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									APPENDIX A: STATE AND NATIONAL AFFORDABLE HOUSING
AGENCY/ORGANIZATION CONTACT INFORMATION

North Carolina Agencies & Organizations

Association of Housing Counselors c/o
The Affordable Housing Group
1300 Baxter Street, Suite 215
Charlotte, NC 28204
Phone: 704-342-3316
Fax: 704-376-8709
www.affordablehousinggroup.org

Center for Responsible Lending
302 West Main Street
Durham, NC 27701
Phone: 919-313-8500
www.responsiblelending.org

Fannie Mae North Carolina Partnership Office
112 South Tryon Street
Suite 1100
Charlotte, NC 28284
Phone: 704-344-6960
Fax: 704-344-6970
www.fanniemae.com

Freddie Mac NC Office
132 Copper's Trail
Wilmington, NC 28411
Phone: 910-686-7904
www.freddiemac.com

IDA and Asset-Building Collaborative of North Carolina
PO Box 27386
Raleigh, NC 27611
Phone: 919-341-6418
Fax: 919-510-0509
www.ncidacollaborative.org

Legal Aid of North Carolina
Administrative Office
224 South Dawson Street
Raleigh, NC 27601
Phone: 919-856-2564
Fax: 919-856-2120
www.legalaidnc.org

NC Association of CDCs
3109 Poplarwood Ct., Ste. 209
Raleigh, NC 27604
Phone: 919-831-9710
Fax: 919-831-9728
www.ncacdc.org

NC Coalition to End Homelessness
PO Box 27692
Raleigh, NC 27611
Phone: 919-755-4393
www.ncceh.org

NC Community Development Initiative Inc.
2209 Century Drive, 2nd Floor
PO Box 98148
Raleigh, NC 27624
Phone: 919-828-5655
Fax: 919-834-8018
www.ncinitiative.org

NC Division of Aging and Adult Services
2101 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-0443
Phone: 919-733-3983
Fax: 919-733-0443
www.ncdhhs.gov/aging
NC Division of Community Assistance
301 N. Wilmington St.
4301 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27601
Phone: 919-733-4151
Fax: 919-733-0443
www.dca.commerce.state.nc.us

NC Division of Public Health
AIDS Care Branch
1902 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-1902
Phone: 919-733-7301
Fax: 919-733-1020
www.epi.state.nc.us/epi/hiv/aidscare

NC Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services
Community Services Section
2801 Mail Services Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-2801
Phone: 919-855-3579
Fax: 919-733-7968
http://dvr.dhhs.state.nc.us

North Carolina Housing Coalition
PO Box 347
Raleigh, NC 27602
Phone: 919-881-0707
Fax: 919-881-0350
www.nchousing.org

North Carolina Housing Finance Agency
Mailing Address:
PO Box 28066
Raleigh, NC 27611-8066
Street Address:
3508 Bush Street
Raleigh, NC 27609-7509
Phone: 919-877-5700 or 800-393-0988; For hearing-impaired dial 711 for
Relay NC Services.
www.nchfa.com

North Carolina Justice Center
224 S. Dawson St.
Raleigh, NC 27601
Phone: 919-856-2570
Fax: 919-856-2175
www.ncjustice.org

Office of Economic Opportunity
222 North Person Street
2013 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27601
Phone: 919-715-5850
Fax: 919-715-5855
www.dhhs.state.nc.us/oeo

US Department of Agriculture
NC State Office
Rural Housing Service
4405 Bland Road
Raleigh, NC 27609
Phone: 919-873-2060
Fax: 919-873-2075
www.rurdev.usda.gov/nc/

US Department of Housing and Urban Development Greensboro Field
Office
1500 Pinecroft Road, Suite 401
Greensboro, NC 27407-3838
Phone: 336-547-4000;
TTY: 336-547-4054-NC Relay: 711 (Voice/TTY)
Fax: 336-547-4138
www.hud.gov/local/index.cfm?state=nc

National Agencies & Organizations
Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law
1101 15th Street, NW
Suite 1212
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-467-5730
Fax: 202-223-0409
www.bazelon.org

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
820 First Street, NE, Suite 510
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: 202-408-1080
Fax: 202-408-1056
www.cbpp.org

Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities
1660 L Street, NW, Ste. 700
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-783-2229
Fax: 202-783-8250
www.c-c-d.org

Corporation for Supportive Housing
1518 K Street, NW, Suite 206
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-393-1948
Fax: 202-393-4664
www.csh.org

Housing Assistance Council
1025 Vermont Ave., N.W.
Suite 606
Washington, D.C. 20005
Phone: 202-842-8600
Fax: 202-347-3441
www.ruralhome.org
National Alliance to End Homelessness
1518 K Street NW, Suite 410
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-638-1526
www.endhomelessness.org

National Low Income Housing Coalition
727 15th Street, NW, 6th Floor
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-662-1530
Fax 202-393-1973
www.nlihc.org

Technical Assistance Collaborative (TAC)
31 St. James Ave., Ste. 710
Boston, MA 02116
Phone: TTY 617-266-5657
Fax: 617-266-4343
www.tacinc.org
APPENDIX B: LEGAL SERVICES IN NORTH CAROLINA

A. Attorneys:

Legal Aid of North Carolina – 919-856-2564 – Provides free legal services
to low-income individuals throughout North Carolina. www.legalaidnc.org

2. Other legal services providers:

a. Asheville/Western NC
Pisgah Legal Services
800-489-6144
www.pisgahlegal.org

b. Charlotte/West-Central NC
Legal Services of Southern Piedmont
704-376-1600
800-438-1254 (Outside of Mecklenburg County)
800-247-1931 (Spanish)
www.lssp.org

c. Forsyth, Davie, Iredell, Surry, Stokes, & Yadkin Counties
Legal Aid Society of Northwest NC
910-725-9166
800-660-6663

3. NC Justice Center – 919-856-2570 – Provides free legal services to low-
income individuals on issues that impact litigation and policy matters.
www.ncjustice.org

B. Fair Housing Investigators:

1. NC Human Relations Commission – 919-789-5930 or 866-324-7474 –
NC state agency that investigates complaints of discrimination and enforces
NC’s Fair Housing Law.

C. Governmental Entities:
NC Attorney General’s Office – Consumer Protection – 919-716-6000

Local Code Enforcement Agencies
APPENDIX C: HUMAN RELATIONS COUNCILS/COMMISSIONS WITH PAID
STAFF CONTACT INFORMATION (AUGUST 2009)

North Carolina Human Relations Commission
1318 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-1318
(919) 789-5930
866-324-7474

Asheville-Buncombe Human Relations
Bob Smith, Director
175 Bingham Rd.
Asheville, NC 28806
(828) 255-5953
RSMITH8483@aol.com
(Buncombe County)

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Community Relations Department
Willie Ratchford, Director
606 E. Trade St.
Charlotte, NC 28202
(704) 336-2195
wratchford@ci.charlotte.nc.us
(covers Mecklenburg County except townships)

Cabarrus County Human Relations Council
Andy Simmons, Director
16 Church Street North East
Concord, NC 28025
(704) 795-3537
www.cbc-cabarus.org

Duplin County Human Relations
Warren Helper, Director
310 West Main Street
Wallace, NC 28466
(910) 296-2193
warren.helper@nc.usda.gov
Durham Human Relations
Yvonne Pena, Director
101 City Hall Plaza
Durham, NC 27701
(919) 560-4107
Ypena@ci.durham.nc.us
(covers Durham city only)

Fayetteville Human Relations
Ron McElrath, Director
City Hall-433 Hay Street
Fayetteville, NC 28301
(910) 433-1696
rmcelrath@ci.fay.nc.us

Gaston County Human Relations
PO Box 1578
Gastonia, NC 28053-1578
(704) 866-3692

Goldsboro Community Affairs
LaTerrie Ward, Director
PO Drawer A
214 North Center Street
Goldsboro, NC 27530
(919) 580-4359
jward@ci.Goldsboro.nc.us

Greensboro Human Relations
Anthony Wade, Director
PO Box 3136
City-County Complex
1 Governmental Plaza
Greensboro, NC 27834
(336) 373-2038
john.shaw@greensboro-nc.gov
(covers city limits of Greensboro)
Greenville Human Relations
Cassandra Daniels, Director
PO Box 7207
Greenville, NC 27835
(252) 329-4494
cdaniels@greenville.gov
High Point Human Relations
Alvena Heggins, Director
PO Box 230
High Point, NC 27261
(336) 883-3124; al.heggins@highpoint.nc.gov

Lexington Human Resources
Jean Thompson, Director
28 West Center Street
Lexington, NC 27292
(336) 248-3955; jeant@lexingtonnc.net

Lumberton Human Resources Department
Laney Sapp, City Clerk
501 East 5th Street
Lumberton, North Carolina 28359
(910) 671-3807
lsapp@ci.Lumbertin.nc.us

Wilmington-New Hanover Human Relations
Carl Byrd, Director
County Administrative Building
801 Princess Street, Suite 101
Wilmington, NC 28401-4026
(910) 341-7171
cbyrd@nhcgov.com
(covers New Hanover County)

Orange County Human Relations
Shoshanna Smith, Director
501 W. Franklin St. Suite 104
Hillsborough, NC 27516
(919) 960-3875
shsmith@co.orange.nc.us
(covers Orange County)

Raleigh Human Resources Division
Hardy Watkins, Director
PO Box 590
Raleigh, NC 27603
(919) 831-6101
hardy.watkins@ci.raleigh.nc.us

Rocky Mount Human Relations
Loretta Braswell, Director
PO Box 1180
Rocky Mount, NC 27802
(252) 972-1181;
braswelll@ci.rocky-mount.nc.us

Salisbury Rowan County
Human Relations Commission
Melissa Taylor, Staff Director
132 N. Main Street
Salisbury, NC 28144
Office (704) 638-5229
mtayl@salisburync.gov
Wilson Human Relations
Veronica Creech, Director
PO Box 10
Wilson, NC 27893
(252) 399-2308

Winston-Salem Human Relations
Wanda Allen-Abraha, Director
PO Box 2511
Winston-Salem, NC 27102
(336) 727-2429
(covers city of Winston-Salem only)
wandaea@cityofws.org
APPENDIX D: SAMPLE BUDGET SHEET

The chart on the next page is an example of a simple monthly personal
budget.

You can enter your information into the blanks or calculate your personal
budget online by visiting www.personalbudgeting.com.

Notice that this sample budget has a net income (i.e., there is money left
over after all expenses have been paid). It is possible that you may end up
with a net loss, which is not a good situation to be in. If this is the case,
you may want to think about what you can do to increase your income,
decrease your spending, or both.

Sample Budget

Income
Paycheck 1 = $2,000
Paycheck 2 = $1,500
Other = $500
Total Income (add above items) = $4,000

Expenses
Mortgage $ 950
Cars $600
Insurance--Auto $150
Insurance--Life $60
Health Expenses/Insurance $200
Installment Loans $125
Phone $75
Utilities--Gas/Water/Electric $125
Groceries $250
Entertainment $250
Gasoline for Cars $100
Total Expense (add above items) = $2,885

Net Income (subtract total expenses from total income) = $1,115
APPENDIX E: SAMPLE RENTAL HOUSING APPLICATION

Date of Application
Desired Date of Occupancy
Type and Size of Apartment Wanted (No. of Bedrooms, etc.)

Personal Information
Applicant’s Full Name
Date of Birth
Social Security No.
Driver’s License No./State
Co-applicant’s Full Name
Date of Birth
Social Security No.

Personal Information
Driver’s License No./State
Full Names of All Other Residents
Relationship to You
Date of Birth

How Many Pets Do You or Other Occupants Own
Kind of Pet, Breed, Weight and Age
How Did You Hear About Our Property?
Residence History
Present Address
Present Telephone
Dates From To
Present Landlord or Mortgage Co.
Telephone
Monthly Payment $
Reason for Moving
Previous Address
Dates From To
Previous Landlord or Mortgage Co.
Telephone
Monthly Payment $
Reason for Moving
Employment Information
Present Employer
Dates From To
Employer’s Address
Telephone
Position
Supervisor
Gross Monthly Salary $

Previous Employer
Dates From To
Employer’s Address
Telephone
Position
Supervisor
Gross Monthly Salary $

Co-applicant’s Employer
Dates From To
Employer’s Address
Telephone
Position
Supervisor
Gross Monthly Salary $

Other Information
Total Number of Vehicles (Including Company Vehicles)
Make/Model
Year
Color
Tag No. & State
Make/Model
Year
Color
Tag No. & State
Other Car, Motorcycle, etc.
Total Gross Monthly Household Income $
If there are other sources of income you would like us to consider, please
list income, source and person (Banker, Employer, etc.) who we could
contact for confirmation. You do NOT have to reveal alimony, child
support or spouse’s annual income unless you want us to consider it in this
application.

Amount $ Per
Source
Telephone
Amount $ Per
Source
Telephone
Comments
Have You or Co-applicant Ever:
Been sued for non-payment of rent?
Been evicted or asked to move out?
Broken a Rental Agreement or Lease?
Been sued for damage to rental property?
Declared Bankruptcy?

In case of Personal Emergency, Notify:
Name
Relationship
Address
Home Phone
Work Phone

I hereby make application for an apartment and certify that this
information is correct. I authorize you to contact any references that I
have listed. I also authorize you to obtain my consumer credit report from
your credit reporting agency, which will appear as an inquiry on my file.

Applicant’s Signature
Date

Co-Applicant’s Signature
Date
If you are applying by mail or fax, please send in signed and completed
application using the contact information provided. If you are applying by
email, download, complete, and send it as an attachment to
info@emailaddress.com. Email applicants may leave the signature fields
blank but must provide a contact number below for Apt. Co’s staff to
confirm identity before the application is processed.

Email Application Contact Telephone Number

Best time to call
APPENDIX F: NORTH CAROLINA LANDLORD-TENANT LAWS

Knowing Your Rights and Responsibilities:

A Brief Overview

Prepared December 2006

William D. Rowe, General Counsel
NC Justice Center
P.O. Box 28068
Raleigh, NC 27611
(919) 856-2177
bill@ncjustice.org

Understanding where your rights and responsibilities come from

There are two places to look to determine what your rights and
responsibilities are. First, there is North Carolina law. Some of the laws
are mandatory and cannot be changed, even if everybody agrees. While
other laws can be changed if everyone agrees. Second, there is your lease
agreement. Your lease is a contract and it explains what each party is
agreeing to and controls each party’s behavior.

For the most part, this information reviews North Carolina laws that you
must comply with and that cannot be changed by your lease agreement.
This outline is intended only as a reference and is not intended to serve as
a substitute for legal advice or to establish any lawyer-client relationship.

Basic Fit-Housing Laws

North Carolina requires the landlord and the tenant each take on certain
responsibilities to ensure the property is maintained in conditions fit for
humans to live in. We review those responsibilities now.

A. What does the landlord have to do regarding repairs?
Obey the Local Housing Code. Most cities and some counties have passed
a law which is called a housing code. This law tells the landlord what
conditions have to be provided and maintained, including such items as hot
and cold water facilities that do not leak, window screens, walls, ceilings
and floors without holes, door locks and other basic necessities.
Cities and counties with a housing code will have an inspection department
whose duties include inspecting units and informing owners and tenants of
needed repairs. The inspection department will also be responsible for
enforcing the local housing code. Failure to make the required repairs can
result in the premises being boarded up and not allowed to be rented until
the repairs are made.

Make any repairs needed to make the premises fit and habitable.

Keep the plumbing, heating, sanitary and electrical equipment in good and
safe working order.

If the landlord provides appliances, such as a stove or refrigerator, he/she
must fix them if they break down.

Keep the stairwells, walkways and other common areas of apartment
buildings and duplexes in safe condition.

Install smoke detectors.

B. What does the tenant have to do regarding repairs?

Keep the place as clean and safe as possible. Get rid of garbage in a clean
and safe way. Keep the plumbing (toilet, sinks, bathtub) as clean as
possible.

Notify the landlord of needed repairs.

Do not do any damage to the premises. If the tenant or someone visiting
damages the premises, the tenant is responsible. This means the landlord
may charge the tenant for the repairs.

C. Consequences of not making repairs.
Tenant may sue owner/landlord and/or agent and recover:
Damages equaling the difference between the fair rental value of the
premises free of defects and the fair rental value of the premises in their
defective condition (―rent abatement‖);
Prospective rent abatement (ordering the rent to be at the lower rate on
account of the condition);
Treble damages (three times the amount of the actual damages) and
attorneys’ fees if the conditions of the premises and the agreement
between the parties are rise to the level of unfair and deceptive acts by the
landlord; and
Injunctive relief, requiring the landlord to make repairs.

2. Local housing code may call for the premises to be taken off the market.
Fines and/or criminal liability may be applicable.

Handling the money: Paying attention to the details

There are two laws that require landlords to handle tenants’ monies with
particular detail. First, there are requirements for handling security
deposits. Second, there are requirements for charging late payment fees.
Security Deposits (N.C.G.S. 42-50)

A. How much security deposit can a landlord charge?

The tenant pays rent every week, the landlord can require two weeks rent
as a deposit.

If the tenant pays rent every month and there is no written lease, he/she
can require one and one-half month’s rent as a deposit.

If the tenant has a lease for more than a month, he/she can charge two
months’ rent as a deposit.

B. What does the landlord have to do regarding security deposits?
Give the tenant written notice of the name of the bank that is holding the
tenant’s security or the name and address of the insurance company
providing a bond to cover the security deposit, if not in a bank in N.C.; and

After the tenant moves out for any reason (including eviction), the landlord
must give the tenant a written account of any items deducted from the
deposit and refund the remainder to the tenant. The landlord has thirty
(30) days from the time the tenant moves out to give an interim
accounting and sixty (60) days to give a final accounting and refund.

C. When can a landlord keep all or part of the security deposit?

If the tenant owes back rent, he/she can deduct what is owed.

If the tenant has damaged the property more than normal wear and tear,
the landlord can deduct the cost of repair.

If the tenant breaks the lease and the landlord loses rent or has expenses
to find a new tenant, he/she can keep the actual amount lost.

If the tenant has been evicted in court, the landlord can deduct court costs
from the security deposit.

Late Fees (N.C.G.S. 42-46)

When can a landlord charge a late fee?
Only after the rent is five days or more late.

How much can be charged?
$15.00 or 5% of the monthly rent, whichever is more.

How much can be charged if living in Subsidized Housing?
Five percent of the portion of the rent the tenant pays. For example, if the
rent is $500/mo. and Section 8 pays $400/mo. and the tenant pays
$100/mo., the late fee is $15, which is greater than 5% of $100 or $5.00.

How much can be charged if rent is paid weekly?
Late fees cannot exceed $4 or 5% of rental payment.
Late Fees may be imposed only one time for each late rental payment.

Late Fees may not be deducted from rent payment so as to make tenant
late with rent payment.

Eviction

Evicting a tenant requires that the landlord follow the process set out by
North Carolina law. Landlords should not take matters into their own
hands. Landlords cannot change the locks; turn off the utilities; or take
other actions to force a tenant to move other than NC’s court process.

How Can the Landlord Evict Legally. (N.C.G.S. 42-25.9)

Some kinds of evictions by a landlord are illegal.

A landlord may evict a tenant legally only by getting a court order. The
landlord may not evict by changing the locks, turning off electricity, gas or
water, disconnecting a heater, or any way other than through the court.

What can a tenant be evicted for?

There are four grounds for evictions:
Nonpayment of Rent
Staying after the lease has ended
Breach of the lease
Certain criminal activities

Tenants facing eviction should seek legal help. (See Section VIII.
Resources.)

How do court evictions work?

The landlord must file a legal complaint with the court. This complaint must
be served to the tenant by the sheriff. Attached to the complaint will be a
summons that tells the tenant the day, time, and place to be in court,
usually within ten days of the filing of the complaint.
If the landlord or the tenant loses in court, he/she has a right to appeal for
a new trial in District Court within ten days in writing or tell the court while
the landlord is there that they wish to appeal. The cost of appeal must be
paid within 20 days after the judgment. The appeal fee can be waived if
the tenant can show they cannot afford to pay it. There is a form, ―Petition
to Sue/Appeal as an Indigent,‖ that will have to be completed and filed
with the Clerk of Court. People who receive Food Stamps, Temporary
Assistance to Needy families (TANF) or Supplemental Security Income
(SSI) automatically qualify to have the fee waived.

If the tenant does not appeal, the landlord can get an order to have the
Sheriff put the tenant out. This eviction by the Sheriff generally occurs
within approximately 15 days of the court hearing.

D. Can tenant stay while the case is appealed to District Court?

Yes. The tenant can get a ―stay of execution‖ by signing and filing a form
with the Clerk of Court that says they will pay the rent to the Clerk as it
comes due and pay the rent claimed to be behind, unless the Magistrate
finds the amount in dispute or the tenant is appealing as an ―indigent.‖

E. Can the landlord accept rent and still evict?

No. If landlord is proceeding with an eviction, they may not accept rent
from the tenant. If they do, the tenant can claim that the landlord ―waived‖
the breach and defeat the eviction.

F. What happens to the tenant’s property after an eviction?

If the tenant is evicted through the court process and the landlord has the
furniture and clothes padlocked inside the house, the tenant will have ten
days to get them out from the day of the padlocking. The tenant must
contact the landlord and arrange for a time during regular business hours
or another time by agreement to come and remove the property.

If the tenant does not remove them within those ten days, the landlord
may dispose of the property in any way he/she wishes.
Where the tenant leases only a space for a manufactured home, he/she
will have 21 days instead of 10 days to remove the manufactured home
from the rental lot.

V. When the tenant seeks to enforce their rights

When a tenant seeks to enforce their rights, a landlord cannot respond by
attempting to evict them. Such action is illegal and the landlord may have
to pay the tenant damages.

Retaliatory Evictions (N.C.G.S. 42-37.1)

The following tenant activities are protected by the law:
Complaining or requesting that the landlord make repairs;
Complaining to the housing inspector, health department or any other
government agency about repair needs or unhealthy conditions;
Any complaint to a landlord from the housing inspector, health department
or other government agency;
Any honest attempt of the tenant to enforce their rights under the lease or
under state or federal law, such as filing a lawsuit and
Any honest attempt to organize, join or become involved with any group of
people who are trying to help tenants.

Eviction is a remedy, if the tenant has breached the lease.

A landlord cannot evict a tenant in retaliation for doing any of these
protected activities. But the landlord can evict for not paying rent or for
breaking the lease in any other way, if the lease says that the tenant can
be evicted for that particular violation.

What are the consequences of evicting a tenant in retaliation for protected
activity?

A tenant may be able to regain possession of the premises and have a
claim for money damages. The damages may include loss of personal
property, lost wages, cost of moving belongings, mental suffering, and
other damages.
VI. Protections for Victims of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault or Stalking

(Applies to leases entered into or renewed after Oct 1, 2005)

Victims of domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking have certain
protections and rights other tenants do not.

A. Who is covered and what are those protections and rights?

1. ―Protected tenant‖ means a tenant or household member who is a victim
of domestic violence under Ch. 50B of the General Statutes or sexual
assault or stalking under Ch. 14 of the General Statutes. (G.S. 42-40)

2. Nondiscrimination – (G.S. 42-42.2) - A landlord shall not terminate, fail
to renew a tenancy, refuse to enter into a rental agreement, or otherwise
retaliate based substantially on (i) the tenant, applicant or a household
member’s status as a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking
or (ii) the tenant or applicant having terminated a rental agreement under
G.S. 42-45.1.

3. Changing locks – (G.S. 42-42.3) – A landlord must change locks after
oral or written request by a ―protected tenant‖ or tenant may do so if
landlord does not, as follows:

If perpetrator is not a tenant in the same dwelling unit, no documentation
required and locks must be changed within 48 hours of notice.

If perpetrator is a tenant in same dwelling unit, protected tenant must
provide the landlord with a copy a court order barring the perpetrator from
the unit and landlord has 72 hours to change locks.

Once a landlord is provided with a court order requiring the perpetrator to
stay away from the dwelling unit, landlord has no duty to allow access
unless the court order allows for access to retrieve personal belongings and
the landlord has no liability if he/she follows the law.
Excluded perpetrator remains liable under the lease for rent or damages to
the dwelling unit.

Protected tenant bears expense of lock change and must provide key to
the landlord if tenant changes lock themselves.

D. Early Termination of Rental Agreement – (G.S. 42-45.1)

Any ―protected tenant‖ may terminate his or her rental agreement by
providing the landlord with written notice effective at least 30 days after
landlord’s receipt of the notice.

Notice to the landlord must be accompanied by either: (i) a copy of a valid
protective order, other than an ex parte order; (ii) a criminal order
restraining contact with the ―protected tenant‖; or (iii) a valid ―Address
Confidentiality Program‖ card issued pursuant to G.S. 15C-4.

A victim of domestic violence or sexual assault must also provide the
landlord a copy of a safety plan which recommends relocation provided by
a domestic violence or sexual assault program.

Upon termination of the rental agreement, the ―protected tenant‖ is liable
for rent prorated to the effective date of the termination notice.
Perpetrator excluded from the dwelling unit and any other tenants of the
dwelling unit remain liable for rent or damages to the unit.

VII. Public and Subsidized Housing

Tenants who reside in public housing or subsidized housing have certain
rights that tenants in private housing do not.

Federal law dictates how rent is figured, and how tenants are selected and
evicted. What rights a tenant has depends in large part on the type of
federally assisted housing a tenant lives in. This is a complex area of law.
See resources for assistance below.

VIII. Resources
See Appendices A and B for contact information.

Addendum to Appendix F: Recent Changes to NC Landlord-Tenant Laws

Basic Fit Housing Laws

A new NC law requires all landlords to repair ―within a reasonable period of
time based on the severity of the condition‖ the following ―imminently
dangerous conditions:‖
a. Unsafe wiring.
b. Unsafe flooring.
c. Unsafe ceilings and roofs.
d. Unsafe chimneys and flues.
e. Lack of drinkable water.
f. Lack of operable locks on all doors leading to the outside.
g. Broken windows or lack of operable locks on all windows on the ground
level.
h. Lack of heat for all living areas.
i. Lack of operable toilet.
j. Lack of operable bathtub or shower.
k. Rat infestation as a result of defects in the structure.
l. Excessive standing water, sewage, or flooding problems caused by
plumbing leaks or inadequate drainage that contribute to mosquito
infestation or mold.

Tenants in Foreclosed Properties

A new federal law, part of the ―Helping Families Save Their Homes Act of
2009‖ (Pub. L.111-22) applies to any foreclosure sale of residential
properties on or after May 20, 2009 until December 31, 2012 & controls
how ―bona-fide tenants‖ can be evicted after the sale of foreclosed
properties. Before May 20, 2009 in NC, a tenant living in a property sold at
foreclosure could be evicted by the new owner without any court hearing
as long as notice was provided. That is no longer the case.

a. Buyers of foreclosed properties take the property ―subject to‖ the
remaining term of any Section 8 voucher lease and accompanying Housing
Assistance Payment (HAP) contract or other bona-fide tenancy of any
foreclosed residential rental property, and requires (1) 90 days notice to
terminate any such tenancy and (2) the landlord to use NC’s court process
for eviction.
b. Bona-fide tenancy: (1) does not include the former owner, or the child,
spouse or parent of the former owner; (2) must be the result of an arms
length transaction; and (3) requires receipt of rent that is not substantially
less than fair market value.
c. If occupants of foreclosed residential rental property are not a Section 8
voucher recipient or other bona-fide tenant, NC law applies. See below.
This will generally be cases where the former owner or his/her family is
living in the property or allowing someone to stay in the property at a
reduced rent.

1. Property with less than 15 rental units
a. Notice of foreclosure sale shall be mailed to the tenant at least 20 days
prior to the sale.
b. Tenant has right to terminate lease after receiving notice of foreclosure
sale by giving LL written notice effective at least 10 days after the date of
the notice of sale.
c. Purchaser of foreclosed property must give 10 days’ notice to tenant
before obtaining order of possession from Clerk of Court.

2. Property with 15 or more rental units
a. Purchaser of foreclosed property must give 30 days’ notice to tenant
before obtaining order of possession from Clerk of Court. (N.C.G.S. 45-
21.29(k)(5)) – No other notice required

Other Authorized Fees

A new NC law allows landlords to charge certain fees for seeking to evict a
tenant.

Complaint Filing Fee: A lease may allow a complaint filing fee of $15.00 or
5% of the monthly rent, whichever is greater, if a landlord files a complaint
for Summary Ejectment.
Court Appearance Fee: A lease may allow a court appearance fee of 10%
of the monthly rent if a landlord wins in Small Claims Court on a Complaint
for Summary Ejectment or for Money Owed.

Second Trial Fee: A lease may allow a second trial fee of 12% of the
monthly rent for a new trial following an appeal of the magistrate’s
judgment and the landlord wins at the second trial.

Where the rent is subsidized, the fees authorized above are based on the
tenant’s share of the rent only.

A landlord is allowed to claim only one of the fees described above.

f. The fees described above may not be deducted from a subsequent rental
payment so as to make the tenant late with his/her rent.
APPENDIX G: EVICTION AND TERMINATION STANDARDS FOR HOUSING
CHOICE VOUCHER (SECTION 8) TENANTS

The rights and responsibilities of landlords and tenants who participate in
the Housing Choice Voucher Program (Section 8) are regulated by the
same laws that apply to all private landlord-tenant relations.

As with other tenants, Section 8 voucher holders may be evicted by the
owner of the rental property. The Housing Authority does not evict Section
8 voucher tenants.

However, there are additional rules that affect the eviction of Section 8
tenants. During the initial lease term and any extensions of the lease, a
landlord may evict only if:
the tenant seriously or repeatedly violates the terms and conditions of the
lease;
the tenant violates a federal, state, or local law regarding the tenants
occupancy of the rental unit;
the tenant, household member, guest, or other person under the tenant’s
control commits a crime threatening the health, safety, or peaceful
enjoyment of the premises by other residents or persons living nearby;
the tenant, household member, guest, or other person under the tenant’s
control commits a violent crime on or near the premises;
the tenant, household member, guest, or other person under the tenant’s
control commits a drug-related crime on or near the premises;
the tenant or household member’s alcohol abuse threatens the health,
safety, or peaceful enjoyment of the premises by other residents;
the tenant or household member violates a condition of state or federal
probation;
the tenant flees to avoid prosecution or confinement after conviction of a
felony; or
for other good cause.

During the first year of the lease term, the owner may not evict the tenant
to use the unit for personal, family, or nonresidential use or for a business
or economic reason like sale of the property, renovation, or to rent the unit
at a higher rate.
At the end of the lease term, the landlord may choose to terminate the
lease or not to renew the lease without cause.

An owner must give the tenant a written notice specifying the grounds
(reasons) for terminating the tenancy which may be included either in the
notice to vacate or the complaint filed in court. The landlord must give a
copy of the notice to vacate to the Housing Authority.

The landlord may not evict because the Housing Authority has not made a
housing assistance payment.

When a tenant is evicted for a serious violation of the lease the Housing
Authority must propose termination of the family’s participation in the
Section 8 voucher program, but the Housing Authority may decide not to
terminate.

Termination of Housing Choice (Section 8) Vouchers

The Housing Authority may not terminate a family’s voucher without first
providing notice of the grounds for the proposed termination and an
opportunity for a hearing.

In some cases, the Housing Authority may decide to continue assistance if
certain conditions are met like removing the household member
responsible for criminal activity or completion of a chemical abuse
rehabilitation program.

If the tenant loses a summary ejectment (eviction) trial because they failed
to appear in court, the Housing Authority may not terminate the voucher
without proving the grounds supporting the eviction at the termination
hearing.

An evicted family whose voucher assistance is not terminated is entitled to
receive a voucher to locate another residence.
APPENDIX H: PUBLIC HOUSING STANDARD FOR EVICTIONS

The PHA may terminate the tenancy ONLY for:

SERIOUS or REPEATED violations of MATERIAL terms of the lease, such as
the failure to pay rent, or

Other good cause.

What is this ―other good cause‖? It definitely is criminal activity, alcohol
abuse that threatens the health and safety of residents and employees of
the PHA, material false statements to the PHA to gain admittance, refusal
to accept new terms in the lease, and failure to comply w/ the community
service requirement (25 CFR 966.4 (2)). But it’s also more. But what else?
That varies.

After many court cases, a few things stand out in determining ―other good
cause‖:

Since right to occupy public housing exists, there must be more than a
minor infraction, and the harm must be weighed against the loss of that
unit to the family. More than one court has noted that public housing may
be the last hope of many to obtain safe and sanitary housing, the stated
goal of public housing.

There must be some ―control‖ by the tenant over the actions alleged.

There, generally, is a ―right to cure‖ which is a right to fix the problem to
avoid eviction.
APPENDIX I: FORECLOSURE PREVENTION RESOURCES

This appendix provides additional information on the actual foreclosure
process, as well as additional resources. As mentioned in Chapter 4, at first
sign of financial difficulty contact a housing counselor.

Typical Foreclosure Process: From Being Late to the Actual Auction of Your
Home
First month missed payment – your lender will contact you by letter or
phone. (A housing counselor can help).
Second month missed payment – your lender is likely to begin calling you
to discuss why you have not made your payments. It is important that you
take their phone calls. Talk to your lender and explain your situation and
what you are trying to do to resolve it. At this time, you still may be able to
make one payment to prevent yourself from falling three months behind.
(A housing counselor can help.)
Third month missed payment – after the third payment is missed, you will
receive a letter from your lender stating the amount you are delinquent,
and that you have 30 days to bring your mortgage current. This is called a
"Demand Letter" or "Notice to Accelerate". If you do not pay the specified
amount or make some type of arrangements by the given date, the lender
may begin foreclosure proceedings. They are unlikely to accept less than
the total due without arrangements being made if you receive this letter.
You still have time to work something out with your lender. (A housing
counselor can still help.)
Letters from the lender will stop - The mortgage company will not send you
any more letters. It is now totally up to you to contact them directly as
soon as possible, or through a HUD certified housing counselor. Unless you
act quickly, your house will be sold at auction on the date specified. Note:
The total number of days of delinquency (90, 120, 180) depends on your
mortgage company.
Attorney takes over - A third party or ―trustee‖ (typically an attorney) takes
over your delinquent account if you have not paid the full amount or
worked out arrangements. You have now incurred all attorney fees as part
of your delinquency. The attorney will send a Notice of Default stating that
the property will be sold. The sale date is the actual day of foreclosure.
You will be notified of the date by mail, the Sheriff will hand deliver or post
a notice to your door, and the sale may be advertised in a local paper. The
time between the Demand or Notice to Accelerate Letter and the actual
Sale varies by state. In some states, it can be as quick as 2-3 months. This
is not the move-out date, but the end is near. You have until the date of
sale to make arrangements with your lender, or pay the total amount
owed, including attorney fees.
Redemption Period – after the sale date, you may enter a redemption
period, which in the state of North Carolina is 10 days after the sale. You
can still reclaim your home, but you will need to pay the outstanding
mortgage balance and all costs incurred during the foreclosure process.
All dates are estimated and will vary according to your mortgage company.
The total number of days of delinquency (90, 120, 180) depends on your
mortgage company.

Know Your Options

Repayment Plan - Spreading the defaulted payments over a series of
months, usually not more than 12-24 months.
Forbearance - Similar to a Repayment Plan where lender agrees to a
modified monthly payment for several months allowing the borrower to
catch up.
Modification - This plan involves more work, and may reduce or fix your
interest rate, change your term from 30 to 40 or 50 years, or add the
delinquent amount to your current amount and re-amortize (or reschedule
your payments).
Partial Claim - You may be able to obtain a second loan from HUD to bring
you current that is repaid after the first loan is paid. This option is available
only with FHA insured mortgage loans.
FHA Secure - A program designed to provide an opportunity for
homeowners to refinance into a prime rate FHA insured mortgage after
having their adjustable rate mortgage ―reset.‖
Service Members Civil Relief Act - You may be entitled to some protections
against foreclosure if you are currently or have within the last three (3)
months been in military service AND joined after signing the deed that is
now in foreclosure.
Refinance - The lender will offer a new loan which may add an additional
borrower. There must be adequate equity in the property. This cannot be
done if the value of the home is less than the amount owed to the lender.
Bankruptcy – Chapter 13 - Filing bankruptcy lets you pay off the
―arrearage‖ (late, unpaid payments) over the length of a repayment plan
you propose—five years in some cases. In this situation, you’ll need
enough income to at least meet your current mortgage payment at the
same time you’re paying off the arrearage.

Options If You Decide Not Keep Your Home

Sell the Property - Best option if the borrower cannot afford the mortgage
payment and the house is worth more than the amount owed. Other
considerations include the condition of your home and how much time do
you have.
Assumption - If you find another borrower willing and qualified to take over
your mortgage and your home, they may assume your mortgage. The new
borrower must meet the lender’s criteria.
Deed in Lieu - In some cases the lender will take back your property
instead of holding you responsible for the mortgage loan. This requires
investor approval. This option will be considered, in most cases, only after
the property has been on the market for 90 days. There may be tax
consequences.
Short Sale - When the borrower owes more than the property is worth, it
may be best to sell the property. The lender and mortgage insurer must
agree to accept the lower payoff. The original homeowner may then
receive a taxable income Form1099 in the amount of the underpayment.
Foreclosure - This is sometimes the only option for a borrower to accept.
After five years, the borrower may qualify for a new mortgage. There are
tax consequences to foreclosure and credit challenges, as well.

NC Counties and Serving Counseling Agency

County
Counseling Agency Handling
Phone number

Alamance - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Greater Greensboro -
336-373-8882
Alexander - Western Piedmont Council of Government - 828-322-9191
Alleghany - Northwestern Regional Housing Authority - 828-264-6683
Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Forsyth County - 336-896-1191
Anson - Sandhills Community Action Program, Inc - 910-947-6575
Ashe - Northwestern Regional Housing Authority - 828-264-6683
Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Forsyth County - 336-896-1191
Avery - Northwestern Regional Housing Authority - 828-264-6683
Beaufort - Cumberland Community Action Program, Inc - 910-323-3192
Bertie - Choanoke Area Development Association - 252-539-4155
Bladen - Kingdom Community Development Corporation - 910-484-2722
Brunswick - Wilmington AME Zion Housing Development Corporation - 910-
815-3826
Buncombe - On Track Financial Services - 828-255-5166
Burke - Western Piedmont Council of Government - 828-322-9191
Cabarrus - Prosperity Unlimited - 704-933-7405
Caldwell - Western Piedmont Council of Government - 828-322-9191
Camden - Northeastern Community Development Corporation - 252-338-
5466
Carteret - Twin Rivers Opportunities, Inc - 252-637-3599
Caswell - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Greater Greensboro - 336-
373-8882
Catawba - Western Piedmont Council of Government - 828-322-9191
Chatham - Triangle Family Services - 919-821-0790
Cherokee - On Track Financial Services - 828-255-5166
Chowan - River City Community Development Corporation - 252-331-2925
Clay - On Track Financial Services - 828-255-5166
Cleveland - Cleveland County Community Development Corporation - 704-
480-7701
Columbus - Wilmington AME Zion Housing Development Corporation - 910-
815-3826
Craven - Twin Rivers Opportunities, Inc - 252-637-3599
Cumberland - Kingdom Community Development Corporation - 910-484-
2722
Currituck - Northeastern Community Development Corporation - 252-338-
5466
Dare - Northeastern Community Development Corporation - 252-338-5466
Davidson - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Greater Greensboro -
336-373-8882
Davie - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Forsyth County - 336-896-
1191
Duplin - Cumberland Community Action Program, Inc - 910-323-3192
Durham - Triangle Family Services - 919-821-0790
Edgecombe - Rocky Mount Edgecombe Community Development
Corporation - 252-442-5178
Forsyth - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Forsyth County - 336-896-
1191
Franklin - Franklin Vance Warren Opportunity Inc - 252-492-0161
Gaston - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Gaston County - 704-864-
7704
Gates - River City Community Development Corporation - 252-331-2925
Graham - On Track Financial Services - 828-255-5166
Granville - Franklin Vance Warren Opportunity Inc - 252-492-0161
Greene       Cumberland Community Action Program, Inc 910-323-3192
Guilford - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Greater Greensboro -
336-373-8882
Halifax - Choanoke Area Development Association - 252-539-4155
Harnett - Kingdom Community Development Corporation - 910-484-2722
Haywood - On Track Financial Services - 828-255-5166
Henderson - On Track Financial Services - 828-255-5166
Hertford - Choanoke Area Development Association - 252-539-4155
Hoke - Kingdom Community Development Corporation - 910-484-2722
Hyde - Choanoke Area Development Association - 252-539-4155
Iredell - Prosperity Unlimited - 704-933-7405
Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Forsyth County - 336-896-1191
Jackson - On Track Financial Services - 828-255-5166
Johnston - Triangle Family Services - 919-821-0790
Jones - Twin Rivers Opportunities, Inc - 252-637-3599
Lee - Kingdom Community Development Corporation - 910-484-2722
Lenoir - Cumberland Community Action Program, Inc - 910-323-3192
Lincoln - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Gaston County - 704-864-
7704
Macon - On Track Financial Services - 828-255-5166
Madison - On Track Financial Services - 828-255-5166
Martin - Cumberland Community Action Program, Inc - 910-323-3192
McDowell - On Track Financial Services - 828-255-5166
Mecklenburg - Prosperity Unlimited - 704-933-7405
United Family Services - 704-332-9034
Mitchell - Northwestern Regional Housing Authority - 828-264-6683
Montgomery - Sandhills Community Action Program, Inc - 910-947-5675
Moore - Sandhills Community Action Program, Inc - 910-947-5675
Nash - Rocky Mount Edgecombe Community Development Corporation -
252-442-5178
New Hanover - Wilmington AME Zion Housing Development Corporation -
910-815-3826
Northampton - Choanoke Area Development Association - 252-539-4155
Onslow - Cumberland Community Action Program, Inc - 910-323-3192
Orange - Triangle Family Services - 919-821-0790
Pamlico - Twin Rivers Opportunities, Inc - 252-637-3599
Pasquotank - River City Community Development Corporation - 252-331-
2925
Pender - Wilmington AME Zion Housing Development Corporation - 910-
815-3826
Perquimans - River City Community Development Corporation - 252-331-
2925
Person - Franklin Vance Warren Opportunity Inc - 252-492-0161
Pitt - Cumberland Community Action Program, Inc - 910-323-3192
Polk - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Carolina Foothills - 828-286-
7062
Randolph - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Greater Greensboro -
336-373-8882
Richmond - Sandhills Community Action Program, Inc - 910-947-5675
Robeson - Kingdom Community Development Corporation - 910-484-2722
Rockingham - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Greater Greensboro -
336-373-8882
Rowan - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Greater Greensboro - 336-
373-8882
Salisbury Community Development Corporation - 704-638-2154
Rutherford - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Carolina Foothills -
828-286-7062
Sampson - Cumberland Community Action Program, Inc - 910-323-3192
Scotland - Sandhills Community Action Program, Inc - 910-947-5675
Stanly - Prosperity Unlimited - 704-933-7405
Stokes - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Forsyth County - 336-896-
1191
Surry - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Forsyth County - 336-896-
1191
Swain - On Track Financial Services - 828-255-5166
Transylvania - On Track Financial Services - 828-255-5166
Tyrell - Choanoke Area Development Association - 252-539-4155
Union - United Family Services - 704-332-9034
Vance - Franklin Vance Warren Opportunity Inc - 252-492-0161
Wake - Triangle Family Services - 919-821-0790
Warren - Franklin Vance Warren Opportunity Inc - 252-492-0161
Washington - Choanoke Area Development Association - 252-539-4155
Watauga - Northwestern Regional Housing Authority - 828-264-6683
Wayne - Cumberland Community Action Program, Inc - 910-323-3192
Wilkes - Northwestern Regional Housing Authority - 828-264-6683
Wilson - Wilson Community Improvement Association - 252-243-4855
Yadkin - Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Forsyth County - 336-896-
1191
Yancey - Northwestern Regional Housing Authority - 828-264-6683
APPENDIX J: HUD PROGRAMS COVERED BY CONSOLIDATED PLANS

As described in Chapter 5, submitting a Consolidated Plan is a required pre-
requisite for states and local communities to receive block grant funding for
the programs described below. Many major cities and several regions
within the state receive funds directly from HUD and therefore must submit
their own local Consolidated Plan. The state as a whole is covered by the
state’s Consolidated Plan.

The federal rules allow for a range of eligible activities for the four
programs, i.e. activities that are allowed under the rules. The Consolidated
Planning requirements for conducting needs assessments and a public
input process are designed to assist localities in targeting their funds,
within the boundaries of the eligible activities set by the federal rules, to
their particular identified needs and priorities.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)

CDBG funds are used to support communities by providing decent housing
and a suitable living environment, and by expanding economic
opportunities. At least 70 percent of CDBG funds must be used to benefit
low and moderate income households.

Under the federal rules, allowable CDBG activities include:
acquisition of property for public purposes;
construction or reconstruction of streets, water and sewer facilities,
neighborhood centers, recreation facilities, and other public works;
demolition;
rehabilitation of public and private buildings;
public services;
planning activities;
assistance to non-profit entities for community development activities; and
assistance to private, for profit entities to carry out economic development
activities (including assistance to micro-enterprises).
In North Carolina, the Department of Commerce’s Division of Community
Assistance administers CDBG funds for community development activities,
while funds for economic development activities are administered by the
Department’s Commerce Finance Center. In 2008, North Carolina received
over $60 million in CDBG funds. Funds help local governments improve
deteriorating residential neighborhoods, support public services, install
water and sewer facilities, and provide assistance to businesses. Category
awards are funded either through competition or on a non-competitive
basis.

Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG)

The ESG Program is designed to help states and local communities meet
the basic shelter and supportive services needs of homeless people while
also preventing more individuals and families from becoming homeless.

Under the federal rules allowable ESG activities include:
renovation, major rehabilitation, or conversion of buildings for use as
emergency shelter;
up to 30 percent on essential services for homeless persons;
up to 30 percent on homeless prevention efforts; and
shelter operating costs, such as maintenance, insurance, utilities, rent, and
furnishings.

The NC ESG Program is administered by the Office of Economic
Opportunity in the NC Department of Health and Human Services. In 2009,
North Carolina anticipates to receive $2.5 million in resources through the
ESG program that are distributed to emergency shelters and transitional
housing facilities across the state, to operate these facilities, provide
essential social services, and to help prevent homelessness.

HOME Investments Partnerships Program (HOME)

The HOME Program is a formula grant of federal housing funds to
participating jurisdictions. Local jurisdictions are larger cities and consortia
of smaller communities (called ―participating jurisdictions‖).

Under the federal rules HOME funds can be used for the following
activities:
rental housing production and rehabilitation loans and grants;
first-time home buyer assistance;
rehabilitation loans for homeowners; and
tenant-based rental assistance (two-year renewable contracts).

All housing developed with HOME funds must serve low - and very low-
income individuals and families. For rental housing, at least 90 percent of
HOME funds must benefit families whose incomes are at or below 60
percent of area median income; the remaining 10 percent must benefit
families with incomes at or below 80 percent of area median income.
Individual states or participating jurisdictions may have even lower income
targeting for their HOME funds.

To encourage affordable housing development by non-profit organizations,
a minimum of 15 percent of a jurisdiction’s HOME funds must be set aside
for housing that is developed by community housing development
organizations (CHDOs).

A CHDO is a special type of non-profit organization and has meaning only
in the context of HUD's HOME Program. Generally defined, a CHDO is a
non-profit, community-based organization that has staff with the capacity
to own, manage, and/or sponsor affordable housing.

The NC state HOME Program is administered by the N.C. Housing Finance
Agency. In 2008, N.C. received $19 million in resources through the HOME
program. The State’s General Assembly appropriated $1.6 million in public
non-federal funds to match the federal HOME funds.

Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA)

The HOPWA Program funds housing and services for people living with
HIV/AIDS and their families whose incomes are at or below 80 percent of
area median income. Funds help local health departments, non-profit
community based organizations, housing authorities, AIDS service
organizations, and other interested provider agencies meet the housing
needs of persons living with AIDS or related diseases, and their families.
Under the federal rules eligible HOPWA activities include:
housing information and referral services;
acquisition, rehabilitation, and leasing of property;
project-based or tenant-based rental assistance;
homeless prevention activities;
supportive services;
housing operating costs; and
technical assistance, including resource identification.

The HOPWA Program is distributed under a formula that is based on AIDS
surveillance information from the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention. The formula allocates 90 percent of the HOPWA appropriation
to eligible states and cities, on behalf of their metropolitan area. Ten
percent of HOPWA funds are awarded by competition.

The NC state HOPWA Program is administered by the AIDS Care Unit in the
Department of Health and Human Services.

In 2009, North Carolina anticipates to receive almost $2.4 million in
resources through the HOPWA program. These funds, along with other
private and nonfederal resources, were available in 2006 to address the
housing needs of persons living with HIV/AIDS.

For more detailed information on how these funds are being used under
the NC State Consolidated Plan, you can access the program reports, the
annual Action Plan, and NC’s Consolidated Plan on the NC Division of
Community Assistance Web site at www.ncdca.org/plan or call 919-733-
2850.

For information on Consolidated Plans for the various communities that
receive funding directly from HUD, contact the local community
development office in that community. A listing of communities that receive
these funds can be found at
www.hud.gov/offices/cpd/about/budget/budget07/states/nc.xls.

Summaries of selected Consolidated Plans from across the country are also
available on HUD’s Web site at www.hud.gov/states.html.

The above is a synthesis of information taken from North Carolina’s 2006
Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report, information from
the NC Division of Community Assistance’s website (www.ncdca.org), and
the Technical Assistance Collaborative’s Regional Housing Forum: A
Technical Assistance Guide for Housing Resources and Strategy (2003). It
is available for download on their Web site at
www.tacinc.org/Pubs/housingpubs.htm.

								
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