Docstoc

long range plans 2011-2012

Document Sample
long range plans 2011-2012 Powered By Docstoc
					                  WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                   INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                     FOUNDED IN 1869
                              L O N G - R A N G E        P L A N

Name:     Doris Sears

Social Security #: ***-**-5606                           Contract Level:

Email Address:    dsears@fsd1.org

Home or Cell Phone Number:   843-667-4122

Date Submitted:     8-20-2011

Teaching Assignment(s):    Precalculus CP, Algebra 2CP, Precalculus H, MYP German 4



Class Schedule and Planning Period(s) for the Year:      2009 - 2010
            Class                           Days                           Times
Precalculus CP                    1st semester                   1st Block
Algebra 2CP                       1st semester                   2nd Block
Planning                          1st semester                   3rd Block
Precalculus H                     1st semester                   4th Block
Precalculus CP                    2nd semester                   1st Block
Algebra 2CP                       2nd semester                   2nd Block
Planning                          2nd semester                   3rd Block
MYP German                        2nd semester                   4th Block

General Background Information of Students (Including sources):
Learning about my students and setting high expectations:
1. Index Card: On the first day of class all students find an index card with their name at their
assigned seat. Students fill the card out with address, phone number, birth date, any health or
other information about them that I need to know. On the back of the index card they record
their class schedule for the semester. From the index cards I prepare a birthday calendar to
display their names in class during the month of their birthday. Their birthday note serves as a
free homework pass during the semester.
2. Journal entries: All students write short journal entries several times each week. On
Mondays these entries ask about weekend events, which give me a lot of insight into my
students’ living situations and feelings. The writing also gives me a relatively accurate
assessment of each student’s ability level and preparation for the course. Math students will
communicate information as part of real world problems.
3. Informal class discussions: All students share what they have learned in previous German
and Mathematics courses.
4. Student Data: A record of pertinent student data will be obtained from the school via Power
School and maintained for assessment evaluation and feedback.
                  WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                   INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                      FOUNDED IN 1869
Long-Range Learning and Developmental Goals for Students:
The common goals for all levels of Mathematics are that the students gain proficiency in:
    1. Solving problems as related to the Curriculum Alignment Document in algebraic,
       graphical, verbal and representational modes.
    2. Using technology to support mathematical problem solving.
    3. Connecting mathematical knowledge to prior learning and applying definitions of a
       more abstract, collegiate form.
All objectives are tied to the South Carolina Mathematics Standards.

The common goals for all levels of German are that the students gain proficiency in:

    1. Conducting dialogues in German on a variety of every-day topics.
    2. Responding in German to oral stimuli as given by teacher, listening CDs, video, TV,
       etc.
    3. Answering questions in German about reading passages from a variety of texts.
    4. Writing essays, interpretative writings, etc. of varying length on a variety of themes
       related to every-day topics.
    5. Forming sentences with correct grammatical structures.
All objectives are tied to the Foreign Language Standards for South Carolina.

Units of instruction to be taught in each subject or preparation, (Including sequence and
timelines; including federal, state and district curriculum requirements; including
requirements on the use of technology; and including how the diverse needs of learners
will be addressed through technology):

Instructional Strategies:
    a) Problem solving skills: Work real world math problems.
 Form sentences with correct grammatical structures.
    b) Independent learning: Respond to text passages, compose essays, work math
        problems.
    c) Active learning and collaborative learning: Conduct dialogues with classmates,
        solve math problems cooperatively.
    d) Different learning styles: a variety of activities, such as listening to recordings,
        prepare PowerPoint presentations, write journal entries, etc.

Different rates of learning:
a)Teacher transitions students from one activity to another. Students, who finish early, start on
a part of the following activity. Students are also encouraged to read in their German novel if
they are finished early with an activity. Students may make up missed assignments.
b) Instructional strategies are modified if they do not engage a certain group of students.
Materials are adjusted if the material is too difficult or easy for a group of students or is too far
removed from the students’ interest.
                      WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                      INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                         FOUNDED IN 1869
   Expectations and Requirements           Precalculus CP/Honors            Mrs. D. Sears

       1. Students are expected to be in their classroom with materials ready to begin instruction
          when the bell rings.
       2. Students are expected to talk during class only with the teacher’s permission.
       3. Students are expected to remain in their seats until the teacher dismisses class.
       4. Students are expected to follow school rules.

Infractions of any of the stated rules result in an oral reprimand. Repeated infractions require a
note, phone call or e-mail to the parents from the teacher and subsequent school disciplinary
procedures.

                           Class Requirements and Procedures
All students need to have a 3-ring binder and a thin spiral notebook (to be kept in the binder) for
homework. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is recommended. Books and notebooks will be
brought to class every day. The notebook is to be kept in sequential order and will be randomly
checked by the teacher.
 Homework will be assigned and checked during every class period. In addition students work on
a daily check up of 4 or 5 problems from the homework which is turned in, checked and recorded
every day. Once a week the check up grade is recorded as a Homework grade in Power school.
Grading system:
All tests and quizzes are announced in advance and students will average 20 short written tests or
quizzes per nine weeks. This gives the student’s grade an even balance. Tests and quizzes count
50%, class work, journal, projects, homework 30% and nine-week exams 20% of the nine-week
grade. The ‘Second Chance’ policy will be followed, giving students a chance to make up work
that does not meet the standard for a C to bring the grade up.
Tutoring sessions will be available before and after school on Mondays, Wednesday s and
Thursdays.

I am looking forward to a great year with your student. Please contact me at 664-8440 or e-mail me
at Dsears@fsd1.org if you have any questions concerning your son/daughter’s progress or set up an
appointment with the guidance department to meet me in person.
                                                                . Mrs. D. Sears
Student name ___________________________________________

Parent signature_______________________________________ Date ______________
                 WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                  INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                    FOUNDED IN 1869
Precalculus CP/Honors 2011-2012                                               Mrs. D. Sears

Materials:
Students will need a three-ring binder and a graphing calculator. A graphing calculator will be
used almost daily during instruction. A TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator is recommended for
your student. This calculator will definitely be needed in all subsequent mathematics classes
until your student graduates.

Homework policy 2011 - 2012:
Homework is assigned and checked every day. A class roster is used where homework and
date are identified and a check mark placed next to the students' names as I go around the room
and scan the work. During this time the students work on a daily check up of 4 or 5 problems
from the homework. This is turned in, checked and assigned up to 4 or 5 points which are
recorded every day. After 5 or more days the points are added up and multiplied to give a top
grade of 100. This grade is recorded as a Homework grade in Power school.

Second Chance Policy:
Students will have an opportunity to make up failing/incomplete tests and major assignments
within 5 days and will receive a grade no higher than 77 or the higher grade of the original
work and the remake.

Grading Policy:
All tests and quizzes are announced in advance and students will average 20 short written tests
or quizzes per nine weeks. This gives the student’s grade an even balance.
Tests and quizzes count 50%, class work 30%, and nine-week exams 20% of the nine-week
grade. Up to three Homework bonus points can be awarded and added to the class work/test
grade at the end of each quarter

Extra Help:
Before or after school help is available on most days. I strongly urge students to see me
immediately if they had problems with an assignment. Most students would only have to stay
for a few minutes to get the help they need.. In the afternoon I am usually available until 4:00
– 4:30 pm. If students would like to work in a group in my room before or after school, they
are definitely encouraged to meet with me. I encourage my students to work individually and
then evaluate answers as a whole group. During individual work I am available for questions
and will clarify problems for the entire class, if two or more students have the same problem.
Please encourage your student to refrain from talking during individual work. Conversations
during individual work discourage students from trying to think deeper on their own.

Contact information:
Please contact me at DSears@fsd1.org or schedule a conference with the guidance department
at 843-664-8440 if I can be of help to you or your student.

Thank you for allowing me to work with your student during the 2009-2010 school year.

Mrs. Doris Sears
Mathematics Teacher
                 WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                 INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                   FOUNDED IN 1869
Precalculus CP

SUGGESTED SUPPLEMENTS:
Real World Math CBL/CBR, Texas Instruments

TEXT:
PreCalculus: Mathematics for Calculus, 4th edition (CP)
Thomson Learning/ Brooks Cole Publishing, 2002

GOALS:
· Students should be able to use the fundamental concepts of algebra, trigonometry,
and analytic geometry.
· Students should be able to show how algebra and trigonometry can be used to
model real life problems.
· Students should be able to graph, identify, and explain the general characteristics
of quadratic, polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, radical, power,
and rational relations and functions.
· Students should be able to express mathematical ideas and concepts using the rule
of four: verbal, analytical, graphical, and numerical.
· Students should be able to use technology to help solve problems, experiment,
interpret results, and verify conclusions
PRECALCULUS COLLEGE PREP RESOURCES:
· Graphing Calculators
· Overhead calculator or TI Presenter
· VCR
· Optional (Data projector)
Practice Masters in Algebra using the TI-89 by DavidLawrence, Pencil Point Press, INC.
· A Watchful Cup Never Cools, Key Curriculum Press
· Parametrics and Polars for Everyone, Venture Publishing
· PreCalculus, By Wayne Bentley, McGraw Instructional Fair, TS Denison
· Algebra 2, By Chad Helgeson, Instructional Fair, TS Denison
· Precalculus and Trigonometry Explorations, By Paul Foerster, Key Curriculum Press, INC.

Websites:
http://education.ti.com
http://www.nctm.org/high/index.asp
http://mathforum.org
http://www.apcentral.collegeboard.com/pre-ap
http://www.sosmath.com/index.html
http://archives.math.utk.edu/topics/precalculus.html
http://occawlonline.pearsoned.com/bookbind/pubbooks/demana_a
wl/chapter1/deluxe.html
                      WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                       INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                           FOUNDED IN 1869
     Precalculus CP
     Suggested Timeline with Correlation to District Syllabus and State Standards
Timeline Stewart, Redlin, Watson Precalculus –         R= Review      2007        Done
          Mathematics for Calculus, 4th Edition.      T = Required Standard       Y/N
                                                       O= optional Covered
  Unit 1  9-1 Parabolas.                                    T         PC 1.2,6.6
 10 days  Supplement: graphing circles and writing          T         PC 6.1,6.2
           equations of circles.
           Supplement: calculate points where a line         T     PC 6.3
           intersects a circle
           9-2 Ellipses.                                     T     PC 1.2,6.4
           9-3 Hyperbolas.                                   T     PC 1.2,6.5
           9-4 Shifted Conics.                               T     PC6.4,6.5,6.6
           9-5 Rotation of Axes.
  Unit 2   2-1 What is a Function?                           R     PC 1.1
 11 days   2-2 Graphs of Functions.                          T     PC2.1,2.5,2.6
                                                                   3.1
           2-3 Applied Functions: Variation
           2-4 Average Rate of Change: Increasing and        T     PC 2.7
           Decreasing Functions.
           2-5 Transformations of Functions.                 T     PC2.2,2.3,2.5
                                                                   3.1
           2-6   Extreme Values of Functions.                T     PC 2.4,2.7
           2-7   Modeling with Functions.                    T     PC 1.3,1.6,
                                                                   2.4,3.5
           2-8 Combining Functions.                          T     PC 1.5
           2-9 One-to-One Functions and their Inverses.      T     PC 1.5,1.6
                                                                   2.5,2.8,2.9
 Unit 3    3-1   Polynomial Functions and Their Graphs.      T     PC1.1,2.1,2.2
 8 days                                                            2.5,3.1
           3-2   Dividing Polynomials.                       R
           3-3   Real Zeros of Polynomials.                  T     PC1.4,1.7,2.4
                                                                   2.7,3.2,3.3,
                                                                   3.6,3.7
           3-4 Complex Numbers.                              T     PC2.4,2.7,3.3
           3-5 Complex Zeros and The Fundamental             T     PC1.4,1.5,1.7
           Theorem of Algebra.                                     2.4,2.7,3.3,
                                                                   3.5,3.6,3.7
           Supplement: Solving polynomial inequalities       T     PC 3.10,3.11
           both algebraically and graphically
 Unit 4    3-6 Rational Functions.                           T     PC2.1,2.2,2.5
 6 days                                                            2.6,2.7,3.4
           Supplement: rational equations and                T     PC 3.8,3.9
           inequalities (Use 1.4 here as well as
           supplemental material)
Unit 5     4-1 Exponential Functions.                        T     PC2.1,2.2,2.4
8 days                                                             2.5,2.6,2.7
                                                                   4.1,4.3,4.6
           4-2   Logarithmic Functions.                      T     PC2.1,2.2,2.4
                                                                   2.5,2.6,2.7,
                                                                   2.8,2.9,4.4,
                                                                   4.5
                     WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                      INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                           FOUNDED IN 1869
          4-3   Laws of Logarithms.                            T         PC1.5,2.4,4.7


          Stewart, Redlin, Watson Precalculus –            R= Review     2007              Done
          Mathematics for Calculus, 4th Edition.          T = Required   Standard          Y/N
                                                          O= optional    Covered
          4-4   Exponential and Logarithmic Equations.         T         PC1.7,2.4,4.7
                                                                         ,4.8,4.9,4.10,
                                                                         4.11
          Supplement: solving expressions with rational        T         PC 4.5
          exponents
          Supplement: Solve exponential and logarithmic        T         PC 4.9,4.11
          equations graphically
          4-5 Modeling with Exponential and                    T         PC1.3,1.4,1.6
                 Logarithmic functions.                                  1.7,2.4,4.6,4.
          Supplement Lab – Real World Math w/CBL                         8,4.9,4.10,
          Activity #7 or #12                                             4.11
 Unit 6   5-1 The Unit Circle.                                 T         PC1.1,1.5,1.6
12 days   Supplement – Wrapping function
          5-2 Trigonometric Functions of Real                  T         PC
          Numbers.                                                       1.5,1.7,2.45.6
          5-3 Trigonometric Graphs.                            T         PC
                                                                         1.5,1.6,1.7,2.
                                                                         1,2.3,2.5,2.6,
                                                                         2.7,5.4,5.5
          Discovery project page 442 supplement                T         PC 5.7
          5-4 More Trigonometric Graphs.                       T         PC1.2,1.3,1.6
                                                                         ,2.1,2.2,2.3,2.
                                                                         5,2.6,2.7,5.4,
                                                                         5.5
          FOCUS on Modeling Harmonic Motion page               T         PC 5.7
          455
Unit 7    6-1 Angle Measure.                                   T         PC1.1,1.5,1.6
7 days                                                                   , 5.1,5.2
          6-2   Trigonometry of Right Triangles.               T         PC1.5,2.4,5.6
                                                                         , 5.8, 5.15
          6-3   Trigonometric Functions of Angles.             T         PC1.7,2.4,5.6
                                                                         ,5.15
Unit 8    6-4   The Law of Sines.                              T         PC2.4,5.6,5.9
7 days                                                                   ,5.12
          6-5   The Law of Cosines.                            T         PC2.4,5.6,5.9
                                                                         ,5.12
          Supplement – Area of Triangles – Heron’s             T
          Formula along with others.
Unit 9    7-1 Trigonometric Identities.                        T         PC 1.5,5.14
9 days    7-2 Addition and Subtraction Formulas.               T         PC 5.14
          7-3 Double-Angle, Half-Angle, and Product-           T         PC 5.14
          Sum Formulas.
          7-4 Inverse Trigonometric Functions.                 T         PC
                                                                         1.5,2.4,2.8,
                                                                         2.9,5.13
          7-5   Trigonometric Equations.                       T         PC 2.4,5.6,
                                                                         5.10,5.11
          7-6 Trigonometric Form of Complex Numbers;
          DeMoivre’s Theorem.
                     WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                      INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                          FOUNDED IN 1869
          7-7 Vectors.                                      O
          7-8 The Dot Product.                              O
          8-1 Systems of Equations.
          8-2 Systems of Linear Equations in Two
          Variables.
          8-3 Systems of Linear Equations in Several
          Variables.
          8-4 Systems of Linear Equations: Matrices.
          8-5 The Algebra of Matrices.
          8-6 Inverses of Matrices and Matrix
          Equations.
          8-7 Determinants and Cramer’s Rule.
          8-8 Systems of Inequalities.
          8-9 Partial Fractions.
          9-6 Polar Coordinates.                            T   PC 5.3
Unit 10   9-7 Polar Equations of Conics.
3 days
          9-8 Parametric Equations.                         O
          FOCUS on Modeling of projectile motion
          10-1    Sequences and Summation Notation.         O
          10-2    Arithmetic Sequences.                     O
          10-3    Geometric Sequences.                      O
          SUPPLEMENT – Convergent and Divergent             O
          Sequences
          10-4    Annuities and Installment Buying.         O
          10-5 Mathematical Induction.                      O
          10-6    The Binomial Theorem.                     O
          11-1 Counting Principles.
          11-2 Permutations and Combinations.

          11-3 Probability.
          11-4 Expected Value.
          12-1 Finding Limits Numerically and
          Graphically.
          12-2 Finding Limits Algebraically.
          12-3 Tangent Lines and Derivatives.
          12-4 Limits at Infinity; Limits of Sequences
          12-5 Areas
                      WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                      INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                         FOUNDED IN 1869
   Expectations and Requirements           Algebra 2 CP          Mrs. D. Sears

       1.      Students are expected to be in their classroom with materials ready to begin
               instruction when the bell rings.
       2.      Students are expected to talk during class only with the teacher’s permission.
       3.      Students are expected to remain in their seats until the teacher dismisses class.
       4.      Students are expected to follow school rules.


Infractions of any of the stated rules result in an oral reprimand. Repeated infractions require a
note, phone call or e-mail to the parents from the teacher and subsequent school disciplinary
procedures.

                          Class Requirements and Procedures
   All students need to have a 3-ring binder and a thin spiral notebook (to be kept in the binder)
   for homework. A TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator is recommended. Books and notebooks
   will be brought to class every day. The notebook is to be kept in sequential order and will be
   randomly checked by the teacher.
   Homework is assigned and checked every day. In addition students work on a daily check up
   of 4 or 5 problems from the homework which is turned in, checked and recorded every
   day. Once a week the check up grade is recorded as a Homework grade in Power school.

Grading system:
All tests and quizzes are announced in advance and students will average 20 short written tests or
quizzes per nine weeks. This gives the student’s grade an even balance. Tests and quizzes count
50%, class work, journal, projects, homework 30% and nine-week exams 20% of the nine-week
grade. The ‘Second Chance’ policy will be followed, giving students a chance to make up work
that does not meet the standard for a C to bring the grade up.
Tutoring sessions will be available before and after school on Mondays, Wednesday s and
Thursdays.

I am looking forward to a great year with your student. Please contact me at 664-8440 or e-mail me
at Dsears@fsd1.org if you have any questions concerning your son/daughter’s progress or set up an
appointment with the guidance department to meet me in person.
                                                                . Mrs. D. Sears
Student name ___________________________________________

Parent signature_______________________________________ Date ______________
                 WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                  INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                    FOUNDED IN 1869
Algebra 2CP 2011 - 2012:                                                   Mrs. D. Sears

Materials:
Students will need a three-ring binder and a graphing calculator. A graphing calculator will be
used almost daily during instruction. Please purchase a TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator for
your student. This calculator will definitely be needed in all subsequent mathematics classes
until your student graduates.

Homework policy 2011 - 2012:
Homework is assigned and checked every day. A class roster is used where homework and
date are identified and a check mark placed next to the students' names as I go around the room
and scan the work. During this time the students work on a daily check up of 4 or 5 problems
from the homework. This is turned in, checked and assigned up to 4 or 5 points which are
recorded every day. After 5 or more days the points are added up and multiplied to give a top
grade of 100. This grade is recorded as a Homework grade in Power school.

Second Chance Policy:
Students will have an opportunity to make up failing/incomplete tests and major assignments
within 5 days and will receive a grade no higher than 77 or the higher grade of the original
work and the remake.

Grading Policy:
All tests and quizzes are announced in advance and students will average 20 short written tests
or quizzes per nine weeks. This gives the student’s grade an even balance.
Tests and quizzes count 50%, class work 30%, and nine-week exams 20% of the nine-week
grade. Up to three Homework bonus points can be awarded and added to the class work/test
grade at the end of each quarter

Extra Help:
Before or after school help is available on most days. I strongly urge students to see me
immediately if they had problems with an assignment. Most students would only have to stay
for a few minutes to get the help they need.. In the afternoon I am usually available until 4:00
– 4:30 pm. If students would like to work in a group in my room before or after school, they
are definitely encouraged to meet with me. I encourage my students to work individually and
then evaluate answers as a whole group. During individual work I am available for questions
and will clarify problems for the entire class, if two or more students have the same problem.
Please encourage your student to refrain from talking during individual work. Conversations
during individual work discourage students from trying to think deeper on their own.

Contact information:
Please contact me at DSears@fsd1.org or schedule a conference with the guidance department
at 843-664-8440 if I can be of help to you or your student.
Thank you for allowing me to work with your student during the 2009-2010 school year.

Mrs. Doris Sears
Mathematics Teacher
                          WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                           INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                                FOUNDED IN 1869
         Algebra 2CP:               2011 - 2012               Mrs. D. Sears

         Algebra II CP
     Suggested Timeline with Correlation to District Syllabus and State Standards
 Timeline McDougal- Littell Algebra 2                 R= Review        2007       Done
                                                    T = Required Standards        Y/N
                                                                     Covered
Combine        1.1 Real Numbers and Number Operations
with chap 2
               1.2 Algebraic Expressions and Models
               1.3 Solving Linear Equations
               1.4 Rewriting Equations and Formulas               R
               1.5 Problem Solving Using Algebraic Models
               1.6 Solving Linear Inequalities
               1.7 Solving Absolute Value Equations and           T
               Inequalities
7 Days         2.1 Functions and Their Graphs                     T
               2.2 Slope and Rate of Change
               2.3 Quick Graphs of Linear Equations
               2.4 Writing Equations of Lines
               2.5 Correlation and Best-Fitting Lines
               2.6 Linear Inequalities in Two Variables
               2.7 Piecewise Functions                            T           IA-2.9,
                                                                              IA-2.10
               2.8 Absolute Value Functions                       T
7 Days         3.1 Solving Linear Systems by Graphing             R
               3.2 Solving Linear Systems Algebraically           R
               3.3 Graphing and Solving Systems of Linear         T           IA-1.5,
               Inequalities                                                   IA-2.1,
                                                                              IA-2.2
                                                                              IA-2.3
               3.4 Linear Programming                             T           IA-1.3,1.4,
                                                                              IA-1.6,
                                                                              IA-2.4
               3.5 Graphing Linear Equations in Three             O
               Variables
               3.6 Solving Systems of Linear Equations in         O
               Three Variables
0 Days         4.1 Matrix Operations                              O
               4.2 Multiplying Matrices                           O
               4.3 Determinants and Cramer’s Rules                O
               4.4 Identity and Inverse Matrices                  O
               4.5 Solving Systems Using Inverse Matrices         O
               Chapter 4 extension augmented matrices             O
Optional to    5.1 Graphing Quadratic Functions                   T
cover chap 6
first -
15 days
               5.2 Solving Quadratic Functions by Factoring       T           IA-3.3
               5.3 Solving Quadratic Equations by Finding         T           IA-3.3
               Square Roots
               5.4 Complex Numbers                                T           IA-3.1,
                                                                              IA-3.2
               5.5 Completing the Square                          T           IA-3.3
                       WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                        INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                             FOUNDED IN 1869
            5.6 The Quadratic Formula and the Discriminant         T         IA-3.3,
                                                                             IA-3.4
            5.7 Graphing and Solving Quadratic Inequalities        T
 Timeline   McDougal- Littell Algebra 2                       R= Review         2007      Done
                                                                 T=          Standards    Y/N
                                                              Required        Covered
            5.8 Modeling with Quadratic Functions                  T         IA-1.2,1.3
                                                                             IA-3.5,
                                                                             IA-3.6
9 Days      6.1 Using Properties of Exponents                      R
            6.2 Evaluating and Graphing Polynomial                 R
            Functions
            6.3 Adding, Subtracting, and Multiplying               T         IA-2.5,
            Polynomials                                                      IA-4.1
            6.4 Factoring and Solving Polynomial Equations         T         IA-4.3
            6.5 The Remainder and Factor Theorems             T (synthetic   IA-4.2
                                                               division)
            6.6 Finding Rational Zeros                             T         IA-4.2
            6.7 Using the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra           T         IA-4.3
            6.8 Analyzing Graphs of Polynomial Functions
            6.9 Modeling with Polynomial Functions                 T         IA-1.3,4.4
7 Days      7.1 nth roots and Rational Expressions                 T         IA-4.12
            7.2 Properties of Rational Exponents                   T         IA-4.5,
                                                                             IA-4.7
            7.3 Power Functions and Function Operations            T         IA-2.6
            7.4 Inverse Operations                                 O
            7.5 Graphing Square Root and Cube Root                 T         IA-2.8
            Functions
            7.6 Solving Radical Equations                          T         IA-4.9
            7.7 Statistics and Statistical Graphs
10 Days     8.1 Exponential Growth                                 T         IA-4.14
            8.2 Exponential Decay                                  T         IA-4.14
            8.3 The number e                                       T         IA-4.6,
                                                                             IA-4.13
            8.4 Logarithmic Functions                              T         IA-4.6,
                                                                             IA-4.13
            8.5 Properties of Logarithms                           T         IA-4.6
            8.6 Solving Exponential and Logarithmic                T         IA-4.10,
            Equations                                                        IA-4.11
            8.7 Modeling with Exponential and Power                T         IA-1.3,4.7
            Functions
            8.8 Logistic Growth Functions
7 Days      9.1 Inverse and Joint Variation                        O
            9.2 Graphing Simple Rational Functions                 T         IA-2.9
            9.3 Graphing General Rational Functions                T         IA-2.9
            9.4 Multiplying and Dividing Rational                  T         IA-4.8
            Expressions
            9.5 Addition, Subtraction, and Complex                 T         IA-4.8
            Fractions
            9.6 Solving Rational Equations                         T         IA-4.12

8 Days      10.1 The Distance and Midpoint Formulas
            10.2 Parabolas                                         T
                        WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                            INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                             FOUNDED IN 1869
            10.3 Circles                                     T        IA-1.1,
                                                                      IA-5.1,
                                                                      IA-5.2
            10.4 Ellipses                                    T        IA-5.3,
                                                                      IA-5.4
 Timeline   McDougal- Littell Algebra 2                   R= Review      2007     Done
                                                             T=       Standards   Y/N
                                                          Required     Covered
            10.5 Hyperbolas                                  T        IA-5.6,
                                                                      IA-5.7
            10.6 Graphing and Classifying Conics             T        IA-5.7
            10.7 Solving Quadratic Systems                   T        IA-2.11
8 days      11.1 An introduction to Sequence and Series      T        IA-6.1,
                                                                      IA-6.5
            11.2 Arithmetic Sequences and Series             T        IA-6.2,
                                                                      IA-6.3
                                                                      IA-6.4
            11.3 Geometric Sequences and Series              T        IA-6.2,
                                                                      IA-6.3
                                                                      IA-6.4
            11.4 Infinite Geometric Series
            11.5 Recursive Rules for Sequences               T        IA-6.7,
                                                                      IA-6.8
                                                                      IA-6.9
                  WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                   INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                    FOUNDED IN 1869
MYP German 4:
This course is designed to develop the students’ skills in understanding, speaking, reading and
writing the German language. The course follows the objectives outlined in the IB syllabus
through the use of a wide range of oral and print material. The lessons will be entirely in
German.
All work units in this first year of study in the IB Diploma Programme are designed to address
the competencies outlined by the International Baccalaureate Organization which involve:
        Language: handling the language system accurately (grammar, syntax, etc.)
        Cultural Interaction: selecting language appropriate to a particular cultural and
       social context.
        Message: understanding ideas and how they are organized in order to
       communicate them appropriately.
 I. Goals:
I.    Goals:
Students will be able to use the German Language when discussing the following topics:
    Leisure activities
    Communication
    German history
    Family
    Music
    Work related topics
    Stereotypes
    Units of Study:
Unit 1:   Freizeit (Leisure)
Unit 2:   Kommunikation (communication)
Unit 3:   Deutschland im 21. Jahrhundert (Germany in the 21st century)
Unit 4:   Familie (family)
Unit 5:   Musik (music)
Unit 6:   Die Welt der Arbeit (work related topics)
Unit 7:   Stereotypen (stereotypes)

II. Instructional Materials:
Kaleidoskop (Houghton/Mifflin)
Komm mit! (Holt/Rhinehart/Winston)
Wechselspiel (Langenscheidt)
                  WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                   INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                     FOUNDED IN 1869
Description of Major Assessments to Monitor Students Progress
(Including criteria and schedules):
Precalculus CP/H: Teacher-made end of course exam
Algebra 2CP: District-wide common assessment
MYP German 4: AATG National German Exam (external moderation)

Description of the Procedures Used to Assign Students Grades:
Classroom assessment: All classes are assessed with weekly quizzes, including oral and
listening quizzes, and bi-weekly unit tests, as well as graded class work assignments. At least
one project is assigned during the course.
Homework: Homework will be assigned and checked daily. Students need to complete
homework assignments in a spiral notebook, which is kept inside their 3-ring binder. The
homework notebook will be checked daily and graded weekly.
Journal: Journal entries are assessed at the end of each grading period and count as part of the
course grade.
Modification of Assessments:
Assessments are modified if the majority of the students have been actively engaged in an
activity and still do not meet the objective. Students who have a failing grade on a test have a
chance to correct mistakes according to the school’s ‘Second Chance’ policy. Occasionally the
objective may be retested with a different format.

Description of the System Used to Maintain a Record of the Students’
Progress:
Standardized test scores (National German Exam results) are kept on file.
All student grades are recorded in the Grade Record book provided by Florence School
District One, the PowerSchool electronic record system.
Tests and quizzes are kept in a student folder in the classroom for access by parents and
administrators.
Student Journals are kept in the classroom and are used by each student for sequential courses.

Plan for Staying Abreast of Current and Emerging Technologies:
In July 2008 I took an TI-nspire 3-day workshop in Denver, CO and received a TI-nspire
handheld calculator and software to be installed on computers at Wilson High school. This
software will be used in the Algebra 2CP and Precalculus CP/H classes.
During the fall semester 2008 I attended a graduate course through Florence School District 1:
Creating Classroom Activities on the smart board. During this course I learned to create
weekly smart board activities for all of my classes. During Fall 2011 I plan to take an ‘iPad
activities in the classroom’ course through Florence School District 1 and plan to explore the
feasibility of using iPads in Mathematics and German instruction.


Plan for Ordering and Obtaining Special Materials and Resources:
Texas Instruments has sent a TI-nspire educators resource packet. I am ordering an Elmo
overhead projector in order to facilitate use of print materials on the projection screen. All
classes will benefit from the www.quia.com web activities.
                  WILSON HIGH SCHOOL
                   INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL
                                     FOUNDED IN 1869
Rules for Students Behavior in the Classroom:
a) Classroom Expectations
1. Students are expected to be in their classroom with materials ready to begin instruction
when the bell rings.
2. Students are expected to talk during class only with the teacher’s permission.
3. Students are expected to remain in their seats until the teacher dismisses class.
4. Students are expected to follow school rules.
Infractions of any of the stated rules result in an oral reprimand. Repeated infractions require a
note, e-mail or phone call to the parents from the teacher and subsequent school disciplinary
procedures. Incentives in form of bonus point coupons for tests, as well as occasional edible
treats are given
b) Communicating Rules to students:
A handout with Expectations, course requirements and grading procedures is sent home with
all students with a request for the parents’ signature. In class this handout is discussed with all
students. Classroom rules are also posted in the classroom. Wilson High School requires that a
Discipline code test be administered during the first week of classes.

Description of Consequences for Violating Class Rules:
Infractions of any of the stated rules result in an oral reprimand. Repeated infractions require a
note, e-mail or phone call to the parents from the teacher and subsequent school disciplinary
procedures. Incentives in form of bonus point coupons for tests, as well as occasional edible
treats are given


Description of Procedures to Carry Out Non-Instructional Activities:
Students copy a series of questions concerning classroom procedures from an overhead
transparency. These questions are discussed with input from me on how procedures are
handled. Procedures are given in positive terms (ask permission to go to the pencil sharpener,
waste basket etc., be quiet when someone is on the intercom). Restroom procedures: Students
are expected to use the restroom between classes, without being tardy to class. If a student
feels he/she will be tardy, the student is to be in the classroom when the bell rings and may ask
for a restroom pass after all students have begun their first class assignment. The teacher does
not sign passes during the class changes.
On the day following discussion of classroom procedures students take a quiz on these
procedures to be filed for later reference if needed.

Plan for Communicating with Parents or Guardians Throughout the Year:
Parents are invited to Open House classroom visitation where course expectations are
discussed. All students take home a letter with course outlines and expectations and have their
parents sign the letter. Phone calls to parents and e-mails are also utilized to give positive
feedback or express concerns. Parents can access student grades anytime through Power
School.

Plan for Revising Long Range Plan When Necessary:
Weekly lesson plans are continuously monitored and adjusted. This may cause the long-range
plan to be adjusted as well. After each unit of study, an evaluation is made to see if less time
will be spent on certain topics where duplication may occur, thereby adhering to the time line
in the long-range plan.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:78
posted:12/20/2011
language:Latin
pages:16