berkley-report by wuzhenguang

VIEWS: 10 PAGES: 25

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SOUTH COAST RAIL PROJECT
Southeast Regional Planning and Economic Development District
Berkley Priority Protection & Development Areas



                  PRIORITY DEVELOPMENT AREAS
                   PRIORITY PROTECTION AREAS
INTRODUCTION
Southeastern Massachusetts is growing rapidly. As a region, we are developing nearly 8
acres each and every day, or about 4½ square miles a year. This is equivalent to fully
developing an area the size of the Town of Somerset every 21 months.

Development is inevitable; our region is a desirable place to live and work, and a certain
amount of new growth is healthy. But in the past, we have not always planned well for
development, and the result has not always been an asset for our communities and region.

Good development should be on sites that are matched to their intended uses. Sites for
more intensive development need good access, compatible abutting land uses, public
water and sewer service nearby, and minimal environmental constraints. These areas
need to be located, mapped and appropriately zoned.

Likewise, we need to plan to protect our most important natural areas. These are the
areas that contribute to our water supply, contain threatened or endangered species or are
special due to their scenic or historic features. These areas also need to be located,
mapped and appropriately protected.

We must steer development toward the appropriate (priority development) areas and
away from the critical (priority protection) areas in order to achieve the vision that we
have for our communities.

In conjunction with the South Coast Rail project and the Southeastern Massachusetts
Commuter Rail Task Force, SRPEDD will be working with the cities and towns of the
region to identify those areas that are the best ones for development and the best ones to
be protected. These will be the Priority Development Areas (PDAs) and Priority
Protection Areas (PPAs) and we will be working with municipal officials and citizens to
locate and designate these areas.


WHAT ARE PRIORITY DEVELOPMENT AREAS?
These are areas within a city or town that are capable of handling more development due
to several factors, including good access, available infrastructure (primarily water and
sewer), an absence of environmental constraints, and local support. PDAs can range in
size from a single lot to many acres. Areas designated under state programs such as
Chapter 43D (expedited permitting), Chapter 40R (smart growth zones) or Economic
Opportunity Areas can be examples of PDAs. Included in these designations will be the
local recommendations for how these sites should be developed.



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WHAT ARE PRIORITY PROTECTION AREAS?
These are areas within a city or town that deserve special protection due to the presence
of significant environmental factors and natural features, such as endangered species
habitats, areas critical to water supply, scenic vistas, or areas of historic significance.
Like PDAs, the protection areas can vary greatly in size. Areas of Critical Environmental
Concern (ACECs), aquifer recharge areas or designated priority habitats can be examples
of PPAs.

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF THE PDA/PPA DESIGNATIONS?
This work is useful to all communities in making land use and zoning decisions. But it
may also be helpful when considering potential mitigation for the commuter rail project
and may be utilized if a regional system of transfer of development rights is utilized. The
PDA/PPA information that is developed will also be integrated into the corridor plan for
the South Coast Rail project.

HOW DOES THE PROCESS WORK?
SRPEDD assembled known data, local zoning bylaws, master plans and open space plans
and worked with local planners, conservation agents, economic development officials,
elected officials, interest groups, local organizations and citizens to review this
information and refine it with local knowledge. This process took several months in each
community. State officials will be consulted for their input and final recommendations
will be brought before local officials and the Southeastern Massachusetts Commuter Rail
Task Force.

HAS THIS BEEN DONE BEFORE?
Similar efforts undertaken by SRPEDD in 1997 and The Coalition of Buzzards Bay have
completed pieces of this process, and that work will be incorporated into this effort.




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The following pages reveal the work that members of the Town of Berkley identified as
Priority Protection and Priority Development Areas in the spring of 2008.


Table of Content:
   I.      The Town of Berkley Priority Protection and Development Map......……….5
   II.     Priority Development/Redevelopment Areas………………………………...6
   III.    Priority Protection Areas……………………………………………………..9
   IV.     Unresolved/Combination of Protection and Development………………….15
   V.      Working Maps…………………………………………………………….....17


Summary

Berkley is located in southeastern Massachusetts, bordered by Town of Dighton and the
Taunton River on the west, Taunton toward the north and Freetown on the south. The
notably stony soil of Berkley did not discourage the early settlers of the community who
concentrated on agriculture and shipbuilding. The woodlands in town drew the first
European settlers to the area. Residents at the time later abandoned the town due to its
vulnerability to the native people during the outbreak of the King Philip’s war, when
townspeople sought shelter in Taunton. Not only did the war delay development in the
area but also lack of water power to fuel industrial mills of colonial times. The town still
retains most of the rural character of its 18th century landscape. Berkley is rich in natural
and cultural resources. The town remains a small, rural community and is well loved by
its residents for its peacefulness.




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Town of Berkley Priority Development/Redevelopment and Protections
Areas

I.     Priority Development/Redevelopment

1.     Berkley Business District/Myricks Development & Preservation Area

       There are two (2) separate areas represented as Berkley’s Business District: Area
       I: County Street/ Route 79 and Area II: Myricks- Grove Street.

               Area I: County Street/Route 79 (Priority Development)
       The area is located in the far
       eastern corner of the town at
       the Lakeville and Taunton
       lines and covers
       approximately 200 acres.
       The area extends from
       approximately the Cotley
       River north of Holloway
       Street at the Taunton line
       south to the Lakeville line,
       parallel to County Street and
       Route 140, then heading
       southeast to a point parallel
       to Route 79, then heading northwest to a point on Route 79 east of Church Street,
       then heading northeast along Route 79 to a point before the intersection of Route
       79/County Road, then heading northwest parallel to County Road to the Cotley
       River north of Holloway Street.

       Berkley recently created this district, which is the only new zoning district other
       than residential and the town anticipates attracting business and mixed-use
       development opportunities. The area provides good transportation access with
       Routes 140/79 and County Street and has CSX rail freight access. The area also
       offers access to water and sewer. Berkley is part of the Greater Taunton
       Economic Target Area (ETA) and can offer development incentives as a
       mechanism to attract private investment.

               Area II: Myricks – Grove Street (Combination Protection & Development)
       This area referred to as Myricks Junction is located at the intersection of Route 79
       and the CSX rail freight line at the Lakeville town line. The area contains
       approximately 128 acres extending from Church on the east to Mill Street on the
       west between CSX’s Middleboro Branch and the Lakeville line. Within this area
       is a 14-acre business zone extending along Grove Street to the Lakeville line
       running parallel to the CSX line.


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       The area has historical significance (former Myricks Depot) and has been
       identified for a scenario of rural village development and preservation that may
       include small-scale, low impact retail and/or service related activities
       complimenting residential preservation and reconstruction and associated rural
       village and rail uses. The area provides access but has no water or sewer.

       In the early 19th century Myricks had a number of industries including carpentry,
       hat making and a mill though fires destroyed much of the area in the 1920s. The
       Myricks Methodist Church, located on the corner of Myricks Street and Church
       Street, as well as the Myricksville School (currently the American Foreign Legion
       Post) remain. This area was also a hub of activity when rail was active, better
       known at the time as
       Myricks Junction. The rail
       line splits in Myricks with
       tracks leading to Taunton,
       Fall River, New Bedford
       and Middleborough. The
       Town of Berkley recognizes
       this area is a prime location
       for redevelopment, but also
       would like to preserve the
       historic integrity that still remains.

                   County Street, Route 79 and Myricks (Grove Street)

         Protected Parcels                              Water Resource
         • APR Stetson Farm                             • Extensive Wetlands
                                                        • Cotley River
         Historic Sites
         • Myricks Junction
         • Historic Village
         Natural Resource Protection Areas              Soils
         • Priority Habitat                             • Sand & gravel
                                                        • Till or Bedrock
         Zoning                                         Possible Use/Reuse
         • Residential                                  • Mix-use
         • Business                                     • TOD
                                                        • Business

                                                        No Municipal Water/Septic System
                                                        (potential water from Taunton)
         Development Area                               21E Site
         • CSX rail                                     • None
         • Route 79




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2.     Padelford Street Limited Development Area

       This area is located on the western side of the Route 24 interchange at Exit 11,
       Padelford Street. Although the area is predominately residential, there is a cluster
       of home occupations and other businesses along this roadway, which has been
       identified for limited business development. Also within this area between
       Padelford Street and Parsons Walk is a 13-acre municipal parcel identified as 48
       Padelford Street rear (Map 11, lot 56) abutting Route 24 southbound which may
       present some development opportunity. However, the area has no water or sewer,
       has limited access and wetland issues.

                        Padelford Street Limited Development Area

         Protected Parcels                              Water Resource
         • None                                         • Extensive Wetlands

         Historic Sites
         • None
         Natural Resource Protection Areas              Soils
         • None                                         • Till or Bedrock
         Zoning                                         Possible Use/Reuse
         • Residential                                  • Mix-use
         • Business                                     • TOD
         No Municipal Water/Septic System               • Commercial business
         Development Area                               21E Site
         • Route 24 Interchange                         • None
         • Padelford Road




3.     Berkley Street Business Node

       This site, located on Berkley
       Street between Bonnie and
       Townley Drives near the
       Taunton line, presently has
       the beginnings of a
       neighborhood node. Part of
       the site is occupied by a
       small, neighborhood
       commercial plaza, containing
       2-3 retail activities. The
       surrounding area is primarily
       residential, offering limited
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       expansion opportunities. However, limited mixed–use redevelopment maybe
       considered. The site offers water from Taunton but has no sewer.
       A neighborhood node is an active gathering place in the community, which is
       located within a neighborhood and which provides essential goods and services
       within walking distance. Locating these uses close to residential neighborhood
       reduces the need to drive, puts more eyes on the street, and offers greater
       opportunity for social interaction, and contributes to the overall neighborhood
       quality. There maybe several areas within the Town of Berkley appropriate for
       neighborhood nodes.


4.     General Store

                                                            The General Store is located at
                                                            16 North Main Street adjacent
                                                            to the Common Place
                                                            (grocery/package store/ gas
                                                            station) on the north side of
                                                            the Town Common. The site
                                                            is 1.25 acres and contains a
                                                            single-family antique cape and
                                                            a 2,500 SF vacant commercial
                                                            building (former General
                                                            Store). Although there is no
                                                            municipal water or sewer, the
       site offers opportunities for small scale, low impact mixed-use redevelopment that
       would compliment the Town Common environment.



II.    Priority Areas of Protection

1.     Assonet Neck

       Assonet Neck is located in the southern portion of Berkley at the confluence of
       the Taunton and Assonet Rivers. Friend Street forms the northern boundary of
       Assonet Neck and Bayview Avenue is the only major roadway north and south,
       with many shorter roads running east and west.

       This area has been valued for its rich natural, agricultural, recreational, and
       historic resources. The area is being considered as a small part of a larger
       archeological district due to the attributes associated with the river system,
       wetlands and the flora and fauna, all of which attracted Native peoples to
       southeastern Massachusetts. This area was believed to have been a heavily
       populated area, where in 1939, 80,000 “Indian” cornhills were present. Assonet


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       Neck has been farmed for centuries with some portions remaining in agricultural
       use (See map for farms in Chapter 61A in this area)

                Heading south from Friend Street
       Friend Street is associated with an early Quaker community. Also included in this
       area roughly opposite Friend Street to the west of Bayview Avenue is Hospital
       Hill, site of a former lepers’ hospital. Immediately to the south of this site is
       Dighton Rock State Park, an 85-acre site owned by the State of Massachusetts
       under the care of the Department of Conservation and Recreation. The park
       commemorated the preservation of an 11-foot high glacial erratic known as
       Dighton Rock, which once rested on the shore of the Taunton River adjacent to
       park. The rock is covered with petroglyphs of uncertain origin. The Nature
       Conservancy and the
       Massachusetts Natural
       Heritage and
       Endangered Species
       Program have identified
       globally rare species and
       priority habitat. (Shoves
       Neck is also associated
       within this area. See
       summary below.)

       A short distance south
       of the park is the site of
       an historic ferry point.
       This site would have
       existed as an early ferry
       crossing and
       shipbuilding area.
       Several small cemeteries exist in this area.

       The tip of Assonet Neck is rich in natural, cultural and recreational resources with
       fantastic views of the Taunton and Assonet River. Conspiracy Island is a small
       island accessible only at low tide. The island received its name in connection with
       the King Philips War.

       Other constraints to developing Assonet Neck include (a) potential breaches
       during storm events associate with surges and (b) saltwater intrusion. Breaches
       could potentially occur along Friend Street, Dighton Rock State Park and north of
       42nd Street. (See Assonet Neck Floodplain) Saltwater intrusion is a process that
       occurs in coastal zones and consists in salt water flowing inland in freshwater
       aquifers. Pumping of fresh water from an aquifer reduces the water pressure and
       intensifies the effect, drawing salt water into new areas such as pumped wells.
       Further development along the neck should be thoughtfully planned.


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                                             Assonet Neck
         Protected Parcels                              Water Resource
         • Dighton Rock State Park                      • Extensive Wetlands
         • CR 42nd Street                               • Taunton River
         • APR Friend Street                            • Assonet River
         Historic Sites                                 • 100 & 500 year floodplain
         • Archeological sites                          • IWPA
         • Hospital Hill
         • Ferry point
         • Fox Cemetery (& other smaller ones)
         Natural Resource Protection Areas              Soils
         • Priority Habitat                             • Sand & gravel
         • Globally rare species                        • Floodplain Alluvium
                                                        • Till or Bedrock
         Zoning                                         No municipal water/no sewer
         • Residential
         Development Area                               21E Sites - None
         • Along Berkley Street



2.     Berkley Aquifer

       An aquifer is an underground layer of water-bearing permeable rock or
       unconsolidated materials such as sand, gravel, silt or clay. A large high yield and
       medium yield aquifer exists in an area along the Taunton River stretching north
       toward the City of Taunton and south near Friend Street ending at Hospital Hill
       Brook. The Town of Berkley is solely reliant on groundwater as its only reliable
       source of potable drinking water. Preservation of this valuable resource is
       essential for the future, a fact which all must bear in mind should the community
       wish to develop a municipal water supply. The Town of Berkley recently adopted
       an Aquifer Protection Overlay District for this area.




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                                        Berkley Aquifer
         Protected Parcels                              Water Resource
         • APR Friend Street                            • Wetlands
                                                        • Taunton River
                                                        • Public water supply
         Historic Sites                                 • High & Medium yield aquifer
         • Elm Street Historic District                 • IWPA
         Natural Resource Protection Areas              Soils
         • Priority Habitat                             • Sand & gravel
         • Globally Rare                                • Floodplain Alluvium
                                                        • Till or Bedrock
         Zoning                                         Municipal Water/Phase III Sewer
         • Residential
         Development Area                               21E Site
         • Elm Street                                   • None
         • North Main Street
3.
       Shoves Neck

       Shoves Neck is
       located in the Town
       of Berkley off
       Bayview Avenue
       with the Assonet
       Bay to the south. It
       is surrounded by
       extensive wetlands
       or open water.
       There is only one
       means of access, a
       dirt road that
       crosses a major
       portion of the salt
       marsh. The Natural
       Heritage and
       Endangered Species Program has identified this area as a Priority Protection Area
       and Estimated Habitat.




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                                           Shoves Neck

     Protected Parcels                               Water Resource
     • None                                          • Extensive Wetlands
                                                     • Assonet River Watershed
     Historic Sites                                  • Estuary
     • Archeological site                            • Hospital Hill Brook
                                                     • 100 & 500 year floodplain
     Natural Resource Protection Areas               Soils
     • Priority Habitat                              • Sand & gravel
     • Globally Rare species                         • Floodplain Alluvium
     Zoning                                          Development Area – None
     • Residential                                   21E Site - None




4.       Taunton River, Assonet River, Quaker Brook and Cotley River

                Taunton River
        The Taunton River flows along the western boundary of the Town of Berkley
        from the north in Taunton to the confluence of the Assonet River at the tip of
        Assonet Neck. The river at this point is a tidal salt-water estuary connected to the
        Mount Hope Bay. The Taunton River is the longest coastal river in New England
        without dams and it supports 45 species of fish and many species of shellfish. The
        watershed is the habitat for 154 types of birds, including 12 rare species. The
        Natural Heritage and Endangered Specieis Program has identified this area of the
        Taunton River as a Priority Habitat. The Nature Conservancy has identified some
        of the same speicies along the river as globally rare. Creating access points along
        the river will keep residents connected to this valuable natural and recreational
        resource. Also maintaining a health buffer along the river’s edge will not only
        preserve the river, it may protect landowners from the cost associated with
        flooding, while offering areas for species migration due to sea level rise.
        Currently the Taunton River is being considered for inclusion in the Wild and
        Scenic Program with the National Park Service.

                 Assonet River & Assonet Bay
        The Assonet River is a major river to the Taunton River; it flows along the
        southern boundary of the Town of Berkley from the area known as Shoves Neck
        to the tip of the Assonet Neck at the confluence of the Taunton River. The Town
        of Berkley shares the Assonet River with the Town of Freetown. The most
        notable saltwater flats and marshlands in Berkley occur on the Assonet Bay in the
        area of Shoves Neck Peninsula. They are fairly substantial and are contiguous
        with a similar sized area in Freetown. A narrow band of salt marsh can be found
        in areas that have not been disturbed by residential development or activity. Salt
        marshes are extremely important for they provide a diverse habitat and nursery for
        two-third of shellfish and commercial or sport fish during their early life stages.

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       These economically important juvenile species use the marsh for feeding, shelter
       and protective covering. They also filter out nutrients and sediments from runoff.

               Cotley River
       The Cotley River is a small tributary of the Taunton River. The river enters
       Berkley from the City of Taunton just northwest of the intersection of County and
       Holloway Streets. The river meanders back and forth between the two
       communities. Public access is extremely limited. However, it does serve to drain
       several wetland habitats and is considered a floodplain which, if compromised,
       could cause severe flooding in the area.

               Quaker Brook
       The headwaters to Quaker Brook begin roughly halfway between Route 24 and
       Bryant Street Bridge in wetlands at the base of Bryant Hill. The brook meanders
       approximately two miles before it enters into the Town of Freetown and drains
       into the Assonet River. Quaker Brook provides significant drainage for central
       Berkley, with outflow from several important wetlands. The Natural Heritage and
       Endangered Species Program has identified rare species within and along the
       brook.

5.     Bridge Village Historic District

       The Bridge Village Historic District is centrally located near the Berkley Dighton
       Bridge and stretches along Elm Street and Berkley Street. The bridge, one of three
       located in this area, is one of the oldest surviving examples of a swing bridge. The
       bridge is over one hundred years old. A new design has recently been drawn and
       approved by Mass Highway that converts the swing bridge into a four arch
       façade.

       The Berkley Bridge
       Village Heritage Park,
       located at the bridge
       southeast abutment, is
       town owned property
       that was reconstructed
       with the help of local
       volunteers. The area
       was completely
       overgrown as recently
       as 2005. From this,
       the Berkley Historical
       Commission turned
       the parcel into a park.
       Now the park has
       been transformed into a wonderful retreat for all to enjoy. The National Alliance
       of Preservation Commissions recently honored the Berkley Bridge Heritage Park
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        an award for excellence in the category of Best Practices in Outreach and
        Advocacy.

        The houses along Elm Street and Berkley Street date from the early 19th century
        through the early 20th century.


6.       Beagle Club

        The Bay State Beagle Club, a 125 acre parcel located on Point Street, was started
        in 1932. The club holds field trials, sanction trails, and shows for the American
        Beagle Club. The club competes in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut.
        The Town of Berkley considers the Beagle Club a valuable resource for
        environmental protection and recreational uses that ought to remain within the
        community.


7.      Hunting Preserve

        Southeastern Massachusetts offers some very good hunting, including wild
        turkey, white-tailed deer and other species. The Partridge Farm Game/Shoves
        Neck Pointing and Retriever Club, located off Main Street abutting Route 24 with
        access available at the end of Briggs Street, also offer hunting opportunities.


III.    Unresolved/Combination Priority Development and Priority
        Protection Areas
Some areas within the Town of Berkley have yet to be determined as to whether they will
become areas of development, protection or a combination of both. The sites listed below
represent those areas:

1.      Myricks Development & Historic Preservation Area
        (See Priority Development Section for summary)

2.      Berkley Town Common

        The Berkley Town Common is centrally located within the community and
        contains approximately 123 acres. Three roadways surround the common area:
        Porter, Locust and Main. The Town Common area consists of the Berkley Public
        Library, Old Town Hall, the Berkley Cemetery, several residential and
        agricultural properties and two commercial businesses, one which is vacant. The
        library was opened in 1912 and built with funding from the Carnegie Foundation.
        The Old Town Hall was constructed in the 1840s and was used for town meetings
        until 1989. The building is now owned and operated by the Berkley Lion’s Club
        for functions and meetings. The current Town Hall is located on Main Street
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       across from the Old Town Hall. It was originally built in the 1920s as the Berkley
       Grammar School. A ball field, playground, basketball court and parking lot are
       located within the triangular shaped common.

       The Berkley Cemetery is located north of the common along Main Street. The
       cemetery was established in 1775 and contains headstones from the 19th and 20th
       century. South of the common along South Main Street is the Berkley
       Congregational Church. The homes surrounding the common were built in the
       early 19th and 20th century. The community has an opportunity to transform this
       area into a historic common and village while preserving its character.




                                       Berkley Town Common
         Protected Parcel                               Water Resource
         • Berkley Common                               • Extensive Wetlands
         • Berkley Cemetery                             • IWPA
         Historic sites
         • Berkley Library
         • Congregational Church
         Natural Resource Protection Areas              Soils
         • None                                         • Sand & gravel
                                                        • Till or Bedrock
         Zoning                                         Possible Use/Reuse
         • Residential                                  • Mixed-use
                                                        • Village design
                                                        No Municipal Water/Phase III Sewer
         Development Area                               21E Site
         • Porter Street                                • None
         • North Main Street
         • Locust Street




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3.     Assonet Neck
       (See Priority Protection Section for summary)

       The Town of Berkley knows that any new development, which should occur on
       Assonet Neck, will need to take into consideration serious environmental
       constraints. This would include saltwater intrusion due to drawdown from water
       resources depletion and flooding due to storm events and surges.

4.     Agway

       Located on Padelford Street at the intersection of the CSX freight line and
       Macomber Street, this 10 acre parcel contains approximately 14,000 SF of space
       in three separate buildings. The site is about two miles from Route 24, Exit 11 and
       approximately one-half mile from Route 79. The site provides a rail spur and has
       direct rail access to CSX the rail freight line. The site presents opportunities from
       mixed-use redevelopment; however it is located in a residential zone and has
       limited wetland concerns. Berkley is included in the Greater Taunton Economic
       Target and could provide development incentives pending any appropriate
       redevelopment proposal.




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