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					        Report of the First Quinquennial School Review of the School of
                                  Management

1       Introduction

The School Review for the School of Management was a broad-ranging review,
with a particular focus on the strategic issues relating to the School and its ability
to respond to changing needs. A key element of the School Review process
includes making recommendations in relation to the continuing approval by
Academic Council of the awards of existing programmes. The Panel considered
the programmes within the School giving specific consideration to any proposed
changes.


2       Summary of Main Recommendations
The Review Panel enjoyed a constructive and detailed dialogue with the
management, staff, students and alumni of the School and the work of the Review
Panel was facilitated by the open, frank and often lively discussions which took
place with staff and students from the School of Management


Areas for Commendation
The Review Panel was particularly impressed by the School’s:
       Preparations for the review, in particular the SWOT Analysis undertaken for
        each programme and the various focus groups which were held
       The interaction of staff within the school and the team approach taken in
        discipline areas
       The sharing of modules between programmes
       The good morale and enthusiasm of staff
       The strong partnerships with Enterprise
       The level of activity in corporate education
       The strong emphasis on work placement
       The objective to substantially grow postgraduate activity
       The ambition to seek international accreditation
       The establishment of advisory groups for programmes
       The innovative pedagogy used
       The significant efforts made to attract and retain students
       The emphasis on developing a research profile and upskilling staff
       Willingness of staff to experiment with live case studies

Programme Changes:
The Review Panel recommends to Academic Council continued approval for the
following programmes:

        BSc (Hons) Business and Computing – Full-Time – Level 8
       BSc (Hons) Logistics and Supply Chain Management – Full-Time - Level 8

       Bachelor of Business Studies (Hons) – Full-Time & Part Time - Level 8

       BSc (Hons) Human Resource Management – Part-Time – Level 8

       Postgraduate Diploma in Management of Technology – Part-Time – Level
       9

       MSc in Technology and Innovation Management – Full-Time & Part-Time –
       Level 9

       M.Sc. \ Postgraduate Diploma in Business Information Systems – Part-
       Time – Level 9

Key recommendations:
The key recommendations of the School review panel are as follows:
      Staff should be facilitated by the Institute to undertake Doctoral research.
      The School’s identified research clusters should be maintained and
       developed.
      The College should seek to maximise the benefits of its corporate
       relationships to support research in the current constrained funding
       environment.
      The School should consider the standardisation of the work placement
       component across all full-time programmes, with a key focus on providing
       either quality work placements or an Erasmus experience to all full-time
       students.
      The part-time HRM programme should be synchronised with the full-time
       HRM programme.
      While recognising the needs of the CIPD, every effort should be made to
       make module titles as clear as possible to potential students on the part-
       time HRM programme.
      The panel notes that areas such as communications, mediation,
       negotiation could be made more explicit in the HRM programmes, with
       opportunities provided to students to obtain practical experience.
      Consider utilising newer media for the promotion of programmes to
       students, such as video streams.
      The School should ensure that there is full documentation for all
       programme committee meetings.
      The School could consider methods to provide more consistent timely
       feedback on assessments in some subject areas.
      A rolling plan should be put in place to replace and update the IT
       Infrastructure
      The Panel noted that there was some concern expressed by the Head of
       School with respect to the existing levels of secretarial and administrative
       support/coverage available to the School to meet its activities. The Panel
       recommends that the Institute review the level of admin support available
       within the School to ensure appropriate support is available
      The School should encourage the library to assess and track student
       usage to better determine use of the library and determine the optimum
       opening hours.

3      The Review Process
The focus of the School Review is in respect of the School as a whole. This
includes the general position and performance; the range of activities and how
these are conducted; reviewed and developed; the range and quality of taught
programmes; the research and staff development activities; the management
procedures and quality improvement systems and the links with external bodies.

Central to the review process was the self-study, prepared by the School and
considered by the Review Panel prior to visiting the School. This self-study is a
critical evaluation of the School's activities and highlights strengths and
achievements as well as areas of difficulty. The process of review carried out by
the School followed the DIT current practice for the review of existing
programmes; that is that the documentation prepared by the School was sent to
the College Board for endorsement. Approved by standing committee.
The review visit took place over a two day period on 16th & 17th June 2010. The
Panel, through a series of meetings with College and School management,
teaching, administrative and support staff, students and graduates of the School
and a visit to the facilities available to the School, considered issues raised in the
self-study and in the other documentation presented.

3.1 The Purpose of the School Based Review
The broad objectives of the School Review were to evaluate:
 the School's approach to programme design and development, having due
   regard to the influence of bodies representing students, employers and the
   sector;
 the learning environment of the School;
 staffing including academic, administrative and technical;
 staff development and research activities within the School;
 the School’s quality assurance systems, including the effectiveness of taught
   programmes in meeting their stated objectives; and,
 the School's development plans for the future.

3.2 Membership of the Review Panel
The Review Panel appointed by Academic Council to carry out the School Based
Review was comprised as follows:

 External Members

 Dr Peggy Chaudhry              Associate Professor of Management and
                                Operations, Villanova School of Business, USA

 Miriam O’Donoghue              Preferred Marketing and PR Ltd., Waterford, Irl.

 Internal Members

 Dr Noel O’Connor               DIT Campus Planning Office, Grangegorman,
                                Dublin 7
Natalie Hopkins                  School of Biological Sciences, DIT, Kevin St.
                                 Dublin 8

James Wyrnn                      School of Marketing, DIT, Aungier Street, Dublin 2

Representatives from the Office of the Academic Registrar

Ms Nicole O’Neill                Quality Assurance Officer, DIT Rathmines Road.

3.3 Programme of Visit to School
The Review took place in accordance with the following schedule.

Day 1 – Wednesday 16 June 2010                   Venue: Management House, DIT
Aungier St.

9.30 am      Teas/coffees. Formal beginning of process: Chair of Panel
             introduces members of panel to the College Director who introduces
             the Head of School and Heads of Department followed by a short
             formal presentation by Head of School and Heads of Department
             describing main activities of the School and introducing the key
             points from the self-study report.

10.15 am     Private meeting of Panel to discuss agenda for day.

11.15 am     Tea/coffee break.

11.30 am     Panel meets with School Management Team to discuss the broad
             contents of the self-study report and the implications for the School
             in terms of individual programmes and resources, more specifically
             the School’s arrangements for quality assurance, programme
             development, links with business, research activity and staff
             development.

12.30 pm     Lunch

1.30 pm      Panel meets with School Management Team, College Administrator,
             Examinations Officer, School Administrators/Secretaries and Site
             Librarian to review the administrative and library supports which
             underpin the effective running and development of the School.

2.30 pm      Private meeting of Panel to review progress and decide on matters
             for further discussion or evaluation.

3.00 pm      Teas/coffees: Panel meets with Heads of Department and
             Programme Chairs and Workplacement Co-ordinator to discuss the
             suite of programmes offered by the School and the trends and
             direction of these – including discussion regarding programme
             management issues and quality assurance arrangements and to
             address specific issues relating to changes proposed.
4.00 pm    Panel meets with School’s Technical Officers.

4.30 pm    Panel meets with Researchers within the School

5.15 pm    Panel views the physical facilities and resources of the School.

6.00 pm    Panel meets with representative current and former students.

6.45 pm    Private meeting of Panel to review progress thus far.

7.00 pm    Dinner (to include College Director, School Management Team and
           other appropriate staff and Panel).

Day 2 – Thursday 17 June 2010                 Venue: Management House, DIT
            Aungier St.

9.00 am    Teas/coffees. Private meeting of Panel to review progress thus far.

9.45 am    Meeting of the Panel with staff teaching on programmes to discuss
           syllabuses, teaching methods and assessment issues specific to the
           programmes.

11.00am    Tea/coffee break.

11.15pm    Private meeting of the panel to discuss issues to be included in draft
           report

12.15pm    Panel meets with College Director, College Administrator and
           School Management Team to discuss issues of resources, staff
           development and any issues requiring clarification arising from self
           study.

13.00pm    Lunch (Boardroom).

13.45 pm   Private meeting of the Panel to finalise the draft report.

3.00 pm    Tea/coffees: Meeting of the Panel with College Director and School
           Management Team to outline orally the Panel’s findings.

Available for perusal during the review event were Student Handbooks,
Programme Documents, Q5s, Examination Papers, Curriculum Vitae and other
relevant documentation.
4.1     Overview of the Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT)

The Dublin Institute of Technology is a comprehensive multi-level educational
institution, fulfilling a role both nationally and internationally in providing full-time
and part-time educational programmes across the whole spectrum of higher
education. It aims to achieve this in an innovative, responsive, caring and flexible
learning environment. It is committed to providing access to students of all ages
and backgrounds and to achieving quality and excellence in all aspects of its
work.      This commitment extends to the provision of research, product
development and consultancy services for industry and society while continuing to
have regard to the technological, commercial, social and cultural needs of the
community it serves.

4.1.1 Quality Assurance Process within DIT
DIT has clearly documented procedures for quality assurance of individual
programmes which begin with initial curriculum design, development and
validation. These procedures are outlined in the DIT Handbook for Academic
Quality Enhancement, 3rd Edition, 2006 and cover:

     Validation and re-validation of programmes;
     Formation of course teams/committees;
     College Boards;
     Composition of validation/re-validation boards;
     Conduct of a validation/re-validation board;
     Examinations – process, marks and standards, internal and external
      examiners, reports;
     Annual monitoring of a programme;
     Partnerships with external organisations;
     Short course validation.

As a general guideline lecturers involved on a programme are required to possess
qualifications at least equivalent to the level of the terminal award of the course
and subjects taught by lecturers generally corresponding to the core disciplines of
their qualifications.

The programme teams (committees) prepare an annual monitoring report for each
programme (Q5) and critically review the programme every five years as part of
the School Review process. Academic quality assurance requires that the agreed
aims and intended learning outcomes of educational programmes are achieved
consistently. Issues relating to quality assurance are well understood by lecturers
and there is a high awareness of their importance. Academic Council is
responsible for developing and maintaining academic standards and quality in all
courses of the Institute. There is an Academic Quality Assurance Committee
under the chairmanship of the Director of Academic Affairs and reporting to
Academic Council.
4.2   Background to the College and School

The College of Business at the Dublin Institute of Technology is one of Ireland’s
leading business schools and represents a core component in the Institute’s
heritage, current activities and its future. The mission of the College of Business
at DIT is to be recognised as one of Ireland’s foremost business schools known
for excellence and innovation in learning, research and partnership with
enterprise; internationally focused, accredited and benchmarked; and contributing
to the wellbeing of the community through the education of outstanding managers
and corporate leaders and the fostering of enterprise.

The College has identified five strategic priorities going forward:
 The continued development of the postgraduate profile
 Increase in staff with advanced research qualifications, staff capable of
   supervising at doctoral level and an increase in publication output in scholarly
   journals
 Internationalisation of the faculty and the student body. One of the key
   mechanisms is the drive to become an accredited member of one, or more, of
   the major business school accreditation bodies (AACSB or EQUIS)
 Continuance of the work with industry in the area of corporate education
 Improving access to third level education for those who do not traditionally
   undertake higher education and broadening access to those groups that
   currently have access but a low level of participation.

4.2.1 School
The School of Management offers a range of full-time and part-time programmes
in business and management at undergraduate and postgraduate level. The
portfolio of programmes includes contribution to shared cross college
programmes (the involvement varying from minor to full partnership on particular
programmes) as well as a number of programmes of national importance for
which the school has exclusive responsibility and is the main provider of
organisation, management and resources. The school has a long tradition of
service to lifelong learners having formerly been one of the major national centres
for part-time business education and it continues to offer important and accredited
provision in both part-time and Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
modes. The main activities of the School also involves a significant and rapidly
growing research community at Doctorate level and a growing output of research
publications.

Vision
"Leading the provision of quality academic learning, teaching and research in
business management education.”


Mission statement
“Developing a multi-disciplined and integrated approach to generating and
delivering market driven and relevant educational experience in business
management, inclusive of all students, drawing upon staff expertise and providing
academic excellence which is accredited and benchmarked, international in
perspective, community driven, enterprise focused and research oriented.”

4.2.3 Current programmes and the development of new programmes

Full-time
DT354                   BSc Business Computing

DT358                   BSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management

DT364                   BBS Bachelor of Business Studies (in partnership with
                        the School of Retail & Services Management)

DT398                   BSc Human Resources Management (commencing
                        September 2010)

Part-time
DT331                   BBS Bachelor of Business Studies
DT332                   BSc Human Resource Management

DT395                   BSc Business and Aeronautical Studies

DT337                   Certificate in Personnel Practice (discontinued 2010)
Postgraduate
DT381                   CPD in Technology and Innovation Management
DT382                   Postgraduate Diploma in Management of Technology

DT385                   MSc Technology and Innovation Management

DT380                   M.Sc. \ Postgraduate Diploma in Business Information
                        Systems

DT397                   CPD Diploma in Innovation Development         *course no longer
                        running


                        Continuing Professional Development Diploma in Public
                        Procurement

Full-time undergraduate and postgraduate programmes are offered through the
Department of Management Information Systems and Department of
Management Studies and have centered on the B.Sc. Business Computing and
the B.Sc. Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Demand for the degree in
Business Computing is variable on a year to year basis as it is for many courses
in the Information Communication Technology (ICT) area. The BSc Logistics and
Supply Chain Management represents a highly specialised offering in the CAO
marketplace where there is as yet low awareness of the critical role of logistics
and supply chain in our globalised economy. The consequent pool of aware and
informed applicants is relatively small though this is strongly supplemented by the
recruitment of Army officer cadets in alternate years.
While the School also partners with other Schools for the delivery of general
business degree programmes, such as the Bachelor of Business Studies and the
B.Sc. Business and Management, there remains a critical need to expand and
improve the stability of the School’s undergraduate portfolio. The recently
validated new full-time B.Sc. Human Resource Management (HRM) offers
important potential in this regard. Market research indicates a potential to recruit
a cohort of students with proven learning aptitude which will provide a large
volume and stable programme, responding to market demand and drawing on the
acknowledged excellence of the staff resource in this disciplinary area. The
School draws on the experience of its management of a part-time version of the
B.Sc. Human Resource Management (HRM) which has been offered successfully
for more than a decade. The programmes are supported by one of the largest
critical mass of HRM lecturers in the Republic of Ireland and by close relationship
with the key professional body in the area, Chartered Institute of Personnel
Development (CIPD).

The School has a long heritage of providing a comprehensive range of Part-time
Continuing Professional Education Programmes for almost all business
professional bodies and is recognised nationally as a key centre for such
provision; these programmes are offered through the Department of Continuing
Professional Education. The portfolio now includes the Bachelor of Business
Studies, B.Sc. Human Resource Management and B.Sc. in Management &
Aeronautical Studies. The School previously offered the Certificate in Personnel
Practice in conjunction with (CIPD) as well as a range of programmes of various
durations and for various awards in partnership with over twenty professional
bodies.

Postgraduate opportunities are facilitated by the affiliation of the School of
Management to the Graduate School within the College of Business. Through
the Graduate School students can access a range of management and business
related programmes. Postgraduate opportunities currently include the Diploma in
Management of Technology and Master of Science in Technology and Innovation
Management, offered in conjunction with ICT Ireland. The School previously
delivered a Postgraduate Diploma in Business Information Systems with Allied
Irish Bank.

The focus, orientation and delivery strategy of all programmes is closely aligned
with the strategic objectives of DIT, with its’ commitment to innovative teaching
and learning, the promotion of relevant competencies in graduates and overall
closeness to the business community.

4.2.4 Physical and Learning Environments of the School


4.2.4.1 Learning Facilities – Teaching Accommodation
The College of Business has access to modern well equipped teaching facilities
which include lecture theatres, tiered lecture rooms and flat classrooms as well as
special purpose rooms. All Lecture Rooms are equipped with Audio Visual
Technology, including Overhead Projectors, DVD Players and PA Systems as
follows:
Table 2 Physical Teaching Resources
Description            Capacity Amount            Type of Equipment Installed




                                                                                  Plasma Screen
                                                  LCD Projector




                                                                        VHS/DVD
                                                                  PC




                                                                                                  PA
Lecture Theatres         106         4            4               4     4         -               4
Lecture Theatres         134/155     2            2               2     2         -               2
Flat Classrooms          20/40       20           18              17    2         -               -
Tiered Lecture Rooms     44-67       19           19              11    1         -               -
Syndicate Rooms          13          3            1               1     1         -               -
Standard Computer        26          23           16              598   -         -               -
Labs
Small Group              7           2            1               14              -               -
Computer Labs
Telematics Facilities    30          1            1               1     1         -               -
Meeting Rooms            15          3            -               -     -         3               -

The College also has a Multi Use Area (Room 5050) and access to Management
House. The Multi Use Area can accommodate up to 100 persons depending on
its layout. It is mainly used for Case Study Preparation and Examinations as well
as Meetings/Conferences. Management House is a suite of two rooms located on
the First Floor adjacent to the Library and consists of:
      Lecture space containing LCD Projector, PC, DVD/VHS
      A full PA system
      Syndicate/meeting room
      Kitchen area


4.2.4.2 Learning Facilities – Computer Labs

College of Business computer labs comprise 624 workstations located in 25 labs
spread across four floors. The facilities include 17 general business labs, 4
specialist labs, 2 limited license application labs, 2 small business labs (7 PCs in
each) for special courses and 1 Apple Mac lab. Each lab has 25 student
Desktops plus 1 Desktop for the lecturer. Lecturer Desktops are encased within
podiums. Each lab has a colour scanner and high speed enterprise class laser
printer, capable of A3 and A4 duplex printing. The PC labs have Microsoft
Windows XP installed and have a wide variety of software applications to
complement the instruction of courses. There are also many general purpose
applications to meet the needs of the students. To enhance the learning process
75% of the labs are equipped with Hi-Beam technology.

The Student Computing Labs are available to College and students. The labs
enable users to perform general computing tasks, such as word processing,
email, and Internet surfing, as well as more advanced computing required for
course work and research.
4.2.4.3 Learning Facilities – Flexible Learning Spaces

The College of Business has invested in a number of Flexible Learning Spaces.
These spaces occupy a wireless environment, where students can use laptops
and other mobile devices. In addition power outlets are also supplied to provide
recharging outlets for these devices. These spaces have been created within
corridors and spaces in and around formal teaching areas. The renovated spaces
provide attractive, comfortable surroundings for staff and students passing
through to use the environment. They are located close to formal learning spaces
and offer areas outside classrooms for students to meet and work. The result is a
social learning area. Integrated within it are individual and group working spaces
to provide maximum flexibility for different styles of learning and social activities.
These spaces provide a learning space that is supportive of group work, student
centred learning and informal learning. The choice between different types of
learning spaces enables students to respond more effectively to alternative study
requirements. Bookable learning spaces for group work are available through the
library.

4.2.5 Research Profile

A combination of events led to a significant positive change in the School of
Management scholarly activity during the review period. Staff were encouraged
and supported in their efforts to engage in research and to undertake doctoral
qualifications. This support included full and partial payment of fees, sabbatical
leave and time release, seed funding competitions at DIT level and ongoing
research training and mentoring. Both the strategic change within the School and
the strong support and management encouragement at College level enabled a
critical mass of research activity to start emerging, as evidenced by the increase
in the number of staff with Doctoral Qualifications, funding success, development
of research seminars and research writing workshops and the emergence of four
broad research groups, with particular strengths in applied research. The
Research Groups comprise the Knowledge, Innovation and Strategy Research
Group, the Supply Chain Management and Operations Group, the Management
and HRM Group and the Management Information Systems Group. The School
has built on this emerging research expertise to obtain funding for postgraduate
students and develop supervisory skills and there are currently 20 PhD/M.Phil
students registered within the School.

5       Key issues arising from the self-study

The Self Study documentation presented to the panel was comprehensive and the
panel commended the School on the SWOT analysis and focus groups
undertaken. The Panel had discussions with the staff and students it met on the
key issues emerging from its consideration of the self-study and the School’s own
recommendations arising from the self-study. These key issues are captured
under the main purposes of School Review:

       The School’s approach to programme design and development, having due
        regard to the influence of bodies representing students, employers and the
        sector and quality assurance procedures
       The Learning Environment
         Staffing
         Research Activities and Staff Development
         School’s Development Plan

5.1       The School’s approach to programme design and development,
          having due regard to the influence of bodies representing students,
          employers and the sector and quality assurance procedures

The School of Management’s work encompasses teaching and learning, research
and services to industry. The School manages the delivery of an extensive suite
of teaching programmes, the continuous improvement of which is in line with the
Quality Assurance procedures of DIT. The School operates in a very integrated
manner within the College. Thus while the School of Management has designed,
developed and delivers programmes that are fully managed within the School, it
participates actively in the delivery of programmes within the College, through the
sharing of module provision, staff and resources.
The panel observed that the School’s approach to programme design is dynamic,
with interactions with industry, graduates and current students, in particular the
panel commends the School on the interaction of staff within the school and the
team approach taken in discipline areas. This is evidenced by the sharing of
modules across programmes.

In programme development and enhancement the School of Management is
cognisant of the positioning of the College of Business as ‘close to business and
the business professions’ and also of the DIT’s stipulation to have ‘due regard to
the influence of bodies representing students, employers and the sector’. In this
context the School implements a number of approaches to support consultation
with industry. Interaction with industry is used as a pedagogical tool in a number
of programmes. The Postgraduate Diploma in Management of Technology
incorporates a ‘Consulting Project’ as part of the course design and of the
curriculum. In this subject students working in small group act as consultants and
work on real-life projects, each consulting group working with a single company.
The School has a long tradition of service to lifelong learners having formerly
been one of the major national centres for part-time business education and it
continues to offer important and accredited provision in both part-time and
Continuing Professional Development (CPD) modes. In particular the panel
commends the School for the high level of Corporate Education provided.


Work placement is a requirement for all third year students studying on DT358
B.Sc. Logistics and Supply Chain Management Degree. The student work
placement element provides a demonstrable role in advancing each individual
student’s assimilation and application of knowledge gained during their first three
years of study on their degree programme. The Panel recommends the School
standardise the work placement component across all full-time programmes, with
a key focus of providing all full-time students with a choice of quality work
placements or an Erasmus experience. In particular the Programme Committee
should revisit the programme document for Business Computing to ensure a more
standardised approach to Work Placement and the programme committee for the
Bachelor in Business Studies full-time, should consider how a work placement
and an erasmus option can be included in the programme. In order to support
this increased Erasmus activity of the School it is important that the College of
Business continues to support an Erasmus co-ordinator to facilitate the
organisation of the Erasmus experience.

The Panel noted that the School has recently developed a new full-time BSc in
HRM programme for delivery in September 2010. The panel welcomes this
development and recommends that the part-time HRM programme be
synchronised with the full-time HRM programme. In addition, whilst recognising
the needs of the CIPD, every effort should be made to make module titles as clear
to potential students on the part-time HRM programme. The panel discussed with
the School the importance of areas such as communications, mediation,
negotiation for HRM and recommends that their inclusion is made more explicit in
the HRM programmes, with opportunities provided to students to obtain practical
experience in these areas.

The Panel was impressed by the very positive student feedback and praise of
their experience on the various programmes. It is evident that in general there are
very good relationships between students and staff. The Panel recommends that
this be further enhanced by the provision of more consistent and timely feedback
on assessments in some subject areas.

The Panel discussed with the School, the School’s implementation of the
Institute’s Quality Enhancement procedures and while the panel recognises that
programme committees are operating within the School, the School should ensure
that there is full documentation for all such meetings.

5.2.1 Programme Changes:
The Review Panel recommends to Academic Council continued approval for the
following programmes:

      BSc (Hons) Business and Computing – Full-Time – Level 8

      BSc (Hons) Logistics and Supply Chain Management – Full-Time - Level 8

      Bachelor of Business Studies (Hons) – Full-Time & Part Time - Level 8

      BSc (Hons) Human Resource Management – Part-Time – Level 8

      Postgraduate Diploma in Management of Technology – Part-Time – Level
      9

      MSc in Technology and Innovation Management – Full-Time & Part-Time –
      Level 9

      M.Sc. / Postgraduate Diploma in Business Information Systems – Part-
      Time – Level 9
The panel endorses the proposed programmatic changes, which are outlined in
Appendix 1.

5.2   The Learning Environment

The School of Management is accommodated in good quality facilities at the
Institute’s Aungier Street campus. These facilities meet the School’s needs and
were fully equipped with a new IT Infrastructure when the School relocated to
Aungier Street in 2003. The aging profile of this IT infrastructure is a matter of
concern for the school and needs to be addressed. The Panel recommends that
a rolling plan be put in place to replace and update the IT Infrastructure.

The Panel was informed that the Institute is operating within the confines of a
national Employment Control Framework which has led to a significant reduction
in the number of IT Personnel assigned to the College and there is a threat to the
level of IT support that can continue to be provided to the School. The Panel
would encourage the Institute to monitor this situation to ensure that the IT
personnel can provide an adequate service to the School.

The Library at DIT Aungier Street is one of the most comprehensive business
academic resource centres in Ireland. Its design takes account of changes in
emphasis from teaching to learning and the new focus on a student-centred
learning experience. As a result the library provides a diverse range of facilities.
The Aungier Street Library has a total book-stock of 72,000 items and subscribes
to 650 hardcopy journals spanning all the major management disciplines. The
Library provides two multiple copy short loan collections. Loan periods are for 24
hours, weekend and 7 days. Qualified librarians are on call to assist users with
their specific research needs. Aungier Street Library is open from 9.30 am to 9.30
pm Monday to Wednesday, 9.30 am to 7.00 pm on Thursday, 9.30 am to 5.30 pm
on Friday and 10.00 am to 5.00 pm on Saturday during term. Again due to the
Employment Control Framework, there is concern about some reduction in the
number of library staff in Aungier Street library which has led to a reduction of
opening hours both inside and outside of term. There is a need to assess and
track student usage to better determine use of the library and determine the
optimum opening hours. This has a particular impact on part-time students who
need the meeting rooms for group work and access to library materials. There is
also a concern that budget limitations would have an impact on the acquisition of
books and periodicals.

5.3   Staffing

The School of Management hosts a critical mass of teachers and researchers in
Human Resource Management, Business, Logistics & Supply Chain
Management, and Computing.         In addition to these specializations, the
disciplinary composition of the School is quite broad, including specialists in
Strategic Management, Economics, Innovation, Accountancy, Marketing, Public
Sector Management, Quantitative Analysis, Law and Information Technology.
The Panel had a lively dialogue with staff on the various approaches taken to
teaching within the School. The panel commends the School on the variety of
innovative pedagogies utilised within the School and willingness of staff to
experiment with live case studies.
The Panel noted that there was some concern expressed by the Head of School
with respect to the existing levels of secretarial and administrative
support/coverage available to the School to meet its activities. The Panel
recommends that the Institute review the level of admin support available within
the School to ensure appropriate support is available

5.4    School’s Research Activities and Staff Development

The more recent tradition in doctoral research within Business has led to the need
for a wide range of staff to be given the opportunity to achieve Doctoral Status.
This is particularly important in the context of a Business School achieving
international accreditation. In addition, such activity is critical to underpinning core
learning and teaching within the School. A core element of DIT staff development
policy is aimed at raising the qualifications profile of staff in the Institute. The
policy previously entailed a comprehensive and generous range of supports to
staff to encourage the attainment of higher qualifications including information on
allowances and the payment of registration and related fees as permitted under
the DIT Fee Support Scheme.

Staff of the School have been proactive in availing of these supports. Since the
scheme began, 6 staff from the School have qualified with a PhD. These staff
were registered across a range of universities including University of Leicester,
University of Limerick, University College Dublin, Dublin Institute of Technology
and Trinity College Dublin. Currently a further 5 staff are at various stages toward
completion of their doctorate studies with registrations in Cardiff University,
University of Warwick, NUI Maynooth, Grenoble Ecole de Management and
University College Dublin.

The support for staff doctoral research is currently under review by the Institute
and the panel recommends that Staff should be facilitated by the Institute to
undertake Doctoral research. In addition, to the benefits mentioned above there
is also a potential threat that talented junior staff may be poached if they are not
provided with the supports to develop their research.

During the review period research has increased significantly and the Panel
welcomes the clustering of research areas evolving within the School, and feels
that these research areas should be maintained and developed. The Panel
recommends that the College should seek to maximise the benefits of its
corporate relationships to support research in the current constrained funding
environment.

The panel welcomes the focus within the School Research strategy of growing
postgraduate student numbers and is impressed with the number of postgraduate
research students currently registered in the School. However, the Panel notes
that there are significant difficulties now being encountered to maintain and
increase the number of postgraduate research students registered due to funding
supporting this activity being substantially reduced nationally.

5.5    School Development Plans
The strategic priorities of the School of Management are firmly located within the
strategic priorities and context of the College of Business, which in turn are
derived from the DIT Strategic Plan 2007-2012. The ambitious development plan
outlined to the Panel and the recent appointment of the new Head of School
provides a significant opportunity for the School to advance and create a strong
strategic position within their sphere of Business Education. This could be aided
by clear milestones to build on the completed SWOT analysis.

Demand for Business programmes nationally at full-time undergraduate level has
fallen significantly over the last ten years. While overall applications to the CAO
have fluctuated around 55,000 per annum, first preferences for Business courses
at level 8 have fell from over 14,000 to just under 9,000 in 2008. The panel
commends the School on the significant efforts made to attract and retain
students and recommends that the School spend some time considering newer
media for the promotion of programmes to students, such as video streams.
Given the resources constraints, the panel suggests this might be facilitated by
student projects.
Appendix 1: Minor Programme Amendments

Changes to BSC Human Resource Management – Part time Programme
DT332

Year 1 – Changes to names of modules
People Management and Development 1 to People Management and
Development Theory
People Management and Development 2 to People Management and
Development Practice
Managing Activities to Managing for Results

Year 2 – Changes to modules and changes to titles
Health and Safety to replace MIS module – credit weighting 10 ECTS
Managing People to Managing and Leading People

Year 3 – Addition of marks for Research Methodology
Research Methodology and Management Report to achieve 10 ECTS credits

Year 4 – Addition of modules
Managing Cultural Diversity – 5 ECTS
International HRM – 10 Credits
Dissertation length changes to 12,000 instead of the original 10,000 words.

Other minor changes to reading lists – across all years.

Changes to Postgraduate Diploma in Management of Technology (ICT
Ireland) (DT382)

      Revision in marks available for project work. Student feedback and the
       external examiner suggested a revision of the marks from 250 marks for
       the Group Project to 200 marks. This is considered to better reflect the
       workload involved in the project.
      Changes were made in a number of module titles to provide better
       descriptors of the module content. Technology Strategy was changed to
       Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation Management.
       Technology and Operations Management 1 and Technology and
       Operations Management 2 were recast as Innovation Management and
       Advanced Operations Management.


Changes to M.Sc. Technology and Innovation Management (DT384)

      Changes were made in a number of module titles to provide better
       descriptors of the module content. Technology Strategy was changed to
       Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation Management.
       Technology and Operations Management 1 and Technology and
       Operations Management 2 were recast as Innovation Management and
       Advanced Operations Management.
      A review of the modules incorporating innovation management aspects to
       reduce overlap and provide better integration. Modules in this review
       included: Innovation Management, Commercialisation and Strategic
       Management of Technology and Innovation.

      Feedback from the industry advisory group led to an enhanced focus on
       cost related aspects of doing business. This included the introduction of a
       new module – Supplier Management.

      Revision in marks available for project work. Student feedback and the
       external examiner suggested a revision of the marks from 250 marks for
       the Group Project and 150 marks for the Individual Project to 200 marks
       each.

Changes to Master of Science in Technology and Innovation Management
(ICT Ireland) (DT385)

      Changes were made in a number of module titles to provide better
       descriptors of the module content. Technology Strategy was changed to
       Strategic   Management      of   Technology   and     Innovation and
       Commercialisation was changed to Commercialisation.

      Revision in marks available for project work. Student feedback and the
       external examiner suggested a revision of the marks from 150 marks for
       the Individual Project to 200 marks. This is considered to better reflect the
       workload involved in the project.


Changes to BBS Bachelor of Business Studies (DT364)

Following requests from student, feedback from staff and industry, the programme
now offers an extended menu of modules in years 3 and 4, drawn across the
validated programmes within the College of Business. The offering of this diverse
and interesting range of modules has the following advantages;
    1 The course is more attractive to potential entrants
    2 Graduates are more employable because of specific skills and knowledge
          base in certain or combined business areas
    3 Increased motivation for students during the programme, as the opportunity
          of taking modules on the specialist degrees within the school, provides
          them with the opportunity to follow up on areas of interest they have
          developed, and to reinforce the learning experiences provided in earlier
          years
    4 Embraces the DIT policy of modularisation
    5 Enhances resource utilisation within the College of Business

In addition, in year 2, the two five credit modules,’ Economics’ and ‘The
International Economic Environment’ are to be substituted with the ‘common’
College of Business 10 credit ‘Economics Module’ in line with the Schools policy
of standardisation of basic business subjects. This module is included in the most
recent edition of the programme document.


Changes to BSc in Business and Computing (DT354)

The honours Degree in Business Computing has a number of changes to its
structure which are outlined below. These include structural changes to year 3, a
re-configuration of the modules being offered in year 3 and year 4, and a change
in the weighting of the contribution of year 3 results to the overall degree award.

Summary of changes to structure so year 3 and year 4.

     Previous Year 3 Semester 1                  Current Year 3 Semester 1

4 Core modules, 2 Options                  6 Core modules, no Options

     Previous Year 3 Semester 1                  Current Year 3 Semester 1

4 Core modules, 2 Options                  2 Core modules + Work Placement /
                                           Erasmus
     Previous Year 4 Semester 1                 Current Year 4 Semester 1

4 Core modules, 2 Options                  6 Core modules, no Options

     Previous Year 4 Semester2                   Current Year 4 Semester 2

5 Core modules, 1 Option                   6 Core modules, no Options


Essentially, all of the choice has been clustered in year 3 semester 2. This results
in the programme being able to accommodate a work placement option, or
facilitate outbound student mobility under the Erasmus programme.

Summary of changes to configuration of modules offered.

Table 1: Previous Programme Structure DT354-3
      Semester      Modules                                   Core           ECTS
      1             Communication and                          Y               5
                    Teamwork
      1             Business Modelling                          Y               5
      1             Enterprise Database                         Y               5
                    Systems
      1             Internet Systems                            Y               5
                    Development
      1             Component Based                            N                5
                    Development
      1             Business Decision Making                   N                5
      1             Intelligent Systems 1                      N                5
      1             XML Applications                           N                5
      2             Software Quality Assurance                 Y                5
      2             Project Management                         Y                5
     2            Software Engineering           Y      5
     2            Distributed Systems 1          Y      5
     2            Component Based                N      5
                  Development 2
     2            Intelligent Systems 2          N      5
     2            Management of Information      N      5
                  Systems

Table 2: Previous Programme Structure DT354-4
      Semester      Modules                     Core   ECTS
      1&2           Project                      Y      20
      1             Strategic Management 1       Y       5
      1             Distributed Information      Y       5
                    Systems 2
      1             Mobile Application           N      5
                    Development
      1             Data Mining                  N      5
      1             Software Patterns 1          N      5

     2            Seminar Series                 Y      5
     2            Strategic Management 2         Y      5
     2            Strategic Information          Y      5
                  Systems
     2            Software Patterns 2            N      5
     2            Entrepreneurship               N      5

Table 3: Proposed Programme Structure DT354-3
      Semester      Modules                     Core   ECTS
      1             Communication and            Y       5
                    Teamwork
      1             Business Modelling           Y      5
      1             Enterprise Database          Y      5
                    Systems
      1             Dynamic Programming          Y      5
      1             Project Management           Y      5
      1             Web Development (Java)       Y      5
      2             Web Development 2 (Rails)    Y      5
      2             Component Based              Y      5
                    Development
      2             Management of Information    Y      5
                    Systems
      2             Work Placement / Erasmus*    Y      15
      2             Business Decision Making     N      5
      2             Entrepreneurship             N      5
      2             Elective Modules**           N      5
      Notes     * Assessed on Pass/Fail Basis
                only.
                ** Modules not ‘owned’ by MIS
                Department. Can choose from
                suitable modules from School
                  of Computing and College of
                  Business

Table 4: Proposed Programme Structure DT354-4
      Semester     Modules                                 Core           ECTS
      1&2          Project                                  Y              20
      1            Strategic Management 1                   Y               5
      1            Distributed Information                  Y               5
                   Systems
      1            Mobile Application                        Y               5
                   Development
      1            Software Patterns 1                       Y               5
      2            Strategic Information                     Y               5
                   Systems
      2            Strategic Management 2                    Y               5
      2            Software Quality Assurance                Y               5
      2            Software Patterns 2                       Y               5

Some modules are no longer offered, some that were previously options are now
core, and the sequencing of some of the modules has changed.

Summary of changes to weighting.

Previously year 3 results contributed 50% of overall marks towards the final
degree awarded, or alternatively, semesters 5,6,7,8 each contributed 25% to the
overall marks of the degree awarded. This has been changed to reflect the work
placement/Erasmus option in year 3 semester 2. Now Semester 5 contributes
20% towards the overall degree, Semester 6 does no contribute at all to the
overall degree award, Semester 7 & 8 each contribute 40% towards the overall
degree award.

				
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