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					                   Message from CEO/Executive Director/Founder
                                                       Rudolph H. Carn

                                      W     elcome to the 2002-2003 Annual Report. I am pleased to present an overview of
                                            National AIDS Education & Services for Minorities, Inc.’s (NAESM) programs and ser-
                                  vices. We have been serving the community since 1990, and we are blessed to have you review
                                  the Annual Report of our successes and challenges.

                                       In 2003, we celebrated the home going of one of our founders, Mae Gratis Reed, whose
                                  vision encouraged me to open the doors of NAESM in 1990. Affectionately called “Auntie Mae,”
                                  I found strength and peace in her unconditional love for me as an openly black gay male.
                                  Auntie Mae always had a word of advice when things did not go as planned. With no place to
                                  live and newly located in Atlanta, she opened her home to so many others and me. Many of
                                  us had left our families due to our openly gay lifestyle, and we became family to each other.
                                  Auntie Mae was the matriarch for our family. She will be remembered as a woman whose life
                                  touched thousands of African American men and women living with HIV/AIDS. Because Auntie
                                  Mae helped to shape the mission of NAESM, this will always be a place where openly gay men,
                                  same gender loving men who love men can find a safe space.

     I thank our funders, volunteers and staff for their hard work and dedication, and I invite you to join us as we build on
thirteen (13) years of providing programs aimed to reduce the spread of new HIV infections and referring clients for treatment
and/or social services for people living with HIV/AIDS. I also thank a very special group of volunteers, the members of Boards
of Directors. To them, I say “thank you and keep the faith.”

    Together, we have gone the extra miles to make sure clients were fed and clothed through Client Services. We even made
sure hundreds of MARTA tokens were given to men, women, and mothers with children who visited NAESM for food or testing
and counseling services.

     Our goal last year was to increase our funding by 20% and to diversify our portfolio of grants, government support, dona-
tions, pledges and fundraising events. We added the Development Department to invest the needed time and resources in
identifying grants and funding sources. We hope to reach this goal in the very near future.

    Our Department of Health Education & Prevention is on track now and is exceeding all of the deliverables for related grants.
We also held our first “On The Real” workshops about safer sex practices funded by the Atlanta AIDS Partnership Fund of the
Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta and United Way. We provided clients an array of workshops, “Many Men, Many
Voices” “On The DL” as well as the “Speaking In The Black” support group.

    The Capacity Building Assistance Department completed its 3rd and 4th years as a CBA provider. We changed the name
from African American Men United Against AIDS to NAESM’s CBA program. The program was also changed to include only the
SE Region, which consisted of 8 states rather than 32 states and the District of Columbia. These changes presented challenges,
yet we made it work.

     AESM House changed its name to Gerald’s House. It is named in memory of Gerald Ludd, a former Board Member. In addi-
tion, Gerald’s House is now long term/permanent housing for HIV positive men. It is also one of Hands On Atlanta’s volunteer
projects, and we appreciate the volunteers who help to beautify the living space and landscaping for our clients. We are seek-
ing additional funding for Gerald’s House since we did not reapply for HOPWA (Housing Opportunities for People With AIDS)
funding.

    With a rather conservative administration and the presence of war in our country and the world, it has indeed been tough
over the past two years. However, NAESM continues to employ qualified professionals who are personally and professionally
committed to the mission, and I am proud of each and every staff member!

    Let us remain united! HIV still claims the lives of far too many African Americans when compared to other ethnic groups.
We must recommit ourselves to reach a little higher, dig a little deeper and stay a little longer in the fight against HIV/AIDS! Let
us walk this journey together teaching everyone that HIV is a preventable disease!

    We Love You, Love Yourself, BE SAFE…!




    Rudolph H. Carn,
    Chief Executive Officer/Founder



NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003                                                                                             Page 2
                                  NAESM’s History and Overview
                    Number of people living with HIV/AIDS: Approx. 900,000*
          Number of people who may NOT know they are HIV positive: Approx. 300,000*
                      Number of new infections per year: Approx. 40,000*
 *Source: HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report: Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States, 2002



    E    stablished in 1990, National AIDS Education & Ser-
         vices for Minorities, Inc. (NAESM) was among the first
African American community-based non-profit organizations
                                                                   tion & Prevention; and NAESM’s Capacity Building Assistance
                                                                   (CBA) Program.
                                                                       NAESM’s CBA program’s purpose is to strengthen com-
to stand on the frontline in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Head-     munity capacity for HIV prevention, by improving the capacity
quartered in Atlanta, Rudolph “Rudy” H. Carn, and the late         of community-based organizations (CBOs) and other stake-
Mae Gratis Reed and Madam Edna M. Brown founded AESM               holders serving African American men who have sex with men
because of the silence surrounding HIV/AIDS and the avail-         (AA-MSM) to mobilize and participate in the community plan-
ability of services and care, particularly for African American    ning process.
men. NAESM became a national organization in 2000 and its
name changed from AIDS Education & Services for Minori-                 Thirteen years after the founding of NAESM, black gay
ties, Inc. (AESM), to National AIDS Education & Services for       men are still battling new HIV infections although there was
Minorities, Inc. (NAESM).                                          some progress. Thus, NAESM was funded by the Centers for
                                                                   Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) in 1999 to provide Capac-
     NAESM’s mission: To educate communities of color              ity Building Assistance in the Southeast, Midwest and West. In
(primarily African Americans) on the facts about HIV/AIDS          NAESM’s third year, CDC restructured the CBA program and
(Education/Prevention) and to make healthcare and social           NAESM became solely responsible for the Southeast Region:
services available to people of color with early or advanced       Delaware, District of Columbia, Georgia, Maryland, North
stages of HIV/AIDS regardless of sexual orientation.               Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia.
     Under the leadership of Rudolph “Rudy” H. Carn, Execu-            While statistics today show that HIV/AIDS can spread to
tive Director, the foundation of the agency stands on a simple     those who are sexually active, AA- MSM represent the single
motto, “We Love You, Love Yourself, BE SAFE…,” which               largest population of HIV/AIDS cases throughout the country
translates into a mission of promoting self-esteem, building       and is NAESM’s largest targeted group.
knowledge, and raising the community’s awareness about the
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and its adverse impact              In addition to funding from CDC, NAESM is the recipient
on communities of color.                                           of various grants from Atlanta AIDS Partnership Fund, Ryan
                                                                   White Title I, Georgia Shares, Broadway Cares/Equity Fights
     NAESM’s free services include: peer counseling; per-          AIDS, IBM Employee contributions, and corporate and indi-
manent housing for HIV positive men; psychosocial support;         vidual contributors. In recent years, NAESM received funding
emergency financial assistance; food; clothing; transportation     from Fulton County Human Services and HOPWA (Housing
assistance (public transit tokens); HIV prevention education;      Opportunities For People With AIDS).
community outreach; HIV counseling, testing, and refer-
rals; risk reduction workshops; substance abuse counseling;            To learn more about NAESM visit our website at
mental health counseling; case management; medical refer-          www.naesmonline.org. As a nonprofit, NAESM recruits volun-
rals; preventive case management; and capacity building            teers and solicits donations year-round. Call today and make
assistance. Services are divided among three departments:          your pledge or volunteer at (404) 691-8880.
Department of Client Services; Department of Health Educa-



                                                                                   Table of Contents
     NAESM’s Board of Directors
                                                          Message from Founder/CEO ................................... Page 2
 Rudolph H. Carn. Executive Director/CEO                  History and Overview ........................................................ 3
          Larry Ferrell, President                        Board of Directors ............................................................. 3
 Darryl Haysbert, Vice President/Treasurer                Client Services .................................................................. 4
         Carlos Murrell, Secretary                        Dept. of Health Education & Prevention ............................ 5
              ivory t. brown                              Dept. of Development........................................................ 7
              Antonio Jones                               Capacity Building Assistance Department ........................ 8
             Trevor Pettiford                             Human Resources........................................................... 11
                Dena Smith                                Audtors’ Reports.............................................................. 12
                                                          Financial Statements ....................................................... 14



Page 3                                                                                                     NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003
                                                 Client Services
Introduction and History                                            to move from transitional/short-term housing to long-term/
                                                                    permanent housing in order to provide more stability for the
    S   ince 1993, the Department of Client Services has
        provided an array of services to individuals with HIV/
AIDS. Today, NAESM provides the following HIV related so-
                                                                    residents and to maintain the linkage with supportive services
                                                                    and adherence to medical treatment. Although the number of
                                                                    clients served annually was reduced quantitatively, overall ser-
cial services: Case Management; Mental Health Counseling;
                                                                    vices and benefits to the residents are enhanced qualitatively.
Substance Abuse Counseling; Peer Counseling; Emergency
Financial Assistance; Permanent/Long-Term Housing; Food             Mae Gratis Reed Food Pantry
Pantry; Clothing Closet; and Transportation Assistance. Indi-
vidual, corporate, and foundation contributions combined with
Ryan White Care Act, Title I, are the funding sources for Client
                                                                        M      any of our clients have challenges beyond living
                                                                               with HIV/AIDS. We know to counsel them on HIV
                                                                    prevention and education or confidential or anonymous HIV
Services.
                                                                    Testing, but in some instances the need for food is just as vast.
Gerald’s House                                                      Nutrition plays an equally vital role toward healthy living and
                                                                    that means providing balanced food options. Through private
    G     erald’s House (formerly called AESM House) is a safe
          place and safe space for HIV positive men, who oth-
erwise would be homeless. Gerald’s House provides these
                                                                    donations, contributions and utilizing The Atlanta Food Bank
                                                                    as a resource, NAESM distributed more that 25,000 pounds of
                                                                    food to 250 clients in 2002 and 2003.
men with a long-term/ permanent housing that enables them
to alleviate a homeless situation and                                   Clients are permitted to visit the Food Pantry once per
develop the life skills necessary to                                                         month and many of them rely tre-
maintain a stable lifestyle. Residents                                                       mendously on this component of Cli-
of Gerald’s House receive mental                                                             ent Services for survival. Through
health counseling, substance abuse                                                           its annual food drives, NAESM
counseling and treatment, sup-                                                               was able to replenish its pantry of
port groups, nutritional counseling,                                                         canned goods and nonperishable
money management training, case                                                              items. The biggest food drive is
management, job referrals, trans-                                                            held in December in conjunction
portation assistance and risk reduc-                                                         with the Carn-Washington Founda-
tion training.                                                                               tion Holiday Social. In addition,
                                                                                             NAESM called on local business
     During 2002, twenty-eight (28)
                                                                                             partners, like Funk Jazz Kafé, to
clients were housed at Gerald’s
                                                                                             provide nutritionally balanced foods
House and ten (10) successfully
                                                                                             to meet the needs of immune sup-
moved into permanent affordable
                                                                                             pressed individuals. The staff and
housing.     Additionally, ninety-six
                                                                                             volunteers supported these efforts
(96) individuals received housing
                                                                    through on-going individual donations.
services, which included screening and referrals to other hous-
ing providers. As some residents were diagnosed with HIV,           Emergency Financial Assistance
mental illness, and addictive disorders, six (6) were referred to
inpatient treatment facilities due to drug addiction and mental
health issues.
                                                                        I    n an economy where funds seem to trickle in, NAESM
                                                                             managed to provide emergency financial assistance to
                                                                    twenty (20) HIV infected individuals who were unable to main-
     Through its Food Pantry, NAESM was able to provide the         tain their monthly financial obligations. Some of the problems
residents of Gerald’s House with approximately 2,000 pounds         for HIV infected individuals are inability to pay rent and inability
of non-perishable food items. Residents of Gerald’s House,          to pay utility bills. Through private donations and a small grant
who due to medical frailties were unable to prepare their own       for Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS, NAESM was able to
meals, were linked with Project Open Hand for delivered             keep the Emergency Assistance Program available.
meals. Transportation assistance in the form of public transit
tokens was provided to the residents to enable them to keep         Clothing Closet
medical appointments and employment interviews. Weekly
support group meetings and individual counseling sessions
were among the supportive services provided to all twenty-
                                                                        A   nother component of client services is the Clothing
                                                                            Closet. Whether the need is for shoes, shirts, pants,
                                                                    sweater’s blankets, or jeans, clients can pick out items that
eight (28) residents. Six (6) residents of Gerald’s house suc-      they need. Through the generosity of individual supporters,
cessfully re-entered the work force, two (2) became employed        NAESM was able to provide clothing to 250 HIV infected men,
by NAESM.                                                           women and their families.
    During 2003 year, Gerald’s House was restructured




NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003                                                                                                 Page 4
             Department or Health Education & Prevention
Introduction and History                                            test counseling. We are continuously exploring options and
                                                                    programs (i.e., small incentives and culturally sensitive promo-
    I   n 1990, the Department of Health Education & Pre-
        vention (DHEP) was established and became the
foundation for NAESM. HIV Counseling, Testing, and Refer-
                                                                    tions) to improve the rate of return. Clients who test positive
                                                                    and return for post-test counseling are referred to primary and
                                                                    secondary medical care and offered additional counseling and
rals (CTR) were added in 2001. Today, DHEP serves as the
                                                                    supportive services. Recently FDA approved oral HIV Rapid
local voice to the community on the education and aware-
                                                                    Testing kits will enable individuals to receive testing results in
ness of HIV/AIDS. DHEP provides free HIV CTR; AIDS 101;
                                                                    approximately 20 minutes. NAESM will begin using these new
Community Outreach; Condom Distribution; Preventive Case
                                                                    testing kits in 2004.
Management; Risk Reduction Workshops such as Many Men,
Many Voices, On The DL, On The Real; Focus Groups; and                  NAESM offers free HIV testing on a weekly basis and
much more.                                                          has entered into several Memoranda of Agreements (MOAs)
                                                                    with local community-based organizations to assist in test-
HIV Counseling, Testing, and Referrals (CTR)                        ing and outreach efforts. NAESM provides on-site testing

    W      ith statistics indicating more African American Men
           are dying from HIV/AIDS than any other group,
NAESM’s responsibilities are enormous. With this in mind,
                                                                    and counseling at colleges and universities for health fairs
                                                                    or student events. For more information, contact us at
                                                                    www.naesmonline.org.
NAESM uses the OraSure HIV test, which is oral and requires
                                                                    Health Education and Outreach
only a saliva sample from the mouth. Results are available
within 3-5 business days.
      NAESM’s HIV CTR Department was established in April
                                                                        O    ne component of the Department of Health, Educa-
                                                                             tion and Prevention (DHEP) is Health Education and
                                                                    Outreach, which is charged with the responsibility of reach-
of 2001. Clients receive pre-test counseling prior to taking an
                                                                    ing out to African men who have sex with men (AA-MSM).
HIV test and post-test counseling when returning for their re-
                                                                    NAESM has been funded by Centers for Disease Control and
sults. The pre-test counseling session identifies for the client
                                                                    Prevention to provide HIV prevention programs and services
behaviors that place him/her at risk of acquiring HIV infection
                                                                    specifically for AA-MSM. Beginning in 2004, under CDC’s new
and to guide him/her in minimizing their risk factors for acquir-
                                                                    HIV prevention initiative, NAESM will expand programs and
ing or transmitting HIV. The purpose of the post-test counsel-
                                                                    services to be inclusive and culturally specific to the sub-popu-
ing is to reinforce risk reduction practices, share information
                                                                    lations of the broader African American community.
from the pre-test counseling session, carefully explain the
results of the HIV test, counsel and refer individuals who test          The efforts of the outreach team included distributing
positive to primary and secondary medical care and offer as-        safer sex kits that contained one flavored condom, one stan-
sistance in partner notification. For individuals who test nega-    dard condom, a pillow of lubrication and an informational/
tive and who are still engaging in risky behaviors, enrollment      promotional insert in areas and venues where the agency’s
in risk reduction workshops and preventive case management          targeted population (AA-MSM) fraternize. These venues
is encouraged.                                                      included gay bars/clubs, selected streets, and parks. Gay
                                                                    clubs/bars identified for outreach included Traxx, Club 708,
    With the growing numbers of HIV tests, NAESM faces
                                                                    Colours, the Palace Lounge, Phase I, the Lion’s Den, and the
the same challenges as most AIDS Service Organizations
                                                                    Chapparral. Piedmont Park was identified as an area where
and health providers; we struggle with the number of clients
                                                                    sexual activities occurred, and Cypress Street as an area
who do not return for their results. During 2002 (July 2002-
                                                                    where commercial sex workers engage in their trade. These
June 2003), NAESM administered 734 HIV tests with only
                                                                    locations were also targeted for outreach activities. In addition
444 returning for post-test counseling. During 2003 (July
                                                                    to distributing safer sex kits, the Outreach Team offers on-site
2003 – December 2003), NAESM administered HIV tests to
                                                                    HIV CTR and recruits AA-MSM for risk reduction workshops
562 individuals with only 336 returning for results and post-
                                                                    and, preventive case management.
                                                                         Over an 18-month period (July 2002 – December 2003),
                                                                    the outreach team distributed 29,538 safer sex kits--July
                                                                    2002-June 2003, 14,941 safer sex kits were distributed; and
                                                                    July 2003 – December 2003, 14,597 safer sex kits were dis-
                                                                    tributed.
                                                                         The DHEP team is responsible for educating staff, clients
                                                                    and other agencies in the community on HIV/AIDS and other
                                                                    STD’s as well as learning from the community how to develop
                                                                    and deliver culturally appropriate services. NAESM’s qualified
                                                                    staff, which consists of Health Educators, HIV Testing Coun-
                                                                    selors, and Preventive Case Managers, organize and facilitate
                                                                    workshops, focus groups and support groups. NAESM offers
                                                                    four risk-reduction workshops: (1) HIV/AIDS 101, which ex-
                                                                    plains the basics of HIV/AIDS; (2) Many Men, Many Voices,
                                                                    which offers prevention/harm reduction strategies through

Page 5                                                                                                 NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003
                                                     DHEP (cont’d)
suggested behavior changes; (3) On the Real, which offers            NAESM’s PCM Program
prevention/harm reduction through alternative safer sex meth-              The Prevention Case Management (PCM) component of
ods; and (4) On the Down Low, which targets those men who            the Department of Health Education (DHEP) is not limited by
have girlfriends and wives and still have sex with other men.        person’s HIV status or sexual identity. The goal of PCM Pro-
The agency also offers a support group called Speaking In            gram is to have eighty percent (80%)of African American MSM
Black Voices, which provides a space for AA MSM who are              who complete a prevention case management service plan,
HIV+ to discuss their issues with peers. NAESM’s DHEP con-           to list behaviors that confer risk; behavior changes needed to
ducts focus groups that allow for feedback from the community        reduce risk, and rationalize underlying risk-reduction changes.
served in terms of the services we provided. The focus groups        The PCM Program will assist the client to commit to risk-reduc-
also allow the team to solicit the community’s opinion on health     tion, identify efforts, and demonstrate developed skills neces-
issues such as the syphilis outbreak. In 2002-2003, DHEP’s           sary for change implementation including consistent condom
team educated 106 AA-MSM through its efforts.                        use or other safer sex practices.
Prevention Case Management                                               Each client enrolled in the PCM Program is screened and
What is Prevention Case Management?                                  assessed for HIV prevention needs. The client, with the assis-

    A    ccording to the Centers for Disease Control and             tance of the preventive case manager, develops a client-cen-
         Prevention (CDC), Prevention Case Management or             tered prevention plan. The PCM Program provides HIV risk-
PCM is a client-centered HIV prevention activity with the fun-       reduction counseling and coordinates HIV preventive services
damental goal of promoting the adoption and maintenance of           and follow-up. Finally the PCM Program monitors clients on a
HIV risk-reduction behaviors by clients with multiple, complex       monthly basis and reassess client needs and progress.
problems and risk-reduction needs. PCM is intended for per-              The PCM program maintained sixty-three (63) prevention
sons having or likely to have difficulty initiating or sustaining    case management cases from October 1, 2001 – September
practices that reduce or prevent HIV acquisition, transmission,      20, 2003. All clients had a PCM client-centered service plan.
or re-infection. As a hybrid of HIV risk-reduction counseling        Each PCM client was screened for other sexually transmitted
and traditional case management, PCM provides intensive,             diseases (STD).
on-going, individualized prevention counseling, support, and
service brokerage. This HIV prevention activity addresses            On The Real Workshop Series
the relationship between HIV risk behaviors and other issues         Funded by Atlanta AIDS Partnership Fund

                                                                         I
such as substance abuse, STD treatment, mental health, and                   n 2002, NAESM was successfully awarded $31,500
social and cultural factors.                                                 from the Atlanta AIDS Partnership Fund, which al-
     Priority for PCM services is given to HIV positive persons      lowed the agency to offer at least six (6) sexually explicit
having or likely to have difficulty initiating or sustaining prac-   workshops, which are culturally designed for young (18-29)
tices that reduce or prevent HIV transmission and re-infection.      African American men who have sex with men (YMSM).
For HIV positive persons, PCM involves the coordination of           There was a strong emphasis on the awareness of safer sex
primary and secondary prevention interventions in close col-         practices for (YMSM). According to a six-city study conducted
laboration with Ryan White CARE Act case management pro-             and released in 2000 by Linda Valleroy of CDC, the HIV inci-
viders. Further, PCM ensures the provision of other medical          dence rate among African American YMSM is 14.7%, while for
and psychosocial services affecting risk behavior, including         Hispanics and Whites, the HIV incidence rates are 3.5% and
STD and substance abuse treatment services.                          2.5%, respectively.
    HIV negative persons, or those of unknown HIV status                   “On The Real” targeted sixty (60) African American YMSM
who are engaging in high-risk behaviors within communities           participants and each workshop series occurs at a participant’s
with moderate to high prevalence rates of HIV infection may          home on a voluntary basis. The goal of “On the Real” is to
also be appropriate for PCM.                                         increase safer sex practices and decrease the risk of HIV/STD
                                                                     infection. This is achieved by providing African American
    PCM includes the following seven essential components:           YMSM a safe space to discuss their sexual experiences and
    1.) Client recruitment and engagement;                           identify creative ways to decrease risk of HIV/STD infection.
    2.) Screening and assessment (comprehensive assess-              Another goal was that participants would be able to define and
        ment of HIV and STD risks, medical and psychosocial          identify symptoms of various STDs common among African
        service needs - including STD evaluation and treat-          American YMSM (such as HIV, gonorrhea, syphilis, and her-
        ment, and substance abuse treatment);                        pes). With this funding, NAESM was able to hire an additional
                                                                     fulltime Health Educator, who was responsible for conducting
    3.) Development of a client-centered “Prevention Plan”;          all workshop series and community outreach. The outreach
    4.) Multiple-session HIV risk-reduction counseling;              component consisted of safer sex kits (condom, lube and pre-
                                                                     vention message designed to be culturally specific to YMSM)
    5.) Active coordination of services with follow-up;
                                                                     and awareness brochures describing agency programs and
    6.) Monitoring and reassessment of clients’ needs, risks,        services.
        and progress; and
                                                                          During the last 12 months, “On The Real” has reached 24
    7.) Discharge from PCM upon attainment and mainte-               African American YMSM. As required by signature on a letter
        nance of risk-reduction goals.                               of consent, all participants are 18 years and older.


NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003                                                                                              Page 6
                                Department of Development
Introduction and History                                         funds from this Employee Workplace giving program. During
                                                                 2003, we significantly increased our participation in the annual
    T   he Department of Development was established in
        2001 to diversify funding streams enabling NAESM to
broaden the scope of both services and targeted population, to
                                                                 workplace campaigns and gained an increase in pledges for
                                                                 Georgia Shares and for NAESM.
reducethe disproportionate prevalence of HIV among African            During 2002 and 2003, NAESM did not hold its Annual
Americans.                                                       Art Auction as had been done in previous years. In 2002, due
                                                                 to the slump in the nation’s economy and ultimately in Atlanta
Grants, Donations and Fundraising                                as well, we realized that the expense to hold the event was

    I    n 2002 and 2003, Ryan White Care Act, Title I Funds,
         were acquired to continue direct services for our
clients. Through these funds, NAESM was able to
                                                                         greater than the projected revenue. In 2003, NAESM
                                                                          scheduled the Art Auction to be held at Scholars
                                                                           Restaurant located at Morris Brown College. Due to
distribute MARTA tokens to clients who had                                  major challenges at the college, the restaurant was
no other means of transportation and                                         forced to close, thereby leaving NAESM without a
to provide mental health and                                                  suitable location for the event. The 8th Annual
substance abuse counseling.                                                    Art Auction, Our Journey…And Our Destiny: HIV
In 2003, Emergency Finan-                                                       Prevention,” is planned for April 24, 2004 at the
cial Assistance was added to                                                     Atlanta Sheraton Midtown at Colony Square.
services funded under Ryan                                                             NAESM will honor some of the communi-
White Care Act, Title I. A suc-                                                    ty’s leading HIV/AIDS activists and commu-
cessful food drive spearheaded                                                      nity persons and will present the following
by Funk Jazz Kafe allowed NAESM                                                       awards: The Ronnie D. Anderson Award
to provide grocery items to clients                                                    for Outstanding Board Member of The
who lacked the financial resources                                                      Year (Mr. Darryl Haysbert); The Madam
to meet their nutritional needs. Kroger                                                  Edna Brown Memorial Award (Mrs.
Supermarket made a donation to the                                                        Ruby Lewis Hardy); The Gerald A.
agency in the form of a gift certificate,                                                  Ludd Lifetime Award for Excellence in
which enabled NAESM to purchase ad-                                                         support of HIV Prevention and Com-
ditional grocery items to distribute to our                                                  munity Service (Dr. George Rob-
clients during the Thanksgiving and Christ-                                                   erts); The Dora Burke Trailblazer
mas holidays. An award in 2002 and 2003                                                        Award (Mrs. Ruby Linsey); and
from Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS en-                                                      The Sankofa Award in Honor of
abled NAESM to provide emergency financial                                                       Pandora Singleton, founder of
assistance to individuals facing a financial crisis                                                Project AZUKA, (Ms. Angela
and unable to pay their rent or utility bills.                                                           Robinson).
     Although NAESM lost funding in 2002 from                                                                  As the HIV/AIDS
Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOP-                                                          epidemic      continues
WA) which supported Gerald’s House, through                                                              disproportionately in the
restructuring and funding from the Atlanta AIDS                                                         African-American     com-
Partnership Fund, administered by United Way,                                                          munity, and during this
Gerald’s House remains a viable alternative for                                                      time of federal cutbacks
HIV/AIDS infected men at risk for homeless-                                                         for health care and social
ness.                                                                                             services, it is essential now
     In 2002 and 2003, the Centers for Dis-                                                     more than ever for concerned
ease Control and Prevention continued to                                                       citizens to support causes that
fund the Health Education and Prevention                                                     directly affect them. Support may
Programs of NAESM and HIV Counsel-                                                          come in many forms: organizing
ing, Testing, and Referrals (CTR). The                                                     a food or clothing drive, “adopting”
AIDS Partnership Fund funded an                                                           a client for the holidays, performing
innovative HIV prevention interven-                                                      volunteer services, and of course,
tion program specifically designed                                                      monetary contributions.
for young African American men                                                             Donations to NAESM can be sent
who have sex with men (YMSM).                                                         to 2140 Martin L. King, Jr. Drive., Atlanta,
YMSM is also used to refer to members                                                Georgia, 30310. To learn about NAESM’s
of this group.                                                                      on-going fundraising events, visit us online
     As a member of Georgia Shares since its incep-                                at www.naesmonline.org.
tion, NAESM continued to be one of the top two recipients of




Page 7                                                                                             NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003
                      Capacity Building Assistance Department
Introduction and History                                            resignation, and West Region financial challenges with subcon-
                                                                    tractor.
    N     ational AIDS Education & Services for Minorities,
          Inc. (NAESM) has been funded by the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to provide capacity
                                                                          Upon receiving the evaluation of its CBA program, NAESM
                                                                    confirmed that consideration should be given to the real feasi-
building assistance (CBA) since 1999, under two priority areas      bility and utility of the sub-contract structure in that it introduced
in accordance to program announcement 99091B. The priority          additional variables into the process.
areas (three and four) are to strengthen community capacity for          In the midst of the program, CBA’s program goals and
HIV prevention and to strengthen HIV prevention community           objectives were revised to eliminate redundancy and incon-
planning. NAESM’s targeted population for its CBA program is        sistencies in reporting between regions. This in turn, eased
community-based organizations (CBOs) that serve the African         the process of examining whether or not objectives had been
American MSM population and stakeholders.                           achieved. The revisions also allowed the program deliverables
What Is Capacity Building Assistance?                               to be more consistent with the priorities defined and established
                                                                    by the CDC.

    C   apacity Building Assistance or “CBA” refers to a range
        of activities intended to strengthen an organization’s
overall ability to deliver effective HIV prevention or care ser-
                                                                        The revised objectives are more streamlined with consid-
                                                                    erably less ambiguity than in past years and significantly less
vices. NAESM is funded to provide CBA in two specific areas.        overlap and duplication. Consistency and stability will be key to
They are: Community capacity building for HIV prevention; and       continued success.
HIV prevention community-planning effectiveness and partici-        CBA REGIONS: Southeast, Midwest and West
pation.
     NAESM’s Capacity Building Assistance Program was cre-
ated to provide capacity building assistance to various regions
                                                                        T   here was considerable variation between the three
                                                                            regions during the fiscal period regarding the achieve-
                                                                    ment of goals and objectives.
in the United States: to increase collaboration and support
among agencies, organizations, groups, and constituencies           SOUTHEAST REGION
providing HIV prevention services to African American gays,               The Southeast region was fully successful in achieving
bisexuals and transgenders.                                         three of the four objectives. The region achieved a success
     The goal of NAESM’s CBA Program is to provide capacity         rate of 83% (calculation based on achievement of success
building and community mobilization assistance to the African       indicators within each of the objectives) on the fourth objective.
American gay, bisexual and transgender community, related to        Evidence submitted by the regional coordinator indicated that
the HIV Community Planning Process. This program is intend-         leadership development training for members of community
ed to get more African American gays, bisexuals and transgen-       planning groups was planned during the fiscal period but not
ders involved in HIV prevention planning activities.                actually implemented.

     By providing capacity building assistance to other AIDS             The Southeast region has emerged as the most success-
Service organizations and community-based organizations,            ful region in implementing components of the capacity building
agencies can provide and deliver the highest quality of ser-        program. Even though it has experienced staff turnover similar
vices possible while maintaining efficient overall operations.      to that experienced by the Midwest region. The present regional
NAESM’s CBA Program is working to organize and mobilize             coordinator is the second in three years and the region oper-
African American gays, bisexuals and transgenders around is-        ated without a coordinator for the first year of the program.
sues impacting HIV prevention goals and helping to facilitate a     MIDWEST REGION
broader African American community inclusive of the presence
                                                                         The Midwest region achieved a success rate of 85% on
of prominent African American MSM.
                                                                    three of the four objectives and 50% on one of the objectives.
      NAESM’s CBA project is a coalition of local agencies          The Midwest region did not provide leadership training for
representing the region. The efforts are focused on building        members of the community planning groups in the region or
stronger communities and organizations in order to encourage        submit information for publication in the program newsletter.
effective and appropriate community mobilization and repre-         There seemed to be considerable confusion and lack of com-
sentative community planning designed “by and for” African          munication regarding the process of receiving requests, pro-
American MSM. This process provides African American MSM            viding capacity building assistance, and tracking the outcome.
at the local level with expanded access to resources, as well       Significant improvement over the last fiscal period was noted
as opportunities to participate in program development, service     in the Midwest regarding coordination and facilitation of meet-
delivery, and coordination efforts at the local and state levels.   ings with community planning groups in the region. Though
     Over the past three years, the CBA program has made sig-       delegates articulated regional needs, the evidence shows that
nificant improvement identifying appropriate needs and strate-      there was no follow up on the identified needs or efforts made to
gies, tracking requests, timely response to requests, and docu-     develop a comprehensive needs assessment and development
mentation of activities. However, CBA continues to be plagued       of strategic plans. Considerable energy was expended estab-
with: the second National Director’s resignation, staff turnover    lishing and re-establishing relationships, which is most likely a
on both the regional and national levels, Midwest Regional Co-      consequence of the absence of a regional coordinator in the
ordinator vacancy; considerable efforts in Midwest but short on     region for an extended period of time. Consistency and stability
deliverables from subcontractor, West Regional Coordinator’s        will be needed for this region to successfully execute the terms

 NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003                                                                                                 Page 8
                                                      CBA (cont’d)
of the cooperative agreement.                                        to the Southeast Region only. This new arrangement will be
      The Midwest region, like the Southeast region, has also        effective through March 2004, which will conclude year 5 of
had two regional coordinators in the three years of the proj-        the program.
ect. The primary difference seems to be that the coordinator         SOUTHEAST REGION PREVAILS
of the Southeast region has previously served as a Program
Assistant and therefore was familiar with the program and had
had an opportunity to develop relationships with the regional
                                                                         S   ince the inception of the CBA program, NAESM has
                                                                             recognized the need to mobilize the African American
                                                                     MSM community by working with community-based organi-
delegates and other key players in the region before assuming
                                                                     zations (CBOs) in the Southeast region. Thus, NAESM has
full responsibility for regional coordination
                                                                     made community mobilization a priority for year five of the
WEST REGION                                                          CBA program. Although NAESM’s CBA program will contin-
     The West region had the most difficulty meeting program         ued to provide CBA services throughout the Southeast region,
goals and objectives. The region demonstrated an objective           NAESM targeted CBOs in three cities with high African Ameri-
achievement rate of only 50% on two of the four objectives           can MSM HIV/AIDS incidence and prevalence rates.
– identification of regional needs and maintaining a regional            Through this community mobilization effort, NAESM:
advisory board. Only one activity was implemented to improve
the capacity to participate in the HIV prevention planning pro-          §   Increased African American leadership;
cess. The region was not successful at all in providing capac-           §   Increased awareness of the HIV/AIDS epidemic
ity building assistance to community based organizations. The                in African American MSM communities in the
lack of financial stability of the sub-contracting organization              southeast region;
was the primary contributing factor to the lack of success in            §   Increased collaboration and information sharing
achieving goals and objectives during the fiscal period.                     strategies; and
                                                                         §   Increased African American MSM targeted HIV
    The West Region was more successful in implementing
goals and objectives of the program during the first and sec-                testing efforts.
ond year than this fiscal period. Additionally, the region had the   SOUTHEAST REGION – YEAR(S) IN REVIEW
same coordinator until the second half of this fiscal period.
                                                                         §   The CBA Coordinator began the period with a one-
     Significant progress was made in moving regional coor-                  year collaborative CBA project with North Carolina
dinators in using a common language in describing monthly                    Department of Health & Human Resources. The
activities and standardizing interpretations of the purpose of               goal of this one-year pilot project was to improve
the various activities.
                                                                             the ability of selected CBOs to deliver better
Summary                                                                      services for African American men at-risk for HIV
     NAESM’s Midwest and West subcontractors, Community                      infection.
Health Outreach Workers (CHOW), and National Black Les-
                                                                         §   January 2002 NAESM participated in the South
bian & Gay Leadership Forum came under great scrutiny and
                                                                             Carolina Community Planning Leadership Summit.
review in the latter months of 2002 of the Cooperative Agree-
                                                                             At the event NAESM facilitated a workshop “No
ment. CDC and NAESM met regarding those challenges.
CDC restructured NAESM’s Cooperative Agreement, which
                                                                             More Excuses: Tips & Challenges for Working with
included three (3) regions – Southeast, Midwest and West.                    AA MSM.”
This change included the reassignment of the Midwest and                 §   The Southeast Region Advisory Board met face-to-
West regions. So, from 2002 –2003 NAESM concentrated                         face February 22–24, 2002, in Norfolk, Virginia, for
solely and heavily on providing capacity building assistance                 its first semi-annual meeting of the 2002.
                                                                         §   NAESM participated in the National Community
                                                                             Planning Leadership Summit in Chicago,
                                                                             Illinois, March 6–9, 2002. NAESM’s participation
                                                                             included: Facilitating a focus group to identify
                                                                             effective interventions for African American MSM;
                                                                             Co-facilitating a workshop to help participants
                                                                             understand the diversity among YMSM; and
                                                                             marketing CBA services via a conference booth.
                                                                         §   Also, the Southeast Region Coordinator facilitated
                                                                             a Baltimore/Central Maryland Town Hall Meeting
                                                                             on March 19, 2002, in Baltimore, Maryland. The
                                                                             meeting had 23 participants based on a head count
                                                                             conducted by the Regional Coordinator.
                                                                         §   April 2002 the Southeast Region Coordinator


Page 9                                                                                              NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003
                                                  CBA (cont’d)
         facilitated a community mobilization in Alexandria,          partnered with other capacity building assistance
         Virginia.                                                    and technical assistance providers and CDC to
                                                                      conduct the orientation for the revised community
    §    Throughout the summer of 2002 the CBA program
                                                                      planning guidance in New York. The orientation
         phased out the African American United Against
                                                                      occurred during the 2003 Community Planning
         AIDS (AAMUAA) name and logo to become
                                                                      Leadership Summit.
         NAESM’s CBA program.
                                                                  §   NAESM’s     summer-long      Capacity   Building
    §    June 2002 the Southeast Region Coordinator
                                                                      Assistance Needs and Priority Assessment has
         conducted a Town Hall Meeting in Washington, DC
                                                                      provided some interesting and unexpected results.
         on the campus of Howard University.
                                                               Gay Men of Color
    §    July 2002 the Executive Director participated in a
         policy education dialogue in Washington, DC at
         the National Leadership Summit                           U   nder the scope of CBA, NAESM participates in the
                                                                      Gay Men of Color (GMOC) Initiative. The purpose of
                                                                              the Gay Men of Color (GMOC) Initiative is
         on Eliminating Racial and Ethnic
                                                                              to improve the capacity of community-based
         Disparities in Health.
                                                                              organizations (CBOs) serving Gay Men of
    §    CBA staff participated in the 6th                                    Color and other community stakeholders to
         Annual United States Conference                                      build and strengthen community capacity for
         on AIDS in Anaheim, California                                       HIV prevention. This initiative also strives
         September 19–22, 2002. Goals                                         to improve the capacity of CBOs serving
         for staff attending the conference                                   Gay Men of Color and other HIV preven-
                                                                              tion stakeholders to effectively participate
         were to (a), market capacity
                                                                              in the HIV prevention community planning
         building assistance offered (b),
                                                                              process.
         identify candidates for CBA
         program consultants and (c),                                               Although the GMOC partnership has
         build the skills and knowledge                                       been in existence since 1999, a new compo-
         of staff through participation in                                    nent was added to the activities in 2003. The
         workshops, institutes, etc.                                          GMOC partnership introduced the GMOC
                                                                              Training Institute, which held it first Institute
    §    November 2002, the CBA                                               in Atlanta, Georgia, on July 24-26, 2003.
         Coordinator partnered with AIDS                                      The goal of this institute was to strengthen-
         Delaware to co-present “A Day of                                     ing diverse communities through education,
         Repair in Wilmington, Delaware.”                                     planning, leadership development and mobi-
         The event included three skills-                                     lization. The objectives were:
         building workshops for African                                       §       To provide characteristics or
         American men at-risk for HIV                                         strategies of spiritual practices among
         infection.                                                           GMOC communities that impact HIV/AIDS
    §    January         2003,      NAESM                                     prevention;
         participated      in     committee                                   §      To provide strategies that support
         meetings        and      conducted                                   network and collaborative relationships
         activities in support of National                                    among diverse cultures;
         Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day
         (NBHAAD). NBHAAD’s purpose                                           §       To provide culturally specific
         is to contribute to an ongoing                                       tools that will enhance one’s personal
         effort that would continuously                                       involvement in community mobilization
         utilize, build, and link HIV/AIDS                                    and community planning; and
         prevention      networks    initially
                                                                              §       To provide models of effective
         established when the AIDS crisis
                                                                              mobilization    efforts  in   GMOC
         emerged.
                                                                              communities.
    §    March      2003      NAESM      staff




NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003                                                                                       Page 10
                                             Human Resources
Overview of Department                                             ther, NAESM will introduce two initiatives in the winter of 2004
                                                                   through the Intern Program and a Workforce Initiative. NAESM
    T    he Department of Human Resources is an intricate
         part of the administrative structure of NAESM. At
NAESM, Human Resources performs in the following ca-
                                                                   will partner with Hands-On Atlanta for the Intern Program and
                                                                   the Department of Labor for the Workforce Initiative for an on-
                                                                   going basis and pool of job applicants.
pacities: identify, recruit, and select qualified candidates to
staff positions; interview and assess applicants; orient new       Volunteers Are Key!
hires; resolve grievance issues; develop policy and procedure;
coach and develop employees; provide benefit and retirement
information, coordinate volunteers; implement programs to im-
                                                                       T    he lifeline of survival for non-profits is from the com-
                                                                            munity at large, more specifically volunteers who give
                                                                   of their time and efforts. Throughout the year, hundreds of
prove staff morale; limit turnover; and other duties that may be
                                                                   youth and adults, from various backgrounds, unite to support
assigned by the Executive Director or deemed appropriate as
                                                                   the mission of NAESM. The volunteers participate in vari-
the needs of the clients change.
                                                                   ous activities, which may vary with personal interests and/ or
Diversity of Staff                                                 strengths. Each volunteer is introduced to NAESM through an
                                                                   extensive orientation process and then hands-on projects. In
    N      AESM proudly employs staff based on various
           knowledge, skills, and abilities. NAESM does not
discriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, age, or sexual
                                                                   the orientation, the volunteer is given an overview of the or-
                                                                   ganization and acclimated to both the mission and services
                                                                   that NAESM offers. Hands-on projects could include working
orientation. NAESM prides itself on remaining “on the cutting
                                                                   in the various departments (Administration, Capacity Building
edge” by conducting periodic assessments to ensure that our
                                                                   Assistance, Department of Health Education & Prevention and
current employees
                                                                                                               Client Services, as
possess skill     sets
                                                                                                               well as fundraising
that are required to
                                                                                                               initiatives).    A part
successfully perform
                                                                                                               of NAESM’s protocol
a position. If an em-
                                                                                                               is to maintain client’s
ployee has an “area
                                                                                                               confidentiality as it
of        opportunity,”
                                                                                                               relates to HIV/AIDS
an individual or per-
                                                                                                               status;       therefore,
formance develop-
                                                                                                               volunteers do not
ment plan is created
                                                                                                               work with clients in
with input from the
                                                                                                               confidential settings
employee. NAESM
                                                                                                               or files that contain
also takes       pride
                                                                                                               medical history.
in its     compensa-
tion structure. In                                                                                                In summary, vol-
most of the funding                                                                                           unteers donate more
proposals that are                                                                                            than 1,500 work
developed, current                                                                                            hours,       annually.
realistic    adminis-                                                                                         They participate in
trative costs are                                                                                             such activities as
included that reflect                                                                                         safer sex kit packing,
the economy.                                                                                                  Hands on Atlanta
                                                                                                              Day where minor re-
New Programs/Incentives                                            pairs and landscaping are done to Gerald’s House, Annual Art

    N     AESM maintains its competitive edge through sev-
          eral mediums. Some of the mediums are as
follows: staff development through ongoing training and de-
                                                                   Auction, Labor Day Pool Party, AIDS Walk Atlanta, Dr. Martin
                                                                   Luther King, Jr. Service Summit, the African- American Out-
                                                                   reach Initiative, and preparing and serving “Sunday Dinner” for
velopment, succession planning, change management, and             the residents of Gerald’s House. With their hands and hearts,
action learning initiatives. Some of the programs that NAESM       volunteers helped NAESM to fulfill its commitment of offering
makes available to its employees are medical and dental            quality services to our clients and community. Additionally,
health coverage, short and long term disability, employee          NAESM staff donate more than 1,500 hours of their personal
assistance programs, and investments opportunities through         time to agency activities and client services. These volunteer
401K Administration.                                               hours are in addition to a fulltime schedule of a 40-hour work
                                                                   schedule.
     In 2003, NAESM participated again in the Governor’s
Intern Program for a total of six (6) weeks. To go a step fur-




Page 11                                                                                                NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003
                               2002 Independent Auditor’s
                            Report of the Financial Statements



         To the Board of Directors of
                 NATIONAL AIDS EDUCATION & SERVICES FOR MINORITIES, INC.:

         We have audited the accompanying statements of financial position of National AIDS Education & Services for
         Minorities, Inc. (a nonprofit organization) (the “Organization”) as of September 30, 2002, and the related statements
         of activities and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of National
         AIDS Education & Services for Minorities, Inc.’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these
         financial statements based on our audit.
         We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and
         the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller
         General of the United States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assur-
         ance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test
         basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing
         the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall finan-
         cial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
         In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of
         National AIDS Education & Services for Minorities, Inc. as of September 30, 2002, and the changes in its net assets
         and its cash flows for the year then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United
         States of America.
         In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued a report dated February 19, 2004, on our
         consideration of National AIDS Education & Services for Minorities, Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting and
         our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts and grants. That report is an integral
         part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards and should be read in conjunction with
         this report in considering the results of our audit.
         Our audit was performed for the purpose of forming an opinion on the basic financial statements of National AIDS
         Education & Services for Minorities, Inc. taken as a whole. The accompanying Schedule of Expenditures of Federal
         Awards is presented for purposes of additional analysis as required by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget
         OMB Circular A-133, “Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations”, and is not a required part
         of the basic financial statements. Such information has been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit
         of the basic financial statements and, in our opinion, is fairly stated in all material respects, in relation to the basic
         financial statements taken as a whole.
         June 30, 2003
         Duluth, Georgia

                                                 WILCOX & BIVINGS, P.C.
                                                        CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS




NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003                                                                                                      Page 12
                                 2003 Independent Auditor’s
                              Report of the Financial Statements



          To the Board of Directors of
                  NATIONAL AIDS EDUCATION & SERVICES FOR MINORITIES, INC.:

          We have audited the accompanying statements of financial position of National AIDS Education & Services for
          Minorities, Inc. (a nonprofit organization) (the “Organization”) as of September 30, 2003, and the related statements
          of activities and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Organi-
          zation’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit.
          We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and
          the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller
          General of the United States, and the provisions of Office Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-133, Audits of
          States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit
          to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit
          includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An
          audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well
          as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for
          our opinion.
          In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of
          National AIDS Education & Services for Minorities, Inc. as of September 30, 2003, and the changes in its net assets
          and its cash flows for the year then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United
          States of America.
          In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued a report dated February 19, 2004, on our
          consideration of National AIDS Education & Services for Minorities, Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting and
          our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts and grants. That report is an integral
          part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards and should be read in conjunction with
          this report in considering the results of our audit.
          Our audit was performed for the purpose of forming an opinion on the basic financial statements of National AIDS
          Education & Services for Minorities, Inc. taken as a whole. The accompanying Schedule of Expenditures of Federal
          Awards is presented for purposes of additional analysis as required by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget
          OMB Circular A-133, Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations, and is not a required part of
          the basic financial statements. Such information has been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of
          the basic financial statements and, in our opinion, is fairly stated in all material respects, in relation to the basic financial
          statements taken as a whole.
          February 19, 2004
          Atlanta, Georgia

                                                  MARTIN, HARPS, SYPHOE & CO.
                                                          CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS




Page 13                                                                                                          NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003
                                            Financial Statements
        STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION                                             STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES


                                          9/30/02     9/30/03   UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS                 9/30/02      9/30/03


ASSETS                                                          SUPPORT AND REVENUE
   Cash and cash equivalents               40,292      51,639       Governmental grants               1,597,899    1,022,767
   Grants receivable                      172,650      49,705       Contributions                       95,537       43,633
   Accounts receivable                      3,948      12,808       Non-governmental grants and
   Prepaid expenses                          350        5,026       allocations                         42,839       75,875

   Inventory - donated art                 21,380      31,615       Conference income                   17,791       22,734

   Property and equipment - net           294,967     264,375       Rental income                        6,000        6,000

   Note receivable                           ------    17,715       Investment return                    2,786         ------

   Deposits                                 4,185       4,185       Inkind donations                      ------      3,941
                                                                    Interest Income                       ------      1,080
                                                                    Special events                         671          117
                  Total Assets            537,772     437,068
                                                                    Client Fees                           ------      5,533
                                                                    Other support and revenue              147         ------
LIABILITIES
   Accounts payable                       127,929      16,251
                                                                                  Total support and
   Accrued liabilities                     37,501      32,693                     revenue             1,763,670    1,181,680
   Note Payable                            23,657      17,715
   Line of credit payable                    ------    81,100   EXPENSES
                                                                    Program Services                  1,663,315     991,856
                  Total liabilities       189,087     147,759       Fundraising                          5,450       15,172
                                                                    Management and general             180,717      267,060
NET ASSETS
   Unrestricted                           248,005     234,897                     Total expenses      1,849,482    1,274,088
   Temporarily restricted                 100,680      54,412
                                                                Change in net assets                    (6,512)     (59,376)
                  Total net assets        348,685     289,309
                                                                Net assets - beginning of year         355,197      348,685
                  Total liabilities and
                  net assets              537,772     437,068
                                                                Net assets - end of year               348,685      289,309




NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003                                                                                     Page 14
                              Financial Statements
                                       STATEMENT OF CASH FLOW
                                                                      9/30/02      9/30/03
          CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
             Change in net assets                                       (6,512)     (59,376)
                Adjustments to reconcile change in net assets to
                net cash provided (used) by operating activities:
                   Depreciation                                         28,275       32,819
                   Grants receivable                                  (144,869)     122,945
                   Accounts receivable                                    ------     (8,660)
                   Prepaid expenses                                      6,482       (4,676)
                   Accounts payable and accrued liabilities            162,989     (116,478)


          Net cash provided (used) by investing activities              46,365      (33,426)


          CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
             Additions to property and equipment - net                 (22,095)     (36,327)


             Net cash flows provided (used) by investing activities    (22,095)     (36,327)


          CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
             Draws and additions to a line of credit                   105,105       81,100
             Principle payments on capital lease payable              (105,105)         ------


          Net cash flows provided (used) by financing activities          ------     81,100


          Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents          24,270        11,347


          Cash and cash equivalents - beginning of year                 16,022       40,292


          Cash and cash equivalents - end of year                       40,292       51,639


          SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES:


          Interest expense and loan fees                                 3,162         4,949


          Acquisition of property and equipment with note payable       26,259          ------




Page 15                                                                              NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003
       National AIDS Education
     & Services for Minorities, Inc.




NAESM Annual Report 2002 - 2003    Page 16

				
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