sociology: Exploring Contemporary Society"; (12)
"Anthropology: Exploring Our Physical and Cultural Roots"; (13) "The
Humanities: Artistic Interpretations of Society"; (14) "Inquiry Instruction";
(15) "Multicultural Education"; (16) "Global education"; (17) "Promoting
Positive Democratic VALUEs"; (18) "Current Events"; (19) "Integrating
Other Content Areas"; and (20) "Resolving Differences of Opinion in the
Classroom." The volume concludes with an appendix that features a sample
social studies unit about the Amish. (EH)

ERIC_NO: ED361106
TITLE: The Integration of Young Children's Literature with Multicultural,
Nonsexist, and Global education Goals and Themes.
AUTHOR: Thompson, Debra S.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
ABSTRACT: Designed to help early childhood and elementary educators in
Iowa integrate multicultural, nonsexist, and global (MNG) perspectives
into the existing curriculum, this paper discusses issues surrounding their
integration and provides two extensive bibliographies of curriculum resources.
First, the paper reviews the definition and purposes of MNG education
according to the Iowa Department of Education and describes the
Department's MNG goals and themes as follows: that students
understand themselves and others as cultural beings in a cultural
context; that students recognize diversity in the country and the world;
that students understand the effect of group membership on VALUEs,
ATTITUDEs, and behaviors; that students understand the dynamics of
discrimination, bias, prejudice, and stereotype; and that students
demonstrate skills for effective social action. The themes include global
interdependence; human resources, VALUEs, and culture; the global
environemnt and natural resources; global peace and conflict
management; and change and alternative futures. For each goal and
theme, the paper provides a summary of a relevant book and a list of creative
ACTIVITIES for integrating the book into the curriculum. Finally, the paper
includes two bibliographies of MNG resources: a 48-item bibliography
organized by the 10 goals and themes, and a 358-item bibliography of works
on other cultures organized by country or culture of origin.
ERIC_NO: ED387081
TITLE: Global Telecommunications Projects: Reading and Writing with the
World.
AUTHOR: Hunter, Barbara; Bagley, Carole A.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This paper explores the potential of telecommunications in
education. It is proposed that classrooms begin telecomputing by
communicating with "electronic pen pals," where students write for a distant
audience and learn about different cultures through interaction on the
computer. The following three sequential stages of the process are outlined:
(1) getting acquainted with pen pals; (2) acting as resources for each other
and discussion of common issues; and (3) collaborating on a project. The
section on collaboration discusses electronic writing projects, electronic
databases, and electronic debates. The use of telecommunications in the
development of reading, writing, and collaborative research and problem-
solving skills is examined. A telecommunications project that involved
children writing for a real audience, conducted in a Withrow Elementary
School (Stillwater, Minnesota) sixth grade class, is outlined. Benefits
identified from involvement in telecommunications projects are development
of literacy skills, personal and interpersonal skills, and development of global
awareness. (MAS)


ERIC_NO: EJ631623
TITLE: Reporting the World: Teaching Current Events from a Global
Perspective.
AUTHOR: Kirkwood-Tucker, Toni Fuss
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1999
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Studies and the Young Learner; v12 n2 p29-31
Nov-Dec 1999
ABSTRACT: Describes a project that focuses on teaching current events
from a global perspective. Students are grouped into news teams and then
develop questions based on the five dimensions of the Hanvey Global
Awareness Model. Provides an example of the questions and answers
developed by a seventh-grade Latin American team.


ED345575.
Integrating Culture and Geography: Techniques To Combat Ethnocentrism
in the Foreign Language Classroom.
Barnada, Kurt (1991).
ABSTRACT: The study of geography and culture are both essential to
development of global awareness and multicultural perspective. The two
can be integrated in secondary school instruction, with the result of enhancing
each. Cross-disciplinary strategies and ACTIVITIES can be adapted to any
course with a cultural component, including second language teaching. Five
themes in geography serve as a basis for instruction: location (cartography
and relationships with other places); place (physical and human
characteristics); regions; relationships within places; and movement
(migration and trade). Reductions in geography instruction support the need
for integration of this subject with others. The integrative and global
APPROACH to education is occurring at a time when secondary teachers
are reorganizing curricula to promote self-directed learning. At the same time,
language educators are reassessing and reinforcing the role of culture in
second language learning. Geography can serve as the foundation for
discussion of many aspects of culture, especially through incorporation of the
five themes of geography.


ERIC_NO: ED381470
Global Issues in the Middle School Grades 5-8. Third Edition.
Johnson, Jacquelyn; And Others )1994).
ABSTRACT: This activity book contains 27 ACTIVITIES designed to help
teachers address the goal of including global education in their classrooms.
The ACTIVITIES, organized into five sections, are presented in a standard
format of: (1) a brief introduction; (2) a list of objectives; (3) an estimate of
required time for the activity; (4) list of needed materials; and (5) step-by-step
procedures for the activity. Some ACTIVITIES include suggested follow-up
exercises, a list of resources, background information, and masters for
student handouts. A list of resources concludes the book. Section 1,
"Introducing the Concept of Global Awareness," includes: (1) "Global
Connections"; (2) "The Global Kid"; and (3) "What Do We Know About...?
What Do We Want to Know?" Section 2, "Studying Human VALUEs,"
includes: (1) "What are 'American Family VALUEs'?" (2) "Special Ways with
Holidays"; (3) "Religion and VALUEs"; (4) "The Trees of Life"; (5) "World
Music"; and (6) "Creating Culture Wheels." Section 3, "Studying Global
Systems," includes: (1) "What Is a System?" (2) "They've Got the Whole
World in Their Hands"; (3) "The Rights of Indigenous Peoples"; (4) "The
Communications Network"; (5) "Sharing Our Global Environemnt"; and (6)
"Adventure in Antarctica: A Case Study in Cooperation." Section 4, "Studying
Global Issues and Problems," includes: (1) "Global and Local Issues A
Survey"; (2) "Biodiversity"; (3) "Democracy at the Turn of the Century"; (4)
"Refugees: Has the Welcome Mat Been Pulled?" (5) "Poverty and
Population"; and (6) "Sustainable Development." Section 5, "Studying
Global History," includes: (1) "Historical Relations"; (2) "The Family Tree of a
Language"; (3) "The Spice of Life"; (4) "Potato Power: How One Food
Changed the World"; (5) "The Nobel Peace Prize: Conflict in the 20th
Century"; and (6) "Humankind's Better Moments."
ERIC_NO: ED407575
TITLE: Adding International Perspectives to Vocational Education. ERIC
Digest No. 183.
AUTHOR: Brown, Bettina Lankard
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
ABSTRACT: Future workers will need to develop global awareness and
an understanding of competitive, cultural, and economic factors that
influence ways of doing business to work in the international arena.
Vocational education, the educational program area specifically designed to
prepare students for work, must infuse international concepts into programs
so the youth of today are prepared for the global workplace. Ostheimer
(1995) offers five suggestions. First, with the growth of multinational
corporations and increased trade among nations, workers need to be aware
of global conditions, development, and trends. Second, vocational educators
must internationalize the curriculum. Third, vocational education needs to
adopt instructional practices that incorporate international dimensions. For
example, communication curricula could be upgraded to take students
beyond awareness of other cultures to competence in intercultural
communication. Fourth, increased corporate input is necessary for
international business program development. The first-hand knowledge and
experiences of corporate representatives working in firms that conduct
international business offer a current and practical basis for upgrading
curricula. Fifth, faculty development is crucial to the implementation of
programs that have an international component.



Literature
ERIC_NO: EJ565781
TITLE: Developing a Global Perspective in Your Classroom.
AUTHOR: Marquis, Carol; Yirchott, Tuckie
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1998
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Studies Review; v37 n2 p38-40 Spr-Sum 1998
ABSTRACT: Discusses some of the instructional APPROACHes advocated
by the California International Studies Project (CISP). CISP proposes
integrating global perspectives throughout the entire curriculum. They
recommend examining the interdependence between different countries,
resources, social issues, and academic subjects. Includes a complete list of
CISP project sites and contact numbers.


ERIC_NO: EJ560367
TITLE: Global Dimensions in the Educational Legislation, Social Studies
Curriculum and Textbooks of Greek Compulsory Education (Grades 1-9).
AUTHOR: Flouris, George
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
JOURNAL_CITATION: Mediterranean Journal of Educational Studies; v2 n2
p17-39 1997
ABSTRACT: Determines whether global themes and supranational elements
are contained in Greek educational legislation and social studies curriculum
and textbooks. Analysis shows some existence of these themes and
elements, but they have not been adequately adapted to correspond to the
pronouncements of the Greek educational establishment and to the new
realities of the European and international space.


ERIC_NO: ED384729
TITLE: The Integration of International Agricultural Concepts into
Agricultural Science Programs in the North Central Region of the United
States. Summary of Research 78.
AUTHOR: Ibezim, Don O.; McCracken, J. David
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1994
ABSTRACT: A study examined the extent to which international
agricultural dimensions were taught in secondary agricultural programs and
factors associated with the extent of integration. A systematic sampling
technique was used to select a random sample of 332 of the 2,612 secondary
agricultural teachers in 12 states of the North Central United States. Of 231
responses, 220 (66%) were usable. Overall, 58% of the teachers reported
teaching international agricultural concepts in their classes. Ohio ranked first
with respect to extent of integration, followed by Wisconsin. Minnesota ranked
12th. Nearly 92% of the respondents expressed a high degree of awareness
about cultural differences among people, and more than 83% expressed
positive ATTITUDEs toward integrating international agricultural concepts into
their program. Older teachers, teachers perceiving strong school
administration support for internationalizing the agricultural curriculum, and
teachers exhibiting higher degrees of cultural awareness were most likely to
integrate international agricultural concepts into their courses. It was
recommended that school authorities support internationalization of the
agricultural sciences curriculum by providing instructional materials and
necessary information on international agriculture and that agricultural
teachers familiarize themselves with and actively participate in internationally
focused ACTIVITIES to enhance their cultural and global awareness.


ERIC_NO: ED454109
TITLE: The Six Characteristics of Universal Citizenship: Their Development
and
Measurement in Pre-Service Teachers.
AUTHOR: Jongewaard, Steve
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
ABSTRACT: This paper addresses three questions: (1) What key citizenship
characteristics are essential for today's highly diverse, complex classrooms?
(2) What should be the content of a course that would teach these traits? and
(3) What pedagogical strategies could be employed to enhance the delivery
of that content and to measure for the desired results? The paper describes a
combined elementary and secondary social studies methods course for
delivery of key components of universal citizenship. It addresses research
design, six characteristics of "transcultural universalism" (cross-cultural
adaptability, geographical global awareness, contextual global awareness,
empathetic activism, shared VALUEs, and trans-cultural awareness), and
three pedagogical principles that facilitate the application of these
characteristics by pre-service teachers. Preliminary descriptive and statistical
results are discussed. Statistical correlations between course components
and citizenship characteristics must be developed, and a specified set of
cross-cultural communication skills should be incorporated into subsequent
iterations of the methods course.



ERIC_NO: ED207850
TITLE: Perspectives of Global education: A Sourcebook for Classroom
Teachers.
AUTHOR: Muessig, Raymond H., Ed.; Gilliom, M. Eugene, Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1981
ABSTRACT: This sourcebook for pre- and in-service teachers suggests
global perspectives as an ongoing theme for education. Two underlying
assumptions are that people need a global perspective because the survival
and collective well-being of all depends upon it, and that professional
educators are responsible for integrating global perspectives into the
curriculum in ways which help students organize their comprehension of
ideas, things, and people and to see holistic relationships. Three major areas
are addressed to broaden educator's understandings of global education and
its applications: (1) definitions for global perspectives and the need for
them in general and global education curricula; (2) global education from
humanistic, historical, geographical, political, economical, anthropological,
and scientific and technological perspectives; and (3) an overview of
instructional methods and materials for global education.


ERIC_NO: ED267006
TITLE: Stewardship. Our Common Home: Earth. A Curriculum Strategy to
Affect Student Skills Development and Exposure to Diverse Global
Natural/Social Environemnts.
AUTHOR: Peters, Richard
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1985
ABSTRACT: One of a series of global education instructional units, this
curriculum on stewardship was designed to be infused with existing social
studies courses aimed at students in grades 5-12. Concept-based and skills-
oriented, the curriculum provides opportunities for students to develop an
understanding of the relationship between humans and global natural
environemnts; of the relationship between humans and global social
environemnts; of why global cooperation is an important human goal; of
various types of global cooperation; and of the effects of each on
natural/social environemnts and humans. Following an introduction, the
importance of combining geography education, ecological studies, and a
sociological perspective in enhancing a student's global awareness is
emphasized. A series of charts showing the concept to be taught, the topic,
essential student outcomes, performance indicators, and content are
included. They are accompanied by charts listing specific ACTIVITIES, print
and nonprint materials, enrichment ACTIVITIES, and suggestions for
evaluation. A rationale statement concludes the curriculum.



ERIC_NO: ED285817
TITLE: Social Studies Curriculum, K-8.
AUTHOR: Boocker, Sam; And Others
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1985
ABSTRACT: This document offers a detailed description of the Oak Park,
Michigan social studies program. The program is built around four goals:
knowledge, skill, VALUE, and participation. Knowledge goals pertain to
acquiring facts, concepts, or generalizations from history and the social
sciences. Skill goals pertain to the ability to collect, organize, interpret, and
use social science information. VALUE goals pertain to understanding the
principles that underlie a democratic society and developing an ability to form
judgments based on these principles. Participation goals pertain to life-long
involvement by students in social groups and civic affairs. In the elementary
schools, the program of study emphasizes the expanding horizons of young
children from self-centeredness to concern for more encompassing social
contexts. The program progresses from the study of self in kindergarten to a
study of the United States in the fifth grade. The primary goal of the Middle
School Social Studies Program is twofold: to develop civic responsibility and
a global awareness. The emphasis in the middle school is on the world
community. In sixth grade, students are introduced to the origins of modern
civilization and a study of world culture. In seventh grade, contemporary
geography and the interdependence of all people is studied. The eighth grade
focuses on the history of the United States and its development as a
democratic nation.
ERIC_NO: ED307175
TITLE: International Studies Seminar. Grade 9, First Semester.
AUTHOR: Girton, Robert
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1987
ABSTRACT: This curriculum guide contains the grade 9 course content of the
interdisciplinary International Studies Seminar, conducted at Withrow High
School in Cincinnati, Ohio. The seminar, part of the school's International
Studies Academy, is an alternative education program which emphasizes
global studies as the core of its curriculum. The document provides the
program's philosophy, its six goals, its objectives, and the scope and
sequence for 15 weeks. The program's four units of study include global
awareness, differences, problems, and understandings, and students are
asked to discuss and debate a variety of selected topics for each unit. Each
unit includes student learning objectives, a course content outline, and a list
of teaching strategies and resource materials. Some of the topics include: (1)
Cincinnati as an international community; (2) social sciences and the
scientific method; (3) key geographical terms and features of the world; (4)
the interaction of geography and culture; (5) cultural universality and diversity;
(6) ethnocentrism and cultural relativism; (7) an introduction to global
problems; (8) population and food problems; (9) resources and development
problems; and (10) human rights.

ERIC_NO: ED214838
TITLE: Teaching Global Awareness with Simulations and Games. Grades
6-12. Global Awareness Series.
AUTHOR: Lamy, Steven L.; And Others
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1981
ABSTRACT: This teaching guide contains 15 simulation/games for students
in grades 6-12 on the topic of global awareness. The overall objective is to
help students understand various global concepts and social studies content.
Specifically, it gives students the chance to experience and understand
international/intercultural situations which involve people in all walks of life
such as politicians, diplomats, farmers, sharecroppers, and consumers.
Students focus on the four global themes of inequality, development and
technology, human rights, and basic human needs. For example, in one
game, "Self Defense," students divide into countries with pseudonames such
as Grainland, Southland, and Northland and unknowingly replay the actions
leading to World War I. In another game, "Creating World Maps: Visual Data
Charts," students redraw the size of countries to correspond to the amount of
oil and food they use and their population. Some ACTIVITIES may be
adapted for elementary grades and for the college classroom. Simulations
and games are arranged according to difficulty and often subject matter. Each
simulation includes an introduction and a list of objectives. Information is
given on the grade level, time required, materials needed, procedures to be
followed, and instructions for debriefing and follow-up. Supplementary
resources such as films and slides are often suggested. A major portion of
the guide provides handout materials for teaching the games.

ERIC_NO: ED289855
TITLE: Infusion of International Perspectives into Undergraduate Teacher
Education Programs.
AUTHOR: Cole, Donna J.; McCormick, Theresa
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1987
ABSTRACT: Addressing the need for greater global awareness, public school
educators have begun the infusion of global education concepts, such
as interdependence, culture, community, and change into the
curriculum. Global issues and problems, unique and universal human
VALUEs, the world economy, and international organizations are
stressed in the content of a typical global education program. This paper
summarizes two universities' deliberate movements toward developing
international understanding in future teachers. An overview is presented of
the efforts at Iowa State University to provide students with an education that
engenders understanding and appreciation of global cultural, social,
economic, and political differences. Specific aspects of infusion of an
international perspective into the undergraduate teacher education program
are discussed. In a discussion on the infusion of global awareness into the
teacher education program at Wittenberg University (Ohio), descriptions are
given of two courses: "International and Comparative Issues in Education"
and "Multicultural Education: Toward a Cultural Pluralistic Perspective." It is
suggested that teacher educators should encourage the adoption of state
requirements for certification that include international/global education and
extend the score of international education beyond cultural concepts to
include political aspects also.


ERIC_NO: EJ339483
TITLE: Introduction: Global education and Textbooks.
AUTHOR: Cortes, Carlos; Fleming, Dan B.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1986
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Education; v50 n5 p340-44 Sep 1986
ABSTRACT: Provides an introduction to the global education and textbook
theme articles in this issue, giving special attention to the National Council for
the Social Studies curriculum guidelines. Reviews literature on international
political socialization and textbook content and draws implications for
achieving a more positive and accurate global awareness via social studies
instruction.


ERIC_NO: EJ424978
TITLE: Toward a Coherent Curriculum for Global education.
AUTHOR: Becker, James M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1988
JOURNAL_CITATION: Louisiana Social Studies Journal; v15 n1 p9-12 Fall
1988
ABSTRACT: Argues that citizenship education needs a global dimension,
and identifies four basic themes for developing a global perspective in the
classroom. Contends that understanding the world's interdependence
requires a knowledge of all major civilizations and cultures to prepare for
future public policy decision making.



TITLE: A Guide to Curriculum Planning in Global Studies.
AUTHOR: Hartoonian, H. Michael; Stock, Hilary
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
ABSTRACT: This guide is designed to assist educators develop curricula to
embrace global perspectives. The guide is organized into five sections. The
first section provides an overview of global studies, and seeks to answer such
questions as "Why study global studies?" and "What does global studies
include?" The second section identifies themes and topics of global studies
within the existing social studies curriculum and among the social science
disciplines. The third section provides a number of sample teaching units
for all grade levels. Examples of these units include: "All the World's a Stage"
(Grades K-2); "All that Garbage" (Grades 7 and 8); and "Human Rights--
Given? or Created?" (Grades 9-12). The fourth section examines the role of
global studies at the elementary and secondary levels and how it may be
integrated with the natural sciences, the humanities, and foreign language
instruction. The fifth section contains eight appendices. These appendices
include a list of references and additional printed resources, microcomputer
resources, a list of global and international studies organizations and
centers, U.S. addresses of other nations' embassies, and nine rules for being
human.


ERIC_NO: ED409188
TITLE: People and the Planet: Lessons for a Sustainable Future.
AUTHOR: Wasserman, Pamela, Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
ABSTRACT: This activity guide is designed to develop students'
understanding of the interdependence of people and the environemnt
as well as the interdependence connecting members of the global
family. It is both an environemntal education curriculum and a global studies
resource suitable for middle school science, social studies, math, language
arts, and family life education classrooms. The readings and ACTIVITIES
contained in this book are designed to broaden students' knowledge of
trends and connections among population change, natural resource use,
global economics, gender equity, and community health. This knowledge
combined with the critical thinking skills developed in each activity will help
students explore their roles as global citizens and environemntal
stewards. The book is divided into four parts: (1) Understanding Population
Dynamics; (2) People, Resources, and the Environemnt; (3) Issues for the
Global Family; and (4) You and Your Community. Also included is a list of
ACTIVITIES grouped by themes including air/water pollution and climate
change, carrying capacity, environemntal and social ethics, family size
decisions, future studies, land use issues, natural resource use, population
dynamics and trends, resource distribution/inequities, solid waste
management, and sustainability. The appendices contain sources for further
research and population education materials.

ERIC_NO: ED319661
TITLE: Studying the World and the United Nations System.
AUTHOR: Kenworthy, Leonard S.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1988
ABSTRACT: The opening chapter of this volume attempts to provide a
framework for education about the international or global community that is
emerging. Chapter 2 notes some of the recent and possible future changes in
the world and in the United Nations (UN) system. The third chapter identifies
some of the obstacles to learning about the world and the UN system.
Chapter 4 discusses some of the central themes for international education
in the 21st century. The fifth chapter focuses on teaching about the UN and
its related agencies. Chapter 6 discusses some key questions for those
evaluating programs for the study of the world and the UN system. The focus
of chapter 7 is on the characteristics of elementary or primary school
curricula that introduce children to the world. Chapter 8 examines the
international dimension of education in secondary schools, course by course.
Teachers must be globally-minded if they are to use a global APPROACH
in teaching. Chapter 9 offers suggestions for pre-service and in-service
teacher education that might foster this APPROACH. Numerous black and
white photographs illustrate the documents.

ERIC_NO: ED303390
TITLE: Greening the Global Village: The Administrative Imperative To
Educate Students for Global Awareness.
AUTHOR: Chaniot, Janet
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1988
ABSTRACT: The first of the three chapters of this document on teaching
global education to elementary and secondary school students begins with a
literature review of perspectives on global studies and continues with a
comparison of definitions, assumptions, goals, and objectives for global
education programs. The obstacles to teaching this global perspective
outlined in chapter 2 are: (1) the traditional versus the futurist viewpoints
toward education; (2) the lack of teacher training; and (3) the complexity of
teaching about global awareness. Chapter 3 contains a review of
California's Potter Valley High School's World Assembly. Following this
chapter is a curriculum model for the World Assembly as it has been
established at Potter Valley High School. The model includes an overview,
ACTIVITIES, time schedule, resource materials, study guide, a world peace
dialogue, points for discussion, and an evaluation form. The appendices
contain goals for a cultural education program and a paper, "The School of
Global education, Livonia Public Schools, Livonia, Michigan" (J. Swift). A 14-
item reference list is included.


ERIC_NO: ED349582
TITLE: Creating Change: Towards a Dialogic Pedagogy. Report Series
2.18.
AUTHOR: Miller, Suzanne M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
ABSTRACT: Internationally, educators are calling for teachers to help
students learn to respect and VALUE social and cultural difference.
Literature teachers can also contribute to such a revolution in consciousness
through literature study. It is crucial to education in a multicultural society that
students are taught ways of reading and talking about literature which create
respect for multiple perspectives. One means of doing this is through a
"dialogic pedagogy," a conversational teaching APPROACH in which the
teacher and students engage in purposeful collaboration, guiding and inviting
each other in talk and activity. Since readers construct different meanings
from identical texts, text discussion can be particularly suited to provoke an
interplay of differences. However, research indicates that such reflection
about different perspectives rarely occurs in American schools, including
literature classes, in which many teachers still rely on closed questioning.
After observing teachers who successfully created conditions that produced
motivated discussions about texts, four principles emerged: (1) inducing a
new stance towards texts; (2) provoking collaborative reflection about
alternatives; (3) scaffolding dialogic heuristics; and (4) encouraging student-
initiated and sustained dialogic inquiry. If multicultural education is limited to
new book lists or curricular add-ons, it may fail to become an integral part of
student and citizen consciousness.

ERIC_NO: ED346762
TITLE: Promoting Intercultural Literacy in Colleges of Business.
AUTHOR: Jaffe, Alexandra; Graves, William, III
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1991
ABSTRACT: This paper outlines some of the particular institutional and
cultural obstacles that faced teachers and administrators at Bryant College
(Rhode Island) as the business school began to internationalize its curricula
and began adjusting towards a multicultural teaching/campus environemnt.
The paper also presents some of the methods used in addressing these
obstacles in the classroom in order to produce business school graduates
who possess the flexibility and adaptability needed to succeed in today's
international and intercultural marketplace. The paper addresses the issue of
multicultural literacy in educational reform and argues that cultural and
linguistic content should not be just an add-on of more information to learn,
but should be part of a more inclusive understanding of cultural process, both
within and across cultures. Examined are two kinds of obstacles present in
business school students' backgrounds, experiences, and orientations that
impede multicultural and linguistic learning: (1) those inherent in the
institutional and curricular structures of the business college; and (2) those
inherent in the structure of contemporary mainstream American culture. A
conclusion is that the essential criterion of international/intercultural courses
is that they require students to think about fundamental issues of experience
and understanding in a very different way than they have been taught by
society to accept. Contains 10
references.

ERIC_NO: ED307384
TITLE: A Review of ACTIVITIES in Internationalizing the Curriculum in
Agricultural Education.
AUTHOR: Moss, Jeffrey W.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1988
ABSTRACT: Recommendations have been made for major curriculum
changes in agricultural education, specifically agriculture programs at the
secondary level. Suggested improvements include emphasis in agricultural
science, agribusiness, marketing, management, and food production and
processing. One change especially desired is placement of more emphasis
on internationalizing the agricultural education curriculum. This paper reviews
five programs developed for that purpose: (1) the National Council for
Vocational and Technical Education in Agriculture; (2) Future Farmers of
America International Programs; (3) Michigan State/North Carolina A&T
University Project; (4) Texas A&M University's Instructional Materials Service
Curricular Revisions; and (5) International Agriculture Course at Anderson
Valley High School, Booneville, California. Each program is described and the
impact of each is assessed.




ERIC_NO: ED289805
TITLE: Introducing Multicultural/Global education into the Schools.
AUTHOR: Arakapadavil, George
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1985
ABSTRACT: Global education lacks a content base due to differing
educational APPROACHes. Combining the expected outcomes of liberal
education, consisting of the development of effective thinking, effective
communication, and VALUE judgments, with the added dimension of the
interconnectedness and complexity of the contemporary world can provide a
framework for a consistent and comprehensive program. The elements that
must be considered in introducing global education into the curriculum
are: (1) the level of the learner; (2) the appropriate method of introducing it
into the curriculum; (3) the available resources; and (4) the role of the
teacher. Studies reveal that children at the age of 9 or 10 are most
receptive to the introduction of other cultures and peoples. The most
appropriate method of introducing global education into the curriculum is to
present a global perspective through every course of study. Many resources
have been developed for teaching global education, but they must be used
selectively. Teacher education courses need to be internationalized in order
to prepare instructors for global teaching. To make education relevant to the
context of the contemporary world, global perspectives should permeate all
levels of learning. Lists of available audio-visual and printed media and
selected resource service centers are attached.

ERIC_NO: EJ549301
TITLE: Internationalizing the Business School--Responding to the
Customer's Needs.
AUTHOR: Nash, Bernard A.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
JOURNAL_CITATION: Journal of Teaching in International Business; v9 n1
p73-85 1997
ABSTRACT: Efforts to internationalize the business curriculum in the United
States must be supported by strong institutional commitment and
implementation, and reflect the world business community and the country's
multicultural business environemnt. Programs should conform to new
accreditation standards and respond to client demand concerning emerging
markets, international competition, and economic, social, political, and
technological trends.

ERIC_NO: ED447781
TITLE: The Power of Digital Learning: Integrating Digital Content. The CEO
Forum School Technology and Readiness Report, Year Three.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
ABSTRACT: This report offers a vision for digital learning and focuses on
actions that schools, teachers, students, and parents must take to integrate
digital content into the curriculum to create the learning environemnts
that develop 21st century skills. Section 1 presents a vision for digital
learning. The power of digital learning is discussed in Section 2, including the
need for digital learning, the power and potential of digital learning, reasons
why digital content is essential to digital learning, digital learning
environemnts, digital learning develops 21st century skills, shifting to digital
learning environemnts, MODELS from the business community, readjustment
(expanding the scope of technology integration), the critical importance of
professional development, and integrating digital content. The following steps
to integrate digital content effectively are presented in Section 3: (1)
identify educational goals and link digital content to those objectives; (2)
select the student outcomes and performance standards that will be achieved
by digital content; and (3) measure and evaluate outcomes against standards
and adjust accordingly. This section also includes two recommendations
regarding digital content: perform a digital content inventory and increase
investment in digital content. Section 4 presents a tool for self-assessment.
Appendices include Year 3 statistics, "A Call for Equity," resources to help
integrate digital content, ISTE (International Society for Technology in
Education) and SCANS (Secretary of Labor's Commission on Achieving
Necessary Skills) skills and standards.
 providing students the opportunity to develop ATTITUDEs, skills, and
   knowledge about the political, social, and economic issues of the world;
   integrate multicultural, nonsexist, and global (MNG) perspectives into the
   existing curriculum
 links global education to citizenship education.
 how global education can promote cross-cultural understanding
 This article suggests specific themes and APPROACHes to integrate a
   more global perspective into courses presently taught at the secondary
   level. inconsistencies in the scope and areas of the curriculum where
   global concepts were addressed lack of student knowledge about global
   concepts, and student reluctance to participate in community service
   projects. multicultural and international themes pervasive throughout the
   curriculum, history should be treated not as a record of events but as a
   perspective; aims and objectives, scope and sequence, time allocation for
   teaching, and attained curriculum based on student assessment. After
   strengths and weaknesses of the present school science curriculum are
   assessed, and future needs identified, the major trends in reforming the
   school science curriculum at elementary and secondary school levels are
   described and analyzed in terms of the inclusion of the STS theme within
   the curriculum.the changing orientation of Japanese society toward the
   future and the emergence of an internationalized society.
 broaden student achievement to include 21st century skills. Development
   of 21st century skills is critical to students' success in the digital age.
 The courses would focus on global awareness and the local solution of
   globally relevant problems.
ERIC_NO: ED423813
TITLE: Reforming the Higher Education Curriculum. Internationalizing the
Campus.
American Council on Education/Oryx Press Series on Higher Education.
AUTHOR: Mestenhauser, Josef A., Ed.; Ellingboe, Brenda J.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1998
ABSTRACT: The 13 chapters of this book attempt to challenge assumptions
about international education and urge comprehensive curricular changes
involving integration of international and global education into all
disciplines. Chapters are organized into three parts that address
internationalization for the 21st century, multidisciplinary perspectives on
curricular change, and evaluation outcomes of internationalization. Included
are the following papers: (1) "Portraits of an International Curriculum: An
Uncommon Multidimensional Perspective" (Josef A. Mestenhauser); (2)
"Culture in Curriculum: Internationalizing Learning by Design" (Kerry
Freedman); (3) "The Impossibility of Internationalizing Students by Adding
Materials to Courses" (Marion L. Lundy Dobbert); (4) "Global Academies as
Strategic Self-Organizing 'Think Tanks'" (Arthur M. Harkins); (5) "The Role of
Foreign Languages in the Internationalization of the Curriculum" (Michael F.
Metcalf); (6) "Teaching about Cognition and Cognitive Development: How to
Internationalize the Topic" (Herbert L. Pick, Jr.); (7) "Internationalization
through Networking and Curricular Infusion" (John J. Cogan); (8) "Mind
Opening through Music: An Internationalized Music Curriculum" (C. Victor
Fung); (9) "Internationalization of Course Work in Soil Science and
Agronomy" (Peter Graham); (10) "Explaining Ourselves through Others'
Cultural Visions: A Mini Course on America" (Harvey B. Sarles); (11)
"Curriculum by Bytes Using Technology To Enhance International Education"
(R. Michael Philson); (12) "Internationalization through the Lens of
Evaluation" (Susan Lewis English); (13) "Divisional Strategies to
Internationalize a Campus Portrait: Results, Resistance, and
Recommendations from a Case Study at a U.S. University" (Brenda J.
Ellingboe).



ERIC_NO: ED393496
TITLE: Internationalizing the Curriculum.
AUTHOR: Sypris, Theo, Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
ABSTRACT: Prepared as a resource for community college practitioners
seeking to internationalize their courses, this report presents 50
internationalized course modules in 22 subject areas developed as part of
curriculum development project undertaken at Michigan's Kalamazoo Valley
Community College. The 50 modules are presented in the areas of
accounting, art, biology, business, career planning, chemistry,
communication, composition (writing), computer information systems,
economics, literature, management, marketing, mathematics, nursing,
philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, reading, religion, and
sociology. For each module, the report provides the course and title number;
module title; a general description of the module, including a rationale; a
description of module objectives; a discussion of methodology, including
lectures and discussions, audio-visual aids used, readings used,
assignments, and evaluation methods; and references. Selected sample
modules include the following: (1) "Population Trends: A Global View," a
contemporary biology course ; (2) "International Marketing," an introductory
business course; (3) "Cultural Communication: When Worlds Collide," an
interpersonal communication course; (4) "Comparative Literature Analysis," a
college writing course; (5) "Culture and Person Centered Care," a mental
health nursing theory course; (6) "World Hunger and Economic Justice," an
applied ethics course; and (7) "A Comparative Analysis of Cultural
Development," an introductory political science course.

ERIC_NO: ED293305
TITLE: Languages and Communication for World Business and the
Professions.
Proceedings of the Annual Conference (6th, Ann Arbor, Michigan, May 8-9,
1987).
AUTHOR: Des Harnais, Gaston R., Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1987
ABSTRACT: Topics covered in papers presented at a conference on
languages and communication for world business and the professions
include: (1) trends and aspects of internationalizing the business curriculum;
(2) internationalized programs in business, foreign language, and cultures; (3)
internationalized courses in business, foreign languages, and cultures; (4)
doing business around the world; (5) business and professional English for
speakers of other languages; (6) business and professional French, German,
Japanese, Chinese, and Spanish; (7) translation and interpretation; (8) the
global economy and higher education's role; (9) building oral skills among
business students and professionals; (10) culture shock; and (11) overcoming
barriers to communication. Of the 78 papers included, eight contain abstracts
only. (MSE)



ERIC_NO: ED417640
TITLE: The Global University for the Twenty-First Century. A Strategic Plan.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
ABSTRACT: This strategic plan addresses the internationalization of
ACTIVITIES of American colleges and universities offering programs in food,
agricultural, and natural resources disciplines. Internationalization is
enhanced by appropriate university roles in economic development,
humanitarian assistance, augmentation of global food security, and
institution building in developing countries. This mission is accomplished
through internationalization of curricula, faculty experiences, exchange
programs, collaborative research, and institutional linkages that enhance the
global environemnt within colleges and universities. Both internal and
external factors influence the environemnt for international food, agricultural,
and natural resources programs. External factors include: globalization of
trade, growing competitiveness of world agricultural markets, and the demand
for college graduates who can function in a global workplace. Internal factors
include: increasing numbers of students seeking study abroad opportunities,
and an emphasis on international partnerships. Recommendations are
offered to promote the following goals for colleges and universities: human
resource development; information dissemination concerning international
trade, markets, business opportunities, and policy issues; international
collaborative partnerships; and promotion of the global university for the
21st century.

ERIC_NO: ED464678
TITLE: Jefferson College--Internationalizing the Curriculum: Global education.
AUTHOR: Hollander, Lisa, Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2002
ABSTRACT: This document presents the results of "Internationalizing the
Curriculum," a project designed to enhance the global knowledge and
experiences of students and faculty at Jefferson College (Missouri).
Specifically, this project encouraged the infusion of international dimensions
into selected courses from several disciplines. The methodology used was
the curriculum module APPROACH. Modules could be one week or one
month long, or the unit could be broken into smaller parts spread out over a
semester. Each instructor selected the length and subject of the module to
specifically match course content. College faculty members from the
academic side, the vocational-technical side, and the area technical school
(high school) participated. Over 300 students have participated in the project
since spring 2001. Overall, students gained a substantial amount of new
knowledge about other cultures, people, and ideas. All the instructors
reported significant levels of comparative cultural discussion and analytic
debate among their students. This document includes summaries from each
instructor of the 18 international modules. The summaries include a
description of the modules, specific resources used, a discussion of the
objectives and goals, at least two feedback/assessment forms, and
conclusions regarding the efficacy of the modules for the students and
instructor.


ERIC_NO: EJ584086
TITLE: Difference, Globalisation and the Internationalisation of Curriculum.
AUTHOR: Rizvi, Fazal; Walsh, Lucas
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1998
JOURNAL_CITATION: Australian Universities' Review; v41 n2 p7-11 1998
ABSTRACT: As Australian higher education advances, new ways of thinking
about the college curriculum need to be developed to meet the changing
imperatives of the global environemnt and address the need for student-
centered instruction. Internationalization tends to destabilize conventional
frameworks of curriculum design and implementation at local, national, and
international levels. An organic APPROACH is recommended.


ERIC_NO: ED362138
TITLE: The Challenge of Internationalization: Relating to Multicultural
Education.
AUTHOR: Scott, Robert A.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
ABSTRACT: This speech examines an agenda and possible actions at the
institutional level for internationalizing the college curriculum. Discussions
include: (1) an assessment of both internal and external environemnts,
including readiness, potential sources of support, and new opportunities; (2) a
set of principles for setting priorities; (3) recommendations; (4) points of
leverage; and (5) a format and schedule for monitoring progress. The speech
addresses the challenge of finding ways to join the trend toward international
and multicultural education by first coming to an understanding of who we are
as Americans. It argues that international and multicultural awareness
are essentially both parts of a greater whole, and that by studying and
understanding our multicultural selves as a nation, it is possible to
better understand foreign cultures. The speech concludes with a review of
a conceptual framework for planning, setting priorities, and assessing
progress towards internationalizing the curriculum, followed by a review of the
points of leverage available on each campus to foster support for international
education.



ERIC_NO: ED433421
TITLE: Globalisation and Its Impact on VET. Review of Research.
AUTHOR: Hobart, Barry
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1999
ABSTRACT: The impact of globalization on vocational education and training
(VET) in Australia was examined through a literature review. Special attention
was paid to the following topics: the growing export orientation in Australian
industry (industrial growth in Australia's economy, growth in Australian
exports, "knowledge intensity" in the manufacturing sector, exports and their
impact on employment, significance of foreign direct investment, impact of
Australian firms investing abroad, Australia's need for investment); debates
about globalization (globalization and distribution of wealth, employment, and
change; International Forum on Globalisation; potential benefits of
globalization; ideology and globalization; foreign investment and innovation);
and implications of globalization for VET (communication evolution and
information-based economies; implications of information technology for VET;
internationalization of the curriculum; knowledge, skills, and ATTITUDEs
required by globalization; staff development to address internationalization).
Key study findings include the following: VET must contribute constructively
to the debate regarding globalization's positive and negative aspects; VET
must accommodate the global context in which the world of work now
operates; VET must increase its flexibility and development goals and
implement strategies that fulfill its clients' needs; and VET teachers/trainers
need initial and recurrent professional development to equip them to perform
successfully within the global context.


ERIC_NO: ED302465
TITLE: Positioning Global education for the 1990s: Higher Education
Strategies.
Remarks to the Sub-Plenary Session.
AUTHOR: Tonkin, Humphrey
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1988
ABSTRACT: One of the obstacles to the internationalization of college
curriculums is the nature of faculty training. In recent years there has been a
decline in second language requirements for the doctoral degree, and, as a
result, college faculties become increasingly anglophone in their research.
But there is a considerable pool of international experience among the
faculties at larger universities that is not being used in the classroom to
promote internationalism. These faculty members are classified as: (1) the
"missionary" who does consulting abroad but knows no foreign languages; (2)
the "converted" for foreign-born faculty member who does not bring the
earlier foreign experience into the classroom; (3) the "plunderer" who does
research abroad but publishes only in U.S. journals; and (4) the "bon-vivant"
who travels abroad for pleasure. To encourage faculties to share their
experiences, universities must promote revision of the curriculum to
incorporate this experience and increase released time for faculty
development, sabbaticals, and travel funds. Foreign language knowledge can
provide students and scholars with a better understanding of world
perspectives, and second language instruction should be encouraged.



ERIC_NO: ED293360
TITLE: The Global Economy and Higher Education.
AUTHOR: Groennings, Sven
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1987
ABSTRACT: Internationalizing the undergraduate curriculum has become a
high priority for colleges and universities across the United States. The
reasons for this change are largely economic; it is recognized that students
today must understand the global economy just as Senator Justin Morrill,
author of the Act which created the unique American system of land grant
colleges, recognized that Americans needed to improve their competitiveness
in all markets foreign and domestic a century age. However, American
institutions are not making the appropriate connections between economic
change, competitiveness, and international education. It is important now and
for the decades ahead that they consider their role in developing the
competencies and citizen understanding needed for American participation,
prosperity, and leadership in the global
economy.

ERIC_NO: ED388165
TITLE: Educating Americans for a World in Flux: Ten Ground Rules for
Internationalizing Higher Education.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: This document, developed by the Commission on International
Education of the American Council on Education, stresses the importance of
students developing the competence to function effectively in a global
environemnt and the need for state and local governments and the private
sector to support higher education's efforts toward this goal. Following an
introductory section, the goals and benefits of international education are
identified. Most of the booklet lists and explains the following 10 ground
rules for internationalizing institutions: (1) require that all graduates
demonstrate competence in at least one foreign language; (2) encourage
understanding of at least one other culture; (3) increase understanding of
global systems; (4) revamp curricula to reflect the need for international
understanding; (5) expand study abroad and internship opportunities for all
students; (6) focus on faculty development and rewards; (7) examine the
organizational needs of international education; (8) build consortia to enhance
capabilities; (9) cooperate with institutions in other countries; and (10) work
with local schools and communities. An attachment lists Commission
members.


ERIC_NO: ED116993
TITLE: An Attainable Global Perspective.
AUTHOR: Hanvey, Robert G.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1975
ABSTRACT: A more complete understanding of global perspective is
provided in this essay through an examination of the modes of thought,
sensitivities, intellectual skills, and explanatory capacities which contribute to
the formation of a global perspective. With an emphasis on both a formal and
informal educational level, the essay is divided into five sections which
examine the requirements for an attainable global perspective. Section 1,
Perspective Consciousness, underscores the need to recognize the concept
that everyone's perspective is shaped by subtle influences and that others
may have different perspectives. Section 2, State of the Planet Awareness,
examines the problems and solutions for increasing the ability of individuals
to intelligently interpret information about world conditions. Section 3, Cross
Cultural Awareness, describes the different degrees of cross-cultural
awareness and the necessity to reach a stage beyond empathy where one
has the capacity to imagine oneself in a role within the context of a foreign
culture. Section 4, Knowledge of Global Dynamics, analyzes the world as an
interdependent system where the issue of growth may be the predominant
contemporary problem. Section 5, Awareness of Human Choices,
emphasizes that increased global perspective will require difficult VALUE
decisions about the solutions to our world problems.
ERIC_NO: EJ269219
TITLE: An Attainable Global Perspective.
AUTHOR: Hanvey, Robert G.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1982
JOURNAL_CITATION: Theory into Practice; v21 n3 p162-67 Sum 1982
ABSTRACT: Five dimensions of a global perspective are identified: (1)
perspective consciousness; (2) "state of the planet" awareness; (3) cross-
cultural awareness; (4) knowledge of global dynamics; and (5) awareness of
choices. The development of a global perspective will illuminate linkages
among events.


ERIC_NO: EJ278773
TITLE: Global education--Stage II.
AUTHOR: Hanvey, Robert G.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1983
JOURNAL_CITATION: California Journal of Teacher Education; v10 n1 p1-
10 Win 1983
ABSTRACT: In the past, global education has concentrated on altruistic
concerns, such as the world environemnt, peace, and international
understanding. Its definition, however, should be expanded; global education
should help solve the problems of individuals, groups, and nations by offering
sophisticated understanding of rapidly changing global conditions.


ERIC_NO: ED326970
TITLE: Global education: From Thought to Action. The 1991 ASCD
Yearbook.
AUTHOR: Tye, Kenneth A., Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: Viewed as a social movement for change, the global education
movement calls for the infusion of a global perspective into all curriculum
areas. Two assumptions of global education include the view of the individual
school as the optimal unit for change efforts, and the importance of local
teacher and school action for lasting school improvement. This yearbook
defines global education, explains its importance, describes it
implementation, and demonstrates its uses for school improvement. The first
part examines the context of schooling in which a global perspective can be
developed, and the second part is directed toward issues of practice. In
chapter 1, Lee F. Anderson develops an argument for global studies in the
schools. Barbara Benham Tye delineates the problems inherent in changing
school curriculum in chapter 2. The last chapter of this section by Steven L.
Lamy presents a framework for understanding extremist ultraconservative
attacks on global education. In the next chapter, James Becker links global
education to citizenship education. Jane A. Boston discusses educational
leadership in global education in chapter 5. Ida Urso examines the role of
teachers in chapter 6 and uses qualitative data to show how global education
can promote cross-cultural understanding and be a renewing force for
teachers. In chapter 7, Jan L. Tucker explores the complex problem of
creating educational collaborations between schools and universities.
Charlotte C. Anderson documents many ways in which global education
involves schools and students with their communities in chapter 8. In chapter
9, Toni Fuss Kirkwood uses personal experience to show how and why global
education has become a successful vehicle for school improvement. The
conclusion, by Kenneth A. Tye, explores themes gathered in a Center for
Human Interdependence (CIH) field study of bringing a global perspective to
school curricula.

ERIC_NO: ED415131
TITLE: Guidelines for Global and International Studies Education:
Challenges, Culture, Connections.
AUTHOR: Collins, H. Thomas; Czarra, Frederick R.; Smith, Andrew F.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1996
JOURNAL_CITATION: Issues in Global education; n135,136 June-July 1996
ABSTRACT: This special issue attempts to provide a summary of what
scholars and educators have recommended that U.S. K-12 students study in
the international dimension of education. These guidelines are not
"standards" as the term is currently used by academic disciplines, but they
can be used to validate local curriculum decisions and to assure that the
international dimension receives attention. The three areas focused on
include: (1) "Global Issues, Problems, and Challenges"; (2) "Culture and
World Areas"; and (3) "The United States and the World: Global
Connections." Within each area or theme the authors provide the rationale for
studying the theme; "knowledge objectives," indicating what students should
know and understand about the theme, a list of "skills objectives," that
students need in order to understand the issues encompassed by the theme,
and "participation objectives," that indicate what actions students should be
able to take in relation to the challenges addressed by the themes.

ERIC_NO: ED344275
TITLE: A Vision of a Preferred Curriculum for the 21st Century: Action
Research in School Administration.
AUTHOR: Wilson, Carol, Ed.; And Others
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1991
ABSTRACT: A 3-year collaborative research project to develop a curriculum
designed to meet the needs of learners for the 21st century is based upon a
Delphi survey of approximately 150 national business, government, and
educational leaders. They were asked to respond to questions in five key
environemntal areas. The study of demographic, economic, political,
technological, and social trends has produced five major themes upon which
k-12 curriculum can be designed. These themes include change and
adaptability, global interdependence and cultural diversity, quality of life,
technology, and self-actualization. Outcomes are included in order to suggest
an appropriate curriculum restructuring framework and design. Chapter 1
gives the introduction, methodology, assumptions, limitations, and curricular
themes of the study. Chapter 2 gives a review of the literature, the major
environemntal trends, demographics, VALUEs, economics, and technological
changes. Chapter 3 elaborates on the research and methodology, identifies
the top 10 trends for education for the year 2000, and a gives a sample
Delphi flow chart. Chapter 4 elaborates on each of the five major themes, and
chapter 5 presents a brief concluding statement.

ERIC_NO: ED344835
TITLE: Michigan Global/International Education Guidelines.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1990
ABSTRACT: This document is designed to provide Michigan school districts
with suggestions on how to develop and enhance educational programs to
meet the needs of students in an interrelated world. Beyond presenting a
definition of global/international education and accompanying concerns, the
paper suggests resources and procedures for fostering programs that reflect
global/international matters--sociological, technological, environemntal,
economic, and political. The suggestions are directed at educators concerned
with all phases of the curriculum, including social studies, arts education,
foreign language, language arts, and science. The guide has four main
sections: (1) Definition; (2) Goals; (3) Implementation; and (4) Self-
Assessment. Three appendices provide: (1) sugested topics for study; (2)
examples of global/international themes for various grade levels; and (3)
goals of global/multilingual/multicultural education.

ERIC_NO: EJ398363 ‫مهم‬
TITLE: Social Studies within A Global education.
AUTHOR: Kniep, Willard M.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1989
JOURNAL_CITATION: Social Education; v53 n6 p399-403,385 Oct 1989
ABSTRACT: Presents a scope and sequence for social studies grounded in
global
education. Four essential elements set the boundaries for the scope of
the curriculum: (1) the study of systems; (2) the study of human VALUEs;
(3) the study of persistent issues; and (4) the study of global history.
Illustrates how these themes are sequenced throughout grades K-12.



ERIC_NO: ED388368
TITLE: Internationalizing the Curriculum: Ideals vs. Reality.
AUTHOR: Raby, Rosalind Latiner
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1995
ABSTRACT: International literacy is a crucial element for institutions of higher
education, and especially for community colleges since they educate more
than half of the adults in the United States, many of whom do not transfer to
four-year universities. The best method for helping students achieve
international literacy is through internationalizing the curriculum, or revising
classes, programs, and general education requirements to include cultural
and global concepts and theories of interrelationship. Three primary means
by which the process of internationalization affects educational reform at
community colleges are through general education reform, including content
changes that include non-Western themes and revisions of the institution's
mission and policy statements; faculty and administration rejuvenation,
occurring through faculty exchanges and participation in international
development programs and relying on active support by faculty and
administrators; and diversifying the student body. Despite efforts for reform,
progress has been slow, with only 14% of California community colleges
having established international curriculum programs as of 1993. Many
faculty and administrators remain opposed to the reforms. Also, due to
economic constraints, new programs can be jeopardized and conflicts can
arise among disciplines or departments. One solution may lie in merging
international and multicultural programs/courses to coordinate these two
programs' similar goals and ACTIVITIES. A list of internationalized classes at
California community colleges in 1993-94 is included.
ERIC_NO: ED465656
TITLE: Teaching World Religions: A Report of FPRI's History Institute for
Teachers.
AUTHOR: Hay, William Anthony
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2001
JOURNAL_CITATION: Foreign Policy Research Institute FootNotes; v7 n2
Dec 2001
ABSTRACT: The growing demand for guidance on teaching about the world
religions in U.S. high schools and colleges over the past few years prompted
the Foreign Policy Research Institute (FPRI) to devote its seventh annual
History Institute, April 2001, to exploring the topic. The institute brought
together university faculty and 44 high school teachers from 16 states to
discuss the best recent scholarship on world religions and how that
scholarship can be used the classroom. FPRI has long recognized the key
role that religion plays in international affairs. Recent headlines on terrorism
and conflict in the Middle East underline the point. A world religion is one with
a global following not restricted to members of a particular society, nation, or
culture. By that definition, there are three world religions today: (1)
Christianity; (2) Islam; and (3) Buddhism. The institute attendees did not
question whether religious studies belonged in the curriculum but rather how
it should be presented as a vital part of the humanities. The high school
teachers agreed that studying about world religions is important to
understanding so many other subjects in the curriculum and addresses
fundamental questions that students ask regarding the meaning of life. The
group concluded that developing an effective synthesis for the classroom
remains the key challenge for teaching about world religions.


ERIC_NO: ED431737
TITLE: Teaching Tolerance for All: Education Strategies To Promote Global
Peace. International Yearbook on Teacher Education 1995. Proceedings
from the World Assembly of the International Council on Education for
Teaching (42nd, Darussalam, Brunei, July 3-7, 1995).
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1997
ABSTRACT: The overall theme of this proceedings, Teaching Tolerance for
All: Education Strategies to Promote Global Peace, is discussed by
addressing four main topics: (1) rethinking the school curriculum to teach the
VALUEs of tolerance and peace; (2) empowering teachers and teacher
educators to teach the VALUEs of tolerance and peace; (3) developing
leaders to promote the VALUEs of tolerance and peace; and (4) consolidating
international initiatives to foster the VALUEs of tolerance and peace.


ERIC_NO: ED447042
TITLE: Teaching for Justice in the Social Studies Classroom: Millions of
Intricate Moves.
AUTHOR: Makler, Andra, Ed.; Hubbard, Ruth Shagoury, Ed.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 2000
ABSTRACT: Intended to help teachers make the move from traditional
textbooks to a more issue-centered, interdisciplinary social studies
curriculum, this collection of essays comes from teachers who describe how
to focus on teaching for and toward justice, with critical pedagogy as an
underlying theme. The teachers' stories in this collection show the importance
of moving beyond a focus on injustice and outrage to considering what justice
might require in a given situation, what justice looks like, and how complex
and difficult it is to achieve. Following an introduction "Teaching from the
Center of the Circle: 'Doing Good Work'" (Ruth Shagoury Hubbard), the 15
essays in the collection are: (1) "Millions of Intricate Moves" (Kim Stafford);
(2) "What Happened to the Golden Door? How My Students Taught Me about
Immigration" (Linda Christensen); (3) "Collective Action: Speaking Up and
Standing Together--The Story of Rachel and Sadie" (Sandra Childs); (4)
"Looking through Layers: A Study of Guatemala" (Jessie Singer); (5) "The
Lives Behind the Labels: Teaching about the Global Sweatshop, Nike, and
the Race to the Bottom" (Bill Bigelow); (6) "That Hard Thing: Getting Inside
the Social Protest Movements in United States History" (Daniel Gallo); (7)
"Social Justice and Vietnam: A Conversation around Literature, History, and
Teaching" (Michael Jarmer); (8) "Students in the Soup Kitchen" (Mary Burke-
Hengen; Gregory Smith); (9) "Peer Mediation and the Color of Justice"
(Russell Dillman; Geoffrey Brooks); (10) "Street Justice by Street Kids"
(Theresa Kauffman); (11) "Treated Fairly: A Middle School Take on the
Supreme Court" (David Molloy); (12) "Market Failure and Economic Justice"
(Paul Copley); (13) "Our Needs and Their Destruction--Oil Drilling in Nigeria:
Engaging in the Struggle for Social Justice" (Sandra Childs; Amanda Weber-
Welch); (14) "Teaching What's Not in the Book: The Lives of Migrant
Farmworkers" (Dirk Frewing); and (15) "What Does Justice Look Like?"
(Andra Makler).


ERIC_NO: ED361691
TITLE: Humanistic Insights into Managing Diversity: The
Humanities/Management Partnership.
AUTHOR: Yahr, Michael A.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1993
ABSTRACT: Global managers of the l990s and beyond must have definitive
impacts on their work environemnts. Among the skills they need to possess
are the abilities to adapt to new and fast-changing situations and to interact
with people who view the business world from varied perspectives. A
humanities/management partnership offers a viable and effective
APPROACH to producing such managers. The process of management is a
culture-specific phenomenon. Culture largely determines how labor is treated,
employed, and motivated; how corporations are structured; and how
decisions are formulated. Because the countries bordering the Pacific Ocean
will play a central role in international trade and relations in the coming
decade and beyond, texts, ideas, themes and issues from China and Japan
can be utilized by management faculty to foster cross cultural appreciation in
an increasingly interdependent world. Internationalization of the curriculum is
a process that suggests collaborative teaching efforts. Strategic management
may be used to both conceptualize and bring about a
humanities/management partnership using specific measurable outcomes
and objectives to facilitate the integration of new cultural materials.
 a new dimension of citizenship is the making and influencing of decisions
    associated with the international relations of daily life,
 international agricultural dimensions
 international agricultural concepts
 incorporate global IT topics within existing curriculum


ERIC_NO: ED381417
TITLE: Education Facing the Crisis of VALUEs: Strategies for Strengthening
Humanistic, Cultural, and International VALUEs in Formal and Non-Formal
Education.
PUBLICATION_DATE: 1992
ABSTRACT: This document was prepared on the basis of discussions at a
workshop organized by UNESCO and other groups on the subject of
education facing the crisis of VALUEs from the point of view of: (1) cultural
identity and cultural diversity in education; (2) humanistic, ethical, and
aesthetic VALUEs in education; and (3) education facing the ethical problems
that arise from scientific and technological progress. The document presents
summaries and recommendations made regarding these themes. The first of
five sections contains presentations by representatives of UNESCO and the
Association Descartes. The next three sections each take one of the three
featured points of view. Section 2 on the point of view of cultural identity and
diversity contains: (1) "The reasons for providing intercultural education and
an assessment of experiments to date" (Perotti); (2) "Cultural diversity and
promotion of VALUEs" (Batelaan; Gundara); (3) "Ideology and ethical
VALUEs in education" (Avakov); (4) "Prospects in Africa" (Wininga); (5)
"Prospects in Latin America" (Lopez); (6) "The 'Musee en herbe'" (Lusardy).
Section 3 on VALUEs includes: (1) "Humanism today: peace, tolerance, and
democracy" (Best); (2) "VALUEs and the school curriculum" (McNicoll); (3)
"Prospects in Asia" (Rajput); (4) "The responsibility of local authorities"
(Schuster); (5) "Art and one's everyday surroundings" (Langlois); and (6) "Art
as salvation" (Rosenfeld). Section 4 on ethical problems contains: (1) "A
jurist's viewpoint" (Gerin); (2) "A philosopher's viewpoint" (Lecourt); (3) "The
ethical problems arising from research" (Adam); (4) "Education and bioethics"
(Huber); (5) "A worldwide code of ethics: the role of universities" (Jaumotte);
(6) "The role of industry in education" (Carrigou); and (7) "Physics teaching
and the crisis of VALUEs" (Lovas). The fifth section contains conclusions and
general recommendations.

				
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