2011 Maryland System of Care Training Institutes

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					  2011 Maryland System of Care Training Institutes
Outreach to Special Populations: Addressing Disparities and Enhancing Cultural
     and Linguistic Competence across the Child-Family Serving Systems

        Including a Disproportionate Minority Contact Pre-Conference


          Monday, June 13 – Wednesday, June 15, 2011
                        Baltimore Convention Center
                               Baltimore, MD




                                   Innovations Institute
                                   University of Maryland School of Medicine
                                   Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
                                                              th
                                   737 West Lombard Street, 4 Floor
                                   Baltimore, Maryland 21201-1009
                                   (410) 706-0961
                                   (410) 706-6220 fax
                                   (410)706-0998 secure fax
                                   innovations@psych.umaryland.edu
                                   www.innovationsinstitute.org
                                   mdvtc.umaryland.edu Virtual Training Center
WELCOME
On behalf of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Department of Human Resources, the Department of
Juvenile Services, Maryland State Department of Education, Governor's Office for Children, Family League of Baltimore City,
Governor’s Office of Crime Control & Prevention, and the State Advisory Group, we welcome you to Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, a
historic seaport and iconic landmark, and home to the Innovations Institute. In 2005, the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Medicine, in partnership with the Maryland Children’s Cabinet established the
Innovations Institute to support efforts to improve child and family outcomes. Innovations Institute provides training and technical
assistance and research and evaluation support throughout the state of Maryland. Our mission is to ensure that public and
academic institutes, providers, and advocates work together efficiently and effectively to support children, youth and their families.

We are proud to host the annual System of Care Training Institutes where key Maryland stakeholders--including youth, parents,
providers, state agency staff, researchers, administrators and policy makers--come together to continue learning and building
Maryland’s system of care. The Maryland System of Care Training Institutes (SOCTI) address a broad array of topic areas, reflecting
the many different initiatives currently underway to improve system of care for children, youth and families in Maryland. The theme
of this 2011 SOCTI is on Outreach to Special Populations: Addressing Disparities and Enhancing Cultural and Linguistic Competence
across the Child-Family Serving Systems. For the first time, the 2011 SOCTI has expanded to include a pre-conference day dedicated
to Maryland’s Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC). This pre-conference day will help to increase understanding about DMC as
a basic premise for equal and fair treatment of all youth with the goal of improving and enhancing child-family serving agencies’
policies and practices. We have included a full day of sessions from Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Race Matters Institute focusing on
strategies and tools for executive leaders. As in years prior, SOCTI will include a Youth Leadership Track that is designed for young
people between the ages of 15 and 26 who have personal experience in the child-serving systems and are ready to take on a
leadership role. We will be providing Continuing Education Units (CEUs) for professional counselors, psychologists and social
workers as well as Residential Care Program Administrators and Early Childhood Core of Knowledge Credits. Our hope is for
everyone to spend these two-three days thinking about how the work that we all do is interrelated and how we can better integrate
our work to create a seamless, effective, culturally and linguistically competent service delivery system to support children, youth
and families.

 While in town for the conference, be sure to enjoy all that Baltimore has to offer. Walk just a few blocks along Pratt Street to the
Inner Harbor and eat, shop, or simply relax and watch the sailboats. Take a water taxi over to the historic Fell’s Point to visit one of
the many quaint restaurant and pubs. Visit Little Italy for some of the best Italian food on the East Coast and gelato to die for! The
Orioles are not in town, but you can stop by the Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards, open until 5pm. However you choose to
spend your time while in town, we are sure you will enjoy it…

We hope that you will take advantage of all that the conference has to offer—listen to the dynamic speakers and take the
opportunity to learn more about Maryland’s systems of care!


Michelle Zabel, M.S.S.
Director, Innovations Institute

Marlene Matarese, M.S.W.
Director of Training & Technical Assistance, Innovations Institute

Mackenzie Oppenheim
Events Coordinator, Innovations Institute
SCHEDULE

    MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2011
    Pre-Conference: Understanding and Impacting Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) Across Maryland’s
    Child-Family Serving Systems

    8:00 AM        REGISTRATION and CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
    8:45 AM        WELCOME and OPENING SESSION
    10:15 AM       BREAK
    10:30 AM       BREAKOUT SESSIONS
    12:00 PM       LUNCH WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER
    1:00 PM        BREAKOUT SESSIONS
    2:30 PM        AFTERNOON REFRESHMENT BREAK
    2:45 PM        BREAKOUT SESSIONS
    4:15 PM        CLOSING KEYNOTE SPEAKER


    TUESDAY, JUNE 14 – WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011
    Maryland System of Care Training Institutes: Outreach to Special Populations: Addressing Disparities and
    Cultural and Linguistic Competence across the Child- Family Serving Systems

    TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 2011
    8:00 AM      REGISTRATION and CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
    9:00 AM      WELCOME and OPENING SESSION
    10:15 AM     BREAK
    10:30 AM     BREAKOUT SESSIONS
    12:00 PM     LUNCH
    1:00 PM      BREAKOUT SESSIONS
    2:30 PM      AFTERNOON REFRESHMENT BREAK
    2:45 PM      BREAKOUT SESSIONS

    WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011
    8:00 AM      CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
    9:00 AM      PLENARY SESSION
    10:15 AM     BREAK
    10:30 AM     BREAKOUT SESSIONS
    12:00 PM     LUNCH
    1:00 PM      BREAKOUT SESSIONS
    2:30 PM      AFTERNOON REFRESHMENT BREAK
    2:45 PM      BREAKOUT SESSIONS
                            MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2011
      Pre-Conference: Understanding and Impacting Disproportionate Minority
           Contact (DMC) Across Maryland’s Child-Family Serving Systems

JUVENILE JUSTICE TRACK
This track will include presentations on racial and ethnic disparities within the juvenile justice system and how other
states are addressing the disparities. Suggested Participants: Juvenile Justice System Caseworkers, Judges, Masters,
Prosecutors, Defense Attorneys, Law Enforcement, and persons interested in the reform of the juvenile justice system.
EDUCATION TRACK
This track will include discussions on the impact of education policies on minorities, the impact of zero tolerance in the
school to prison pipeline and other interesting topics related to education reform and DMC. Suggested Participants:
Local and state school Administrators, school Resource Officers, Teachers, Guidance Counselors, and persons interested
in the reform of the education system.
MENTAL HEALTH TRACK
This track will include discussions on cultural competence and children’s mental health services, implicit bias, and
solutions to addressing the disparities within the system. Suggested Participants: Mental Health Clinicians, Doctors,
Nurses, Local Law Enforcement, Caseworkers, and persons interested in the Mental Health System.
CHILD WELFARE TRACK
This track will include both a presentation of data on disparities within the child welfare arena as well as solutions
towards policy reform and improved outcomes. Suggested Participants: Caseworkers, Administrators, Child Advocacy
Center Staff, Local Law Enforcement, and persons associated with Maryland’s Child Welfare System.

8:00 AM         REGISTRATION and CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

8:45 AM         WELCOME and OPENING SESSION

                Welcome
                Michelle Zabel, Director, Innovations Institute
                Debra Arnold, Eastern Region Chief, Governor's Office of Crime Control & Prevention

                Opening Session
                Kristen Mahoney, Executive Director, Governor’s Office of Crime Control & Prevention
                Heber Watts, Chair, Maryland’s State Advisory Group
                Sam Abed, Secretary, Department of Juvenile Services
                Renata Henry, Deputy Secretary, Behavioral Health & Disabilities, Department of Health & Mental
                Hygiene
                Carol Ann H. Heath-Baglin, Assistant State Superintendent, Maryland State Department of Education

                Keynote
                James Bell, Founder and Executive Director, W. Haywood Burns Institute

10:15 AM        BREAK
MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2011
10:30 AM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
           Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Maryland’s Juvenile Justice System: Where, When, Why?
           Presenters: Lisa Garry, DMC Policy Director, Center for Children’s Law & Policy and Doug Young, Senior
           Faculty Researcher, Institute for Intergovernmental Service and Research at the University of Maryland
           Analyses of juvenile justice system data in Maryland have shown youth of color to appear in
           disproportionately high numbers in virtually all stages of case processing. This presentation will focus on
           findings from a recent statewide assessment of disproportionate minority contact (DMC), detailing the
           level of DMC occurring at various processing stages for African-American and Latino youth, and for girls
           of color.

           The Impact of Educational Policy on African American Males: Is There A School to Prison Pipeline?
           Presenter: Robert Murphy, M. Ed., Specialist of School Completion and Alternative Programs, Maryland
           State Department of Education
           Participants will explore educational policies and life events that impact African American male’s ability
           to connect with schools thus placing them at higher risk for incarceration. The discussion will include the
           impact of School Resource Officers (SRO) in schools and subsequent contact with the justice system. A
           data analysis on schools with SROs vs. schools that do not have SROs will be available. Learners will
           strategize solutions for reducing the number of African American male contacts with the Justice System.

           Are Kids in Some Counties Really Worse Than Others? Finding Solutions to Maryland's Disparity in
           Suspension Rates
           Presenter: BeBe Verdery, Education Reform Director, American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Maryland
           Some Maryland school systems suspend 20% or more of their students each year in comparison to other
           school systems which have rates of 10% or lower. School systems are required to have a system of
           graduated consequences to encourage positive behavior but the wide variability in suspension rates
           suggests that a number of systems are not implementing this system effectively. These disparate rates,
           disproportionately affecting minority youth, should drive policymakers to examine current practices and
           take action to reduce suspensions and expulsions. The workshop will outline the differing rates among
           counties, look at what some school systems have done to reduce suspension rates, and how Restorative
           Justice and Community Conferencing can play a role.

           Disparities and Cultural Competency in Children’s Mental Health: Context and Understanding the
           Affect across Child Serving Systems
           Presenters: Crystal Barksdale, Ph.D, Child Mental Health Disparities Researcher and Licensed Clinical
           Psychologist and Patricia A. Wilson, MSW, LCSW-C, Deputy Director, MENTOR Maryland
           This workshop will begin by describing the distinction between disparities and disproportionality as it
           relates to child serving systems, and providing a brief overview of the scope of disparities in children’s
           mental health. The presenters will present data describing disparities in children’s mental health
           nationally and locally (as available). The workshop will then focus on cultural competency as a key
           strategy in identifying and addressing disparities in mental health and disproportionality in other child
           serving systems.

           Disproportionality in Child Welfare: Facts and Solutions
           Presenter: Sandra Chipungu, Ph.D., Chair, Ph.D. Program, Morgan State University
           Participants will receive an overview of disproportionality in child welfare in the country and Maryland.
           The goal of this workshop is to share the current status of data on disproportionality in child welfare and
           state examples that have begun to address this issue. The objectives are to: (1) Increase understanding
           of the issue and (2) provide examples of what some states are doing to address disproportionality.
MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2011
12:00 PM   LUNCH
           Keynote Speaker
           Rita Cameron-Wedding, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Women’s Studies and Professor of Women’s
           Studies and Ethnic Studies at Sacramento State University

1:00 PM    BREAKOUT SESSIONS
           Policies and Practices that Unfairly Shift Youth of Color into the Juvenile Justice System
           Presenter: Ashley Nellis, Ph.D., Research Analyst, The Sentencing Project
           This workshop will explore several of the policies and practices associated with minority
           overrepresentation in the juvenile justice system, including the growing use of police officers in schools,
           zero tolerance policies, three strikes legislation, unequal access to counsel, the over-policing of some
           communities, and the inappropriate use of detention to provide social services to disadvantaged youth.
           It will be stressed at the outset that some policies and interventions have been designed with good
           intentions but nevertheless lack a mechanism to consider their disparate impact on various groups.

           Healing Hurt People
           Presenter: Theodore Corbin, MD, MPP, Co-Director, Healing Hurt People
           The presentation will describe Healing Hurt People, a hospital-based, trauma informed intervention for
           victims of interpersonal violence. Interpersonal violence disproportionately affects youth of color,
           particularly African-American and Latino youth. Traditional approaches to intervention in this population
           have ignored the power of the health care setting and focused on criminal justice approaches or
           punitive models of behavior change. This new approach incorporates existing knowledge about the
           impact of adversity and trauma to reduce re-injury and future chronic mental and physical illness. The
           presentation will detail the foundation of evidence on which Healing Hurt People is built, components of
           the intervention, and efforts to engage policymakers in trauma informed system change. The
           presentation will also describe innovative approaches to engaging injured youth to help them heal from
           trauma and to share their experiences through their stories.

           Policy Reform on Racial Inequity in Our Child Welfare System: It’s About Both Over-Inclusion and
           Under-Inclusion
           Presenter: Howard Davidson, J.D., Director, Commission on Youth At Risk, ABA Center on Children and
           the Law
           Across the country, data tell us that African American children disproportionally are reported for child
           maltreatment, are the subject of child protective interventions including foster placement, and that they
           exit foster care to family reunification, or to adoptive placements, more slowly than White children. But
           there is also evidence that African American children may be more likely than White children to
           experience maltreatment, to experience severe maltreatment, to experience serious consequences
           from their maltreatment, and to suffer poor outcomes after child welfare interventions. This
           presentation will explore the issue of child welfare racial disparities from the law and policy viewpoint,
           with suggestions for how legislative change, juvenile court reform, and social service agency changes
           might better address these concerns. It will explore how not just race, but also how poverty and inner-
           city family social isolation create injustices that impact disparate attention by the child welfare system.

           Talking Back in Class is Not a Crime: Exploring Successful Strategies to Combat the School to Prison
           Pipeline & Identifying Solutions for You
           Presenter: Alexi Nunn Freeman, Esq., Staff Attorney, Advance Project
           This workshop will focus on what you can do to combat the school-to-prison pipeline by sharing
           examples of successful strategies employed in different cities and states across the country, and engage
           in a participatory process to identify and develop alternatives and solutions for their own communities.
MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2011
2:30 PM   AFTERNOON REFRESHMENT BREAK

2:45 PM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
          Cops and Kids of Color: The Philadelphia DMC Youth/ Law Enforcement Curriculum
          Presenters: George Mosee, Esq., Deputy District Attorney, Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office and
          Lieutenant Garrett Marsh, Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority Police Department
          The Pennsylvania Youth/Law Enforcement Curriculum is a 1-day training for police academy recruits,
          experienced law enforcement officers and youth. This workshop is designed to provide an overview of
          the curriculum, a description of the historical background of its evolution and allow workshop
          participants to engage in a discussion with key officials who developed and implemented this model
          program.

          Lessons Learned: Clayton County’s School Reduction Program & DMC
          Presenter: Joe Vignati, Clayton County, Georgia, National Juvenile Justice Specialist
          This workshop will examine how the Juvenile Court of Clayton County (Georgia), by utilizing a
          community-driven approach, has been able to reduce the overall number of school referrals to juvenile
          court and positively impact the disproportionate contact students of color have with school disciplinary
          officials and the juvenile justice system.

          Implicit Bias: Impact on Decision Making in Youth-Serving Systems
          Presenter: Rita Cameron-Wedding, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Women’s Studies and Professor of
          Women’s Studies and Ethnic Studies at Sacramento State University
          Even the most well-meaning, youth-oriented professionals can discriminate in subtle-yet-consequential
          ways – ways that significantly impact the lives of children, families, and individuals in public agency
          settings. These hidden biases can be expressed, quite unintentionally, through language, attitude, and
          actions. When used by those in positions of decision-making power, these expressions – however slight
          – can influence the interpretation and application of policies, procedures, and the law, and contribute to
          ongoing racial disparity. In this presentation, Dr. Rita Cameron Wedding will provide information on
          recognizing, minimizing, and eliminating hidden biases. She will provide an overview of a safe, effective
          approach to become more aware of personal biases, more effective in communications, and more
          confident in personal abilities to make fully-informed, fact-based decisions – ultimately improving the
          outcomes for the children and families.

          Understanding Disproportionate Treatment of African American Males (Ages 16-25) and the Effects on
          Men of Color
          Presenter: Anees Abdul-Rahim, MHS, Family Support Specialist, Casey Family Services
          The purpose of this workshop is to provide a forum to promote, discuss, and exchange often
          overlooked, important information about the disproportionate treatment of a class of our population.
          Participants will learn about this subtle, yet pervasive manifestation of modern-day racism, and how it
          contributes to a self-destructive mind-set among young African American men that is expressed in the
          formation of gangs and gang violence, as well as a loss of hope and the will to live. The presenter will be
          encouraging attendees to serve as change agents who understand this population’s mind set and
          provide them with effective support services so they can be successful in society. The presenter hopes
          that information in this workshop will curb recidivism and eradicate repeat violations of the law and
          ultimately save lives.

4:15 PM   CLOSING
          Reducing Racial Disparities in Juvenile Justice: Lessons from the Field
          Bart Lubow, Annie E. Casey Foundation
                      MONDAY, JUNE 14 – TUESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011
                         Maryland System of Care Training Institutes:
     Outreach to Special Populations: Addressing Disparities and Enhancing Cultural and
               Linguistic Competence across the Child-Family Serving Systems

TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 2011
8:00 AM     REGISTRATION and CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

9:00 AM     WELCOME and OPENING SESSION
            Welcome
            Michelle Zabel, Director, Innovations Institute

            Opening Session
            Rosemary King Johnston, Executive Director, Governor’s Office for Children
            Renata J. Henry, Deputy Secretary, Behavioral Health & Disabilities, Department of Health & Mental
            Hygiene

            Keynote
            The Challenge of Achieving Equity for Children and Families
            Michael Finley, Esq., Senior Program Assistant, W. Hayward Burns Institute
            This keynote will highlight some of the fundamental challenges system stakeholders must acknowledge
            and overcome to more effectively implement policies and practices that ensure that all youth are
            treated in an equitable manner.

10:15 AM    BREAK

10:30 AM    BREAKOUT SESSIONS
            Fundamentals of Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Juvenile Justice System
            Presenter: Michael Finley, Esq., Senior Program Assistant, W. Hayward Burns Institute
            This workshop will provide a general understanding of many of the issues related to the problem of
            racial and ethnic disparities in the juvenile justice system. The presenter will discuss several of the
            fundamental issues necessary to address the problem such as: 1) effectively framing the discussion; 2)
            using data to identify target populations and analyze the impact of policies and practices on disparities;
            and 3) the importance of involving community representatives as part of the collaborative process. The
            workshop is designed to increase the capacities of stakeholders to begin to organize and champion
            efforts to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in local juvenile justice systems.

            Taking Care of Yourself: Avoiding Compassion Fatigue
            Presenters: Toni Issadore, Director of Training and Family Education, Family Involvement Center, &
            Madge Mosby, Parent Peer Support Partner Trainer and Coach, Innovations Institute
            One of the hardest things to do as a Peer Parent Support Partner and caregiver is taking care of you.
            Our effectiveness in supporting family members can be enhanced by how we take care of ourselves. In
            this session, presenters will provide an overview of the experience of compassion fatigue and how to
            recognize and avoid the effects of ongoing stress while providing support to others.
            (Suggested Participants: Peer Support Partners, Family Navigators, Parent Advocates caregivers, other
            family members)
TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 2011
10:30 AM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
           Implicit Bias: Impact on Decision Making in Youth-Serving Systems
           Presenter: Rita Cameron-Wedding, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Women’s Studies and Professor of
           Women’s Studies and Ethnic Studies at Sacramento State University
           Even the most well-meaning, youth-oriented professionals can discriminate in subtle-yet-consequential
           ways – ways that significantly impact the lives of children, families, and individuals in public agency
           settings. These hidden biases can be expressed, quite unintentionally, through language, attitude, and
           actions. When used by those in positions of decision-making power, these expressions – however slight
           – can influence the interpretation and application of policies, procedures, and the law, and contribute to
           ongoing racial disparity. In this presentation, Dr. Rita Cameron Wedding will provide information on
           recognizing, minimizing, and eliminating hidden biases. She will provide an overview of a safe, effective
           approach to become more aware of personal biases, more effective in communications, and more
           confident in personal abilities to make fully-informed, fact-based decisions – ultimately improving the
           outcomes for the children and families.

           The Seven Challenges: Substance Abuse Adolescent Treatment Model Implemented in DJS Residential
           Treatment Facilities
           Presenters: Alberta L. Brier, CAC-AD, Director of Substance Abuse Services, Maryland Department of
           Juvenile Services; Nancy Schrock, CAC-AD, Western Regional Coordinator of Substance Abuse Services,
           Maryland Department of Juvenile Services; Shannon Bowles, NCC, LCPC, LCADC, Central and Baltimore
           City Regional Coordinator of Substance Abuse Services, Maryland Department of Juvenile Services; and
           Kristine Nossock, BA, Equestrian Therapist; Vision Quest Morning Star Youth Academy
           The session will focus on presenting the basic concepts of The Seven Challenges Adolescent Substance
           Abuse Treatment Model, including how to implement and maintain an evidence-based program (The
           Seven Challenges) in the Department of Juvenile Services committed residential facilities. We will
           discuss the unique challenges faced by staff in: 1) adjusting to the differences between The Seven
           Challenges and traditional 12 Step Programs, 2) explaining the model and getting buy-in from
           stakeholders at all levels including families, and 3) meeting the mental health and substance needs of
           the youth while ensuring safety and security of the facility. The roles of direct-care staff, case managers,
           mental health/substance abuse professionals, and facility directors to maintain the fidelity of the EBT
           model will be examined. In addition, we will discuss how the EBT model is integrated into other
           program components such as restorative justice curriculum, social skills training, emotion management,
           abuse and trauma, and behavior management systems.

           Changes Resulting from the Passage of HB 840 - Children, Youth and Families - Services to Children
           with Special Needs
           Presenter: Kim Malat, Chief, Grant and Contract Administration, Governor's Office for Children
           Changes to the law will be effective July 1, 2011. In preparation for those changes, GOC (in their role as
           staff to the Children’s Cabinet and the SCC) will facilitate a series of technical assistance sessions for LCC
           members and stakeholders to discuss the changes and is proposing to offer some of those sessions at
           SOCTI. Topics to be discussed will include: what is no longer required; what is now required;
           composition and purpose of the Local Care Team (LCT); and administrative functions of the LCT.
TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 2011
10:30 AM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
           Disproportionality in Juvenile Services
           Presenters: Crystal L. Barksdale, Ph.D., Research Specialist, Innovations Institute, University of Maryland,
           Baltimore, School of Medicine; Jennifer Mettrick, MHS, MS, Research Supervisor, Innovations Institute,
           University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Medicine; Tony Bonadio, Research Analyst, Innovations
           Institute, University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Medicine University of Maryland, Baltimore,
           School of Medicine; and Christina Yancey, Ph.D., University of Maryland, Institute for Governmental
           Service and Research
           A recent assessment of Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) in Maryland’s juvenile justice system
           demonstrates that racial and ethnic minority youth are overrepresented at almost every stage of case
           processing, and that the nature of this disproportionality varies across Maryland counties. The following
           session will review findings from an assessment on DMC reduction efforts in the State, provide a more
           in-depth analysis of racial disproportionality occurring at disposition and residential placement, and
           examine the effect of race on length of stay and arrest among youth participating in Evidence-Based
           Programs, particularly Multisystemic Therapy and Functional Family Therapy. The implications of these
           findings, as well as potential strategies to reduce disproportionality and disparities will be discussed.

           Effects of Trauma on Early Childhood
           Presenter: Kyla Liggett-Creel, LCSW-C, Senior Clinician/Foster Parent/Adoptive Parent, Center for Infant
           Study, UMB
           Three developmental categories, speech, motor and social emotional, will be discussed. Participants will
           also learn the four different types of attachment; secure, ambivalent, avoidant and disorganized and
           how these behaviors present behaviorally. Current research on the effects of drug exposure will be
           discussed as well as current interventions. Presenter is a social worker as well as a foster parent with
           over ten years of experience in the child welfare system as a therapist and trainer.

           Youth Gang Awareness
           Presenter: Frank L. Clark Jr. Assistant Director, Gang Intelligence/ Intervention Unit, Maryland
           Department of Juvenile Services
           In recent years, youth gangs have become more widespread and part of our community; Gangs are
           more persistent and menacing today than any other time in history. This session is designed to provide
           participants with an overview of the gang problems that are impacting our youth. It will also give a basic
           understanding of gang culture and why youth join gangs. This session will also identify some gangs
           operating in Maryland. It will also assist the participant to recognize the signs of gangs in communities,
           and their language, dress and culture. Gangs have become a part of the fabric of our society in ways
           that, previously, we never could have imagined. Maryland is not exempt from this national dilemma.
           This training will focus on Maryland's youth gang culture it will also enlighten you about the growing
           challenge of female involvement with gangs and help to enhance participants' knowledge of this
           growing problem. This training's design will provide information to help parents, service providers,
           community groups, youth programs, and teachers to understand the mounting challenge that our youth
           face each day. The session will also provide information regarding the history of gangs, why some youth
           join, some things that youth are exposed that promote the THUG and gang mentality, as well as the
           media influences. We will also discuss some strategies for Prevention and Intervention.

12:00 PM   LUNCH – A plated lunch will be served in rooms 308-310
TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 2011
1:00 PM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
          Disproportionate Representation of African American Youth in the Child Welfare System: The History,
          Continued Institutional Racism and Current Interventions to Address the Issue
          Presenter: Kyla Liggett-Creel, LCSW-C, Senior Clinician/Foster Parent/Adoptive Parent, Center for Infant
          Study, UMB
          Participants will learn the history as well as reasons behind over representation of African American
          youth in foster care. Institutional racism in the medical and child welfare system will also be discussed.
          Current statistics will also be discussed such as 32% of children in the US are African American yet they
          make up 68% of children in foster care, and 71% of youth in Therapeutic Foster Care (Department of
          Health and Human Services, 2006). Participants will also learn about current interventions to address
          disproportionate representation. The role of Family Team Decision Making will be included as an
          intervention that was created to address this issue.

          Trauma Resulting from Out-of-Home Placements
          Presenter: Sheryl Jefferson, MSW, LCSW-C, Clinical Social Worker, The Family Center, Kennedy Krieger
          Institute
          Gain a broader overview of the effects of traumatic stress and how it affects children when there is a
          need for Out-of-Home Placements. The discussion will include the types of traumatic stress and the
          potential for re-traumatization once placement occurs. Strategies for reducing the effects of trauma will
          be identified and discussed.

          Providers Engaging Families in Evidence Based Practices and Promising Approaches
          Presenters: Natalie Keegan, Research Project Coordinator, Innovations Institute, University of Maryland,
          Baltimore, School of Medicine; Sharon Stephan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Maryland,
          Baltimore, School of Medicine; Carol S. Allenza, J.D., Director, Family Leadership Institute/Training,
          Maryland Coalition of Families; Crystal Barksdale, Ph.D., Research Specialist, University of Maryland,
          Baltimore, School of Medicine; and Cathy Symister-David, MA in Education, Family Services Supervisor,
          Montgomery County Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health
          This session will provide family support partners, family navigators, family advocates, peer specialists,
          and providers and agency representatives with a general overview of EBPs and other promising
          approaches, with a specific emphasis on engagement strategies. This session will begin a dialogue
          around strategies for assisting families in accessing EBPs and promising approaches, as well as strategies
          supporting their involvement in treatment.

          Cross-Racial/Ethnic Practice for the Clinician, Supervisor and Administrator
          Presenter: Benjamin G. Kohl Jr., Ph.D., LCSW-C, Director of Programs: Mid-Shore, Eastern Shore
          Psychological Services, Inc.
          The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Standards for Cultural Competency emphasize the
          importance of race and culture in social work treatment, supervision and administration. This didactic
          and experiential workshop will help practitioners in both private practice and agency settings become
          more effective in cross-racial/ethnic relationships. Current theory and case examples will be used to
          develop an awareness of how racial identity connects with the dynamics of privilege and disadvantage in
          therapeutic and supervisory relationships. Participants will learn: 1) Guidelines for facilitating
          discussions of race and racism in human service treatment and supervision settings, 2) How an
          awareness of the relationship between power and social identity group memberships can enhance their
          work with clients and colleagues, 3) Practical strategies for integrating the realities of structural racism
          in the clinical hour and human services administration.
TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 2011
1:00 PM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
           “I Have a Roadmap for My Trip”: Using the Family Journey Assessment to Help Family Members
          Progress on Their Empowerment Journey.
          Presenters: Celia Serkin, Executive Director, Montgomery County Federation of Families for Children’s
          Mental Health, and Bruno Anthony, Ph.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, Director of Research
          and Evaluation, Center for Child and Human Development
          The presentation will describe how family support partners and family navigators can use the Family
          Journey Assessment to help family members to identify specific skills, information, and support needed
          to attain caregiver empowerment. The presenters will demonstrate how the data extrapolated from the
          measure can be used to determine the specific level of family peer-to-peer support that would be
          beneficial to a family member during the different stages in the service delivery period. The presenters
          will describe the structure and implementation of the measure and illustrate how it helps to shape the
          work of family support partners and family navigators. The presentation also will describe how the data
          from the Family Journey Assessment can be shared with child and family team members to develop
          specific interventions for the plan of care and to assess progress. The presentation will highlight the
          participatory development process in creating the Family Journey Assessment, which involved the
          Montgomery County Federation for Children’s Mental Health’s family support partners and family
          navigators, all of whom are legacy family members, and the Georgetown University Center for Child and
          Human Development.
          (Suggested Participants: Peer Support Partners, family navigators, parent advocates)

          Implementation Science for the Non-Scientist
          Presenter: Sarah Kaye, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Medicine
          There is a growing science behind the process of implementation to support comprehensive and lasting
          change. Research tells us that training staff or writing new regulations are not enough to fully
          implement evidence-based and promising practices. This session will review best practices in
          implementation based on findings from implementation science. It will identify important components
          of any implementation effort by focusing on concrete steps which leaders, administrators, and
          supervisors can make to increase the success of change so that children and families can achieve
          maximum benefit from new programs.

          Treating Trauma in Immigrant Populations (3 hour session)
          Presenter: Karen Hanscom, Ph.D., Executive Director, Advocates for Survivors of Torture and Trauma;
          Sheetal Patel, Ph.D., Licensed Staff Psychologist, Advocates for Survivors of Torture and Trauma; and
          Christine Chianese, PsyD Student, Argosy University
          This presentation will focus on the psychological treatment of immigrant trauma survivors. Specifically,
          we will discuss the prevalence of torture and trauma in this population, cross cultural influences on
          presentations of trauma symptoms, and culturally relevant forms of treatment. A cross-cultural model
          for providing psychological treatment to traumatized immigrant populations will be presented.

          Reaching Urban, African American Families and Youth Impacted by Interpersonal Trauma: Strategies
          for Screening, Engagement, Assessment and Treatment Planning (3 hour session)
          Presenter: Kay Connors, LCSW-C, Project Director, Family Informed Trauma Treatment Center
          Interpersonal violence shatters the protective shield that families and children need for growth and well
          being. Trauma informed, family centered strategies support SOC providers’ efforts to effectively engage
          families and support positive outcomes to mitigate the traumatic events and support recovery and
          resiliency.
TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 2011
1:00 PM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
          Resiliency in Action: How Schools, Families, & Communities Build “Bounce Back” Kids (3 hour session)
          Presenter: Nan Henderson, M.S.W., President, Resiliency in Action, Inc.
          In this session, participants will thoroughly examine the research base of resiliency that is emerging from
          the fields of psychology, psychiatry, sociology, and education. The emphasis of the training will be
          practical application of these research findings in strategies that can be used to move children and youth
          "from risk to resiliency." Examples of practices and programs that are building resiliency will be shared.
          The session will conclude with “The Four Most Important Steps to Fostering Resiliency.”

2:30 PM   AFTERNOON REFRESHMENT BREAK

2:45 PM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
          Understanding & Meeting the Needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth in the
          Juvenile Justice System
          Presenters: Lee D. Crump, Ph.D., Chief of Psychological Services, Maryland Department of Juvenile
          Services and Johnitha McNair, Superintendent, Waxter Children Center, Maryland DJS
          In addition to providing a summation of the relevant literature on LGBT youth, first and second hand
          anecdotal accounts of “LGBT related experiences” from DJS staff, LGBT youth, and family members will
          be provided. A summation of applicable laws and overview of the Maryland DJS policies, procedures,
          and action plans for creating a safe and supportive environment for LGBT youth will also be covered.

          Introduction to the Common Practice Elements of Evidence-Based Practices
          Presenter: Sharon Stephan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of
          Medicine
          As systems seek to increase their efficiency and effectiveness, interest in evidence-supported
          interventions has grown dramatically. The common elements approach was developed to identify and
          encourage utilization of practice techniques that have been found to be effective in manualized
          evidence-supported interventions. This approach also emphasizes the use of data to make decisions-
          including data from the client’s progress toward treatment goals as well as scientific evidence. The
          objectives of this presentation are: (1) to familiarize participants with the common elements approach,
          (2) to present some of the resources available to support the use of common elements, and (3) to share
          some of current Maryland efforts to infuse the common elements in teaching and practice.

          Promoting Behavioral Health Equity for African American Children and Families in Rural Maryland
          Presenters: Vivian Jackson, National Center for Cultural Competence and National TA Center for
          Children’s Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, and Joyce
          Sebian, National TA Center for Children’s Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and
          Human Development
          This session will explore the intersection between disparities that exist based on rural geography with
          disparities that exist by racial identity as African American for behavioral health services for children and
          families in Maryland. It will use the framework of the 5 A’s - Availability, Accessibility, Affordability,
          Appropriateness, and Acceptability- that clarify various domains of disparities and offer guidance on
          public health approaches that will inform strategic interventions to address disparities and promote
          behavioral health. Participants will be guided through a process to initiate an intervention relevant to
          their own community.
TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 2011
2:45 PM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
          How Family Navigators and Family Support Workers Engage Families
          Presenter: Name: Crystal Barksdale, Ph.D., Research Specialist, Innovations Institute, University of
          Maryland, Baltimore, School of Medicine; Cathy Symister-David, MA in Education, Family Services
          Supervisor, Montgomery County Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health; Karina Funes
          Oviedo, Family Support Partner Team Leader, Montgomery County Federation of Families for Children’s
          Mental Health; and Melody Smith, Family Navigator/Family Support Partner, Montgomery County
          Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health
          This workshop will provide family support partners, family navigators, family advocates, and peer
          specialists with specific strategies and tools to help families understand and engage in EBPs. As cultural
          brokers, these workers play an important role in promoting effective communication between evidence-
          based practice providers and family members.

          Tips and Strategies for Effective Documentation
          Presenters: Toni Issadore, Director of Training and Family Education, Family Involvement Center, &
          Madge Mosby, Parent Peer Support Partner Trainer and Coach, Innovations Institute, University of
          Maryland, Baltimore, School of Medicine
          Effective documentation is one of the essential requirements for providing peer support and is a way for
          a Peer Parent Support Partner to verify the work they do with families. This session will cover topics
          related to the importance of documentation in work with families, the process for documentation, tips
          for effective documentation and strategies for preparation and organization related to documentation.
          (Suggested Participants: Peer Support Partners, family navigators, parent advocates)
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

8:00 AM    CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

9:00 AM    WELCOME and OPENING SESSION
           Welcome
           Marlene Matarese, Director of Training and Technical Assistance, Innovations Institute

           Opening Session
           Sam Abed, Secretary, Department of Juvenile Services

           Keynote Speaker
           Mirtha Beadle, Deputy Director, Office of Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

10:15 AM   BREAK

10:30 AM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
           Health Care Reform, Federal Strategic Initiatives and You: Opportunities to Reduce Racial and Ethnic
           Health Disparities for Children and Families
           Presenter: Mirtha Beadle, M.P.A., Deputy Director, Office of Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health
           and Human Services
           This workshop will provide information on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
           Strategic Action Plan to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities and on the newly launched National
           Partnership for Action. Attendees will learn about these federal initiatives and how they intersect with
           implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Health Care Reform). Attendees will
           learn about what they can do to help reduce health disparities for children and families in Maryland and
           how they can take the pledge to show their support for the National Partnership to End Health
           Disparities.

           An Overview of the Race Matters Toolkit— Part I
           Presenters: Delia Carmen, Director, Race Matters Institute, Voices for America's Children, and Paula
           Dressel, Vice President, Just Partners, Inc.
           Participants will be provided with an overview of the entire contents of the Race Matters (RM) Toolkit
           including its origin, framework, point of view, and core tools that situate it differently from other anti-
           racism; cultural competency training approaches. Participants will be given working definitions of
           commonly used terms in today’s racial equity discussions in an effort to establish their own shared
           language to foster improved understanding of what is meant by such terms as racial equity; race
           informed analyses, disparities and disproportionality to foster improved communication about race.
           Using the What’s Race Got to Do with It? Tool, participants will gain important insights about the
           historical underpinnings as well as the “upstream” policies and practices that have led to the
           disparities/disproportionality of children of color in systems of care today. These insights are designed
           to catalyze participants desire to move to action in an effort to identify and dismantle deeply embedded
           inequities in systems of care.

           Policies and Practices that Unfairly Shift Youth of Color into the Juvenile Justice System
           Presenter: Ashley Nellis, Ph.D., Research Analyst, The Sentencing Project
           This workshop will explore several of the policies and practices associated with minority
           overrepresentation in the juvenile justice system, including the growing use of police officers in schools,
           zero tolerance policies, three strikes legislation, unequal access to counsel, the over-policing of some
           communities, and the inappropriate use of detention to provide social services to disadvantaged youth.
           It will be stressed at the outset that some policies and interventions have been designed with good
           intentions but nevertheless lack a mechanism to consider their disparate impact on various groups.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011
10:30 AM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
           Consumer to Service to Science: Consumer Perspective of an Evidence-Infused Treatment Foster Care
           Model
           Presenters: Name: Paul Brylske, Director of Therapeutic Foster Care, The Family Center at the Kennedy
           Krieger Institute; Angela Vaughn-Lee, Baltimore Director, Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s
           Mental Health; Carl Price, KKI –TF Alumni Youth; Kwaynmay Harris, KKI –TF Alumni Youth; Shanna Green,
           KKI –TF Alumni Youth; Michelle Brown, KKI –TF Current and Treatment Parents Organization; Debbie
           Barnes, KKI –TF Current and Treatment Parents Organization; and William Shaw, KKI –TF Current and
           Treatment Parents Organization
           Whether evidence-based, best practice, or promising practice, practice models must ultimately meet the
           needs of consumers and stakeholders. The Trauma Integrative Model (TIM) is an evidence-infused
           Treatment Foster Care Model which treats complex trauma of children and youth in foster care. This
           model includes the voice of the consumers and stakeholders at the programmatic as well as practice
           level in its “focus of change”. A panel of consumers (youth, treatment parents and families) will discuss
           their experiences which will include areas of input into the Model‘s development and fidelity. Current
           research in treatment foster as well as practice based outcomes (CANS, education achievement,
           placement stability, and permanency) will be discussed.

           Making Successful Connections Between Families and Resources
           Presenters: Sheila Philip, Provider Relations Director, Maryland Choices, Inc.; Celia Serkin, Executive
           Director, Montgomery County Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health; and Kim Malat, Chief,
           Grant and Contract Administration, Governor’s Office for Children
           As a Care Management Entity, an important part of our work with families is to make connections with
           resources in the community that effectively meet the needs of each family. In order to make successful
           connections, it is critical that the family’s culture, values, and linguistic competencies are considered. In
           addition, understanding the role of the family in the implementation of actual service delivery and the
           importance of that role is a concept that is not always accepted by providers. This presentation would
           highlight how embracing families and including them throughout the process can actually improve
           results.

           Place Matters in Maryland: Goals, Outcomes, and Future Directions
           Presenters: David Ayer, Deputy Executive Director of Operations, Maryland Department of Human
           Resources, Social Services Administration; Terry V. Shaw, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland,
           School of Social Work; and Linda Carter, Manager, Research, Evaluation and Quality Assurance,
           Maryland Department of Human Resources, Social Services Administration
           The primary principle behind the Maryland Child Welfare Systems’ Place Matters initiative is that every
           child deserves a home. Place Matters is a results oriented, data driven initiative designed to move youth
           toward a permanent home. Family Centered Practice is the practice model in Maryland and it requires
           caseworkers to involve youth and family members in the decision making process through Family
           Involvement Meetings and community partnerships. An integral part of the Place Matters initiative is
           the evaluation of state specific and federally mandated child welfare outcome measures, one such
           outcome of interest is the effect on disproportionality and disparity.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011
10:30 AM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
           Understanding, Recognizing, Supporting and Advocating for Children & Families with Mental Health
           Needs
           Presenters: Augustine Cook, Family Navigator, Maryland Coalition of Families; Bernadette Townsend,
           Family Navigator, Maryland Coalition of Families; and Audra Cherbonnier, Family Navigator, Maryland
           Coalition of Families
           This workshop is intended for families and/or care providers that want to learn a basic understanding of
           mental health, how it affects the young child, how to recognize warning signs, how to support a family
           that might be caring for a child with mental health needs and advocacy basics.
           (Suggested Participants: Peer Support Partners, Family Navigators, Parent Advocates caregivers, other
           family members)

           Understanding Emerging Adulthood: Theory, Research, Practice, and Family Perspectives
           Presenters: Elizabeth Connors, Healthy Transitions Initiative Evaluation Coordinator, Innovations
           Institute, University of Maryland, Baltimore; Kathleen Stein, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of
           Special Education, Towson University; and Youth TBD
           This presentation will provide specific information about how to approach service work with emerging
           adults (ages 16-29) with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD). The impact of having an EBD during
           this life stage will be discussed within Jeffrey Arnett’s (2006) theoretical framework of Emerging
           Adulthood. This presentation will also provide an introduction to the TIP model, nationwide evidence-
           based practices to serve this population, and currently-available services in Maryland. All content will
           be supplemented by feedback from family partner panelists.

           Youth Gang Awareness
           Presenter: Frank L. Clark Jr. Assistant Director, Gang Intelligence/ Intervention Unit, Maryland
           Department of Juvenile Services
           In recent years, youth gangs have become more widespread and part of our community; Gangs are
           more persistent and menacing today than any other time in history. This session is designed to provide
           participants with an overview of the gang problems that are impacting our youth. It will also give a basic
           understanding of gang culture and why youth join gangs. This session will also identify some gangs
           operating in Maryland. It will also assist the participant to recognize the signs of gangs in communities,
           and their language, dress and culture. Gangs have become a part of the fabric of our society in ways
           that, previously, we never could have imagined. Maryland is not exempt from this national dilemma.
           This training will focus on Maryland's youth gang culture it will also enlighten you about the growing
           challenge of female involvement with gangs and help to enhance participants' knowledge of this
           growing problem. This training's design will provide information to help parents, service providers,
           community groups, youth programs, and teachers to understand the mounting challenge that our youth
           face each day. The session will also provide information regarding the history of gangs, why some youth
           join, some things that youth are exposed that promote the THUG and gang mentality, as well as the
           media influences. We will also discuss some strategies for Prevention and Intervention.

12:00 PM   LUNCH – A plated lunch will be served in rooms 308-310
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011
1:00 PM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
          Racial Equity Impact Analyses Tool Workshop—Part II
          Presenters: Delia Carmen, Director, Race Matters Institute, Voices for America's Children, and Paula
          Dressel, Vice President, Just Partners, Inc.
          Participants will be provided with an overview of the rationale behind the development of the Racial
          Equity Impact Analyses Tool, its utility and the benefits that can be derived from its application. In
          breakout sessions, participants will be given an opportunity to test-drive the tool. They will be
          encouraged to either share a “real life” example that they would like the breakout group to work on
          together or will be provided with a hypothetical, relevant case scenario provided by the trainers.
          (Suggested participants include: Administrators, Judicial/Agency Decision and Policy Makers and Social
          Workers) *Participants must have attended Part I to participate in this workshop

          The Dejah Project: CARE (Creating a Respectful Environment) for Families - A Child Welfare Initiative
          to Serve High Intensity Youth in Family Care
          Presenters: Judith Schagrin, LCSW-C, Assistant Director, Baltimore County Department of Social Services;
          Susan Loysen, LCSW-C, Supervisor, Family Team Decision-Making, Baltimore County Department of
          Social Services; Deborah Barr, LCSW-C, Administrator for Placement and Support Resources, Baltimore
          County Department of Social Services; Tiffany Thames, Parent; and Kelly Kates, Parent
          This will be a data-driven presentation intended to highlight the needs of high intensity youth served in
          congregate care settings, describing the characteristics of youth in group care, and the extent to which
          externalizing behavior and special needs are driving entry into the child welfare system. We will
          examine the role of race and culture, and review the types of group care serving high intensity youth.
          The presentation will also describe one local department’s initiative to reduce group care, their findings
          and recommendations, and the perspective of parents with regards to the availability and quality of
          community based care to keep their children safe and stable at home.

          Demystifying Child Psychiatry Prescribing
          Presenter: Gloria M Reeves M.D., Assistant Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of
          Medicine, Psychiatry
          This session will provide an overview of general prescribing principles and practices in child psychiatry.
          Attendees will to learn about the most commonly prescribed medications and side effects. There will
          also be a discussion of medication monitoring concerns. The intended audience for this session includes
          care coordinators, case workers, supervisors, and family members.

          Trauma Informed Care: What Families Need to Know
          Presenter: Toni Issadore, Director of Training, Family Education and Evaluation, Family Involvement
          Center
          When we talk about “trauma informed care” we are NOT referring to trauma itself or any particular
          form of therapy or treatment. Trauma informed care is a philosophy which guides systems and service
          delivery by incorporating knowledge about trauma and seeks ways to facilitate healing and
          empowerment and emphasizes collaboration throughout the system. When trauma is not considered,
          people see themselves and are looked upon by their behaviors alone, rather than with the
          understanding of what they have experience. We will discuss the need to see people as a whole and
          increase understanding of the impact of trauma on people’s lives, relationship, connections and
          communities. Opportunities for healing rest within the context of those relations connections and
          communities.
          (Suggested Participants: Peer Support Partners, Family Navigators, Parent Advocates, caregivers, other
          family members)
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011
1:00 PM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
          Creative Solutions to Supporting Social Emotional Wellness and Recovery in Military Families with
          Young Children (3 hour session)
          Presenter: Name: Kay Connors, LCSW-C, Project Director, Family Informed Trauma Treatment Center;
          Kyla Liggett-Creel, LCSW-C, Supervisor, Ph.D. Candidate UMSSW, Taghi Modarressi Center for Infant
          Study; Jane Walker, Executive Director, Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health;
          Renee Cotton, Family Navigator, Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health
          Effective practice with military families requires the same type of cultural understanding that we would
          expect to have in order to work with any other unique groups in our society. Participants will learn
          about collaborations and creative solutions geared toward supporting military families. Participants will
          also become more aware of the ways to support militaries families and children coping with multiple
          deployments, re-integration, traumatic grief, and new/changing roles of family members.

          Effective Strategies for DJS Involved Youth: Adapting Wraparound and FLAVORS (3 hour session)
          Presenters: Joseph Wilson, LCSW-C, Clinical Director, Maryland Choices and Melody Smith, Family
          Support Partner, Montgomery County Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health
          This workshop will focus on two programs that effectively engage youth involved in the juvenile justice
          system, their families and system partners, and the positive outcomes that result from program
          involvement. First, presenters will present how to effectively utilize the Wraparound model with youth
          referred by the juvenile justice system. Second, the presenters will also cover other effective strategies
          that have shown to have a direct impact on behaviors and result in positive outcomes. This discussion
          will center around the FLAVORS Program (Families Linked to Advocacy and a Variety Of Resources and
          Supports). FLAVORS is a program for families of children and youth involved in the juvenile justice
          system and is comprehensive and multifaceted approach of supporting, educating and empowering
          culturally diverse family members of children and youth who have been or are currently involved with
          law enforcement and/or are further into the juvenile justice system.

          Nuts and Bolts of Assessment for Cultural and Linguistic Competence: Organizational and Personal
          Assessment (3 hour session)
          Presenter: Vivian H. Jackson, Ph.D., Senior Policy Associate, National Center for Cultural Competence,
          National TA Center for Children’s Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human
          Development, Washington, DC
          This session is designed to help participants develop an approach to organizational and personal cultural
          and linguistic competence assessment that is appropriate for the organizational goals and contexts. It
          will review the process of determining the focus of the assessment, the tools and processes to use for
          the assessment, methods to prepare the organization for the assessment, critical elements to consider
          for analysis, dissemination of findings and organizational planning. Participants will have hands-on
          opportunities to examine a variety of assessment tools.

          Moving the Margins 201 (3 hour session)
          Presenter: Karen Finn, Senior Consultant, Results Leadership Group
          The Moving the Margins training was jointly developed by the National Association of Social Workers
          and the Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund. This interactive training session is the second of two
          workshops. It is a more advanced curriculum designed in skill-building modules with each piece
          exploring the issues that LGBTQ clients face in greater depth. Attendees should have had Moving the
          Margins 101 or the equivalent before participating in this workshop. The modules include scenarios that
          can be explored in small group discussions, role-playing and learning labs.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011
1:00 PM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
          The Ties That Bind: Connections Between Foster Children and their Biological Families (3 hour session)
          Presenter: Melissa Watson-Clark, LCSW-C, Trainer, Innovations Institute, University of Maryland,
          Baltimore, School of Medicine
          On any given day there are about 500,000 children and youth in the foster care system in the United
          States. In Maryland alone there are approximately 9,000 children in out of home care. These children,
          through no fault of their own, are often separated from their parents, siblings, extended family, and
          communities with no idea where they are going or how long they will be away. Many age out of the
          foster care system with few supports and little idea of how to support themselves. More so than any
          other factor, aging out of the foster care system has been shown to increase the likelihood of
          incarceration, unplanned pregnancy, not completing high school, unemployment or underemployment,
          homelessness, unmet mental health needs, violent and unhealthy relationships. What can make a
          difference in these outcomes? If our children can maintain relationships with families, even if it is
          necessary for them to continue in care, they can have someone committed to remaining in their lives for
          the long run. Foster parents can serve as the bridge of support that helps these children connect or
          reestablish connections with the families they were separated from. The goal of the workshop is to
          discuss how a strong relationship between your foster child and their family of origin can help them
          forge those lifelong relationships that serve to enhance their quality of life and avoid some of the
          negatives outcomes that so many of them experience.

2:30 PM   AFTERNOON REFRESHMENT BREAK

2:45 PM   BREAKOUT SESSIONS
          How to Talk About Race Tool Workshop—Part III
          Presenters: Delia Carmen, Director, Race Matters Institute, Voices for America's Children, and Paula
          Dressel, Vice President, Just Partners, Inc.
          Participants will be provided with an overview of the research that frames the development of the How
          to Talk about Race? Tool, its utility and the benefits that can be derived from developing race informed
          messages. In breakout sessions participants will be given an opportunity to test-drive the tool. They will
          be encouraged to either share a “real life” example that they would like their team to work on together
          or they will be provided with a hypothetical, yet relevant case scenario provided by the trainers.
          (Suggested participants include: Administrators, Judicial/Agency Decision and Policy Makers and Social
          Workers) *Participants must have attended Part I to participate in this workshop

          Changes Resulting from the Passage of HB 840 - Children, Youth and Families - Services to Children
          with Special Needs
          Presenter: Kim Malat, Chief, Grant and Contract Administration, Governor's Office for Children
          Changes to the law will be effective July 1, 2011. In preparation for those changes, GOC (in their role as
          staff to the Children’s Cabinet and the SCC) will facilitate a technical assistance session for LCC members
          and stakeholders to discuss the changes. Topics to be discussed will include: what is no longer required;
          what is now required; composition and purpose of the Local Care Team (LCT); and administrative
          functions of the LCT.

          History Repeats Itself Because No One Was Listening the First Time: Are You Listening?
          Presenters: Kimberly Estep, M.A., Trainer and Coach, Innovations Institute, University of Maryland,
          School of Medicine, and Wai Chow, Ph.D., Research Faculty, Innovations, Institute, University of
          Maryland, School of Medicine
          We will explain the importance of gathering a family’s history and explore this history from a
          relationship and attachment framework. Then we will provide explanations of how this interpretation of
          the family story can be used to guide interventions and attain positive outcomes for youth and
          caregivers.

				
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