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Flat Screen TV - A Buyer's Guide

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									Flat Screen Monitors - A Buyer's Guide

By: http://www.flatscreentvlib.com/

The tipping point has arrived. Flat screen monitors have become widely accepted as the new
standard for media displays in computing, and with good reason. Flat screen monitors are slim,
and fit on desks that couldn't hold a conventional CRT monitor, with a tube. They also require
less energy to power and thus produce less excess heat, creating a safer and more economical
environment in which to complete your work.

Additionally, within the past year or so prices on flat screen monitors have dropped markedly,
making them more accessible for buyers everywhere. This combination of factors has come
together to create a perfect storm in the market, flooding sales floors all over with a veritable
smorgasbord of monitor options. Picking the right one can be a long and arduous process, but
can be made much easier if you keep a few simple rules in mind.

RULE 1

DECIDE WHAT SIZE YOU WANT BEFORE YOU GO SHOPPING Picking the correct size
monitor for your media needs is an essential part of this process. Will you be primarily watching
movies on your computer? If so, consider a wide-screen monitor that will fit the ratio of most
letter-box movies, this will not only increase your viewable area on the monitor, but will also
result in a more fulfilled viewing experience. Plan on doing word processing, emailing and other
standard desktop activities? Then you probably don't need an excessively large or wide-screen
monitor.

For the most part, flat screen monitors start at about fifteen inches and work their way up to in
excess of thirty-two. Picking a size that fits your needs, and your budget is a critical part of this
process.

RULE 2

LCD, PLASMA OR LED - WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE?

LCDs Liquid Crystal Display, or LCD flat screen monitors use a backlight to send light through
the liquid crystal molecules and the substrate. LCD flat screen monitors work through applying
voltage to the pixels using a complex series of interconnected diodes, the pixels can be lightened
or darkened to prevent the backlight from shining through. The problem with LCDs is their
inability to show true blacks. So, if you're a film or photo editing guru, an LCD may not give you
the color matching quality you need.

PLASMA Plasma screens are basically a network of multicolored phosphors (red, green and blue
phosphors which combine to create a single pixel) mounted between two ultra-thin layers of
glass or clear substrate. Plasma televisions use a submicron pulse for each triad of phosphors to
excite the argon, neon and xenon used to produce the color information and light. As energy
excites the phosphor molecules, the oxygen atoms dissipate and create the fourth state of matter,
plasma, and emitting UV light in the process. The gases used within a plasma television actually
have a half-life and will fade over time. Meaning, a plasma television is not a good long-term
media option.

The problem is that they're relative power hogs, using more than 5x the electricity that a standard
LCD uses. So if you're trying to think green, plasma is not the way to go.

RULE 3

YOUR BUDGET

LCD flat screen monitors are much cheaper than their plasma or LED counterparts, so keep that
in mind when setting a budget. Also, think about how long you plan to use and have the monitor,
if it is for the spare bedroom, you may not need it to have a high contrast ration or display
resolution. If you plan on using it daily, and want it to last a while, then it might be time to shell
out a bit extra and pay for the quality and longevity you deserve.

CONCLUSION Follow the rules and you'll be sure to end up with a flat screen monitor that
matches your exact needs without breaking the bank.

For more information visit http://www.flatscreentvlib.com/.

								
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