RAY-BAN AVIATOR THE ESSENTIALS RAY-BAN CELEBRATES THE LEGENDARY by ajizai

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									                           RAY-BAN AVIATOR: THE ESSENTIALS
            RAY-BAN CELEBRATES THE LEGENDARY AVIATOR
26th May 2010 (London,UK)

Ray-Ban celebrates the birth of the brand with the re-launch of their most iconic frames – the Ray-Ban Aviator – with a live event to
take place at London’s Scala. The event will focus on the influence that the iconoclastic sounds and style of the 1970s have had on
some of today’s most influential bands.

Unveiling the six new styles of the Ray-Ban Aviator – Ray-Ban Aviator Craft, Ray-Ban Aviator Road Spirit, Ray-Ban Aviator Tech,
Ray-Ban Aviator Titanium, Ray-Ban Aviator Metal Glide and the limited edition Ray-Ban Aviator Ultra Gold – the event will feature
live performances and collaborations by some of the most exciting rock groups around – past and present.

Headlined by the New York Dolls with support from London’s own The Big Pink and French rock-pop group the Plastiscines, with a
special DJ set by form Pulp front man Jarvis Cocker, the main feature of the evening will be a live collaborative performance as the
Plastiscines join the New York Dolls on stage to perform one of the band’s classic tracks.

The evening is the second of two events which will start in NYC’s home to indie rock at the Music Hall of Williamsburg on 12th May.
The New York event is headlined by Iggy & The Stooges, with support from The Virgins and Free Energy and a DJ set by Roxy Cottontail.

Ray-Ban Aviator and rock ‘n’ roll have always evolved together with rock musicians of all kinds wearing the Aviator as a necessary
accessory to life. And in the 1970s, both the Ray-Ban Aviator and music both came of age, exciting times epitomised by two groups
in particular. With their primal blues howl and audience-baiting aggression, Michigan’s Iggy & The Stooges looked and sounded like
no one before them. The New York Dolls combined The Rolling Stones’ androgyny, girl group pop and glam rock to create a new form of
music that presaged both punk and heavy metal.

“We’re really looking forward to playing with the New York Dolls because they were one of the bands that were really important for us
at the beginning - all their energy and even their style and crazy attitude that we love,” says the Plastiscines’ Louise Basilien.
“We’re really looking forward to meeting them and sharing the same stage. It’s going to be really cool.”

With his roots in the 1970s rock scene, both events will feature exclusive photographic exhibitions of specially commissioned photography by
renowned rock photographer, Kevin Cummins. Kevin’s photography naturally brings together music and the Ray-Ban Aviator with photos
of The Virgins in Ray-Ban Aviator Tech, The Big Pink in Ray-Ban Aviator Ultra Gold and Ray-Ban Aviator Titanium, The Plastiscines in the
Ray-Ban Aviator Metal Glide, We Are Scientists in Ray-Ban Aviator Road Spirit and Free Energy in the Ray-Ban Aviator Craft.

“We live in a world of nostalgia at the moment,” notes photographer Cummins. “But I think you can recreate a classic without just
copying it in a very dull way. What Ray-Ban have done, they’ve worked really hard to make this huge range that are contemporary, but
have classic overtones. When you get the new bands to wear them, the Aviator looks really contemporary. All the bands we’ve worked
with are very different and all respond in a very different way to being photographed. That’s reflected in the range of glasses; because
each range has been really different.”

“The bands wear them readily,” he concludes. “And they look great in them.”

Alongside Kevin’s classically natural rock ‘n’ roll photography, the events will feature displays of some of the most symbolic documentation
of the Ray-Ban Aviator from the 1970s.

The Ray-Ban Aviator was originally designed for the U.S military fighter pilots in 1937 to protect pilots from glare at high altitudes
whilst maintaining a clear field of vision. Today the technology behind the new Aviators still reflects the importance of anti-glare and
100% UV protection with the polarized lenses technology. And can still be seen gracing the faces of today’s rock bands.

Sara Beneventi, Ray Ban Brand Director, said: “Ray-Ban is the number one brand in eyewear globally and it has such a huge history
of success. We are thrilled about this exciting experience with top talents in music and famous photographer Kevin Cummins.
The launch of the new models of Ray-Ban Aviator sets a new milestone in Ray-Ban’s continue evolution toward being one of the most iconic
brands globally. We are proud of being still today at the verge of the exiting world of indie-rock music which is perfectly expressing the
personality of Ray-Ban.”




About Ray-Ban:
www.ray-ban.com

About Luxottica Group S.p.A.
Luxottica Group is a leader in premium fashion, luxury and sports eyewear, with over 6,200 optical and sun retail stores in North America, Asia-Pacific, China, South Africa and Europe
and a strong and well balanced brand portfolio. Luxottica’s key house brands include Ray-Ban, the best known sun eyewear brand in the world, Oakley, Vogue, Persol, Oliver Peoples,
Arnette and REVO, while license brands include Bvlgari, Burberry, Chanel, Dolce & Gabbana, Donna Karan, Polo Ralph Lauren, Prada, Salvatore Ferragamo, Tiffany and Versace.
In addition to a global wholesale network covering 130 countries, the Group manages leading retail brands such as LensCrafters and Pearle Vision in North America, OPSM and Laubman
& Pank in Australasia, LensCrafters in Greater China and Sunglass Hut globally. The Group’s products are designed and manufactured in six Italy-based manufacturing plants, two
wholly-owned plants in China and a sports sunglass production facility in the U.S. In 2009, Luxottica Group posted consolidated net sales of €5.1 billion. Additional information on the
Group is available at www.luxottica.com.

Safe Harbor Statement
Certain statements in this press release may constitute “forward-looking statements” as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements involve risks,
uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those which are anticipated. Such risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to,
the ability to manage the effect of the poor current global economic conditions on our business, the ability to successfully acquire new businesses and integrate their operations, the
ability to predict future economic conditions and changes in consumer preferences, the ability to successfully introduce and market new products, the ability to maintain an efficient
distribution network, the ability to achieve and manage growth, the ability to negotiate and maintain favorable license arrangements, the availability of correction alternatives to
prescription eyeglasses, fluctuations in exchange rates, as well as other political, economic and technological factors and other risks and uncertainties described in our filings with the
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. These forward-looking statements are made as of the date hereof, and we do not assume any obligation to update them.
                                 RAY-BAN AVIATOR cOllecTION
For aviation, both military and civil, the 1920s was a decade of remarkable advances. Air traffic grew as a result. With the development
of new aeroplanes that could fly higher and higher came altitude-related problems. Pilots were suffering from headaches and nausea
because of glare and the great distances that they had to traverse. In 1929, General MacCready asked Ray-Ban for a new type of air
force eyewear that would protect pilots from glare at high altitudes while at the same time ensuring a clear field of vision. The company took
up the challenge and succeeded in developing a new pair of glasses with lenses that could block out a high proportion of visible light.
This marked the birth of Ray-Ban’s first, green-lens anti glare eyewear. The first model to go on sale to the public - in 1936 - featured
a plastic frame with the classic Aviator shape. But the name anti glare was too generic and the new name was chosen for the new
product to emphasise that the eyewear could block out glare and protect the user’s eyes from the sun’s rays. The Large Metal model
immediately leapt to fame with the name Ray-Ban Aviator.

The Ray-Ban Aviator is the heart of Ray-Ban collection and now it represents a complete family of models: classical, technological,
precious, creative, gold and on the road! They are already available– except for the Tech version that will be sold starting form July 2010
- in optical stores, chains and in the best department store and the suggested consumer price is between 134,00 and 385,00 Euros
and 139,00 and 485,00 USD; the lenses are available in two different versions, polarized* and non-polarized.




                                                                                           clASSIc AVIATOR
                                                               This frame became an icon of style and design, and the model that
                                                               signalled the birth of a timeless legend. The Ray-Ban Aviator has gradually
                                                               earned its place as an essential fashion accessory for men and women.
                                                               Ray-Ban lives up to its name by offering maximum wearer protection while
                                                               delivering the distinctive style that has become world-famous thanks to
                                                               the many Hollywood stars.




                                                                                           MeTAl GlIDe
                                                               Ray-Ban re-works its most iconic models in an explosion of fresh color.
                                                               The bright, bold colorways work to highlight the original and non-conformist
                                                               spirit that remains an intrinsic feature of the Ray-Ban brand. The Aviator
                                                               gets a new dress with ne w glossy colors. Shiny and funny colors with
                                                               tone on tone lenses, that highlighting Ray-Ban’s unique and independent
                                                               character, since 1937.
                           RAY-BAN cRAFT
On these restyled icons the top bar and temple end pieces are covered with
soft hand-sewn leather. Ray-Ban Craft is a celebration of craftsmanship,
an important and valuable element in the history of Ray-Ban. Ray-Bans
have always made a statement about the bold and unique individuals who
wear them. Now, the aviator model is enriched with premium details and
skilfully handcrafted with genuine leather.




                           ROAD SPIRIT
The Aviator gets a creative dress with the new Road Spirit. The details
around the shapes confer a younger look to this evergreen model for the
people that live on the road.




                           TITANIUM
The model is made entirely of milled titanium, a guarantee of solidity,
flexibility, maximum comfort and lightness. This model mixes the
esthetical characteristics of this shape and the comfort of the material.
The elevated perceived quality and the polar gradient lenses make this
glasses unique.




                           UlTRA GOlD
The Ray-Ban Ultra limited edition of this style icon features an updated
design improved in its classic shapes, enriched with new, prestigious
details, and updated with the contribution of cutting-edge technology:
titanium, beta-titanium, and pure gold, combining contemporary taste
with tradition, technology with beauty, solidity with legend. The entire frame
is 22K gold plated and wears the new P3 (P-Cube) lenses that further reflect
the quality and technological core of Ray-Ban Ultra designs.
                                                                                                                        TecH
                                                                                   Carbon fibre is an extraordinarily sturdy yet extremely lightweight material.
                                                                                   It has a very fine, threadlike structure and it is used to manufacture a
                                                                                   wide range of materials referred to as “composites” because the fibres
                                                                                   are combined with a matrix – generally resin – designed to hold these
                                                                                   extremely strong fibres together, protect them and maintain the shape of
                                                                                   the product. The result of this patented process is a frame that is extremely
                                                                                   lightweight, sturdy, flexible and exceptionally durable.




* POlARIZeD leNSeS:
Since 1937, Ray-Ban has been using high-quality materials to create ultra-resistant, ergonomic and unique sunglass frames and,
naturally, lenses that provide clear and perfect vision in any light condition. In glaring light conditions where real vision is impaired,
as is the case in the common phenomenon of polarization, optimum vision is especially important.
Polarized light reflects off of any surface: water, snow, ice, as well as hot asphalt roads and sand. To counteract this phenomenon
a quality lens must come between the polarized light and the eye to shield the distortions of the light and enable ideal vision.
Ray-Ban polarized lenses, a legend within a legend, are the result of exclusive technology and craftsmanship that block glare and
reflections. All Ray-Ban polarized lenses with a distinctive “P” directly laser-etched onto the lens offer exceptional 99.9% efficiency
for crisp, clear vision.




About Ray-Ban:
www.ray-ban.com

About luxottica Group S.p.A.
Luxottica Group is a leader in premium fashion, luxury and sports eyewear, with over 6,200 optical and sun retail stores in North America, Asia-Pacific, China, South Africa and Europe
and a strong and well balanced brand portfolio. Luxottica’s key house brands include Ray-Ban, the best known sun eyewear brand in the world, Oakley, Vogue, Persol, Oliver Peoples,
Arnette and REVO, while license brands include Bvlgari, Burberry, Chanel, Dolce & Gabbana, Donna Karan, Polo Ralph Lauren, Prada, Salvatore Ferragamo, Tiffany and Versace.
In addition to a global wholesale network covering 130 countries, the Group manages leading retail brands such as LensCrafters and Pearle Vision in North America, OPSM and Laubman
& Pank in Australasia, LensCrafters in Greater China and Sunglass Hut globally. The Group’s products are designed and manufactured in six Italy-based manufacturing plants, two
wholly-owned plants in China and a sports sunglass production facility in the U.S. In 2009, Luxottica Group posted consolidated net sales of €5.1 billion. Additional information on the
Group is available at www.luxottica.com.

Safe Harbor Statement
Certain statements in this press release may constitute “forward-looking statements” as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements involve risks,
uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those which are anticipated. Such risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to,
the ability to manage the effect of the poor current global economic conditions on our business, the ability to successfully acquire new businesses and integrate their operations, the
ability to predict future economic conditions and changes in consumer preferences, the ability to successfully introduce and market new products, the ability to maintain an efficient
distribution network, the ability to achieve and manage growth, the ability to negotiate and maintain favorable license arrangements, the availability of correction alternatives to
prescription eyeglasses, fluctuations in exchange rates, as well as other political, economic and technological factors and other risks and uncertainties described in our filings with the
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. These forward-looking statements are made as of the date hereof, and we do not assume any obligation to update them.
                          RAY-BAN AVIATOR: THE ESSENTIALS
                                    TALENT BIOS
                                                       IggY & THE STOOgES




While other 1970s bands were asking the way to San Francisco and imploring listeners to be sure to wear some flowers in their
hair, The Stooges combined the primal lurch of garage rock with a lyrical template that celebrated the seediest side rock ‘n’ roll.
Fronted by the always-shocking Iggy Pop – who would became notorious for slashing his chest with broken glass, covering himself
in peanut butter and physically beating his audience – and completed by the primitive rhythm section of Ron And Scott Asheton, the
Michigan trio were unlike anything in music that had come before. Though albums The Stooges (1969), Fun House (1970) and Raw
Power (1973) garnered frequently poor reviews and sold even worse, their blend of avant-noise and nihilistic lyrics is now regarded
as groundbreaking – an influence on everyone from Nirvana to The White Stripes. With The Stooges continuing to cast a long shadow
over music for the next 30 years, they reunited for 2007’s successful The Weirdness, recorded with acclaimed producer Steve Albini.
Tragically in 2009 Ron Asheton died of a heart attack; though The Stooges continued to tour, providing one of rock’s truly unmissable
live shows. “I like music that’s most offensive,” Pop once reflected. “I like it to sound like nails on a blackboard.”
                                                          NEw YORk DOLLS




Pitching up somewhere between The Rolling Stones, The Stooges and David Bowie, many cite the New York Dolls as the inspiration for
punk itself. Certainly their shambolic performances and self-imposed outsider status bore all the hallmarks of what was to come.
Influenced as much by 1960s girl groups as 1970s glam rockers T-Rex, the original line-up of David Johansen (vocals), Johnny
Thunders (guitars), Arthur ‘Killer’ Kane (bass) and Billy Murcia (drums) cut a swathe across their native New York club scene in the
early 1970s, with most audiences finding them too loud and too brash to palate. Time has been rather kinder to their self-titled debut
album, plus follow-up 1974’s Too Much Too Soon, however – both are now rightly hailed as classics. In addition, Johnny Thunders – who
sadly died in 1991 – is regarded as one of rock’s great guitar heroes. Due in no small part to the enthusiasms of Morrissey – who, as
a teenager, ran the British New York Dolls fan club – the band reformed in 2004, to the plaudits that had originally eluded them.
They have since issued two marvellous albums, 2006’s One Day It Will Please Us To Remember Even This and 2009’s Cause I Sez So.
Long may they reign.
                                                           THE BIg PINk




Londoners Milo Cordell and Robbie Furze were already steeped in music before they formed electro-rock duo The Big Pink in 2009.
Cordell had founded cutting-edge record label Merok Records and nurtured the talents of The Teenagers and Klaxons, among others,
while his partner Robbie Furze had played guitar for underground acts such as Alec Empire and Panic DHH. Together as The Big Pink
they embody a spirit that’s pure rock ‘n’ roll. Often likened to My Bloody Valentine, The Big Pink’s live shows are characterised by
lacerating sound and eye-popping white light. Signed to seminal record label 4AD (Pixies, Cocteau Twins) 2009’s debut album A Brief
History Of Love won them universal praise across the music press, while single ‘Dominoes’ proved an instant indie disco classic.
The band remain enthralled to the power of loud music. “There’s so much emotion in the noise and in the guitars and in the drums,”
says Furze. “They all come from the same place, and it’s really important that they never lose it.”
                                                            THE VIRgINS




Formed in 2006 by New Yorker, sometime model and cool-kid-about-town Donald Cumming, NYC’s The Virgins combine the 1970’s
smarts of Talking Heads and Modern Lovers with a polished, modern indie-rock sound. Completed by Wade Oates (guitar) and Nick
Zarin-Ackerman (bass), it was only a short time before the trio’s good-time, funk-influenced dance-rock sound had won them a legion
of boldface fans. They were soon touring 2008’s self-titled debut as a support act for names including Patti Smith, Sonic Youth and
Jet. A firm festival favourite, The Virgins’ music is perhaps best enjoyed al fresco, with a beer and the sunshine. They have performed
at Lollapalooza, FujiRock and Glastonbury; as well as wowing crowds all over Europe. If contemporary New York cool has a name in
music, then it’s The Virgins. “All our songs are reflective of New York,” says Cumming. “A lot of songs were tested at parties, so they
are dance-y for a reason. It’s reflections of living in the city, and celebrating things that are good.”
                                                           FREE ENERgY




Emerging in 2009 from the break-up of Minneapolis-based indie band Hockey Night, Paul Sprangers (vocals) and Scott Wells (guitars)
relocated to Philadelphia and hooked up with Geoff Bucknum (rhythm guitar), Nicholas Shuminsky (drums) and Evan Wells (bass) to
found Free Energy. Combining the glitter stomp of T-Rex and Thin Lizzy with the widescreen euphoria of 1970s soft rockers Journey and
The Cars, the band hit paydirt immediately with March 2010’s critically-lauded album Stuck On Nothing. Summertime rock n’roll is the
aptly-named five piece’s forte, a sound teased out to the max by acclaimed producer James Murphy, to whose super-hip DFA label they
are signed. A surfeit of undeniably hooky tunes, combined with a stellar live show plus classic rock star looks have made Free Energy
one of music’s most exciting new acts. “Classic rock is in our blood, and it just kind of seeps out,” says Sprangers. “Like sweat.”
                                                             PLASTIScINES




Paris is home for the all-female four-piece Plastiscines, formed in 2004 around teenage friends Katty Besnard (guitar and vocals),
Marine Neuilly (guitar), Louise Basilien (bass) and Anïas Vandevyvere (drums). With a name taken from The Beatles’ ‘Lucy In The Sky
With Diamonds’ (‘plasticine porters with looking glass ties’), the girls set about establishing a sound that tipped its hat in equal parts
to the 1990s revival rock of The Strokes and The Libertines and the classic guitar chops of Blondie and The Kinks. Seen as both too
young, and not in keeping with more traditional home-grown French music, Plastiscines have forged their own path. Basilien admits
her rock education came through the internet and her parents, rather than the French media and local record shops. A perennial
favourite of the soundtrack programmers on TV show Gossip Girl, their albums LP1 (2007) and About Love (2009) have won them a
legion of admirers – not least in America.
                                                         wE ARE ScIENTISTS




Building a small-but-devoted US following based around their phenomenal live show, Brooklyn-hailing trio We Are Scientists released
a series of acclaimed EPs before signing to Virgin Records and releasing their album With Love And Squalor in 2006. The band found a
ready UK fanbase after joining the NME Shockwaves Tour alongside Arctic Monkeys and Maximo Park the same year. A second album, Brain
Thrust Mastery, was released in 2008 to great critical acclaim, though coincided with the departure of drummer Michael Tapper – leaving
a nucleus of Keith Murray (vocals/guitars, and onetime nominee for The World’s Sexiest Vegetarian award) and Chris Cain (bass).
Razorlight’s Andy Burrows, one of rock’s great virtuoso drummers, joined as a permanent member in late 2009. Regarded as much for
their entertaining between-song comedy banter as their formidable playing, We Are Scientists have been influenced by a diverse range
of music’s great and good, including David Bowie, Fleetwood Mac, The Velvet Underground and Hall & Oates. Always evolving, always
different, We Are Scientists refuse to be tied down to one scene. “It was very natural that we grew out of that sound,” says Cain of the
group’s initial experiments with disco-punk – a genre that had quickly became ubiquitous in the mid-2000s. “Our personal feelings
were that if we heard another spiky, angular disco-punk dancefloor filler, we were gonna kill somebody.”
About Ray-Ban:
www.ray-ban.com

About Luxottica group S.p.A.
Luxottica Group is a leader in premium fashion, luxury and sports eyewear, with over 6,200 optical and sun retail stores in North America, Asia-Pacific, China, South Africa and Europe
and a strong and well balanced brand portfolio. Luxottica’s key house brands include Ray-Ban, the best known sun eyewear brand in the world, Oakley, Vogue, Persol, Oliver Peoples,
Arnette and REVO, while license brands include Bvlgari, Burberry, Chanel, Dolce & Gabbana, Donna Karan, Polo Ralph Lauren, Prada, Salvatore Ferragamo, Tiffany and Versace.
In addition to a global wholesale network covering 130 countries, the Group manages leading retail brands such as LensCrafters and Pearle Vision in North America, OPSM and Laubman
& Pank in Australasia, LensCrafters in Greater China and Sunglass Hut globally. The Group’s products are designed and manufactured in six Italy-based manufacturing plants, two
wholly-owned plants in China and a sports sunglass production facility in the U.S. In 2009, Luxottica Group posted consolidated net sales of €5.1 billion. Additional information on the
Group is available at www.luxottica.com.

Safe Harbor Statement
Certain statements in this press release may constitute “forward-looking statements” as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements involve risks,
uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those which are anticipated. Such risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to,
the ability to manage the effect of the poor current global economic conditions on our business, the ability to successfully acquire new businesses and integrate their operations, the
ability to predict future economic conditions and changes in consumer preferences, the ability to successfully introduce and market new products, the ability to maintain an efficient
distribution network, the ability to achieve and manage growth, the ability to negotiate and maintain favorable license arrangements, the availability of correction alternatives to
prescription eyeglasses, fluctuations in exchange rates, as well as other political, economic and technological factors and other risks and uncertainties described in our filings with the
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. These forward-looking statements are made as of the date hereof, and we do not assume any obligation to update them.

								
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