UNR MPH Program Preliminary Self Study

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UNR MPH Program Preliminary Self Study Powered By Docstoc
					A Self Study of the Master of Public Health Program

                University of Nevada, Reno


     Submitted In Partial Fulfillment of Requirements for Accreditation
              to the Council on Education for Public Health




                             Contact Persons:

           Paul G. Devereux, PhD, Lead, Self-Study Committee,
                    775-692-7080 devereux@unr.edu
                                   or
                     Dana P. Loomis, PhD, Director,
                    775-682-7103 dploomis@unr.edu

                  School of Community Health Sciences
                           UNR Mailstop 274
                         1664 N. Virginia Street
                         Reno, NV 89557-0034




                                 June 2010
UNR School of Community Health Sciences




                                                         Table of Contents


1.0 The Public Health Program........................................................................................ 4
1.1 Mission ..................................................................................................................... 4
1.2 Evaluation and Planning ............................................................................................ 8
1.3 Institutional Environment ........................................................................................ 16
1.4 Organization and Administration ............................................................................. 23
1.5 Governance ............................................................................................................. 27
1.6 Resources ................................................................................................................ 33
2.0 Instructional Programs............................................................................................. 45
2.1 Master of Public Health Degree ............................................................................... 45
2.2 Program Length....................................................................................................... 47
2.3 Public Health Core Knowledge................................................................................ 51
2.4 Practical Skills......................................................................................................... 53
2.5 Culminating Experience .......................................................................................... 57
2.6 Required Competencies ........................................................................................... 61
2.7 Assessment Procedures ........................................................................................... 65
2.8 Academic Degrees................................................................................................... 71
2.9 Doctoral Degree ...................................................................................................... 72
2.10 Joint Degrees ......................................................................................................... 73
2.11 Distance Education or Executive Degree Programs................................................ 75
3.0 Creation, Application and Advancement of Knowledge ........................................... 76
3.1 Research.................................................................................................................. 76
3.2 Service .................................................................................................................... 87
3.3 Workforce Development ......................................................................................... 95
4.0 Faculty, Staff and Students .................................................................................... 102
4.1 Faculty Qualifications ........................................................................................... 102
4.2 Faculty Policies and Procedures ............................................................................ 114
4.3 Faculty and Staff Diversity .................................................................................... 118
4.4 Student Recruitment and Admissions .................................................................... 125
4.5 Student Diversity ................................................................................................... 131
4.6 Advising and Career Counseling ........................................................................... 135




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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


                                                       List of Appendices
MPH Program Review Report ........................................................................................ A
Asset and Opportunities Inventory ……………………………………………………… B
MPH Internship Memorandum of Understanding ............................................................C
Core Course Competency Plans & Assessment Data ..................................................... D
Matrix of Core Competencies .......................................................................................... E
Epidemiology Competencies & Assessment Data............................................................ F
Matrix of Epidemiology Competencies .......................................................................... G
Social & Behavioral Health Competencies & Assessment Data ...................................... H
Matrix of Social & Behavioral Competencies ................................................................... I
Evaluation Tool Capstone Paper & Presentation ............................................................... J
Forum for Healthy Nevada ............................................................................................. K
SCHS Bylaws ................................................................................................................. L
MPH Student Handbook ................................................................................................ M




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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


1.0 The Public Health Program
1.1 Mission. The program shall have a clearly formulated and publicly stated mission with
supporting goals and objectives. The program shall foster the development of professional
public health values, concepts and ethical practice.
1.1.a. A clear and concise mission statement for the program as a whole.
The mission of the MPH program is to develop, disseminate, and apply knowledge with an
ecological approach to protect and promote the health of populations statewide and worldwide.
This is also the mission of the School of Community Health Sciences (SCHS), Division of
Health Sciences (DHS), University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) in which the program is located.
The program mission is congruent with the missions of the University and Division of Health
Sciences. The mission of the Division is to contribute to the advancement and dissemination of
knowledge that will help to improve society at the state, regional, and national levels. The
Division of Health Sciences is tied together by the need to find solutions for and help people
towards improving their health and well-being through education, research, clinical care, and
public service. Through one-on-one treatment of people with health problems, providing
opportunities to participate in medical and social behavioral research, and conducting scholarly
activities aimed at improving the health and well-being of whole populations, faculty prepare and
teach students to work in high-demand professions.
The University of Nevada, Reno is a constitutionally established, land-grant university. The
university served the state of Nevada as its only state-supported institution of higher education
for almost 75 years. In that historical role, it has emerged as a doctoral-granting university which
focuses its resources on doing a select number of things well. The University of Nevada, Reno
offers a wide range of undergraduate and graduate programs, including selected doctoral and
professional studies, which emphasize those programs and activities which best serve the needs
of the state, region, and nation. By fostering creative and scholarly activity, it encourages and
supports faculty research and application of that research to state and national problems.

Areas in which the mission of the University of Nevada, Reno are especially relevant for the
MPH program include the resolve to: emphasize undergraduate, graduate, and professional
programs which meet the needs of the citizens of Nevada; offer a range of applied,
interdisciplinary and career-oriented programs at both the undergraduate and graduate levels;
provide community and public service programs through continuing education and cooperative
extension; contribute to the advancement and dissemination of knowledge that will help to
improve society at the state, regional, and national levels; reflect and respect the rich ethnic and
cultural diversity of the citizens of Nevada in its academic programs, support programs, and in
the composition of its faculty, administration, staff and student body; and, enhance the research
and public service capabilities of the university through increased collaboration with both the
public and the private sectors, and by providing assistance to the state and local governments.

1.1.b. One or more goal statements for each major function by which the program intends
to attain its mission, including instruction, research and service.

The goals of the MPH Program and SCHS are:

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


       To develop the knowledge base for public health through research
       To be recognized for leadership in innovative approaches to public health
       To engage with multiple communities through professional and scholarly service
       To prepare future public health practitioners, researchers, educators and leaders
       To expose students to diversity in multiple venues.

1.1.c. A set of measurable objectives relating to each major function through which the
program intends to achieve its goals of instruction, research and service.
Table 1.1.c. Listing of SCHS Goals and Objectives.
1) Goal: “To develop the knowledge base for public health through research.”
Objectives:
    1. At least 60% of faculty will publish an article in a peer-reviewed journal by 2011.
    2. At least 70% of faculty will present research results at a conference by 2011.
    3. At least 70% of faculty will submit one proposal for grant funding by 2011.
    4. External funding per FTE will increase 10% by 2011.
2) Goal: “To be recognized for leadership in public health.”
Objectives:
    1. At least 25% of faculty holding positions on advisory boards, review panels, study
        sections, editor positions, and other influential bodies by 2015.
    2. Increase by 10% health-related information shared with community or media by 2011.
3) Goal: “To engage with multiple communities through professional and scholarly
service.”
Objectives:
    1. By 2011, 40% of faculty will co-author reports and publications with colleagues at other
        units on campus.
    2. By 2011, 30% of faculty will co-author reports, publications, and presentations with
        community members.
    3. By 2011, 15% of faculty will provide workshops, trainings and continuing education
        opportunities to public health professionals.
    4. By 2011, 15% of faculty will provide technical assistance to the community, including
        but not limited to, program evaluations, consulting, data analysis, grant partnerships.
    5. By 2011, 10% of UNR faculty is members of community boards or committees.
    6. By 2011, 10% of UNR SCHS committee composition will be community members.
4) Goal: “To prepare future public health practitioners, researchers, educators and
leaders.”
Objective 1): Recruitment/Admissions
    1a. By 2011, 80% of students enrolled in the MPH program will have an overall
        undergraduate GPA that exceeds 3.2.
    1b. By 2011, 40% of students enrolled in the MPH program will have a standardized test
        score (GRE, MCAT) that exceeds the 50th percentile.
Objective 2): Education/Training
    2a. By 2011, 90% of MPH students will receive grades of B or higher as evidence of partial
        attainment of core MPH and emphasis-specific competencies.
    2b. By 2011, 95% of MPH students will receive approval of their culminating project
        proposal by their committee on the first attempt.

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


    2c. By 2011, 30% of MPH students will be involved with faculty in research activities.
    2d. By 2011, 10% of current MPH students or graduates within the last 5 years will be the
        primary author or a co-author on a publication (peer-reviewed).
    2e. By 2011, 20% of current MPH students or graduates within the last 5 years will be the
        primary author or a co-author on a presentation at a scientific conference (peer-
        reviewed).
    2f. By 2011, 35% of MPH students will be involved in leadership roles and providing service
        to the community or university.
Objective 3): Graduation/Post-Graduation
    3a. By 2011, 90% of full-time MPH students will complete their degree within 3 years of
        matriculation.
    3b. By 2011, 75% of MPH graduates will become employed in public health or settings
        closely related to their degree within 6 months of graduation.
    3c. By 2011, 5% of MPH graduates will be admitted to a program for further academic
        training (PhD, MD, etc.).
    3d. By 2011, 10% of MPH graduates will have local or national leadership positions in
        public health.
    3e. 60% of employed UNR MPH graduates are located in Nevada and the Intermountain
        West by 2011.
5) Goal: To expose students to diversity in multiple venues.
Objectives:
    1. Faculty and staff are representative of women, underrepresented minority, and other
        diverse groups in the relevant labor markets by 2015.
    2. By 2011, efforts to recruit underrepresented populations for the MPH program will
        increase by 10%.
    3. Efforts to recruit diverse faculty and staff will increase by 5% for each new hire.
    4. By 2011, historically underrepresented racial/ethnic populations will comprise 20% of
        the students enrolled in the MPH program.
    5. By 2011, 20% of MPH applicants will report experience working with underrepresented
        populations.
    6. By 2011, 50% of faculty address issues affecting underrepresented populations in their
        work.


1.1.d. A description of the manner in which mission, goals and objectives are developed,
monitored and periodically revised and the manner in which they are made available to the
public.
The mission and goals have been reviewed nearly every year since the formation of the MPH
program in 2000 and revised as needed. The faculty hold School-wide retreats twice a year at the
beginning of each semester. Strategic planning, which includes reviewing our goals and mission,
typically occurs during these meetings. Measureable objectives tied to the mission and values
were first developed in SCHS faculty subcommittees. The drafts were then presented to all
program faculty who voted to adopt the final list of objectives in the Fall of 2009. The process of
developing measurable objectives will allow for a stronger tie in to our goals, concrete feedback,
and a better evaluation process to occur at our Fall 2010 retreat.

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


The mission, goals, and objectives are made available on the school’s website and in program
materials, such as those distributed to community partners and in the school’s bylaws. They are
included in the students’ handbook available on the website and distributed to students at new
student orientation.

The faculty efforts and accomplishments are monitored through the use of Digital Measures, an
online effort reporting system that faculty complete each year which captures accomplishments
in service, teaching, and research. Objectives related to students are measured most commonly
through surveys and instructor records.

1.1.e. A statement of values that guide the program, with a description of how the values
are determined and operationalized.
The program’s values reflect what guides our work as a faculty, school and our interactions with
the community and what actions we want to model to our students and other stakeholders.

Values of the School of Community Health Sciences

•   Professionalism
•   Integrity
•   Diversity
•   Community and Collaboration
•   Advancement of Knowledge and Learners

The values were determined by a vote of faculty and MPH students in Fall 2009. The same five
values were chosen separately by the students and faculty. The values are operationalized in our
goals and objectives.

1.1.f. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
       Broad support for the mission among faculty and students.

Suggested Improvements
      Measureable objectives are a new process for the school and they will require careful
      monitoring especially in the next couple years to ensure that they are measured
      appropriately and revised as needed.
      Identify more teaching-related objectives.
      Establish a process in which more stakeholders are involved in the development and
      review of goals and objectives.




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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


1.2 Evaluation and Planning. The program shall have an explicit process for evaluating and
monitoring its overall efforts against its mission, goals and objectives; for assessing the
program’s effectiveness in serving its various constituencies; and for planning to achieve its
mission in the future.

1.2.a. Description of the evaluation procedures and planning processes used by the
program, including an explanation of how constituent groups are involved in these
processes.
Based on a thorough needs assessment in 1999 which demonstrated strong support for an MPH
program among health professionals within a 45-mile radius of the University, a lack of public
health training among existing professionals in Nevada, and few MPH programs in the
Intermountain West, UNR’s MPH program was designed and launched to meet a clearly
demonstrated need in the state.

Since that time, the MPH program has undertaken numerous planning efforts. In 2003, as a result
of a strategic planning process to address the state’s needs, plans were launched to develop a full
School of Public Health at UNR which was approved by the Nevada State Board of Regents in
2004. However, due to budget constraints that were slowing the progress of a full School, in
Spring 2008, faculty decided to delay the development of the School of Public Health and to
pursue the advancement of the MPH program.

The Nevada Code of Higher Education requires that all departments undergo periodic review and
the program complies with university planning and evaluation procedures. The School conducts
program reviews every couple years and most recently completed a review of the MPH program
in Spring 2009 (see Appendix A). The review included site visits from other faculty at other
graduate public health programs and input from students and community stakeholders. The
school collaborates with UNR’s Office for University Assessment (OUA) which conducts the
yearly employer and MPH alumni surveys. In addition to formal reviews at the University level,
the bi-yearly School faculty retreats are the primary site for program planning and evaluation.
For example, the measureable program objectives developed in Fall 2009 will be reviewed at the
faculty retreat in Fall 2010.
The school has actively engaged the community and key public health stakeholders to provide
input to guide improvements since it began plans to offer an MPH. The original committee to
explore the feasibility of a UNR MPH program consisted of students, faculty from medicine and
other related departments (nutrition, nursing, aging), and eight state and county health
professionals. Alumni and employer surveys are conducted each year and in 2006, a needs
assessment of Nevada State Health Division staff (see Section 3.3.a.), demonstrated continued
support for public health education and training.

Another way in which community constituents participate in program planning is by their
involvement in the MPH students’ and School committees. In particular, the School’s advisory
board consists of public health professionals from the region (including program alumni). In
addition, the School’s affiliate and adjunct faculty include community members.
Student representatives attend the monthly MPH Graduate Committee meetings. Students
provide feedback on all aspects of the MPH program through communication with their
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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


instructors, advisors, and the Graduate Program Director. Particular feedback from students is
obtained each semester about their courses, instructors, and internship preceptors. The internship
preceptors also evaluate the student and the amount of support received from program faculty.
The Graduate Program Director serves as the program’s Assessment Coordinator with input and
guidance provided by the Graduate and Steering committees. The faculty and Graduate
Committees meet monthly. The Steering Committee meets regularly, typically once a month.

1.2.b. Description of how the results of evaluation and planning are regularly used to
enhance the quality of programs and activities.
The program continually uses evaluation results to improve the quality of the program and
activities. The most typical feedback source is information from alumni surveys. This
information has been used to revise the curriculum, such as adding or removing particular
courses. For example, the alumni feedback showed that there was redundancy in a course
designed to introduce students to the field of public health with other core courses and a lack of
research methods in the curriculum. As a result Community Health Sciences (CHS) 700
“Introduction to Public Health” was replaced by CHS 700R “Research Methods for Public
Health”. In other cases, internship sites have been discontinued based on student feedback about
the preceptor or site. In Fall 2009, the graduate committee approved adding a question to the
2010 alumni survey to ask about leadership activities to better capture information on alumni
leader positions, which is one of the school’s outcome objectives.
Planning processes with stakeholders led to the development of the dual MPH/MD and the
removal of the nutrition emphasis which lacked student participation. Feedback from students
and alumni was also used to support revisions to the dual MSN in nursing/MPH degree. These
revisions are currently occurring and therefore, students will not be admitted into the dual
MSN/MPH program until the curriculum is updated.
As part of the development plans for a full School of Public Health, a SWOT analysis was
conducted in October 2007 (see Appendix B). Although the development of a full School has
been delayed, the planning process produced a number of changes (e.g., identification of the
need to hire an internship coordinator).
Finally, in part based on feedback from students, the MPH culminating experience has been
changed. In addition to input from the students and faculty who served on the MPH students’
committees, the evidence showed that students’ time-to-degree completion was unnecessarily
long, and that the focus of the culminating project was too narrow allowing students to
sufficiently demonstrate mastery of only one or just a few competencies. As a result of a review
of this review, the culminating experience project was replaced with a 3-credit capstone course
in Spring 2010.

1.2.c. Identification of outcome measures that the program uses to monitor its effectiveness
in meeting its mission, goals and objectives. Target levels should be defined and data
regarding the program’s performance must be provided for each of the last three years.




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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Table 1.2.c. UNR SCHS MPH Program Goals, Objectives, Targets, and Data for the Last 3 Years.
1) Goal: “To develop the knowledge base for public health through                 2007 to 2008 2008 to 2009   2009 to 2010
research.”                                                                        Data         Data           Data
Objectives:
1. At least 60% of faculty will publish an article in a peer-reviewed journal by  75%          71%            63%
    2011.
2. At least 70% of faculty will present research results at a conference by 2011. 88%          71%            59%
3. At least 70% of faculty will submit one proposal for grant funding by 2011.    69%          71%            75%
4. Number of new external fund awards and amount of awards per FTE will           31%          43%            44%
    increase 5% by 2011.                                                          $187,299 per $92,312 per    $84,671 per
                                                                                  faculty FTE  faculty FTE    faculty FTE
    (2006-2007 Baseline: 3 faculty received grants                                >5% increase
    Total amount = $261,090 = $18,649 amount/faculty FTE)
2) Goal: “To be recognized for leadership in public health.”                      2007 to 2008 2008 to 2009   2009 to 2010
                                                                                  Data         Data           Data
Objectives:
1. At least 25% of faculty holding positions on advisory boards, review panels, 39%            38%            21%
    study sections, editor positions, and other influential bodies by 2015.
Objectives:
2. 30% of faculty will share health-related information with community or         17%          19%            37%
    media by 2011.
3) Goal: “To engage with multiple communities through professional and            2007 to 2008 2008 to 2009   2009 to 2010
scholarly service.”                                                               Data         Data           Data
Objectives:
1. By 2011, 40% of faculty will co-author reports and publications with           56%          21%            31%
    colleagues at other units on campus.
2. By 2011, 30% of faculty will co-author reports, publications, and              25%          36%            35%
    presentations with community members.
3. By 2011, 15% of faculty will provide workshops, trainings and continuing       17%          19%            26%
    education opportunities to public health professionals.
4. By 2011, 15% of faculty will provide technical assistance to the community, 22%             25%            26%
    including but not limited to, program evaluations, consulting, data analysis,
    grant partnerships.

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


5. By 2011, 10% of UNR faculty is members of community boards or                  56%              63%            47%
    committees.
6. By 2011, 10% of UNR SCHS committees will include a community                   N/A              N/A            17%
    member.
4) Goal: “To prepare future public health practitioners, researchers,             2007 to 2008     2008 to 2009   2009 to 2010
educators and leaders.”                                                           Data             Data           Data
Objective 1): Recruitment/Admissions
1a. By 2011, 80% of students enrolled in the MPH program will have an overall     53%              67%            70%
    undergraduate GPA that exceeds 3.2.
1b. By 2011, 40% of students enrolled in the MPH program will have verbal and     31%              33%            47%
    quantitative GRE scores that exceed the 50th percentile.*
Objective 2): Education/Training
2a. By 2011, 90% of MPH students will receive grades of B or higher as            92%              84%            90%
    evidence of partial attainment of core MPH and emphasis-specific                                              Includes Fall
    competencies.                                                                                                 2009 only,
                                                                                                                  Spring 2010
                                                                                                                  not yet
                                                                                                                  available
2b. By 2011, 95% of MPH students will receive approval of their culminating       Data Not Yet     Data Not Yet   Data Not Yet
    project proposal by their committee on the first attempt.                     Available        Available      Available
2c. By 2011, 30% of MPH students will be involved with faculty in research        14%              21%            22%
    activities.
2d. By 2011, 10% of current MPH students or graduates within the last 5 years     8%               5%             12%
    will be the primary author or a co-author on a publication (peer-reviewed).
2e. By 2011, 20% of current MPH students or graduates within the last 5 years     11%              13%            13%
    will be the primary author or a co-author on a presentation at a scientific
    conference (peer-reviewed).
2f. By 2011, 35% of MPH students will be involved in leadership roles and         100%             90%            73%
    providing service to the community or university.


Objective 3): Graduation/Post-Graduation
3a. By 2011, 90% of full-time MPH students will complete their degree within 3    73%              58%            N/A

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   years of matriculation.                                                                       *Historical       *This cohort just
                                                                                                 graduation rate   entered in Fall
                                                                                                 is 80%. Three     2009.
                                                                                                 years have not
                                                                                                 yet elapsed for
                                                                                                 this cohort.
3b. By 2011, 75% of MPH graduates will become employed in public health or      92%              57%               Data not yet
    settings closely related to their degree within 6 months of graduation.                                        available
3c. By 2011, 5% of MPH graduates will be admitted to a program for further      8%               29%               Data not yet
    academic training (PhD, MD, etc.).                                                                             available
3d. By 2011, 10% of MPH graduates will have local or national leadership        15%              14%               Data not yet
    positions in public health.                                                                                    available

3e. 60% of employed UNR MPH graduates are located in Nevada and the             75%              86%               Data not yet
    Intermountain West by 2011.                                                                                    available

5) Goal: To expose students to diversity in multiple venues.                    2007 to 2008     2008 to 2009      2009 to 2010
                                                                                Data             Data              Data
Objectives:
 1. Faculty and staff are representative of women, underrepresented minority,   Women:           Women             Women
    and other diverse groups in the relevant labor markets by 2015.             Faculty: 50%     Faculty: 56%      Faculty: 65%
    Relevant Labor Markets Targets:                                             Staff: 67%       Staff: 100%       Staff: 83%
    Women
    Faculty:54%                                                                 Minority         Minority          Minority
    Staff: 46%                                                                  Faculty: 17%     Faculty: 19%      Faculty: 15%
    Minority                                                                    Staff: 50%       Staff: 25%        Staff: 50%
    Faculty:16%
    Staff: 21%
 2. By 2011, efforts to recruit underrepresented populations for the MPH        1 effort         1 effort          2 specific
    program will increase by 10%.                                                                                  efforts
                                                                                                                   (participation
                                                                                                                   in diversity
                                                                                                                   recruitment
                                                                                                                   fairs)

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


3. Efforts to recruit diverse faculty and staff will increase by 5% for each new No Search      No Search   3 specific
   hire.                                                                                                    efforts
4. By 2011, historically underrepresented racial/ethnic populations will         13%            25%         4%
   comprise 20% of the students enrolled in the MPH program.
5. By 2011, 20% of MPH applicants will report experience working with            100%           90%         73%
   underrepresented populations.
6. By 2011, 50% of faculty address issues affecting underrepresented             50%            59%         58%
   populations in their work.
*N = those students with GRE scores. A few students complete other entrance exams (e.g., MCAT, LSAT).




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1.2.d. An analytical self-study document that provides a qualitative and quantitative
assessment of how the program achieves its mission, goals and objectives and meets all
accreditation criteria, including a candid assessment of strengths and weaknesses in terms
of the program’s performance against the accreditation criteria.
This self study is hereby submitted in compliance with Criterion 1.2.d.

1.2.e. An analysis of the program’s responses to recommendations in the last accreditation
report (if any).
Not Applicable

1.2.f. A description of the manner in which the self-study document was developed,
including effective opportunities for input by important program constituents, including
institutional officers, administrative staff, teaching faculty, students, alumni and
representatives of the public health community.
The self study was developed in partnership with the community, faculty, and students. The
primary committee was comprised of Paul Devereux, Chair, Self-Study, SCHS faculty, Dana
Loomis, SCHS Director, Richelle O’Driscoll, representative from the Division of Health
Sciences, William Cathey, Vice Provost, Instruction and Undergraduate Programs at UNR, Kim
Somma Mueller MPH Student, Ginger Fenwick, Center for Ethics & Health Policy, Division of
Health Sciences, Karla Bee MPH Student and Aliya Buttar MPH Student. The committee was
designed in response to feedback from a site visit from Mollie Mulvaney, CEPH in Spring 2009
and from the CEPH Accreditation Workshop in July 2009.
All School faculty were involved in writing the self-study. Committees were formed to address
each self-study section. In addition, faculty reviewed and edited self-study sections written by
others. In addition, the complete list of suggested improvements from each self-study section
was distributed separately to faculty so that identified areas for improvement could be used in
planning.
The draft will be placed on WebCampus, an online community, for students to review,
Sharepoint, a shared network which faculty and staff can access, and on the program’s website
for community input. It will be sent to alumni who requested a copy to review. The School’s
Advisory Board will be sent a copy and provide input on the draft before final submission to
CEPH. Finally, Patty Charles, DrPH, MPH, SCHS Affiliate Faculty and Professor at the School
of Medicine agreed to provide a review of the document.

1.2.g. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is met.

Strengths
       The School has an explicit plan for monitoring its efforts towards its mission, goals, and
       objectives.
       The School seeks input from students and other stakeholders in its planning process.
       The School uses evaluation data to inform its course.


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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Suggested Improvements
      Resources and more structure are needed to ensure successful future planning efforts.




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1.3 Institutional Environment. The program shall be an integral part of an accredited
institution of higher education.
1.3.a. A brief description of the institution in which the program is located, along with the
names of accrediting bodies (other than CEPH) to which the institution responds.
The Graduate Program in Public Health is housed in the School of Community Health Sciences
(SCHS), a unit of the Division of Health Sciences of the University of Nevada, Reno.
The University of Nevada, Reno is a constitutionally established, land-grant university. The
University is classified by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Education as a
Comprehensive Doctoral institution with medical and/or veterinary medicine. Within the
University, nine colleges offer wide range of undergraduate and graduate majors. Graduate-level
training and research, including a number of doctoral-level programs enhance the University's
mission to create scholarly activity.

Nevada is one of the top 120 universities in America for funded research, according to the
Carnegie Foundation. With more than $80 million in research expenditures, a figure that has
almost doubled over the past 10 years, the University is the leading research enterprise in
Nevada's higher-education system.
The Division of Health Sciences (DHS) includes the schools of Medicine, Nursing, Social Work
and Community Health Sciences, as well as several free-standing centers. Its chief administrative
officer is the Vice President for Health Sciences, John A. McDonald, MD, PhD. Dana Loomis,
PhD, is Director of the School of Community Health Sciences. The Director reports to the Vice
President for Health Sciences; level of authority and reporting lines are equivalent to those of the
Directors of the schools of nursing and social work. Dr. Loomis has standing bi-weekly meetings
with the Vice President and may communicate directly with him whenever needed.
The University of Nevada, Reno is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and
Universities, recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the U.S.
Department of Education. The University has been accredited since 1938. On January 28, 2008,
the University received a letter from the NWCCU which reaffirmed its accreditation on the basis
of the Fall 2007 Comprehensive Evaluation report.

In addition to the Northwest Commission institutional accreditation, there are numerous
university programs which are accredited by their national professional accrediting
organizations. These specialized accrediting organizations, which are recognized by the Council
for Higher Education Accreditation, are shown below:

     Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. (for selected programs in
     engineering and mines)
     Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
     American Dietetics Association Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education
     Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language-Hearing
     Pathology, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
     Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


     American Psychological Association
     Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs
     Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
     Council on Social Work Education
     Liaison Committee on Medical Education (U.S. Department of Education -recognized
     accrediting body for programs leading to the M.D. degree in the United States)
     National Association of Schools of Music
     National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education

1.3.b. One or more organizational charts of the university indicating the program’s
relationship to the other components of the institution, including reporting lines.

Organizational charts for the University of Nevada, Reno and the Division of Health Sciences
are shown in Figures 1.3.b.1. and 1.3.b.2.

Figures 1.3.b.1. UNR Organizational Chart.




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UNR School of Community Health Sciences




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UNR School of Community Health Sciences




Figure 1.3.b.2. Division of Health Sciences Organizational Chart.

                                                           DIVISION OF HEALTH SCIENCES

                                                                                                            Health Sciences VP
                                                                                                             John McDonald


                          School of Comm. Health       School of Social          Orvis School of     School of Medicine         Sanford Center for   Campus Rec &            Center for the
                                  Sciences              Work Denise                 Nursing                                           Aging            Wellness              Application of
                                                                                                       Ole Thienhaus,
                              Dana Loomis, Dir          Montcalm, Dir           Patsy Ruchala, Dir          Dean                John McDonald, Int   Steve Pomi, Dir        Substance Abuse
                                                                                                                                       Dir                                    Technologies
                                                                                                                                                                                (CASAT)
 Nevada Ctr for Ethics   Center for Program Eval   Nevada Center for Health                                                                                                 Nancy Roget, Dir
   & Health Policy       Elizabeth Christiansen,   Statistics and Informatics
                                                                                                                              Gerontology Academic
  Sally Hardwick, Dir              Dir                   Wei Yang, Dir                                                                Prog
                                                                                                                                Betty Dodson, Dir



                                                                                                                  Executive
                                                                                                                 Assistant to
                                                                                                                      VP
                                                                                                                    Jessica
                                                                                                                   Younger                Fiscal
                                                                                                                                          Officer
                                                                                                                                          Renee         Int/Ext
                                                                                                                                          Warren        Affairs
                                                                                                                                                       Richelle
                                                                                                                                                                        Student
                                                                                                                                                      O''Driscoll
                                                                                                                                                                       Advising Ctr      Development
                                                                                                                                                                       Lorena Beck         Stefanie
                                                                                                                                                                                         Scoppettone/
                                                                                                                                                                                           Christina
                                                                                                                                                                                           Sarman




1.3.c. A brief description of university practices regarding: Lines of accountability,
including access to higher-level university officials; Prerogatives extended to academic
units regarding names, titles and internal organization; Budgeting and resource allocation,
including budget negotiations, indirect cost recoveries, distribution of tuition and fees and
support for fund-raising; Personnel recruitment, selection and advancement, including
faculty and staff; Academic standards and policies, including establishment and oversight
of curricula.

1.3.c.1. Lines of accountability, including access to higher-level university officials. The
University of Nevada, Reno has clear lines of reporting as shown in 1.3.b. The President is the
University’s chief executive, with ultimate decision-making responsibility for all aspects of the
institution. The Executive Vice President and Provost reports directly to the President and is the
University’s chief academic officer. Other aspects of university operations, such as
administration and finance, information technology, development, student services and
sponsored research are the responsibility of several vice presidents (see 1.3.b). The academic
portion of the University is divided into colleges defined along subject-matter lines. Each college
is headed by a dean who reports to the Provost (see 1.3.b). Departments are grouped within
colleges and department chairs report to their respective deans. In general, departments are the
fundamental academic units of the University.


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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


The University’s Division of Health Sciences departs from this general structure, however (see
1.3.b). The Division, which includes the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Community Health
Sciences and Social Work is headed by the Vice President for Health Sciences (VPHS), who has
a direct reporting line to the President, as well as to the Provost. Because of this reporting line,
the Division can be seen as a higher administrative unit than the colleges. The Dean of the
School of Medicine and the Directors of the schools of Nursing, Community Health Sciences
and Social Work all report to the VPHS. Schools that have directors, rather than a dean, are
regarded as intermediate units with attributes of both colleges and departments.

The Vice Presidents and Deans interact regularly with the President and Provost. Chairs of
academic departments relate primarily to the deans of their colleges, while in the Division of
Health Sciences, directors of schools interact in a similar way with the VPHS. In most situations,
the deans and the VPHS represent the departments and schools to higher administrators.
However, school directors may communicate with the Provost and meet with him when the need
arises.

1.3.c.2. Prerogatives extended to academic units regarding names, titles and internal
organization. Academic units have considerable autonomy with respect to internal
organization. The Director of the School of Community Health Sciences has the authority under
the School’s bylaws to create internal subunits, name them and to appoint their heads. The
position of MPH Program Director is specifically named in the School’s bylaws, which were
drafted by the School’s faculty and have the authority of the bylaws of the Division and the
University.

Units may also initiate proposals for new names. Name changes that are considered to be
cosmetic in nature require internal approval by the Division and University courses and
curriculum committees, and approval by the Academic Affairs Council of the Nevada System of
Higher Education. Substantive changes must also be approved by the Board of Regents.

1.3.c.3. Budgeting and resource allocation, including budget negotiations, indirect cost
recoveries, distribution of tuition and fees and support for fund-raising. The University
administration sets the non-grant portion of academic unit budgets in consultation with the Deans
and Vice Presidents. Under the University’s funding formula (see 1.6), unit budgets are
proportional to the number of instructional faculty. Units also receive 7.25% of indirect costs
receipts for grants involving unit faculty. Tuition and fees are not returned directly to the units
that generate them, but are part of the pool of funds available to the administration to meet the
university’s operating expenses. Fund-raising support is typically provided at the College or
Division level by specialized development staff.

1.3.c.4. Personnel recruitment, selection and advancement, including faculty and staff.
Faculty recruitment, selection and advancement are handled primarily at the level of the School
and the Division. Searches for tenure-track faculty are initiated by the unit and must be
authorized by the Dean or Vice President and the Provost. The areas in which new faculty are
recruited are determined by the units in consultation with the Dean or Vice President. When a
candidate is selected as a result of a search, the selection is made by the unit and requires
approval from the Dean or Vice President and the Provost. There is considerable flexibility in

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


hiring grant-funded, non-tenure track faculty, but approval of the Dean or Vice President is still
required.

Faculty promotion and tenure applications are also initiated by the academic unit following a
standard schedule. Applications are reviewed within the unit and subsequently by faculty
committees at the College (or Division) and University level. Recommendations for promotion
and tenure must be approved by the Dean or Vice President and the Provost. Awards of tenure
require final approval by the Board of Regents of the Nevada System of Higher Education.
Classified staff positions are governed by the policies and procedures of the Nevada State
Personnel System. Staff hires are initiated by the units, and staff are evaluated within the units
according to state personnel policies. The Dean or Vice President must review and approve staff
evaluations but is usually not involved directly.

1.3.c.5. Academic standards and policies, including establishment and oversight of
curricula. Curricula are developed and managed within academic units. Proposals for new
curricula and changes to existing ones are reviewed by Division and University committees on
courses and curricula. Graduate curricula are also reviewed by the University’s Graduate
Council. These internal reviews tend to be concerned primarily with the potential for duplication
of courses and programs within the University. Proposals for new majors and new degrees also
require approval by the Board of Regents. Unless changes are proposed, oversight of curricula is
usually left to the academic units that administer them.

Minimum academic standards for graduate degrees are set by the Graduate School. Academic
units may set additional requirements if they do not conflict with Graduate School policies. For
example, a unit may establish the number of credits required for a degree, as long as that number
is no less than the minimum established by the Graduate School.

1.3.d. If a collaborative program, descriptions of all participating institutions and
delineation of their relationships to the program.
Not applicable

1.3.e. If a collaborative program, a copy of the formal written agreement that establishes
the rights and obligations of the participating universities in regard to the program’s
operation.

Not applicable.

1.3.f. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is met.

Strengths
       UNR and Nevada System of Higher Education have well established infrastructure within
       which to develop new programs.
       Faculty within different departments of Division are focusing on Interdisciplinary teams
       and training which will have a positive impact on the MPH program.

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Suggested Improvements
      Greater faculty representation on University committees to ensure engagement with the
      system and promotion of MPH program.




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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


1.4 Organization and Administration.
The program shall provide and organizational setting conducive to teaching and learning,
research and service. The organizational setting shall facilitate interdisciplinary
communication, cooperation and collaboration. The organizational structure shall
effectively support the work of the program’s constituents.
1.4.a. One or more organizational charts showing the administrative organization of the
program, indicating relationships among its component offices of other administrative
units and its relationship to higher-level departments, schools and divisions.
The Graduate Program in Public Health is located within the School of Community Health
Sciences (SCHS). A chart depicting the organization of the School and the public health
program is given in Figure 1.4.a.




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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Figure 1.4.a. Organizational Chart for the SCHS.




                                                                              Vice President for Health Sciences
                                                                                  John McDonald, MD, PhD



                                                                                                                                    Graduate Director
             Classified Staff                                                                                                   Mel Minarik, PhD, MPH*
              Tara Burrows                 Administrative             Director, School of Community Health Sciences
                                             Assistant
                                                                                 Dana Loomis, PhD, MSPH**                        Undergraduate Director
                                           Bonnie Coker
                                                                                                                                 Nora Constantino, PhD*
             Student Worker
            Whitney Genseal


                     Nevada Center for Health Statistics and Informatics                                    Nevada Center for Ethics and Health Policy
                                       Wei Yang, PhD, MD**                                                             Sally Hardwick, MS




        Epidemiology & Biostatistics           Social & Behavioral Health           Center for Program Evaluation           Internship Coordinator
          Kristen Clements-Nolle,            Kristen Clements-Nolle, PhD,            Elizabeth Christiansen, PhD*          Jennifer Bennett, MPH*
            PhD, MPH** (Chair)                      MPH** (Chair)




                 Leslie Elliot, PhD, MPH                Marie Boute, PhD




                    John Hsieh, PhD                   Michelle Granner, PhD




                    Minggen Lu, PhD                 Paul Devereux, PhD, MPH




               Julie Smith-Gagen, PhD,                    Judith Sugar, PhD
                         MPH



                 Jeff Angermann, PhD                        Dan Cook, PhD




                                                        Jaime Anstee, PhD




                                                            Amy Fitch, MPH



*Also faculty member in Social/Behavioral Health Emphasis
**Also faculty member in Epidemiology Emphasis


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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


1.4.b. Description of the roles and responsibilities of major units in the organizational
chart.
The School’s chief administrative officer is the Director. As described in Section 1.3, the SCHS
Director reports to the Vice President of Health Sciences; his level of authority and reporting
lines are equivalent to those of the Directors of the schools of nursing and social work. The
Director has standing bi-weekly meetings with the Vice President of Health Sciences and may
communicate directly with him whenever needed.
The Program is administered by the Graduate Program Director and the School’s Graduate
Committee. The Graduate Director is chair of the Committee, which is composed of 6 members
of the graduate faculty. The Graduate Committee meets monthly and has primary responsibility
for establishing, reviewing and monitoring the curriculum and core competencies. The
committee also recommends and implements curriculum changes; sets admissions standards for
the MPH program; reviews applicants to the program; provides input to faculty searches based
upon program needs; and develops materials and strategies for marketing and student
recruitment. Each specialty area within the Program has a Head appointed by the School
Director. The area Heads coordinate the curriculum and teaching assignments within their
respective areas and facilitate communication between the specialty areas, the School Director
and the Graduate Committee.

1.4.c. Description of the manner in which interdisciplinary coordination, cooperation and
collaboration are supported.
The Graduate Program Director and the Graduate Committee have primary responsibility for
ensuring coordination, cooperation and collaboration among the disciplines that make up the
public health program. The Graduate Director, the specialty area Heads, and the Graduate
Committee work together to ensure that the program exposes students both to a broad public
health perspective representative of the core public health disciplines and to specialized
knowledge within their areas of concentration. The specialty area Heads and the Graduate
Director are also members of the School’s Steering Committee. The Steering Committee meets
monthly and is specifically charged with facilitating communication and collaboration among the
School’s academic programs, both graduate and undergraduate.

1.4.d. Identification of written policies that are illustrative of the program’s commitment to
fair and ethical dealings.
The program’s commitment to fair and ethical dealings is exemplified by the Bylaws of the
School of Community Health Sciences. Section 1.1 of the Bylaws states specifically the purpose
of the Bylaws is “to provide consistency, fairness and equity to School operations.”

1.4.e. Description of the manner in which student grievances and complaints are addressed,
including the number of grievances and complaints filed for each of the last three years.
MPH Student Concerns Resolution. The MPH Program strives for a professional, collegial
relationship with all MPH students. Students are encouraged to follow the University of Nevada,
Reno policies for resolving any concerns – see http://www.unr.edu/gsa/pdf/rights&resp.s.pdf
Our commitment is resolution of issues, and different situations support different methods.

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Depending on the type of concern the student may have, there are several options:

       If the concern is about a course, students are encouraged to seek assistance first from the
       course instructor, then from his or her advisor and/or Graduate Director. If a result is still
       not satisfactory, the student may seek assistance from the Director of the School of
       Community Health Sciences. Beyond that, the route would be to the Vice-President for
       Health Sciences.
       If a concern involves the advisor and/or internship preceptor, the student is encouraged to
       seek assistance from the Graduate Director and/or Internship Coordinator, and finally the
       Director of the School. Again, the route would then be to the Vice-President for Health
       Sciences.
       If a Graduate Assistant has an issue with their supervisor, the student can come to the
       Graduate Director and/or then to the Director of the School.
       If students have issues with other students, this would be formally handled though the
       instructor and/or advisor, depending on the situation.
Regardless of the issue, an MPH student may choose to meet with and process the issue with the
MPH Student Representative for their program specialization. We recognize that in some cases,
MPH students may need support in resolving their issue. From that point, the MPH Student and
Student Representative can follow the appropriate Line of Authority process as noted above to
work toward resolution.
Communication of the process for conflict resolution - this process has been distributed to our
list-serve, posted on the Graduate Student bulletin board, and also posted on the MPH
WebCampus site.

1.4.f. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is met.

Strengths
       The infrastructure is designed to assure ongoing monitoring, collaboration,
       interdisciplinary teamwork and learning.
       Mechanics are in place to facilitate program improvement
       Faculty and students have a set of policies and procedures which assure that they will be
       treated fairly and to guide them through situations which may require resolution.




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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


1.5 Governance. The program administration and faculty shall have clearly defined rights
and responsibilities concerning program governance and academic policies. Students shall,
where appropriate, have participatory roles in conduct of program evaluation procedures,
policy-setting and decision-making.

1.5.a. Description of the Program’s governance and committee structure and processes,
particularly as they affect: - general Program policy development - planning - budget and
resource allocation - student recruitment, admission and award of degrees - faculty
recruitment, retention, promotion and tenure - academic standards and policies - research
and service expectations and policies.
School of Community Health Sciences. The governance of the Public Health Program falls under
the governance structure of the School of Community Health Sciences, as established in the
School’s Bylaws under the authority of the bylaws of the Division of Health Sciences and the
University of Nevada, Reno and the Code of the Nevada System of Higher Education (see 1.5.b).
Within the School of Community Health Sciences, the School Director is the primary level of
governance and final authority. The Director is appointed by the President of the University on
the recommendation of the Vice President for Health Sciences and the faculty of the School.
The faculty constitutes the second level of governance. Rights and responsibilities of the faculty
are established by the Bylaws of the University (Chapter III, section 39). Under the Bylaws of
the School, the faculty provides input regarding policies and procedures. Policy
recommendations are developed by standing or ad hoc committees of faculty and brought
forward to the Director for consideration. The Director may also develop policies and procedures
needed for the operation of the School. The faculty votes on matters affecting the mission,
programming and functioning of the School. Approval by majority vote of the faculty is required
for curriculum changes (described below), establishment of new academic programs and centers,
appointment of adjunct faculty, and amendment of the Bylaws. In other matters, votes of the
faculty are advisory to the Director. Decisions of the Director can be appealed by a majority vote
of the faculty, which may petition the Vice President for Health Sciences if resolution cannot be
reached internally. The University Bylaws provide further mechanisms for resolution of faculty
grievances.
The Public Health Program. Policies and procedures for the Graduate Program in Public Health
are developed by the SCHS Graduate Program Committee. The Graduate Committee is
established by the Bylaws of the School of Community Health Sciences; its charge and
membership are shown in 1.5.c. The Graduate Program Director is chair of the Committee,
which has 6 other members representing the graduate faculty and the core areas of public health.
The committee is required by the Bylaws to have at least one member who is a graduate student.
The members of the Committee and the Graduate Director are appointed by the School Director
for 2-year terms. Student members typically serve for one academic year.

The Graduate Committee meets monthly during the academic year and has primary
responsibility for establishing, reviewing and monitoring the curriculum and core competencies.
Proposals for new courses and curriculum changes must be reviewed and approved by the faculty
and Director of the School, and subsequently by the Division of Health Sciences Courses and
Curriculum Committee, the University Courses and Curriculum Committee, and Graduate
Council. The School has a representative on the Division Courses and Curriculum Committee.

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


The Division, in turn, has a representative on the university-level committee and the Graduate
Council who represents the interests of the School of Community Health Sciences, as well as the
other units in the division.
Academic standards, policies and procedures for the public health program are established by the
Graduate Committee, subject to the regulations of the Graduate School. These are disseminated
to students in the MPH Student Handbook (see Appendix M) and to faculty in the Handbook for
MPH Advisors. The Committee also sets admissions standards for the MPH program, reviews
applicants to the program, and develops materials and strategies for marketing and student
recruitment. Graduate degrees are awarded by UNR’s Graduate School.
Faculty Recruitment, Retention, Promotion and Tenure. Faculty recruitment, retention,
promotion and tenure are managed at the level of the School and the Division (with approvals
required at the university level). Searches for new faculty are initiated by the School Director in
consultation with the faculty and standing committees and must be authorized by the Vice
President for Health Sciences and the Provost. The specific areas in which new faculty are
recruited are prioritized to advance the mission, goals and objectives of the school and the
program. Development of the public health program is a high priority in faculty recruitment, and
all new tenure-line faculty members are expected to contribute to it. Searches for new faculty
members are conducted by a search committee approved by the Director. The search committee
is responsible for advertising, interviewing, and recommending candidates to the Director, who
makes the final selection, with approval by the Vice President and Provost.
UNR Bylaws require that faculty are evaluated annually for research, teaching and service. At
the beginning of each calendar year, faculty submit a role statement listing goals for the year. At
the end of the calendar year, faculty submit an annual review document summarizing
productivity. Evaluations must include peer review and student evaluations of teaching. Program
faculty is evaluated initially by the School of Community Health Sciences Personnel/Promotion
& Tenure Committee, which recommends an evaluation to the Director. The Director then
produces an evaluation report, which takes the Committee’s input into account. The Director’s
report is shared with the faculty member in writing and discussed in a meeting, and is then
forwarded to the Vice President for review and approval.
Promotion and tenure actions are also initiated within the School. Candidates prepare an
application package. This document, along with letters from external referees that have been
solicited by the Director, is reviewed initially by the Personnel/Promotion & Tenure Committee.
Following the P&T Committee’s review, the Director makes a written recommendation to the
Vice President that refers to the recommendation of the Committee and the external referees.
Recommendations for promotion and tenure require further approval by the Division and
University promotion and tenure committees. Awards of tenure must be approved by the Board
of Regents of the Nevada System of Higher Education.

Budget and Resources. Financial support for the Graduate Program in Public Health is provided
through the budget of the School of Community Health Sciences as described in 1.6. The budget
includes lines for salary and operations for the School as a whole. Since the School administers
both graduate and undergraduate programs and members of the faculty and staff typically
contribute to both at varying levels, the Program does not have a separate budget. Resources are
allocated to the program through the assignment of faculty and staff to teaching and

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


administrative functions. These assignments are made by the School Director in consultation
with the program directors and the Steering Committee.

Classroom and administrative space is also shared by all of the school’s programs. Office and
research space is assigned by the School Director according to criteria specified in the Bylaws.
Again there is no specific allocation for the public health program, since most faculty are
involved in both graduate and undergraduate teaching. However, research conducted in the
School’s laboratory space furthers the mission of the graduate program and involves graduate
students.

1.5.b. A copy of the constitution, bylaws or other policy document that determines the
rights and obligations of administrators, faculty and students in governance of the
Program.
The Bylaws of the School of Community Health Sciences are provided in Appendix L and are
available at http://www.unr.edu/facultysenate/bylaws/health-sciences/school-of-community-
health-sciences-policies-and-procedures-11-25-09.pdf

The rights and responsibilities of administrators and faculty are also governed by the following
documents:

  Bylaws of the Division of Health Sciences:
 http://www.unr.edu/healthsciences/documents/DHS.Bylaws.DRAFT_2010.pdf
  Bylaws of the University of Nevada, Reno (URL)
 http://www.unr.edu/facultysenate/bylaws/UNR%20Bylaws/unr-bylaws-11-18-09-2.pdf

  Code of the Nevada System of Higher Education (URL)
 http://system.nevada.edu/Board-of-R/Handbook/TITLE-2---/index.htm

1.5.c. A list of standing and important ad hoc committees, with a statement of charge,
composition, and current membership for each.
The standing committees of the School are the Steering Committee (described in 1.4), the
Personnel/Promotion and Tenure Committee, the Undergraduate Program Committee, and the
Graduate Program Committee. The Personnel/Promotion and Tenure committee is charged under
School and University Bylaws with providing peer review for annual evaluations of faculty
performance and for promotion and tenure decisions. The Undergraduate and Graduate Program
committees are charged with the management of the undergraduate and graduate academic
programs, respectively. The role of the Graduate Committee in connection with the public health
program is described in more detail above. Ad hoc committees may also be formed as needed to
complete a specific task or charge. These committees are temporary and are dissolved when their
charge is fulfilled. Chairs of all committees are appointed by the School Director and actions of
committees are advisory to the Director and the faculty. The charges and current membership of
standing committees is shown in below.

Charge of the Graduate Program Committee. The purpose of the Graduate Committee is to:
“monitor the quality of the graduate program including periodic review of curriculum and
assessment of learning outcomes; provide recommendations pertaining to changes, modifications
or additions to the graduate curriculum, and recommend action to the SCHS Director; process

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


graduate applications for admission to the graduate program; develop marketing programs to
increase student enrollment in the graduate programs; review applications for Graduate Assistant
positions, and make recommendations to SCHS Director; develop an assessment plan, conduct
assessment activities, and provide assessment data to the university assessment office; develop
competencies and the means to assess the extent to which those competencies are met; conduct
regular reviews of curriculum, competencies and assessment results and recommend those
changes needed to ensure competencies are met; regularly review accreditation criteria set by
CEPH and other relevant bodies and recommend changes needed to ensure the program meets
accreditation requirements.” (Bylaws of the School of Community Health Sciences, section
2.3.3)

Membership of the Graduate Committee
Melanie Minarik, MPH, PhD (Chair)                   Jeff Angermann, PhD
Michelle Granner, PhD                               Paul Devereux, PhD
Kristen Clements-Nolle, MPH, PhD                    Dana Loomis, PhD (Ex-Officio)
Minggen Lu, PhD                                     Joe Medellin (Graduate Student Member)
Leslie Elliott, MPH, PhD

1.5.d. Identification of Program faculty who hold membership on University committees,
through which faculty contribute to the activities of the university.

Members of the Program faculty serve regularly on committees at the Division and University
level, through which they contribute to academic planning, policy-making, personnel evaluation,
and other activities. Examples of faculty serving on University and Division committees in the
last 3 years are listed below.
*Jennifer Bennett: Health Sciences’ Interprofessional Education Committee, 2009-present.
*Marie Boutte, Member, University Promotion & Tenure Committee, 2009-present; Division of
Health Sciences Promotion & Tenure Committee, 2007-08.
*Elizabeth Christiansen: Chair, Division of Health Sciences Bylaws Committee, 2009-10
*Daniel Cook: Chair of Health Care Ethics, Nevada Center for Ethics and Health Policy, 2010.
Scholarships in Aging Awards Committee, Spring 2010.
*Paul Devereux: Member, Search Committee, Vice-President of Health Sciences/Dean of
Medical School position; Program Reviewer of Department of Nutrition Graduate Program for
UNR’s Graduate Council, Member, Faculty Senate Grievance Committee for Promotion and
Tenure Review, 2010.
*Dana Loomis: Member, University committee on environmental sustainability 2009-10.
*Judith Sugar, Member, Faculty Senate, 2007-8. Interdisciplinary Gerontology Curriculum
Committee 2007-present.
*Wei Yang, Member, Division of Health Sciences Curriculum Committee, 2009-10.
*Nora Constantino, Member, Steering Committee for Campus Recreation & Wellness 2009-
present, Collaboration and Communication, DHS 2008-present.

1.5.e. Description of student roles in governance, including any formal student
organizations, and student roles in evaluation of Program functioning.



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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Graduate Public Health Network: MPH Students have an officially recognized club with the
UNR graduate student association. This allows the students to have organizational capacity, and
provides resources to launch special projects, programs, and activities.

Graduate Student Association: The UNR graduate student union has a student government that
utilizes student fees to support programs and activities. The health sciences division holds three
seats on the council, and MPH students have frequently been elected to these seats. The GSA
participates in campus-wide policy and program advocacy on campus.

Community Health Sciences Graduate Student Government: In the past year, MPH students have
created a student government structure to address students’ concerns related to academic
programs, curriculum, grievances, and professional development. Four offices were created:
Epidemiology Co-Chair, Social and Behavioral Health Co-Chair, First Year Representative, and
Professional Development Representative. Elections for the two Co-Chair and Professional
Development positions are held during the spring semester and the election for the first year
representative is held during the fall semester. These procedures have not yet been implemented.
Future students can alter and revise the government structure and election procedures as needed.
Course evaluations: Students complete confidential course evaluations at the end of each
semester for all of our courses. The results of these are compiled by school administrative staff
and then shared shortly after (1 month or less) with the individual faculty members. Faculty then
has this information for self-assessment purposes for the next time they teach the course. In
addition, this course information is part of the Faculty member’s annual performance review
during which the Personnel Committee will also see the data.
Faculty Teaching: The course evaluation process includes teaching evaluation by the students.
Results are also shared in the same method for review. Faculty also provide peer evaluations of
classroom performance.
Graduate Assistantship Evaluations: Each semester, the Graduate Director sends out a
confidential survey to student GA’s to get feedback on their experiences under faculty
supervision. Results are shared with the Graduate Committee and Faculty Supervisors for
improvement purposes.
Internship Evaluation: As part of the internship experience, our students are asked several times
throughout to evaluate their internship site, their preceptor, and their experiences related to their
competencies. Results are then shared with the internship site and preceptor for improvement
purposes.
Career Placement Evaluation: Informally, students give us feedback about professional
opportunities and needs that they have in regard to career placement. This feedback has
prompted us to more closely connect with our professional networks, our alumni, and other
programs with career placement services on campus such as, the College of Business. These
evaluations are received from students via faculty advisors and direct discussions.
Graduate Committee: MPH student representatives are members of this committee. They are
asked monthly for input on the committee agenda, and they attend the meetings, participate in
the discussions and give voice to student issues and needs.

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Advisors: Advisors are assigned early in the student’s Program of Study. There have been
instances where students have requested changes for various personal and professional reasons.
Those requests were accommodated. Each advisor receives feedback from students in their
individual meetings and the faculty may share this at faculty meetings or at Graduate Committee
meetings.
WebCampus Communication: After pilot-testing networking/communication vehicles, we now
use a section of WebCampus for all of our communications with MPH students. It is a
convenient tool that allows for 2-way communication between groups and/or individuals. While
traditional methods are also utilized (announcements posted on central bulletin boards and sent
by e-mails), our standard method is WebCampus, since it is accessible for all students and
faculty and regularly used as UNR for various purposes.
Search Committees: In every search for new faculty, MPH students are involved at each stage of
the process, providing input and student perspectives about the job description and the selection
of candidates. Student participation allows perspective candidates to gain information about our
program as well.
MPH Program Review: In 2009 during the MPH program review initiated by the UNR Graduate
School (see Appendix A), students were involved in creating documents, gathering data, reading
the documents, and meeting with the external reviewers.

CEPH Self-Study: In this year as we complete the self-study for CEPH, students have
participated in each step the process. The self-study requires greater depth and breadth than the
2009 Program Review, and we have enlisted more students in creating our self-study (see
Section 1.2.f.).

1.5.f. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is met.

Strengths
       There are numerous avenues for faculty governance both within the School of
       Community Health Sciences and at the University.
       Policy documents are in place that clearly delineate roles, rights, and responsibilities.
       Students actively participate in the public health program.

Suggested Improvements
      Student involvement in the MPH program needs to increase in depth and scope (e.g.,
      greater representation on other School committees and by more students).
      Create a stronger connection with alumni.




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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


1.6 Resources. The program shall have resources adequate to fulfill its stated mission and
goals, and its instructional, research and service objectives.

1.6.a. A description of the budgetary and allocation processes, sufficient to understand all
sources of funds that support the teaching, research and service activities of the program.
This should include, as appropriate, discussion about legislative appropriations, formula
for funds distribution, tuition generation and retention, gifts, grants and contracts, indirect
cost recovery, taxes or levies imposed by the university or other entity within the
university, and other policies that impact on the resources available to the program.
The funds that support the MPH Program are provided by the SCHS. The main components of
the School’s budget are state funds allocated by the University of Nevada, Reno, grants and
contract awards to the School’s faculty, and funds for instructional support and graduate
assistantships provided by the Division of Health Sciences and the Graduate School,
respectively. The School also receives 7.25% of indirect costs received by the University.
Further details of the School’s budget are outlined in section 1.6.b.
The University of Nevada, Reno has total annual revenues of approximately $700 million as
shown in the table below.

        Table 1.6.a. Revenue sources, University of Nevada, Reno (data for FY 2008).
        Source                                     Amount ($ x 1000)*     Percent*
        Total revenue                                    737,497             100
        State appropriations                             203,758             28
        Tuition & fees                                    71,997             10
        Grants & contracts                               150,072             20
        Sales & services                                  64,192              9
        Gifts & investments                               18,374              2
        Other                                               2997             <1

Legislative appropriations to the university are based on a funding formula by which funds are
allocated to the institution in proportion to enrollment and to the level and cost of the academic
programs it offers. Details of the formula are given on the University’s web site
(http://www.unr.edu/vpaf/pba/budget/fundformula.html).
The university administration sets the non-grant portion of academic unit budgets in consultation
with the Deans and Vice Presidents. Tuition and fees are not returned directly to the units that
generate them, but are part of the pool of funds available to the administration to meet the
university’s operating expenses. Faculty salaries are the largest component of the state funds
allocated to units. This sector of the budget is dictated by the number and rank of occupied
faculty positions allocated to the unit in a given fiscal year. Tenure-line faculty positions in the
School of Community Health Sciences are fully state-supported, so state funding for these
positions supports teaching, research, and service activities. Classified staff positions are handled
similarly in that the number of state-supported positions is determined by the university
administration in proportion to the number of faculty positions. Funds for staff positions are also
allocated annually according to the job title and seniority of the incumbents. The University also
allocates funds for general operations, including equipment, supplies, communications, travel,
and student recruitment. Annual operating budgets are typically based on the budgets for
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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


previous years.
Funds for graduate assistantships are provided by the Graduate School. The number of full-time
equivalent assistantships allocated to each academic program is determined by the Dean of the
Graduate School and is typically based on allocations in past years. However, the School of
Community Health Sciences has the option to split fulltime assistantships into full- and half-time
positions.
Additional funds for instructional support and special projects are provided by the Office of the
Vice President for Health Sciences on request from the School. At the beginning of each
academic year, the School submits an estimate of the number of credit hours to be taught by
temporary and contract faculty and a budget based on this estimate and a standard contract rate
set by the university. These requests are routinely granted. The School Director may occasionally
request other funds from the Vice President. This process was used, for example, to equip a
video conference facility that can be used for meetings and distance education.

1.6.b. A clearly formulated program budget statement, showing sources of all available
funds and expenditures by major categories, since the last accreditation visit or for the last
five years, which is longer. If the program does not have a separate budget, it must present
an estimate of available funds and expenditures by major category and explain the basis of
the estimate.
The MPH Program does not have a budget separate from the School of Community Health
Sciences. The School has an annual budget of approximately $2.2 million, including university
funds, grants and indirect-cost recovery. University funds are the largest component, totaling
approximately $1.6 million in the current fiscal year, including $1.3 million for faculty salaries,
$64,000 for staff salaries, $39,000 for general operations, $30,000 for instructional support and
$70,000 for graduate student stipends. Grant income in the last 5 years ranged from $262,000 in
2005-2006 to about 2.8 million in 2007-2008. Indirect cost receipts on faculty grants generate
income averaging $5,000-7,000 per year. In addition, the University provided research startup
funds to new faculty supporting the Public Health Program. The School does not receive a direct
appropriation from the state or a share of tuition and fees and does not have an endowment. No
direct gifts were received in the past 5 years.
From the preceding revenues, the School provided support to the program ranging from about
$700,000 in 2005-2006 to about $968,000 in 2008-2009, the last year with complete data. Note
that data on revenues and expenses for the 2010 fiscal year were incomplete as of this writing, so
these amounts may be underestimated. Program expenditures include: the portions of faculty and
staff salaries and operating funds devoted to supporting the Program; graduate assistantships
allocated to MPH students; instructional support funds for contract faculty teaching courses to
MPH students, and grants and contracts that contribute to the program. Estimates of these
amounts in the last 5 years are shown in Table 1.6.b.




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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Table 1.6.b. (Template A) Sources of Funds and Expenditures by Major Category, Fiscal
Years 2005 to 2009.
                         2009-2010       2008-2009      2007-2008        2006-2007      2005-2006
Source of Funds
Tuition & Fees         0               0              0                 0              0
State Appropriation 0                  0              0                 0              0
University Funds       849,473         960,344        928,792           880,071        766,649
Grants/Contracts       488,532         1,362,980      2,776,329         410,021        262,545
Indirect Cost          4,912           7,408          4,090             5,404          6,036
Recovery
Endowment              0               0              0                 0              0
Gifts                  0               0              0                 0              0
Other (explain)        0               0              0                 0              0
Expenditures
Faculty Salaries &     821,451         848,590        770,844           709,940        681,990
Benefits1
Staff Salaries &       15,126          12,107         8,424             7,933          5,320
         2
Benefits
Operations3            12,361          20,377         9,700             7,941          10,039
Travel                 0               0              1,223             257            881
Student Support        106,850         89,332         163,538           94,665         81,084
University Tax         0               0              0                 0              0
Equipment              0               0              0                 0              0
Other: Contract        2,445           0              0                 0              0
Faculty
Other: Faculty         0               87,000         66,200            70,000         0
Startups
Notes:
1. Faculty salaries and benefits estimated from the proportion of total faculty FTE dedicated to
    the program
2. Staff salaries and benefits estimated from the proportion of staff effort dedicated to
    supporting the program.
3. Operating costs for the program are estimated to be 25% of the total cost of operations for the
    School of Community Health Sciences plus program-specific expenses (e.g., student
    recruitment, accreditation)

The revenues and expenditures shown in Table 1.6.b were estimated as follows: the portion of
faculty salaries supporting the Program was estimated using the data on faculty effort that we
used to construct Tables 1.6.e and 4.1.a (below); staff effort in support of the Program was
estimated from position descriptions submitted to the university personnel system, and operating
costs are proportional to the faculty and staff effort allocated to the program, plus program-
specific expenditures, such as graduate student recruiting and accreditation-related fees. The
grant and contract funds and income from indirect cost recovery correspond to the grants and
contracts listed in table 4.1.c. and are considered to support the Program. Note that grant
expenditures for costs other than graduate research assistantships are not included in Table 1.6.b,
so program revenues and expenses may not add. The budgeted and expended amounts shown for
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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


contract faculty supporting the program and for student support are the actual amounts, rather
than estimates.
State support for the program has remained fairly constant over the past 5 years. Although a
number of new faculty members have been hired, others have retired or left the University, so
there has not been a net increase. The amounts budgeted for operations have been essentially flat
for the past 5 years, but as a result of state budget shortfalls the state operating budget was
retroactively reduced by 5% in fiscal 2009 and in fiscal 2010 mandatory furloughs were imposed
for classified staff and untenured faculty. In contrast, funding from grants and contracts has
increased substantially, from about $260,000 in 2005-06 to over $1.3 million in 2008-9 (the last
year with complete data).

1.6.c. If the program is a collaborative one sponsored by two or more universities, the
budget statement must make clear the financial contributions of each sponsoring university
to the overall program budget. This should be accompanied by a description of how tuition
and other income is shared, including indirect cost returns for research generated by
public health program faculty who may have their primary appointment elsewhere.
Not applicable.

1.6.d. A concise statement or chart concerning the number (headcount) of core faculty
employed by the program as of fall for each of the last three years.

Table 1.6.d. Headcount of Faculty with Research Responsibilities and Total Faculty Count
Type of Faculty                  2007-2008               2008-2009             2009-2010
Faculty with Research                16                     14                      16
Responsibilities
Total Faculty (with                  19                     17                      20
Research/Teaching/Other
Responsibilities)*
*Includes the Director of the Nevada Center for Ethics and Health Policy (Hardwick; SCHS
faculty) who provides web and recruitment support for the School but does not contribute to the
faculty FTE for the MPH program through teaching or research and therefore is not reflected in
other faculty tables.

1.6.e. A table showing faculty, students, and student/faculty ratios, organized by specialty
area, for each of the last three years. These data must be presented in table format and
include at least: a) headcount of primary faculty who support the teaching programs, b)
FTE conversion of faculty based on % time or % salary support devoted to the
instructional programs, c) headcount of other faculty involved in the teaching programs
(adjunct, part-time, secondary appointments, etc), d) FTE conversion of other faculty
based on estimate of % time commitment, e) total headcount of core faculty plus other
faculty, f) total FTE of core and other faculty, g) headcount of students in department or
program area, h) FTE conversion of students, based on 9 or more credits per semester as
full-time, i) student FTE divided by regular faculty FTE and j) student FTE divided by
total faculty FTE, including other. All programs must provide data for a), b) and i) and
may provide data for c), d) and j) depending on whether the program intends to include the
contributions of other faculty in its FTE calculations.

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Table 1.6.e. (Template B) Faculty, Students and Student/Faculty Ratios by Specialty Area
                    HC Core FTEF HC                FTEF Total             Total       HC        FTE          SFR by        SFR by Total
                    Faculty     Core Other         Other Faculty          FTEF        Students Students Core               FTEF
                                         Faculty              HC                                             FTEF
    1) Academic Year 2007-2008
MPH –               8           7.8      1         1          9           8.8            10        9.56      1.23          1.09
Epidemiology
MPH --              9           6.97 0             0          9           6.97           9         6.83      .98           .98
Social/Behavioral
Health
    2) Academic Year 2008-2009
MPH –               8           8.0      1         .4         9           8.4            16       12.72      1.59          1.51
Epidemiology
MPH --              8           5.5      0         0          8           5.5            11        9.17      1.66          1.66
Social/Behavioral
Health
    3) Academic Year 2009-2010
MPH –               8           8.0      0         8.0        8           8.0            20       15.06      1.88          1.88
Epidemiology
MPH --              11          7.2      1         .43        12          7.63           18       11.22      1.56          1.47
Social/Behavioral
Health
* Faculty FTE was calculated by dividing the number of hours spent supporting the MPH program (advising students, serving on
student committees, preparing for and teaching courses, research activities and service activities) by the total hours in a work week (40
hours). Where this number is > .5 = 1 FTE.
Student FTE was calculated as full-time if enrolled in at least 18 credits during the academic year or 12 credits if employed as a
graduate assistant.

Key:
       HC = Head Count                                                          FTEF = Full-time-equivalent faculty
       Core = full-time faculty who support the teaching                        Other = adjunct, part-time and secondary faculty
       programs                                                                 Total = Core + Other
       FTE = Full-time-equivalent                                               SFR = Student/Faculty Ratio

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


1.6.f. A concise statement or chart concerning the availability of other personnel
(administration and staff).
The School has two full-time administrative assistants who provide support for academic
programs, in addition to other duties. Bonnie Coker is the assistant to the MPH Program
Director. In that role, she records the transactions of the Graduate Program Committee,
processes applications to the MPH program, and assists in scheduling graduate courses. Ms.
Coker is also Assistant to the School of Community Health Sciences Director and has primary
responsibility for maintaining the School’s financial accounts. Tara Burrows performs additional
support functions for the program, including processing graduate assistant time sheets and
payments for student stipends, and maintaining files on students and alumni. Both
administrative assistants and a part-time student employee provide other support as needed,
including general office functions.

1.6.g. A concise statement or chart concerning amount of space available to the program by
purpose (offices, classrooms, common space for student use, etc.), by program and location.
The Program has access to approximately 9700 sq. ft of administrative, faculty and research
office space in the Lombardi Center on the main UNR campus. Details are shown in Table
1.6.g. and a brief description follows.

Table 1.6.g. Office, research and classroom space currently assigned to the SCHS
Description                         Number Area (sq ft) Notes
Lombardi Recreation Center
Faculty office with window             14        1820      Average size 130 sq ft
Faculty office without window          2          325
Director’s office                      1          204
Administrative offices                 2          520
Grad student office                    1          228      9 workstations
Conference room, 20 seats              1          361      Rm. 202
Common/work room                       1          306
Lecture room, 70 seats                 1         1596      Rm. 205
Classroom, 40 seats                    1          720      Rm. 204
Seminar room, 15 seats                 1          385      Rm. 214b
Research/LOA offices                   5          750      Average size 150 sq ft
Informatics Center                     1          280
Human subjects facility                1         1260
Exercise physiology lab                1          866
Subotal                                          9621
Applied Research Facility
Environmental health lab               1         1000      ARF 315
Survey research lab                    1         1100      ARF 205
Mackay Science
Center for Program Evaluation                    1000
Center for Ethics & Health Policy                1000
Total                                           12,171


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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Office and Administrative Space. Every full-time academic faculty member has a private office
of approximately 130 sq. ft. with a telephone and networked personal computer with standard
software. An administrative suite totaling 1100 sq. ft. includes offices for the School Director,
two administrative assistants and part-time student workers, and a staff work room. A 400 sq. ft.
conference room with computer projection and video-conferencing capabilities is available for
meetings and seminars. UNR IT provides timely administrative support for all technology issues
including during emergencies.
Research Space. Five offices of about 150 sq. ft. each are available in the Lombardi Center for
sponsored research projects. These offices typically provide work space for grant-supported
graduate assistants. In addition to the preceding space in the Lombardi building, two affiliated
centers, the Center for Program Evaluation, and the Nevada Center for Ethics and Health Policy,
occupy approximately 2000 sq. ft. in the Mackay Science building on the southern part of the
main campus. Research laboratories are described below in section h.
Classroom Space. Three classrooms are available to the program in the Lombardi building:
Room 204 (capacity 38 students), room 205 (capacity 70 students), and room 214b (capacity 15
students). Both of the larger rooms are “smart classrooms” equipped with networked computers
connected to the internet, LCD projectors and document cameras. The School’s computer- and
video-equipped conference room may also be utilized for teaching, including for distance
learning. Classrooms in the Lombardi building are shared with the School’s undergraduate
program and may be requested by other campus units when not in use. Recent growth in both
the MPH program and undergraduate enrollment have increased the demand for instructional
space, leading to some challenges in scheduling classes. Many graduate courses are offered in
the evening to meet the needs of working professionals, and this also helps to ease the pressure
on classroom space, and classes have also been scheduled in other university buildings. The
School currently does not have its own instructional computer laboratory, but several such
facilities are available on campus and are utilized for epidemiology and biostatistics courses.
Although the use of other campus space has made it possible to accommodate the need for more
course sections, it reduces efficiency because of the increase in travel time for faculty and
students.
Student Areas. State-supported graduate assistants have assigned carrels in a shared 250 sq. ft.
office with 9 workstations. No other dedicated work space is available for graduate students who
are not employed as research or teaching assistants. A common area (approximately 850 sq. ft.)
with tables and chairs is provided on the second floor of the building, and students have very
convenient access to the new Joe Crowley Student Union, which offers study space, restaurants,
a bookstore and a convenience store, and to the IGT-Matheson Knowledge Center which has
extensive areas for study and research.
The Program’s current space in the Lombardi Center is largely adequate for current needs, but it
is being utilized to full capacity, with very limited opportunity for future expansion. More
graduate student work space and a computer teaching lab are needed and access to additional
classroom space is desirable. The University’s plans currently call for the School of Community
Health Sciences to move to new, large space after the 2010-2011 academic year, when several
new buildings are scheduled to open.



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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


1.6.h. A concise statement or floor plan concerning laboratory space, including kind,
quantity and special features or special equipment.
Laboratory space is available to the program in the Lombardi Center and in the adjacent Applied
Research Facility (ARF). A human subjects facility used for clinical research is located on the
ground floor of the Lombardi building. This laboratory is approximately 1200 sq. ft., including a
private room for interviewing or examinations, and is equipped with clinical manipulation tables,
a GE Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometer for measuring body composition, a Precor treadmill,
and a Cosmed K4b2 portable metabolic system. An exercise physiology laboratory, also located
in Lombardi, is used primarily for undergraduate teaching. A 320 sq. ft. lab the 2 nd floor of
Lombardi is houses facilities for statistical data analysis used by the Nevada Center for Health
Statistics and Informatics. The lab has 6 computer work stations and a 16 TB memory size data
analysis server.
In the ARF, the School of Community Health Sciences controls a 1000 sq. ft. research laboratory
that support activities relating to translational medicine, environmental and cellular physiology,
histopathology, molecular biology, environmental toxicology, cell / tissue culture, and algal
aquaculture. Specialized equipment is available for use by researchers in the School, the Division
of Health Sciences, and other researchers in the UNR community, on a collaborative basis.
Research equipment maintained in the ARF ab includes: Microscopy- Zeiss Axioplan 2 imaging
upright fluorescence microscope with Axiocam HRc high-speed camera and Axiovision 4.8
image processing software; Zeiss Axiovert 25 inverted fluorescence microscope with Axiocam
MRc high-speed camera and Axiovision 4.8 image processing software; Nikon SMZ-2T
dissecting scope with Sony color camera; Custom-built three-channel confocal microscope based
on Zeiss Axioplan 2 imaging upright microscope, with laser excitation lines at 488, 532, and
635nm. Electrophysiology- Patch clamp workstation based on Zeiss Axiovert 40CFL stand,
with Siskiyou 4-axis micromanipulator, Axon Axopatch 200B and 1D amplifiers, and Axon
1200 / Clampex 8 A/D converter and data processing software; Vascular contractility
workstation with (4) Radnoti tissue baths, WPI TBM-4 transbridge, and custom National
Instruments Labview data interface; Tissue clamp / stimulation workstation with Olympus
dissecting scope, Grass S48 stimulators, Axon Geneclamp 500 amplifier, and Axon 1200 /
Clampex 8 A/D converter and data processing software. Molecular Biology / Cell Culture-
Cepheid SmartCycler four-color real-time quantitative PCR system; Applied Biosystems 7500
four-color real-time quantitative PCR system, Alpha Innotech gel imaging workstation; Esco
Class IIIb biosafety hood, liquid nitrogen storage, stacking Heraeus HeraCell incubators, -80C
freezers, Zeiss Invertoskop inverted cell culture inspection microscope, numerous agarose,
PAGE, and Western blot electrophoresis setups. Histopathology- Shandon 620 cryostat;
Shandon Hypercenter XP tissue processing station. Aquaculture equipment- (2) Braun Biotech /
Sartorius Biostat B fermenters / custom photobioreactors supporting 2L and 5L culture vessels;
(1) Braun Biotech / Sartorius Biostat i fermenter / custom photobioreactor, supporting 2 x 10L
culture vessels; B. Braun Biostat M 1L fermenter; B. Braun Biostat E 15L stainless steel
fermenter system. Analytical equipment- Tecan Ultra384 fluorescence / luminescence /
absorbance plate reader; Shimadzu UV-1601 UV-Vis Absorbance spectrophotometer; Cahn
microbalance, various analytical balances, pH meters, and other miscellaneous equipment.
Also in ARF, is laboratory space for survey research and analysis of statistical data that is
occupied by the Nevada Center for Health Statistics and Informatics. This includes an 800 sq. ft.
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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


data collection and survey lab in the Applied Research Facility, which has work areas, meeting
space and 5 workstations equipped with PCs and software for Computer Assisted Telephone
Interview functions.

1.6.i. A concise statement concerning the amount, location and types of computer facilities
and resources for students, faculty, administration and staff.
All full-time administrators, faculty and staff have their own dedicated, networked computer
workstations. Two high-speed networked printers are available in the Lombardi Building and
most faculty members also have local printers. All faculty and staff computers are connected to
the Internet and are equipped with standard software for communication, word processing and
data analysis. The University has site licenses for numerous software packages for such
specialized tasks as statistical analysis, as well for general office use, and these are available for
faculty, staff and students at no or reduced cost. The University also provides free email service
to employees and students. University-owned computers and software are maintained by the
University’s Information Technology staff at no cost to the Program.
Computing facilities are available to students in several locations on campus. Graduate research
and teaching assistants have access to a student office with 8 networked workstations on the
second floor of the Lombardi Building. Graduate assistants working on research projects usually
have access to additional computers in faculty research offices and laboratories.

In addition to the School’s on-site facilities, a fully equipped, state-of-the-art computer
laboratory is available to students in the adjacent IGT-Matheson Knowledge Center.
There are more than 66 public and departmental computer labs across campus. All computers on
the UNR domain require a login and can connect to the campus network by cable or wireless.
Computers vary from basic desktop workstations and checkout laptops to high-end systems for
research and special projects. All computers supported by the campus IT staff are purchased
through approved vendors, run the latest operating systems and security software, and receive
regular maintenance at the start of each semester. Faculty, staff and administration office
computers are available through the department or campus replacement program.
All students, faculty, staff, administration and guests have access to standard IT user support
through a centralized Help Desk in the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center. The Help Desk is
available by phone, email and a walk-up counter. Service requests that cannot be resolved
immediately are recorded and maintained in an electronic work order system. Information on IT
supported systems and user support, plus self-help documentation is available on the UNR IT
website at http://www.it.unr.edu

1.6.j. A concise statement of library/information resources available for program use,
including description of library capabilities in providing digital (electronic) content, access
mechanisms and guidance in using them, and document delivery services.
The scope of the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center reaches far beyond its 295,000-square-foot
size. As the pace of innovation and intellectual growth continues to flourish at the University, the
Knowledge Center is uniquely positioned as one of the most technologically advanced university
libraries in the country, providing the discovery, acquisition, and access to diverse forms of
knowledge that the University’s students and faculty need. Building highlights include:

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


automated book retrieval system; reading rooms and quiet study-areas; computing laboratories
and large format printing; wireless network and computer access throughout; smart classrooms
and conference rooms.
Resources. The collection contains more than 1 million volumes of books and journals, 23,000-
plus e-journals and more than 50,000 e-books. Plus, hundreds of general and specialized research
databases available online. More specifically, the collection boasts more than 600 electronic
journal subscriptions relating to public health and many, many more general health sciences
titles. The University of Nevada Savitt Medical Library (located just north of the School) has
designated funds with which to purchase new titles in public health.

Guidance. Research and Computing Help Desk: Recognizing the synergy between information
and technology, the Knowledge Center has consolidated library research and computing help
into a single service point. The pooled expertise of library and information technology
professionals aids library users in eliminating obstacles to access, empowering them with the
tools and skills they will require to navigate the complex web of knowledge to which the
Knowledge Center hopes to function as a gateway. Library staff also provide assistance via
phone, email and chat services to give students, faculty and staff a broad range of service
options.

Library Services Desk. Continuing the theme of one-stop shopping, a single counter pulls
together the related, yet often separated, roles of circulation, electronic reserves, and document
delivery services.

@One Desk. The @One desk is staffed by both library and technical staff available to field any
question that a computer lab user might have.

Other Instructional Assistance. Subject-specialist librarians are available upon request to provide
one-on-one and in-class instruction in their areas of expertise.

Delivery Services: LINK+. LINK+ is a combined catalog of over 5 million unique books from
participating libraries throughout California and Nevada. Users from member libraries
electronically request an item not available in their own library and it is delivered to them for
check out. Items usually arrive within 4 days and there is no charge to UNR faculty, students and
staff to request or borrow LINK+ materials.

Document Delivery Services. When library materials are not available in the University of
Nevada, Reno Libraries, library users may request those items through Document Delivery
Services. This service supplies books not available through LINK+ and articles not owned by the
University Libraries. This service is provided free of charge to UNR faculty, students and staff.

Access mechanisms. Currently enrolled UNR students, faculty or staff members are eligible for
off-campus access to licensed resources upon providing necessary identification. Wireless
network and computer access is available throughout the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center.

1.6.k. A concise statement describing community resources available for instruction,
research and service, indicating those where formal agreements exist.

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The School has an extensive network of relationships with organizations that provide
opportunities for instruction, research and service. The school has a formal contract, which is
renewed annually, with the Washoe County Health District to facilitate student field placements
and other collaborations. Agreements with other organizations are typically made on an ad hoc
basis for the duration of specific projects.
The School is committed to collaborating with community organizations to fulfill its mission of
teaching, research and service. The School seeks external partnerships at local, state, national,
and global levels. Community‐based collaboration with the School takes a variety of forms
including invited lecturers, opportunities for summer study abroad programs,
community‐engaged research, service‐learning opportunities, community advisory board, and
student field placement.
The Washoe County District Health Department is located less than a mile from the university
and the Nevada State Health Division is located 30 miles away in Carson City, NV. There are
also a number of county health districts in the Eastern Sierra which is just across the state
boarder in California. The Health Officer from Nevada County, California is a member of the
School’s Advisory Board.
The students and faculty are involved with many community agencies in the Reno/Sparks area.
There are also opportunities for students to be exposed to rural settings in Nevada. For example,
an MPH student did a field studies placement through the Quentin Burdick Rural
Interdisciplinary Training Program in which she worked with multi-disciplinary teams in Fallon,
Nevada. Also, students in the toxic communities class have traveled to rural communities in
which mining sites are located to interview residents.
Public health personnel from the Washoe County District Health Department have served as
guest lecturers in almost every MPH course. Other public health guest speakers include
professionals from the Nevada State Health Division, area hospitals, the State Division of Aging
Services, Planned Parenthood, and MPH alumni. Guest lecturers are also frequently used in
undergraduate courses to expose newer students to public health practice. Public health
professionals, especially from the Washoe County District Health Department, have served as
course instructors and are members of the school’s affiliate and adjunct faculty. Community
affiliate faculty members have served on faculty search committees. Grants and contracts for
research and service with the community are described in section 3.2.b.
1.6.l. A concise statement of the amount and source of “in-kind” academic contributions
available for instruction, research and service, indicating where formal agreements exist.
The School faculty have sufficient time in their workload to fulfill our mission, which includes
teaching courses, mentoring students, and conducting research. Therefore, “in-kind” academic
contributions have not been extensively needed for the School. All internship supervisors
provide preceptor support to students without cost although many sites provide a student stipend
and formal agreements for this support exist. Graduate assistant positions have been available to
MPH students at locations which include UNR’s Gerontology Academic Program, Sanford
Center for Aging, the Center for the Application of Substance Abuse Technologies, Department
of Nutrition, School of Nursing, School of Medicine, and Center for Ethics and Health Policy.
Faculty throughout the university, but especially adjunct and affiliate faculty, serve on MPH
students' culminating committees. The university also has teaching and research grants available.

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In Spring 2010, $6,000 was offered to faculty who wanted to develop online delivery formats for
required MPH courses.

1.6.m. Identification of outcome measures by which the program may judge the adequacy
of its resources, along with data regarding the program’s performance against those
measures for each of the last three years. At a minimum, the program must provide data
on institutional expenditures per full-time-equivalent student, research dollars per full-
time-equivalent faculty, and extramural funding (service or training) as a percent of the
total budget.
Table 1.6.m. Selected Outcome Measures for Program Resources.
Outcome Measure          2007-2008                 2008-2009                2009-2010
Expenditures per FTE $62,228.74                    $48,305.44               $36,462.44
Student
Research Dollars per     $173,520.56               $97,355.71               $30,533.35
FTE Faculty*
Extramural Funding       N/A                       15%                      25%
(service/training) per
Total Budget**
*Only includes FTE for faculty who have research responsibilities. In addition, includes only
those grants which contribute to program budget (e.g., direct and indirect costs received by
School). Does not include grants in which faculty are project personnel or Co-Investigators and
funding is housed in another department. Grants in which faculty are project personnel or Co-
Investigators are included in the School’s objectives data which explains why those figures may
be higher.
**These percentages are calculated using grants awarded in the study years that have a service
component divided by the total budget for that year.

1.6.n. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is met. The Program has sufficient resources to support its activities.

Strengths
       Increasing grant support in the past 5 years.
       University funds to support graduate assistants.
       University funds for new faculty startups.
       More than the minimum faculty FTE in each specialty area.
       State of the art campus library facilities.
Suggested Improvements
       Impact of state budget cuts.
       Limited physical space.
       Consider options to develop an alumni giving program and endowments.




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2.0 Instructional Programs

2.1 Master of Public Health Degree. The program shall offer instructional programs
reflecting its stated mission and goals, leading to the Master of Public Health (MPH) or
equivalent professional masters degree. The program may offer a generalist MPH degree
or and MPH with areas of specialization. The program, depending upon how it defines the
unit of accreditation, may offer other degrees, professional and academic, if consistent with
its mission and resources.

2.1.a. An instructional matrix (see Table 2.1.a., Template C) presenting all of the program’s
degree programs and areas of specialization, including undergraduate, masters and
doctoral degrees, as appropriate. If multiple areas of specialization are available, these
should be included. The matrix should distinguish between professional and academic
degrees and identify any programs that are offered in distance learning or other formats.
Non-degree programs, such as certificates or continuing education, should not be included
in matrix.

Table 2.1.a. (Template C) Instructional Matrix – Degree/Specialization.
                                                          Academic                 Professional
Master of Public Health - Social/Behavioral Health                                      X
Master of Public Health - Epidemiology                                                  X
Joint Degrees
MD/MPH                                                                                  X

In addition to the degrees and specializations in Table 2.1.a., there are five students in other
emphases which are not being submitted for accreditation review at this time. Due to a loss of
faculty, we are no longer accepting students in health ethics, policy, and administration (3
students currently enrolled who were accepted previously) and environmental/occupational
health (1 student enrolled previously accepted). There is 1 student previously accepted to the
joint Master of Science in Nursing/MPH degree program. However, we are not accepting
students into this degree at this time because the curriculum is being updated (see Section 2.10
Joint Degrees).

In collaboration with the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) School of Community Health
Sciences, we offer a joint PhD in environmental and occupational health. There is one student
enrolled in this program. This program is currently not taking students and is not being submitted
for accreditation review.

2.1.b. The bulletin or other official publication, which describes all curricula offered by the
program. If the university does not publish a bulletin or other official publications, the
program must provide for each degree and are of specialization identified in the
instructional matrix a printed description of the curriculum, including a list of required
courses and their course description.
Epidemiology Description. Epidemiology, the fundamental science underlying public health, is
the study of the distribution and determinants of health and diseases, morbidity, injuries,
disability, and mortality in populations. The epidemiology concentration is designed for students

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seeking to acquire skills necessary for careers in descriptive and analytic epidemiology. Students
enrolled in this area of emphasis will acquire the methodologic skills necessary to study a wide
range of public health issues including: infectious disease, chronic disease, health care delivery,
social and behavioral health, environmental health, and occupational health. Concentration
courses emphasize basic and advanced epidemiologic principles and their application to current
problems in public health and related disciplines. Students in the epidemiology concentration are
expected to use appropriate methods to plan, implement, and conduct epidemiologic research.
Students are also expected to critically evaluate research methodology to assess validity and
potential sources of bias. Students receive applied analysis training using common statistical
packages and opportunities to analyze, interpret, and disseminate the results of epidemiologic
investigations.

       http://hhs.unr.edu/schs//epi.html
       http://hhs.unr.edu/schs/mph_epi_prog.html

Social and Behavioral Health Description. Social and behavioral health examines the
psychological, behavioral, social, cultural, and institutional factors that affect individual and
population health. The social and behavioral health MPH concentration is designed for students
interested in health promotion, health education, and the prevention and reduction of health
disparities over the life course. Social/behavioral health researchers and practitioners solve
public health problems through public health policy, services, and interventions at the individual,
family, community, and societal level. In their concentration courses, students are trained to
apply health promotion and behavior change theories to design, implement, and evaluate public
health policies and programs.

       http://hhs.unr.edu/schs//soc_behav_health.html
       http://hhs.unr.edu/schs/mphsbh_prog.html

MD/MPH Degree.           http://www.cis.unr.edu/ecatalog/default.aspx?article_list_id=22379

Course Descriptions. http://www.ss.unr.edu/records/catalog//?prefix=CHS

2.1.c. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is met.

Strengths
       The MD/MPH provides a model for future collaboration with other departments (e.g.,
       business).

Suggested Improvements
      Review course and curricular descriptions on UNR website regularly for accuracy and
      completeness.




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2.2 Program Length. An MPH degree program or equivalent professional master’s degree
must be at least 42 semester credit units in length.

The MPH program is 43 credits for both the epidemiology and social/behavioral health
emphases. The program length was approved by the appropriate UNR curricular committees in
Spring 2006 for students entering the program Fall 2006. One student was admitted in the Spring
2006 semester when the revisions were occurring but she completed the 43-credit epidemiology
emphasis. Prior to that time, the MPH program was 39 credits.

2.2.a. Definition of a credit with regard to classroom/contact hours.

According to official policy from UNR’s Office of the Provost and as explained in the UNR
catalog: “Described in semester credit hours, a credit is defined as three hours of work per week
for one semester. Usually this work is made up of one period in class plus two hours of
preparation for lecture-seminar classes, or three hours of laboratory classes.” This definition is
available on the UNR catalog website at:
http://www.cis.unr.edu/ecatalog/Default.aspx?article_list_id=16188. Therefore, a course with 3
hours of lecture per week during a 15-16 week semester is equated with 3 student credit hours.

2.2.b. Information about the minimum degree requirements for all professional degree
curricula shown in the instructional matrix. If the program or university uses a unit of
academic credit or an academic term different than the standard semester or quarter, this
should be explained and an equivalency presented in a table or narrative.

Tables 2.2.b.1. and 2.2.b.2. summarize the minimum requirements for the MPH professional
degree, with emphases in epidemiology and social/behavioral health. The degree requires 13
credits of core courses and 30 credits each in the two emphases. Hence, the MPH degree
Program conforms to accepted standards regarding program length and objectives of the
credentials. Students in the dual MD/MPH program must choose to complete either the
epidemiology or social/behavioral health emphasis.

Table 2.2.b.1 Master of Public Health Program Curriculum, Epidemiology Option (43
credit hours)
MPH Core             CHS 700R – Research Methods for Public Health (1)
(21 hours)           CHS 701 – Social and Behavioral Dimensions of Health (3)
                     CHS 712 – Epidemiology in Public Health (3)
                     CHS 725 – Health and the Environment (3)
                     CHS 755 – Health Policy and Administration (3)
                     CHS 780 – Biostatistics in Public Health (3)
Epidemiology         CHS 703R – Applied Health Data Analysis (3)
Required Courses     CHS 708 – Epidemiology II (4)
(12 hours)           CHS 709R – Epidemiologic Research Design and Planning (2)
                     CHS 753 – Health Informatics (3)
Practicum (6 hours) CHS 694 – Field Studies in Public Health (6)
Capstone (3 hours) CHS 695R – MPH Capstone (3)
Electives (students  CHS 661 – Global Health (3)
choose 6 hours       CHS 706 – Social Epidemiology (3)
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from the following)     CHS 707 – HIV/AIDS Epidemiology (3)
                        CHS 722 – Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases (3)
                        CHS 723 – Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases (3)
                        CHS 724 – Environmental Epidemiology (3)
                        CHS 735 – Exposure Assessment and Control (3)
                        CHS 739 – Cancer Epidemiology (3)
                        CHS 740 – Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease (3)
                        CHS 742 – Epidemiology of Tropical Diseases (3)
                        CHS 748 – Epidemiologic Surveillance (3)
                        CHS 749 – Outbreak Investigation (3)
                        CHS 781 – Environmental and Occupational Risk Assessment (3)
                        CHS 782 – Analysis of Categorical Data (3)
                        CHS 783R – Regression and Multivariant Analysis in Health Sciences (3)
                        CHS 784 – Conduct and Analysis of Clinical Trials (3)
                        EAB 725 – Infectious Disease Epidemiology (online UNLV) (3)
                        EAB 745 – Epidemiological Surveillance (online UNLV) (3)


Table 2.2.b.2. Master of Public Health Program Curriculum, Social and Behavioral Health
Option (43 credit hours)
MPH Core             CHS 700R – Research Methods for Public Health (1)
(21 hours)           CHS 701 – Social and Behavioral Dimensions of Health (3)
                     CHS 712 – Epidemiology in Public Health (3)
                     CHS 725 – Health and the Environment (3)
                     CHS 755 – Health Policy and Administration (3)
                     CHS 780 – Biostatistics in Public Health (3)
Social and           CHS 705 – Theoretical Foundations of Health Promotion (3)
Behavioral Health    CHS 720 – Program Planning and Grant Writing (3)
Required Courses     CHS 721 – Program Evaluation in Public Health (3)
(12 hours)           CHS 746 – Cultural Diversity in Public Health (3)
Practicum (6 hours) CHS 694 – Field Studies in Public Health (6)
Capstone (3 hours) CHS 695R – MPH Capstone (3)
Electives (students  CHS 605 – Spirituality and Health (3)
choose 6 hours       CHS 626 – Medical Anthropology (3)
from the following) CHS 627 – Toxic Communities and Public Health (3)
                     CHS 639 – Cross-Cultural Perspectives and Health (3)
                     CHS 648 – Research Ethics in Public Health (3)
                     CHS 660 – Disability Issues in Public Health (3)
                     CHS 661 – Global Health (3)
                     CHS 676 – AIDS: Psychosocial and Healthcare Concerns (3)
                     CHS 706 – Social Epidemiology (3)
                     CHS 707 – HIV/AIDS Epidemiology (3)
                     CHS 710 – Health Behavior Change (3)
                     CHS 711 – Advocacy in Health Promotion (3)
                     CHS 738 – Public Health and Aging (3)
                     CHS 791 – Seminar: Health Communication (3)


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                         ECON 620 – Economics of Health Care and Health Policy (3)
                         EDSP 632 – Serving Individuals with Disabilities and their Families (3)
                         EDUC 753 – Advanced Qualitative Methods (3)
                         Human Development & Family Studies (HDFS) 637 – Death and Dying:
                         Family and Lifespan Perspectives (3)
                         HDFS 638 – Children and Families in a Multiethnic Society (3)
                         HDFS 658 – Families and Public Policy (3)
                         HIST 690B – Social History of Medicine in Modern Era (3)
                         NURS 630 – Aging and Health (3)
                         NUTR 720 – Public Health Nutrition (3)
                         NUTR 725 – Nutrition and Health (3)
                         PSY 641 – Abnormal Psychology (3)
                         PSY 642 – Psychology of Aging (3)
                         PSY 644 – Psychology of Exceptional Children (3)
                         PSY 748 – Community Psychology (3)
                         SOC 657 – Society and Health (3)
                         SOC 737 – Survey Research Methods (3)
                         SW 741 – Advanced Research – Data Collection and Analysis (3)

2.2c. Information about the number of MPH degrees awarded for less than 42 semester
credit units, or equivalent, over each of the last three years. A summary of the reasons
should be included.

No student in either the epidemiology or social/behavioral health emphasis has graduated with
less than 43 credits. Twelve students completing the discontinued generalist emphasis graduated
with 39 credits (Table 2.2.c.). Two students completed the dual nursing MSN/MPH which only
required 18 public health credits at that time. It is no longer an option to complete the MPH
degree with less than 43 credits. The dual MSN/MPH is currently being revised and no students
are being accepted into that emphasis until the curriculum has been updated.

       Table 2.2.c. Students Graduating with fewer than 43 credits
                         Generalist Program    MSN/MPH
       2007 – 2008       8                     1
       2008 – 2009       4                     1
       2009 – 2010       0                     0
       TOTAL             12                    2

There are two students (one in the generalist emphasis and one in the dual emphasis with
nursing) accepted under the previous curricula of fewer than 43 credits remaining in the program
who plan to graduate in August 2010.

2.2.d. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.



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Strengths
       Minimum requirements for the MPH degree are set forth and well publicized in
       university and program materials.
       The program meets the accepted standards for program length. No students in
       epidemiology or social/behavioral health have graduated with less than 43 credits and all
       active degree programs meet the criteria.
       Students are exposed to a solid core of public health coursework and have a variety of
       reviewed and approved options for electives across campus.

Suggested Improvements
      Develop additional program materials to assist in recruiting students and increase
      information sources about the program for existing students.




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 2.3 Public Health Core Knowledge. All professional degree students must demonstrate an
 understanding of the public health core knowledge.

 MPH students develop a broad understanding of public health through a series of required MPH
 core courses. Tables 2.3.a.1 and 2 contain the course numbers and titles for the core courses.
 These courses correspond to the five specialty areas of knowledge basic to public health
 (biostatistics, environmental/occupational health, epidemiology, health policy/administration and
 social/behavioral health). In addition, all students are required to complete a 1-credit research
 methods course. An overall grade point average of 3.0 is required for completion of the degree.
 To ensure competency in core public health knowledge, a grade of B- or higher is required for
 credit to be awarded in the core courses.

 The academic departments and the MPH faculty developed areas of competency which all MPH
 students must master before graduating from the program. The competencies were reviewed and
 approved by all faculty and are available on the school website. The faculty instructing in the
 five core courses prepare and revise learning objectives for their specific core courses which link
 to the areas of competency for the MPH program.

 2.3.a. Identification of the means by which the program assures that all professional degree
 students have a broad understanding of the areas of knowledge basic to public health. If
 this means is common across the program, it need be described only once. If it varies by
 degree or specialty area, sufficient information must be provided to assess compliance by
 each.

 Table 2.3.a.1. Course Progression for MPH in Epidemiology (Two Years: 43 Units).
Summer #1 (second term):          Credits
CHS 700R: Research Methods (1)       1

Year 1: Fall semester                Credits    Year 1: Spring semester                       Credits
CHS 712: Epidemiology I (3)            9        CHS 709R: Epi Research & Planning (2)           12
CHS 780: Biostatistics (3)                      CHS 703R: Applied Analysis (3)
CHS 701: Social/Behavioral (3)                  CHS 708: Epidemiology II (4)
                                                CHS 755: Policy & Administration (3)
Summer #2:                           Credits
CHS 694: Field Studies (3)             3

Year 2: Fall Semester                Credits    Year 2: Spring Semester                       Credits
CHS 753: Health Informatics (3)        9        Epidemiology Elective (3)                       9
Epidemiology Elective (3)                       Culminating Experience / Capstone (3)
CHS 694: Field Studies (3)                      CHS 725: Environmental Health (3)




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Table 2.3.a.2. Course Progression for the MPH in Social/Behavioral Health (Two Years: 43
Units).
Summer #1 (second term):           Credits
CHS 700R: Research Methods (1)        1

Year 1: Fall semester               Credits   Year 1: Spring semester                  Credits
CHS 712:Epidemiology I (3)            12      CHS 721: Evaluation (3)                    9
CHS 701: Social/Behavioral (3)                CHS 755: Policy & Administration (3)
CHS 705:Theory (3)                            CHS 746: Culture & Diversity in
CHS 720: Program Planning (3)                 Public Health (3)
Summer #2:                          Credits
CHS 694: Field Studies (3)            3

Year 2: Fall Semester               Credits   Year 2: Spring Semester                  Credits
CHS 780: Biostatistics (3)            9       CHS 725: Environmental Health (3)          9
Elective (3)                                  Elective (3)
CHS 694: Field Studies (3)                    Culminating Experience / Capstone
                                              (3)


Section 2.6 summarizes the competencies for all MPH students. Mechanisms for assessing the
competency of students completing the program are described in Section 2.7.

2.3.b. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
       The School provides curricular methods to assure students are able to demonstrate
       understanding of public health core knowledge.

Suggested Improvements
      The competency‐based education has been firmly developed in the last year and this
      curricular overview must be carefully monitored for impact and effectiveness.




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2.4 Practical Skills. All professional degree students must develop skills in basic public
health concepts and demonstrate the application of these concepts through a practice
experience that is relevant to the students’ areas of specialization.

2.4.a. Description of the program’s policies and procedures regarding practice placements,
including selection of sites, methods for approving preceptors, approaches for faculty
supervision of students, means of evaluating practice placement sites, preceptor
qualifications, and criteria for waiving the experience.

Practical public health skill development is an integral part of the MPH program, regardless of
program concentration, requiring 270 hours (6 credit hours) of professional work experience in a
public health agency (clerical- level work is not accepted). While students are encouraged to
take these six credits in two consecutive semesters (3 credits each), the program is flexible
regarding the time frame in which students complete the internship, provided that 45 hours of
internship coincide with each credit.

Internship participation is required for all MPH students; no students receive waivers for the
course. Students are responsible for locating and arranging their own internship experience, with
support from their faculty advisor and the internship coordinator. Faculty advisors and the
internship coordinator maintain ongoing communication with former site preceptors to facilitate
new student placements and partnerships in state and local health departments and community
agencies, and continuously work to foster new community relationships with potential preceptors
in order to develop further student opportunities.

 Working with their faculty advisor and the internship coordinator, students begin planning for
the internship at least three months before the desired start date by examining interests, program
concentration, competencies, and goals for the internship. Students locate sites and preceptors
based on all of these factors. Once a site and preceptor are arranged, the student completes the
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), a student learning contract outlining student goals,
competencies to be addressed, and scope of work for the internship (see Appendix C for MOU;
course overview provided in onsite resource file). Upon student completion of this document, it
is reviewed and signed by the preceptor, faculty advisor, and internship coordinator to ensure
common understanding among all parties in moving forward. Only then can the student begin
work on the internship.

Internship emphasis is placed on developing an experience that will provide the student with
opportunities to: enhance skills learned during coursework, develop new skills and experiences
in which the student will be working in a professional capacity, address competencies, and
evaluate the site and overall experience. Students are required to focus on six Association of
Schools of Public Health (ASPH) competencies during the internship coursework, three of which
are pre-defined (one leadership [H-2] and two professionalism [J-5 and J-10]), and three of the
student’s choice, to be determined by areas of special interest or an identified need to enhance
specific skills, and which apply to the individual internship experience. In addition to the 270-
hour work requirement, students must complete two reports during their internship work. The
mid-term and final reports require students to research the organization for which they are



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working, describe their own role in addressing the agency’s mission and vision, and reflect on
their progress in working toward the goals and competencies identified in the MOU.

Preceptors are approved by the faculty advisor and the internship coordinator, and qualifications
are based on position in the organization and extent of public health background, including
number of years in practice as well as educational degrees earned. In addition to overseeing
student on-site work, preceptors provide mid-term (at 100 hours of internship completed) and
final (at 250 hours) evaluations of student performance, strengths, areas for improvement, and
readiness to enter the public health workforce (Preceptor mid-term and final student evaluations
will be provided in onsite resource file).

The internship coordinator facilitates the internship course (CHS 694) and is responsible for
overseeing students during their internships, including maintaining communication with the
student and preceptor throughout the internship, establishing procedures, monitoring progress,
assessing quality, and arranging for student and site evaluations. Faculty advisors serve in a
supportive role for students throughout the internship process, assisting the student in the
development of internship goals and competencies, locating a suitable placement site, and
monitoring student progress.

Placement sites and preceptors are evaluated by the student on such topics as: relevance of the
experience to student goals and competencies, professional work environment, engagement of
preceptor and other agency staff, and strengths and weaknesses of the site for future internships
(Student Site Assessment will be provided in onsite resource file). The internship coordinator
and faculty advisor also contribute evaluations from their perspectives of the effectiveness of
each site and preceptor for the internship, and recommendation of the site for future placements.

2.4.b. Identification of agencies and preceptors used for practice experiences for students,
by specialty area, for the last 2 academic years

MPH Internship Placements for Academic Years 2007-2010
             Internship Site                           Preceptor
                               Epidemiology Emphasis
 Bureau of Family Health Services, Nevada         Judy Wright Bureau Chief
            State Health Division
  Bureau of Community Health Services,        Debra McBride, MBA Bureau Chief
       Nevada State Health Division
Gastroenterology Consultants/Nevada Colon            John Gray, MD, FACP
              Cancer Coalition
 Bureau of Family Health Services Nevada               Debra Wagler, MA
            State Health Division
 National Institute of Environmental Health            Jane Hoppin, ScD
                   Sciences
  Washoe County Department of Juvenile                 Joseph Haas, MD
                   Services
   Clark County Department of Juvenile                    Fritz Reese

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                   Services
      Renown Regional Medical Center                  Bernadette Longo, PhD, MS
 Division of Health Care Financing & Policy                Mary Cotay, RN
        Nevada State Health Division
   Silver Sage Center for Family Medicine              Teresa Angermann, D.O.
 Office of Health Statistics and Surveillance,           Alicia Hansen, MS
        Nevada State Health Division
Carson City Department of Health and Human             Cortney Bloomer, MPH
                   Services
                         Social/Behavioral Health Emphasis
  Center for the Application of Substance                Eric Albers, PhD
            Abuse Technologies
   Family Ties of Nevada (people with                   Marcia O’Malley
                disabilities)
  Washoe County Department of Juvenile                  Joseph Haas, MD
                  Services
  University of California San Diego Pace              Greg Norman, PhD
                   Project
 Washoe County District Health Department            Leslie Elliott PhD, MPH
                                              Mike Johnson, MS, Director of Mission
     Saint Mary’s Center for Wellness
                                                   Outreach Community Benefit
      WaterFitTM Fitness Education                     Mary Sanders, PhD
         Sanford Center for Aging                      Teresa Sacks, MPH
         Northern Nevada HOPES                        Leah Thompson, MPH
      Washoe County Health District;                  Jeanne Rucker, REHS
      Environmental Health Division
   Rural Western Coalition Partnership             Deborah Loesch-Griffin, PhD
 Carson City School District/ Nevada State           Barbara Howe, MS RD
              Health Division

2.4.c. Data on the number of students receiving a waiver of the practice experience for each
of the last three years.

Not applicable. No students have received a waiver.

2.4.d. Data on the number of preventive medicine, occupational medicine, aerospace
medicine, and public health and general preventive medicine residents completing the
academic program for each of the last three years, along with information on their
practicum rotations.

Not applicable. We are currently discussing the option of residency placements with the School
of Medicine.




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2.4.e. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
       In restructuring the internship course and requiring more student work hours, students
       and preceptors alike note the practicability of the changes, suggesting a greater
       opportunity for learning through the new hour requirements, and parallel to that, the
       internship site and preceptor are provided with a greater product.
       With the addition of a 25% FTE internship coordinator in 2009, the internship has
       become more centralized and streamlined, creating a more standardized process.

Suggested Improvements
      As noted above, the department was able to commit 25% FTE for an internship
      coordinator in 2009, to facilitate the MPH internship program, which has significantly
      improved processes. To further improve the program, however, an increase in FTE for
      this position is recommended. Providing at least 50% FTE, and preferably 100% FTE,
      for this position would substantially improve the coordinator’s ability to develop
      internships through engagement with students, preceptors, and faculty advisors, and
      would allow time for this person to advocate within the community for internship
      partnerships with a variety of organizations. Providing for greater coordinator time will
      become essential as the MPH program grows in size and develops greater visibility
      within the public health community.




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2.5 Culminating Experience. All professional degree programs identified in the institutional
matrix shall assure that each student demonstrates skills and integration of knowledge
though a culminating experience.
2.5.a. Identification of the culminating experience required for each degree program. If this
is common across the program’s professional degree programs, it need be described only
once. If it varies by degree or specialty area, sufficient information must be provided to
assess compliance by each.
A culminating experience is one that requires a student to synthesize and integrate knowledge
acquired in coursework and other learning experiences and to apply theory and principles in a -
situation that approximates some aspect of professional practice. In our program, that course is
Community Health Sciences 695R: MPH Capstone.
Preparation. Students will take the MPH capstone course during the last semester of their
professional program. The MPH capstone course builds on students’ field studies experience and
cannot be taken until students have completed their field studies units. Only in special
circumstances will the instructor approve concurrent enrollment with remaining field studies
units (1-3 remaining units).

Before enrolling in the MPH capstone course, students must: 1) establish a culminating
experience committee; 2) obtain committee approval for their proposed culminating experience
paper topic; 3) obtain committee signatures on their program of study. The culminating
experience committee includes: 1) the student’s academic advisor (committee chair); 2) a
graduate faculty member outside the School of Community Health Sciences (graduate school
representative); 3) the capstone course instructor; and 4) a professional practice representative
typically from the student’s field studies site (encouraged, but not required).
Table 2.5.a. presents the timeline which ensures appropriate preparation for the MPH capstone
course.

Table 2.5.a. Capstone Course Preparation Timeline.
Completion of 6 field studies units      Summer / Fall Before Capstone Enrollment
Establish culminating experience         September 15 (Fall Semester)
committee
Committee meeting to propose culminating October 15 (Fall Semester)
experience paper topic
Program of study (POS) signed by all     October 15 (Fall Semester)
committee members

Purpose. The MPH capstone course will give students an opportunity to integrate coursework
and fieldwork into a culminating experience. The MPH culminating experience will include
written and oral components (the capstone paper and presentations) and will demonstrate
proficiency in public health knowledge and competencies. The nature of the MPH culminating
experience topic may vary given the student’s career goals and chosen area of MPH emphasis
(Epidemiology or Social and Behavioral Health).



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The MPH capstone course will cover important competencies related to professional
development. Successful completion of the capstone course is evidence that the MPH graduate
is prepared to become a public health professional.

Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH) Competencies for the MPH Capstone
Course:
Culminating Experience Paper and Presentation
   Demonstrate effective written and oral skills for communicating with different audiences in
   the context of professional and public health activities (F7)
   Communicate epidemiologic information to lay and professional audiences (C8)
   Apply evidence-based principles and scientific knowledge base to critical evaluation and
   decision-making in public health (J3)
   Analyze determinants of health and disease using an ecological framework (J6)
   One competency within discipline (Epi or Social/Behavioral) (student choice)
   One cross-cutting competency (student choice)

Professional Development
   Embrace a definition of public health that captures the unique characteristics of the field
   (e.g., population-focused, community-oriented, prevention-motivated and rooted in social
   justice) and how these contribute to professional practice (J9)
   Value commitment to lifelong learning and professional service including active participation
   in professional organizations (J11)
   Apply basic principles of ethical analysis (e.g. the Public Health Code of Ethics, human
   rights framework, other moral theories) to issues of public health practice and policy (J2)
   One competency within area of emphasis (Epi/Biostats or Social/Behavioral) that needs
   development (student choice)
   One cross-cutting competency that needs development (student choice)

Course Requirements:
Culminating Experience Paper. Students will complete an academic paper that represents the
culmination and mastery of the MPH curriculum. The culminating experience paper will
typically be based on student’s field studies experience, but occasionally it could be related to
faculty-student research, or another field experience. Some examples of culminating experience
that could be the basis of the paper include: needs assessment, program planning, program
evaluation, product or curriculum development, a research report (analysis of primary or
secondary data), policy analysis, or grant development.
In addition to the capstone competencies identified by the course instructor, students will choose
one competency within their area of emphasis and one cross-cutting competency that they will
emphasize in their capstone paper and presentation.
The capstone paper will typically be 20-30 pages, not including references, tables, and figures.
The paper must also include a 250-word abstract. The report should include the information
below and follow this outline:

       Abstract: 250 words (background, methods, findings, discussion)

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       Background: The background section should describe the significance of the public
       health issue being addressed. Peer reviewed literature should be summarized and should
       set the stage for the objectives or research questions that will be addressed in your paper
       (approximately 8-10 pages).
       Methods: This section will vary depending on the nature of the student’s project but
       should clearly describe the what, where, when, and how of the project. For research
       projects, the methods section should include standard sub-headings such as:
       participants/procedures; measures; and analyses. If appropriate the methods could
       include a description of the organization or setting in which the project was carried out
       (approximately 2-5 pages)
       Results: The results section should include the final product that was produced by the
       student. This section will vary in length and format depending on the nature of the
       project. For example, the results could include a summary of research findings, a
       program or evaluation plan, a grant proposal, a training curriculum, or policy analysis.
       (approximately 5-10 pages).
       Discussion: This section should briefly summarize the main findings and the public
       health impact of the project. The results should be interpreted in the context of previous
       research and a clear discussion of implications for future research, program or
       intervention development, and policy should be included (approximately 5 pages).
       References and Bibliography: Use a standard documentation style, such as APA or AMA
       Guidelines. Examples and resources will be provided.
       Appendices: Appendices may be included, but should not count toward the page
       requirement.
       Personal Assessment: Describe how the project has contributed to your understanding of
       public health practice. Identify if and how each of the public health competencies was
       applied during the process. Describe the facilitators and barriers to project completion
       and reflect on lessons learned in the process (approximately 2 pages). This will be
       submitted separately from the final paper.

Note: If the work contributing to the capstone paper involved human subjects, make sure you
have received appropriate approval from the University of Nevada, Reno Office of Human
Research Protection. IRB approval must be obtained before any data collection with human
subjects can begin.
Capstone Presentation. Students are required to present their culminating experience paper in the
field setting where the work was completed. Students are responsible for setting up this
presentation and ensuring that interested agency members are invited. In addition, a final
presentation will be made to MPH students, faculty, and graduate committee representatives.
The presentation will be approximately 15-20 minutes with 10 minutes for questions and
discussion.
Professional Development. The capstone course will also address professional development.
Special sessions and assignments related to professional development include: public health
ethics and professionalism, group facilitation/mediation, public speaking/presentations, resume
development, and applying for a career position.



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In addition, students will complete a competency assessment to identify competencies that need
to be further developed. This assessment will provide valuable feedback on MPH curriculum
competencies. In addition, students will use the assessment to develop a post-graduation
professional development plan.

Course Points: A maximum of 300 points can be obtained in this course
Culminating Experience Paper (150 points). The capstone paper will be submitted in sections
and each section (Background, Methods, Results, Discussion) will be critiqued by the student’s
advisor, the course instructor, and a peer evaluator. Multiple drafts of each section may be
required. The final paper will be evaluated by the student’s committee using a competency-
based assessment tool. In addition, all members of the culminating experience committee must
approve the culminating experience paper and sign the student’s notice of completion.
Capstone Presentation (50 points). The capstone presentation will be assessed by the course
instructor and other CHS faculty using a competency-based assessment tool (see Appendix J).
The scores of each evaluator will be averaged.

Professional Development Assignments (100 points)
   1) Ethics training (25 points)
   2) Resume development (25 points)
   3) Professional development plan (25 points)
   4) Competency assessment (25 points)

2.5.b. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion has been met with commentary.

Strengths
       The culminating experience capstone course retains the positive aspects of a rigorous
       committee structure, but also promotes a cohort experience and shared learning
       experiences with the students.
       The competency project provide students ample opportunity for one-on-one work with a
       faculty member.
       The competencies for this course balance academic and professional development.

Suggested Improvements
      The capstone course was initiated in 2010 and continues to need to be evaluated;
      however, initial student evaluations were very positive.




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2.6. Required Competencies. For each degree program and area of specialization within
each program identified in the instructional matrix, there shall be clearly stated
competencies that guide the development of educational programs.

2.6.a. Identification of core public health competencies that all MPH or equivalent
professional Master degree students are expected to achieve through their courses of study.

The MPH Program has identified public health competencies that all students must achieve by
completing their core courses of study (biostatistics, environmental health, epidemiology, health
policy and administration, social and behavioral health, research methods, field studies, and the
capstone course). A competency sub-committee made up of MPH core course instructors and a
student representative reviewed and adapted the competencies set forth by the Association of
Schools of Public Health (ASPH).

Core course instructors developed competency plans for each course. The competency plan
linked the chosen competencies with readings, assignments, and assessment/evaluation methods.
Instructors noted whether the competency was introduced or practiced and identified culminating
assessment activities for the course as a whole (Appendices D.1-D.8: Core Course Competency
Plans).

2.6.b. A matrix that identifies the learning experiences by which the core public health
competencies are met. If this is common across the program, a single matrix will suffice. If
it varies by degree or specialty area, sufficient information must be provided to assess
compliance by each.

Core MPH competencies are mapped to required courses demonstrating the learning experiences
by which core public health competencies are met (Appendix E). Specific details on the learning
and assessment activities for competencies in each course can be found in Appendices D.1-D.7.

2.6.c. Identification of a set of competencies for each program of study identified in the
instructional matrix, including professional and academic degree curricula.

In addition to the core competencies, faculty and a student representative in each MPH area of
specialization identified specific competencies for required courses. ASPH competencies were
the foundation for this process, but additional competencies for each area of specialization were
also developed. The competencies for each area of specialization are listed in Appendix G
(Epidemiology) and Appendix I (Social and Behavioral Health). Individual competency plans
for required courses in Epidemiology (Appendices F.1-F.6) and Social and Behavioral Health
(Appendices H.1-H.5) were also developed by course instructors to describe the learning and
assessment activities associated with each competency.

2.6.d. A description of the manner in which competencies are developed, used and made
available to students.

Competency Development. MPH core competencies were identified by a competency
subcommittee consisting of faculty who teach required core courses and a student representative.

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Core course instructors developed competency plans that mapped each competency to specific
learning and assessment activities. This process encouraged thoughtful reflection on the course
competencies, learning objectives, learning activities, and assessment methods. After all
competency plans were developed, the competency subcommittee reconvened to approve
individual course competency plans and to develop the matrix that maps all core competencies
with the required courses (Appendix E). The core competency matrix was approved by faculty
in the School of Community Health Sciences faculty on April 7, 2010.

A similar process was followed for the development of area of specialization course competency
plans and the competency matrix for each area of specialization. However, the competency sub-
committees consisted of faculty and students in each area of specialization. The competency
matrix for Epidemiology (Appendix G) was approved by faculty in Epidemiology and
Biostatistics on May 7, 2010. The competency matrix for Social and Behavioral Sciences
(Appendix I) was approved by faculty on May 5, 2010.

Competency Use. The core and area of specialization competencies form the basis for all MPH
Program curriculum development, assessment, and revision. Although this process has only
begun, the competency mapping for each area of specialization helped identify gaps and
duplication in our curriculum. The review of core and area of specialization competencies will
continue on an annual basis.

Student progress in mastering the core and area of specialization competencies is assessed two
times during the semester (before the drop date and near the end of the semester). This process
was piloted Spring Semester 2010 and faculty found it to be a useful and objective process for
monitoring student progress and identifying potential problems in required courses.

The competencies also form the basis for MPH Program evaluation. Beginning Fall Semester
2010 students will engage in a self-reflection of their mastery of practice competencies for all
core and area of emphasis required courses. This self-reflection process was pilot tested in
Spring 2010 in two MPH core courses.

Finally, the competencies form the basis for student planning and participation in field studies
and the culminating capstone course. Students select competencies to target for individual
development during each course and complete self-assessment of chosen competencies.
Students in the capstone course also identify competencies that they plan to address through
professional development after graduation.

Availability of Competencies to Students. All syllabi for MPH core courses and required courses
for each area of specialization include the approved competencies. In addition, beginning Fall
Semester 2010, individual instructors will make the competency plans available to students.
This gives students a clear indication of how the course competencies are linked to readings,
assignments, and assessment activities.

All core competencies and areas of specialization competencies are available to students on the
MPH Program website, as well as in the student/advisor handbook. Beginning Fall Semester



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2010, students will be informed of the required competencies and how they will be acquired and
evaluated during orientation and individual meetings with their faculty advisors.

2.6.e. A description of the manner in which the program periodically assesses the changing
needs of public health practice and uses this information to establish the competencies for
its educational programs.

As discussed in Section 1.2 “Evaluation and Planning”, a comprehensive needs assessment of
employers was conducted to determine whether there was interest and support for an MPH
degree in the area. The results showed broad support for graduate-level public health training
and reflecting that interest, since its inception, the program has attracted a large number of public
health professionals in the area. Since that time, the annual employer survey (survey instruments
provided in onsite resource file) has been the biggest source of information about skills needed
by our graduates. The survey results demonstrate that employers of UNR MPH graduates value
ethics, working collaboratively, cultural diversity, and strong written and oral communication
skills. The MPH curriculum has specifically emphasized these skills and the competency
committee selected competencies that will ensure that these areas are adequately covered in our
required courses.

From 2000 to Spring 2010 the SCHS alumni survey asked students to evaluate the usefulness of
their coursework. In 2010, this survey will be revised to more completely capture our alumni’s
evaluation of their competency attainment and the relevance of the existing competencies in their
work. In addition, the previous college in which the SCHS was located had an Associate Dean
for Workforce Development whose charge was to work closely with public health professionals
to monitor their training needs. The Associate Dean held a series of forums in which input on
educational training priorities was obtained (see Appendix K).

To ensure that the SCHS competencies reflect the changing needs of public health practice,
prioritized competencies were distributed to four representatives from the Nevada State Health
Division for their review and input. In five years, we will conduct a more representative
statewide survey of public health practitioners to identify the competencies and skills they
believe are essential for MPH graduates.

Finally, faculty enrolled in the 2009-2010 Great Basin Public Health Leadership Institute
participated in a roundtable session with public health practitioners to identify recent workforce
development needs. The participants emphasized the importance of students’ understanding the
business of public health such as budgeting, grant proposal writing, and the structure of the
public health system in Nevada including its political pressures and how to work with the state
legislature. These results support a 2006 needs assessment of the NSHD that was conducted by
UNLV and the Great Basin Public Health Leadership Institute. The results have been shared
with representatives of the SCHS competency committee and clearly indicate a continuing need
and interest in MPH coursework by state employees. Respondents were particularly interested in
training that could be applied to a degree or certificate program. In addition, respondents were
interested in on-site and online training options. These are two areas in particular in which the
SCHS could effectively fulfill the NSHD staff’s needs in the future.



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2.6.f. Assessment of the extent to which the criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
       A thorough competency-based curriculum developed with broad input is in place.
       Competencies underlie the entire curriculum.

Suggested Improvements
      Further evaluation of the competencies is needed.
      A more recent and thorough needs assessment of employer-identified competencies needs
      to be conducted.




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2.7 Assessment Procedures. There shall be procedures for assessing and documenting the
extent to which each student has demonstrated competence in the required areas of
performance.

2.7.a. Description of the procedures used for monitoring and evaluating student progress in
achieving the expected competencies.

Every required MPH and area of specialization course has a competency plan (described in
section 2.6). The competency plan includes assessment and evaluation methods that serve the
basis for monitoring whether students are achieving expected competencies (e.g., exams,
assignments, papers, projects, and final course grades). Using the evaluation methods identified
in the competency plans, faculty members meet twice a semester to assess student progress in
mastering the core and area of specialization competencies (before the drop date and near the end
of the semester). Competency assessment data from Fall Semester 2009 and Spring Semester
2010 for the core MPH courses are presented in Appendices D.1 –D.8. Beginning Fall Semester
2010 all core and area of specialization course instructors will have students provide self-
reflection of attainment of course competencies. This student self reflection was piloted in two
core course during Spring 2010 and provided valuable feedback for the core course instructors.

The internship preceptor completes a student evaluation based on competencies identified in the
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) (see section 2.4 Practical Skills). In addition, students
establish a culminating experience committee (student advisor, graduate school representative,
capstone course instructor, and internship preceptor (when available)) that evaluates students’
achievement of course- and student-identified competencies using a standard evaluation tool and
approves their final paper and presentation (Appendix J) based on the student’s ability to
synthesize public health knowledge and apply it to the solution of public health problems.

2.7.b. Identification of outcomes that serve as measures by which the program will evaluate
student achievement in each degree program, and presentation of data assessing the
program’s performance against those measures for each of the last three years.




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Table 2.7.b. Student Achievement Outcomes, Targets, and Data for Last 3 Years.
4) Goal: “To prepare future public health practitioners, researchers,    2007 to 2008           2008 to 2009   2009 to 2010
educators and leaders.”                                                  Data                   Data           Data
Objective 2): Education/Training
2a. By 2011, 90% of MPH students will receive grades of B or higher as   92%                    84%            90%
    evidence of partial attainment of core MPH and emphasis-specific                                           Includes Fall
    competencies.                                                                                              2009 only,
                                                                                                               Spring 2010
                                                                                                               not yet
                                                                                                               available
2b. By 2011, 95% of MPH students will receive approval of their culminating   Data Not Yet      Data Not Yet   Data Not Yet
    project proposal by their committee on the first attempt.                 Available         Available      Available
2c. By 2011, 30% of MPH students will be involved with faculty in research    14%               21%            22%
    activities.
2d. By 2011, 10% of current MPH students or graduates within the last 5       8%                5%             12%
    years will be the primary author or a co-author on a publication (peer-
    reviewed).
2e. By 2011, 20% of current MPH students or graduates within the last 5       11%               13%            13%
    years will be the primary author or a co-author on a presentation at a
    scientific conference (peer-reviewed).
2f. By 2011, 35% of MPH students will be involved in leadership roles and     100%              90%            73%
    providing service to the community or university.




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2.7.c. If the outcome measures selected by the program do not include degree completion rates and job placement experience,
then data for these two additional indicators must be provided, including experiential data for each of the three years. If
degree completion rates, in the normal time period for degree completion, are less than 80%, an explanation must be
provided. If job placement, within 12 months following award of the degree, is less than 80% of the graduates, an explanation
must be provided.

Table 2.7.c. Alumni Achievement Outcomes, Targets, and Data for Last 3 Years.
4) Goal: “To prepare future public health practitioners, researchers,          2007 to 2008   2008 to 2009     2009 to 2010
educators and leaders.”                                                        Data           Data             Data
Cont.
Objective 3): Graduation/Post-Graduation
3a. By 2011, 90% of full-time MPH students will complete their degree within 3 73%            58%              N/A
    years of matriculation.                                                                   *Historical      *This cohort
                                                                                              graduation       just entered in
                                                                                              rate is 80%      Fall 2009.
                                                                                              within three
                                                                                              years. Three
                                                                                              years have not
                                                                                              yet elapsed
                                                                                              for this
                                                                                              cohort.
3b. By 2011, 75% of MPH graduates will become employed in public health or    92%             57%              Data not yet
    settings closely related to their degree within 6 months of graduation.                                    available
3c. By 2011, 5% of MPH graduates will be admitted to a program for further    8%              29%              Data not yet
    academic training (PhD, MD, etc.).                                                                         available
3d. By 2011, 10% of MPH graduates will have local or national leadership      15%             14%              Data not yet
    positions in public health.                                                                                available

3e. 60% of employed UNR MPH graduates are located in Nevada and the           75%             86%              Data not yet
    Intermountain West by 2011.                                                                                available


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    UNR School of Community Health Sciences



    2.7.d. A table showing the destination of graduates for each of the last three years. The table must include at least the number
    and percentage of graduates by program area each year going to a) government (state, local, federal), b) nonprofit
    organization, c) hospital or health care delivery facility, d) private practice, e) university or research institute, f) proprietary
    organization (industry, pharmaceutical company, consulting), g) further education, h) non-health related employment, or i)
    not employed. See CEPH Data Template D.

    Table 2.7.d. (Template D) Destination of Graduates by Program Area for Each of the Last 3 Years.
                      Govern-     Nonprofit    Health Care   Private         University/   Proprietary   Further     Non-       Not
                      ment                                   Practice        Research                    Education   Health     Employe
                                                                                                                     Related    d
                    #     %        #     %      #      %      #         %      #      %     #     %       #     %     #     %    #   %
  1) Academic Year 2007-2008
MPH -               2    15%       0     0%     0     0%      0         0%    0      0%     0     0%      1    8%    0    0%    0   0%
Epidemiology
MPH-Social             0    0%     0     0%     0     0%      0         0%    1      8%     0     0%      0    0%    0    0%    0   0%
Behavioral/Health
MSN/MPH*               0    0%     0     0%     1     8%      0         0%    0      0%     0     0%      0    0%    0    0%    0   0%

MPH –                  1    8%     1     8%     1     8%      0         0%    2     15%     2    15%      0    0%    0    0%    1   8%
Generalist*

  2) Academic Year 2008-2009
MPH -               0    0%        0     0%     0     0%      0         0%    0      0%     0     0%      1   14%    0    0%    0   0%
Epidemiology
MPH-Social             0    0%     0     0%     1     14%     0         0%    1     14%     0     0%      0    0%    0    0%    0   0%
Behavioral/Health
MSN/MPH*               0    0%     0     0%     0     0%      0         0%    0      0%     0     0%      0    0%    0    0%    0   0%

MPH –                 1    14%       0     0%     1    14%    0         0%    1     14%     0     0%      1   14%    0    0%    0   0%
Generalist**
   3) Academic Year 2009-2010 (Data not yet available)
    *Not accepting students into this area of emphasis
    **No longer offering this area of emphasis

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MPH program alumni have obtained positions at the highest levels of government such as the
Nevada State Epidemiologist, the Director of the Carson City Health and Human Services, and
the Director of Indian Health Services, Office of Public Health for 24 states. They have also
obtained leadership positions in nonprofit and private settings such as Carson Tahoe Regional
Medical Center, the Center for Wellness at St Mary's Regional Medical Center, and Nevada
Energy. Apart from a person currently on the job market, we are not aware of any alumni who
does not have a job utilizing their MPH training. We feel that our alumni’s success is one of the
strongest components of our program.

2.7.e. In public health fields where there is certification of professional competence, data on
the performance of the program’s graduates on these national examinations for each of the
last three years.

Since 2000, we have tracked 5 MPH alumni who completed the Certified Health Educator
Specialist Exam (CHES). Our alumni have a 100% pass rate.

2.7.f. Data describing results from periodic assessments of alumni and employers of
graduates regarding the ability of the program’s graduates to effectively perform the
competencies in a practice setting.

Tables 2.7.f.1. and 2.7.f.2. present the results from the employer and alumni surveys conducted
by UNR’s Office of Assessment. Overall, the feedback on the program is positive; however the
results should be interpreted cautiously as the response rates are very low so comments are more
anecdotal.

Table 2.7.f.1. Employer Survey 2002-2009 (N=5)
                                                             % responding “Very” or
                                                              “Somewhat Prepared”
“How prepared were UNR MPH graduates to…
…carry out writing tasks                                            100%
…express themselves orally                                           90%
…use quantitative methods                                            90%
…develop solutions to work-related problems                         100%
…think critically                                                   100%
…work cooperatively on a team                                       100%
…use computers or other technology                                  100%
…work in a culturally diverse environment                           100%
…consider the ethical implications of his/her behavior              100%
“Generally, how satisfied are you with this graduate?”     100% responded “Very” or
                                                             “Somewhat Satisfied”

Table 2.7.f.2. Alumni Survey 2007-2009 (N=11)
                                         % responding “Excellent” or “Good”
Overall quality of program                          73% (8/11)
Program preparation for career path                 82% (9/11)
Level of student to faculty interactions            91% (10/11)

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                                              % responding “Excellent” or “Good”
Quality of advisement                                        45%
                                            (55% responded “fair” in 2007-2008; in
                                             2009, 100% of respondents rated it as
                                                    “excellent” or “good”)

2.7.g. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
       The program has thorough assessment procedures to monitor student performance in the
       classroom, during fieldwork and in the culminating experience.
       GPAs of entering students generally meet or exceed program requirements and the
       majority of students are progressing through the curriculum with a grade of B or higher.
       The time to complete degrees is at 80% measured since the inception of the program.
       Graduates have high employment and continuing education rates and have obtained
       leadership positions in the public health field.

Suggested Improvements
      Response rates for both the alumni and employer surveys need to be increased.
      Encourage graduates to take the CHES.




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2.8 Academic Degrees. If the program also offers curricula for academic degrees, students
perusing them shall obtain a broad instruction to public health, as well as an
understanding about how their discipline-based specialization contributes to achieving the
goal of public health.
Not applicable.




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2.9 Doctoral Degrees. The program may offer doctoral degree programs in the future, if
consistent with its mission and resources.

Not applicable.




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2.10 Joint Degrees. If the program offers joint degree programs, the required curriculum
for the professional public health degree shall be equivalent to that required for a separate
public health degree.
2.10.a. Joint Degree Programs Offered. Identification of joint degree programs offered by
the program and a description of the requirements for each.
SCHS is approved to offer two post‐baccalaureate joint degree programs: the (master of science
in nursing) MSN/MPH and the MD/MPH.

In addition to the joint degrees, we collaborate with two other groups on campus. With the
College of Business, an MBA student may have a core emphasis in health care administration
and policy. With the School of Medicine Family Practice Residency Program, we offer the MPH
as a separate degree, but coordinated with the physicians’ residency program.
MD/MPH. Our first four MD/MPH students started with us in fall 2009, one year earlier than we
expected. Initially in our discussions with the University of Nevada School of Medicine
(UNSOM), the plan was for medical students to start a MPH program of study (POS) after their
third year of medical school and their clinical clerkships. However, a new faculty member, Dr.
Jason Crawford, who arrived from a joint MD/MPH program in Arizona, created much
enthusiasm around the MPH for medical students. He suggested that the students start earlier
(after their second year), before starting their clinical clerkships, so that they would have their
background in public health before going out into clinical medicine. We all agreed to go forward
with an earlier start with the understanding that we would assess the results after the experience
was concluded.

For the MD/MPH, we created an accelerated one year POS for any MPH student (including
medical students) wanting to get all coursework completed for the MPH in one year, then the
field studies and capstone course would follow in year 2.

There is a 6-unit overlap with the medical students in their clinical rotations which will have a
public health emphasis and therefore, may be used for their MPH internship credits. Upon
completion of the clinical rotations, the students will return for the following spring semester to
complete their MPH capstone course. Apart from the 6-unit overlap, MD/MPH students are
required to complete all other requirements just like other MPH students, and to demonstrate
attainment of all identified public health competencies.
The success and enthusiasm for this dual degree has now created the impetus for Family Practice
Residents to obtain their MPH during their residency time and POS have been created for these
two students as well who started in Spring 2010.
Overall, these two programs have elevated our student diversity to a higher level, increased the
collaborative nature of public health discussions, and supported students with broader academic
interests to be part of the public health profession.

MSN/MPH. In the original version of the dual MPH/MSN degree program approved in 2004,
MSN students took the core MPH courses, then completed a joint professional project with the
MPH and MSN programs. They were not required to complete a specialization within public

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health which was a concern for faculty. We also heard feedback from alumni with this dual
degree that they did not do enough coursework in the MPH side of the dual degree.

In the current version (in the process of curricular approvals), the students in this program select
a specialization in both the MSN-nursing educator, clinical nurse leader (CNL), and family nurse
practitioner (FNP) as well as the MPH-epidemiology and social behavioral health. There is a 6
credit overlap in the area of field studies (internship) with the MSN clinical experiences in
NURS 760. However, there must be a public health emphasis in what their experiences are in
their clinical experience. As with the MD/MPH, the MSN/MPH students are required to
complete all other requirements expected of the other MPH students, and to demonstrate
attainment of all identified public health competencies.
Until the new curriculum is approved, we are not accepting students into this dual degree
program. This is why we are not submitting the dual MSN/MPH as part of the accreditation unit
at this time. However, there is a close working relationship with UNR’s Orvis School of Nursing
and we are committed to making this program of study available and meaningful for those
students who might choose this dual degree. We will apply for accreditation review of this
program at a future date.

2.10.b. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is met.

Strengths
       Curriculum flexibility and faculty advisement in this area.
       Strong faculty and administrative support in both Orvis School of Nursing and UNSOM
       for these programs.
       The Division of Health Sciences is supportive of interdisciplinary teamwork and
       educational training.

Suggested Improvements
      Obtain appropriate approvals for revised MPH/MSN curriculum and submit for review
      by CEPH.
      Continue to develop and implement assessment strategies for the entrance/timing of the
      MD/MPH program.
      Look to future dual degrees with College of Business, School of Social Work,
      Department of Political Science, and Behavioral Psychology.
      Implement a BS/MPH program in order to capture our best and brightest undergraduates
      in Community Health Sciences.
      Devote faculty time for marketing the programs and further development.




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2.11 Distance Education or Executive Degree Programs. If the program offers degree
programs using formats of methods other than students attending regular on-site course
sessions spread over a standard term, these degree programs must a) be consistent with the
mission of the program and within the program’s established areas of expertise; b) be
guided by clearly articulated student learning outcomes that are rigorously evaluated; c) be
subject to the same quality control processes that other degree programs in the university
are; and d) provide planned and evaluated learning experiences that take into
consideration and are responsive to the characteristics and needs of adult learners. If the
program offers distance education or executive degree programs, it must provide needed
support for these programs, including administrative, travel, communication, and student
services. The program must have an ongoing program to evaluate the academic
effectiveness of the format, to assess teaching and learning methodologies and to
systematically use this information to stimulate program improvements.
Not applicable.




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3.0 Creation, Application and Advancement of Knowledge
3.1 Research. The program shall pursue an active research program, consistent with its
mission, through which its faculty and students contribute to the knowledge base of the
public health disciplines, including research directed at improving the practice of public
health.
3.1.a. A description of the program’s research activities, including policies, procedures and
practices that support research and scholarly activities.
All of the tenure- and research-track faculty members affiliated with the Program are involved in
research. Tenure-track faculty typically dedicates 40% effort to research during the academic
year and often do more research during the summer months. Research-track faculty devotes a
larger proportion of their time to research, usually 50-90%, depending on funding and other
duties.
The norm for most members of the faculty is to conduct empirical research. This typically
requires grant support and results in publications in peer-reviewed scientific journals. However,
there is considerable variation reflecting the range of academic disciplines that make up the
program and the backgrounds of individual faculty members, as shown in table 3.1.c. Much of
the research conducted by the faculty involves graduate students, typically acting as research
assistants. Student research is addressed in more detail in 3.1.e.

For the faculty as a group, both production of scholarly publications and grant support have
increased markedly since 2006. This trend is due to increasing average individual productivity,
rather than to increasing faculty size, as the number of faculty members has been essentially
constant over this period. Research support is obtained from a variety of federal, state,
university and foundation sources, with federal grants and state contracts accounting for the
largest amounts of funding. Recent funding sources include: the National Institute for
Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Institute of Environmental Health
Sciences (NIEHS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Nevada State
Health Division, and the Nevada Trust Fund for Public Health. Faculty publications in peer-
reviewed journals have also increased. Faculty have published their research in respected public
health journals, including: American Journal of Epidemiology; American Journal of Health
Behavior, American Journal of Public Health, Archives of Physiology and Biochemistry,
Biometrika, Epidemiology, Environmental Health Perspectives, International Journal of Health
Services, Journal of American Statistical Association, Journal of Physical Activity and Health,
and Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
Faculty involvement in research is highly valued by the School of Community Health Sciences
and by the University. Faculty members regularly enter their research accomplishments,
including publications, presentations, grant applications, and grant and contract awards into the
university’s online database (Digital Measures). Research productivity, along with teaching and
service is assessed in both annual evaluations of individual performance and recommendations
for merit pay. At the end of each calendar year, Digital Measures is used to generate an annual
report summarizing activities and output for the year. The report is the basis of evaluations
conducted jointly by a faculty Personnel Committee, the School Director and the Vice President.
Evaluations emphasize the importance of scholarship and specifically encourage activities that

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contribute to public health knowledge. Evaluations for promotion and tenure also consider
research: excellence in research is one of the bases for promotion and granting of tenure.

In addition to evaluating research productivity, the University encourages research with direct
financial incentives to externally-funded investigators. A 7.25% share of indirect cost receipts is
returned to grant investigators; these funds are deposited in a University account and may be
expended for professional needs, such as books, travel, conference registration and student
support. Grant-funded faculty on 9-month contracts may also supplement their salaries by
working overload on non-contracted days.

3.1.b. A description of current community-based research activities and/or those
undertaken in collaboration with health agencies and community-based organizations.
Formal research agreements with such agencies should be identified.
The School is committed to community‐based research and has a number of projects with most
providing opportunities for student involvement. This research is sponsored by federal and state
organizations including the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, and the Nevada State Health Division.

The School is home to the Center for Program Evaluation (formerly named the Center for
Partnership Evaluation to emphasize its commitment to community-based partnerships). The
Center has a number of community partners which are listed below in Table 3.1.b. and which
include formal agreements to provide community-based evaluation research.

Table 3.1.b. Community Partners at the Center for Program Evaluation.
Boys and Girls Clubs in Reno and the Tahoe- Carson City Manager’s Office
Truckee area
Children’s Cabinet                          Children’s Collaborative of Tahoe-Truckee
City of Las Vegas Neighborhood Services     Clark County Community Resources
Department                                  Management Division
Community Chest, Incorporated               Community Council On Youth
Community Services Agency Head Start        Douglas County Sheriff’s Office
Program
Douglas County School-Based Partnership     Duck Valley Indian Reservation
Team
Eastern Sierra Institute for Collaborative  Education Collaborative of Washoe County,
Education                                   Inc.
Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe                Family Resource Centers in Washoe and
                                            Storey Counties and the Tahoe-Truckee area
Food Bank of Northern Nevada                Fort McDermitt Paiute/Shoshone Tribe

Healthy Communities Coalition                      I Can Do Anything Even Start Program
International Visitors Council of Northern         Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada
Nevada
Job Opportunities In Nevada                        Join Together Northern Nevada
Lyon County Human Services Department              Lyon County School District
National Association of Minority Contractors       Nevada Commission for National and
                                                   Community Service

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Nevada Department of Education                    Nevada Department of Employment, Training
                                                  and Rehabilitation
Nevada Health Division’s Bureau of Family         Bureau of Community Health, HIV/AIDS
Health Services                                   Prevention Care and Surveillance Program
State WIC Program                                 Nevada Literacy Coalition
Nevada Museum of Art                              Nevada Service-Learning Partnership
Northern Nevada International Center              Northern Nevada Literacy Council
Nye Communities Coalition                         Partnership of Community Resources
Reno-Sparks Indian Colony                         Storey County School District
Tahoe-Truckee Unified School District             UC Berkeley Lawrence Hall of Science
United States Department of Agriculture           United Way of Northern Nevada and the Sierra
Washoe County Public Health Department            Washoe County School District

The School is also home to the Nevada Center for Health Statistics and Informatics and
Biostatics which has formal agreements for community-based research with the State of Nevada
Health Division.

In addition to community-based work, the School is also heavily involved in interdisciplinary
work with colleagues at the Division of Health Sciences (including medicine, nursing, nutrition,
social work, and the Center for the Application of Substance Abuse Technologies) and with
colleagues at other units within the university (e.g., social psychology, environmental sciences,
Center for Research Design & Analysis).

Table 3.1.c. lists examples of community-based research and to highlight some recent examples:
One faculty member (Devereux) is working with the School of Medicine, and the Nevada Cancer
Institute to evaluate a colon cancer screening program and with the Nevada Hispanic Services to
identify barriers to colon cancer screening and to map assets within their community with which
to address the barriers. Another faculty (Granner) will be conducting a community needs
assessment in Truckee, California as requested by the Tahoe Forest Hospital Board of Directors.

3.1.c. A list of current research activity of all primary and secondary faculty identified in
4.1.a and 4.1.b., including amount and source of funds, for each of the last three years. This
data must be presented in table format and include at least the following: a) principal
investigator, b) project name, c) period of funding, d) source of funding, e) amount of total
award, f) amount of current year’s award, g) whether research is community based, and h)
whether research provides for student involvement.




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Table 3.1.c. (Template E) Research Activity of Primary and Secondary Faculty from 2007 to 2010.
Project Name      Principal       Funding Source     Funding Period Amount        Amount        Community   Student
                  Investigator &                     Start/End       Total        Current       Based       Participation
                  Department                                         Award        Year          Y/N         Y/N
                                                         2007-2008

Cancer Registry     Yang EPI      DHHS-CDC/NV-     1/2007-2/2007    $21,216                      Y          Y
Analysis                          DHHS-HD
Childhood           Yang EPI      DHHS-HRSA-       1/2007-7/2008    $32,569                      Y          Y
Asthma Prev                       NSHE-UNLV
Analysis
Women’s Health      Yang EPI      DHHS-CDC/NV-     2/2007-6/2008    $46,000.00                   Y          Y
Analysis                          DHHS-HD
Cohort              Loomis EPI    DHHS-            1/2007-12/2008   $43,800.00
Analysis/Cancer                   NIH/UNIV OF N.
Studies                           CAROLINA
Chrysotile: New     Loomis EPI    DHHS-            1/2007-9/2008    $36,652.00
Exposure                          CDC/UNIV OF
                                  N. CAROLINA
BRFSS: Diabetes Yang EPI          DHHS-CDC/NV-     1/2008-3/2008    $ 15,012.00                  Y
Crosstab                          DHHS-HD
Effect of NV     Elliott,         NV-DHHS-HD       7/2007-6/2009    $165,047        $83,524.00
Clean Indoor Air Loomis (Co-
                 PI) EPI
Nevada WIC       Yang EPI         DOA-FNS/NV-      8/2007-9/2008    $53,920.00                   Y          Y
Analysis                          HD
Autism Database Yang EPI          NV-DHHS-ODS      7/2007-12/2008   $48,153.00                   Y
Analysis
Evaluation of    Yang (Co-PI)     NV-DOETR-RD      1/2007-12/2008   $31,546                      Y
DETR Rehab       EPI
Services
Exercise         Angermann        NV-DHSS-HD       7/2007 – 6/2009 $220,812         $109,826.0
Prescription     EPI                                                                0

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Project Name        Principal      Funding Source   Funding Period   Amount         Amount    Community   Student
                    Investigator &                  Start/End        Total          Current   Based       Participation
                    Department                                       Award          Year      Y/N         Y/N
Study-YR 2
Gender              Elliott, Yang   NSF             7/2008-6/2009    $187,344       $81,523
Differences in      (Co-PI) EPI
Health
Community           Yang, Smith-    DHHS-ACF/NV-    7/2008-6/2009    $81,000                  Y           Y
Health              Gagan (Co-      DHHS
Nurse/EPSDT         PI) EPI
Physician           Yang, Smith-    DHHS-ACF/NV-    7/2008-6/2009    $61,650                  Y           Y
Train/EPSDT         Gagan (Co-      DHHS
Billing             PI) EPI
Parent Usage of     Yang, Smith-    DHHS-ACF/NV-    7/2008-6/2009    $201,150                 Y           Y
EPSDT:              Gagan (Co-      DHHS
Outreach            PI) EPI
BRFSS Diabetes      Yang EPI        DHHS-CDC/NV-    7/2008-1/2009    $11,718                  Y
Module Analysis                     DHHS-HD
                                                       2008-2009

ENV Arsenic &       Loomis EPI      DHHS-NIH-       8/2008-5/2010    $39,731
Diabetes Melitus                    UNIV.OF N.
                                    CAROLINA
Chrysotile &        Loomis,         DHHS-CDC        8/2008-5/2010    $710,641
Lung Cancer Yr      Hsieh (Co-PI)
1                   EPI
BRFSS/Native        Yang (Co-PI)    DHHS-CDC/NV-    10/2008-8/2009   $64,000                  Y           Y
Amer Over           EPI             DHHS-HD
Sample
BRFSS/Core          Yang EPI        DHHS-CDC/NV-    5/2008-3/2009    $42,500                  Y
Analysis &                          DHHS-HD
Report
Evaluation of       Yang EPI        NV-DOETR-RD     1/2009-12/2009   $5,987                   Y           Y

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Project Name        Principal      Funding Source     Funding Period   Amount         Amount    Community   Student
                    Investigator &                    Start/End        Total          Current   Based       Participation
                    Department                                         Award          Year      Y/N         Y/N
DETR Rehab
Services
Community           Yang, Smith-    DHHS-ACF/NV-      7/2009-6/2010    $72,495                  Y           Y
Health              Gagan (Co-      DHHS
Nurse/EPSDT         PI) EPI
Physician           Yang, Smith-    DHHS-ACF/NV-      7/2009-6/2010    $55,177                  Y           Y
Train/EPSDT         Gagan (Co-      DHHS
Billing             PI) EPI
Parent Usage of     Yang, Smith-    DHHS-ACF/NV-      7/2009-6/2010    $180,029                 Y           Y
EPSDT:              Gagan (Co-      DHHS
Outreach            PI) EPI
Hyperoxia &         Angermann       OHIO              5/2009 – 6/2010 $30,453
Oxidative Stress    EPI             UNIVERSITY
Assessing the       Clements-       CDC               2008-2009        $52,846                  Y
HIV Prevention      Nolle (Co-PI)   Supplemental
Needs of Men        EPI             Grant PS04-012
Who Have Sex                        through the
With men in                         Nevada State
Nevada: A                           Health Division
Strategic
Planning
Proposal
                                                         2009-2010

Diabetes            Christiansen    DHHS-CDC/NV-      05/2009-         $23,000
Prevention &        SBH             DHHS-HD           03/2010
Control
Family to Family    Anstee SBH      DHHS-             08/2009-         $5,000
Eval                                HRSA/Family       05/2010
                                    Ties of NV

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Project Name        Principal      Funding Source     Funding Period   Amount         Amount    Community   Student
                    Investigator &                    Start/End        Total          Current   Based       Participation
                    Department                                         Award          Year      Y/N         Y/N
Family Resource     Christiansen   Washoe County      07/2009-         $6,700
Center Eval         SBH            School District    06/2010
Higher              Christiansen    Nevada            7/2009-9/2010    $23,000
Education           SBH             Volunteers
Service Learning
Evaluation
Nevada              Christiansen    Great Basin       07/2009-         $30,000        $17,500
Conservation        SBH             Institute         09/2011
Corps
Americorps and
Volunteer
Program
Evaluation
PIRC Evaluation     Christiansen    Washoe County     10/2009-         $30,000
                    SBH             School District   06/2010
PIRC Evaluation     Christiansen    Washoe County     07/2010-         $10,000
                    SBH             School District   09/2010
WCDS APMR           Christiansen    Washoe County     08/2009-         $3,250
Technical           SBH             School District   09/2009
Assistant
Washoe County       Anstee SBH      Washoe County     10/09-6/2010     $49,000
School District                     School District
Title II
Evaluation
Technical
Assistance
Diabetes            Christiansen    DHHS-CDC/NV-      05/2009-         $23,000
Prevention &        SBH             DHHS-HD           03/2010
Control
Gender              Elliott, Yang   NSF               8/2009-8/2011    $105,821                 Y
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Project Name        Principal      Funding Source   Funding Period   Amount         Amount     Community   Student
                    Investigator &                  Start/End        Total          Current    Based       Participation
                    Department                                       Award          Year       Y/N         Y/N
Differences in      (Co-PI) EPI
Health
Tribal              Smith-Gagan,   DHHS-HIS-     12/2009-6/2010      $18,390                   Y           Y
Management          Yang (Co-PI)   WASHOE
Grant/Type 2        EPI            TRIBE NV & CA
Diabetes
Washoe Tribal       Smith-Gagan    DHHS-            11/2009-         $13,000                   Y           Y
Health Center       EPI            HRSA/WASHOE      3/1/2010
                                   TRIBE NV&CA
Latino Cancer       Smith-Gagan    UNIV OF CA,      1/2010 –         $20,000                   Y           Y
Survivors           EPI            LOS ANGELES      11/2010

Colon Cancer        Devereux       NIH/NCRR         9/2009-8/2011    $680,000       $340,000   Y           Y
Screening           (Co-PI) SBH
Program
Navigator
Evaluation
Algal-Based         Angermann      DOE-NSHE-DRI     11/2009 –        $100,000
Renewable           EPI                             10/2010
Energy




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3.1.d. Identification of measures by which the program may evaluate the success of its
research activities, along with data regarding the program’s performance against those
measures for each of the last three years. For example, programs may track dollar amounts
of research funding, significance of findings (eg, citation references), extent of research
translation (eg, adoption by policy or statute), dissemination (eg, publications in peer-
reviewed publications, presentations at professional meetings), and other indicators.

The Program has established specific goals and objectives (Table 3.1.d) by which research
success is measured. The four objectives assessing peer-reviewed publication, conference
presentations, grant submissions, and grant awards are tracked annually using data submitted by
the faculty via the Digital Measures database described previously. Data on the amount of grant
awards are supplemented by information from the university Office of Sponsored Projects.

The objectives pertaining to publication and growth in research awards have been met in advance
of the December 2011 target date. The two objectives related to conference presentations and the
number of faculty submitting grant proposals have not yet been achieved, but it appears likely
that they will be by the end of 2011.

Table 3.1.d. Measures by which the program evaluates the success of its research activities
with data for the last 3 years.
1) Goal: “To develop the knowledge         2007 to 2008  2008 to 2009       2009 to 2010
base for public health through             Data          Data               Data
research.”
Objectives:
 1. At least 60% of faculty will publish 75%             71%                63%
     an article in a peer-reviewed journal
     by 2011.
 2. At least 70% of faculty will present 88%             71%                59%
     research results at a conference by
     2011.
 3. At least 70% of faculty will submit 69%              71%                75%
     one proposal for grant funding by
     2011.
 4. Number of new external fund            31%           43%                44%
     awards and amount of awards per       $187,299 per  $92,312 per        $84,671 per
     FTE will increase 5% by 2011.         faculty FTE   faculty FTE        faculty FTE
                                           >5% increase
    2006-2007 Baseline:
    3 faculty received grants
    Total amount = $261,090
    $18,649 amount/faculty FTE

Other measures of research success are evaluated annually for individual faculty members, as
described above. The indicators considered in annual evaluations of research activity are
directed primarily toward scholarly publication and grant support. For publication, the number
and types of scholarly publications, the faculty member’s role as an author, and, for journal

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 articles, the journals in which they appear are considered. Some faculty members contribute to
 public health reports or other professional documents, and these are also considered in
 performance evaluations. The impact of publications is difficult to assess in the short-term, but
 narrative evidence of impact, such as influence in science or policy-making is considered when
 available. Highly-cited papers and particularly influential ones are noted in evaluations for
 promotion and tenure where the longer time span facilitates evaluating the impact of
 publications.

  Grant support is also considered in faculty evaluations. All faculty members are encouraged to
 pursue external research support, while recognizing that there is considerable variation among
 disciplines in the need for research support and the amounts likely to be obtained. The
 magnitude of grant awards is considered to be less important than success in securing the funds
 needed to support a high-quality research program.
 3.1.e. A description of student involvement in research.
 Student involvement in developing new public health knowledge is a priority of the Program.
 The opportunity to be involved in research and scholarly publication is an important component
 of graduate training, allowing students to practice skills they learn in the classroom.
 The faculty provide many opportunities for students for scholarly work, through both
 independent work and in a faculty partnership mentoring capacity. Research training of graduate
 students is accomplished by performing well in graduate courses, the mentoring relationship with
 a faculty member, acting as a research assistant of a faculty member. Master’s professional
 projects may also involve research.

  Many MPH students gain research experience through formal research assistantships. Graduate
  research assistants are involved in all phases of research and carry out a wide variety of
  activities, such as:
           Collecting data by administering                     Using computer skills such as word
           surveys, interviews, or running                      processing, spreadsheet, scheduling
           research protocols                                   and statistical analysis software
           Coding and entering data into a                      Participating in preparation of
           spreadsheet or statistical analysis                  submissions for local or regional
           program                                              conferences and, if accepted,
           Conducting literature reviews and                    working on poster or oral
           document research                                    presentations for professional
           Developing and proposing new                         conferences
           research ideas and IRB applications                  Participating in preparing a
           Participating in the methodological                  manuscript to submit the results of
           development of a research project,                   your collaborative research to a
           including study designs, modeling                    scientific journal
           and statistical inference.
Mentorship and research assistantships also allow the student to work one-on-one with a faculty
member, enabling the student to gain skills and knowledge that aren't easily learned in the
classroom, such as research attitude and generation of research ideas.




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f. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

This criterion is met.

Strengths
       Program faculty and students are active in contributing to the knowledge base of public
   health.

Suggested Improvements
      Involve more faculty in extramural research activities.




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3.2 Service. The program shall pursue active service activities, consistent with its mission,
through with faculty and students contribute to the advancement of public health practice.

3.2.a.Description of the program’s service activities, including policies, procedures and
practices that support service. If the program has formal contract or agreements with
external agencies, these should be noted.

As a land grant university, UNR maintains a commitment to community and public service
programs through dissemination of knowledge to the community, collaboration with the public
and private sectors, and provision of assistance to state and local governments. The UNR
Division of Health Sciences (DHS) mission statement also illustrates a commitment to service;
“[DHS] is tied together by the need to find solutions for and help people towards improving their
health and well-being through education, research, clinical care and public service” (DHS draft
bylaws).

The mission of the School of Community Health Sciences, “to develop, disseminate, and apply
knowledge with an ecological approach to protect and promote the health of populations
statewide and worldwide,” highlights a commitment to service, and one of our five core values is
Community and Collaboration. Goals adopted by SCHS demonstrate our commitment to
engaging in professional and scholarly service and contributing to positive changes in the health
of Nevadans. Our mission, vision and goals are satisfied through numerous activities and
commitments of the CHS faculty and are supported through the university’s and school’s
encouragement and expectations of both faculty and student involvement in service activities.
Personnel policies. Faculty of the University of Nevada, Reno are evaluated annually on
teaching, research and service activities. The University by-laws state that “an academic faculty
member being recommended for appointment with tenure must receive a "satisfactory" rating or
better in the area of service, which may include, but not be limited to [italics added to
community service elements]:
        (A) Membership and participation in professional organizations;
        (B) Ability to work with faculty and students in the best interests of the academic
        community and the people it serves, and to the extent that the job performance of the
        academic faculty member's major unit may not be otherwise adversely affected;
        (C) Service on University or System committees;
        (D) Recognition among colleagues for possessing integrity and the capacity for further
        significant intellectual and professional achievement; and
        (E) Recognition and respect outside the System community for participation and service
        in community, state, or nationwide activity.

At the DHS level, the expectation for faculty members to participate in service includes
“community, professional, Unit, Division, and university service” (draft DHS bylaws) All SCHS
faculty have service obligations that are outlined in annual role statements upon which they are
evaluated. Although service activities for SCHS faculty generally include membership and chair
positions on SCHS, Division of Health Sciences and university committees, faculty are also
expected and encouraged to engage in both scholarly and community service outside the
university. The SCHS personnel committee is in the process of drafting new annual evaluation
guidelines that provide more specific language regarding the expectation of external service

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(including both scholarly and community service) for all tenured professors, tenure-track
professors who have completed at least two years toward tenure, and lecturers.

Structural service promotion. The graduate curriculum requires that all students complete a six
credit (270 hour) internship, which includes a service-learning component. Examples of past
student internship projects are identified in section 3.2.d. below. In 2009 SCHS hired a 25% FTE
internship coordinator to oversee student internships and ensure that internship placements fulfill
the service learning requirement and other requirements. The student internship is discussed in
more detail in section 2.4. Students are also engaged in service through the Public Health Club,
an active student organization, and through voluntary participation in faculty-led service
activities. The school’s commitment to student involvement in service is also demonstrated by
the 3-credit field studies course that is required of all students receiving a Bachelor of Science
degree in Community Health Sciences. MPH students are kept informed of community events
and opportunities for service through a bulletin board and a WebCampus webpage that allows for
mass email distribution. An undergraduate field study project has provided a thorough listing of
all opportunities for employment, internships and service in the Northern Nevada area and is
published on FaceBook.

As of July 2010 SCHS houses two centers that have ongoing partnerships with community
organizations and agencies. The Center for Program Evaluation and the Center for Health
Statistics & Informatics are primarily involved in research, but their links to the community
provide us with capacity to develop additional service-related collaborations.

3.2.b. A list of the program’s current service activities, including identification of the
community groups and nature of the activity, over the last three years.
CHS faculty has both volunteered been invited to serve on local, regional and international
committees. Committee membership of CHS faculty includes: the Regional Transportation
Commission Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Committee, Nevada Multicultural End-of-Life Care
Coalition, The Indian Health Board of Nevada Youth Suicide Prevention Steering Committee,
Autism Coalition of Nevada, Biophysical Society, National Toxicology Program, Elder Count
Nevada Advisory Committee, North America Public Health Forum, International Institute of
Anticancer Research (IIAR), and the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology.
In addition to committee membership, CHS faculty have served in leadership positions for a
variety of organizations such as the Nevada State Maternal and Child Health Needs Assessment
Steering Committee, Nevada Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System Advisory Committee;
Nevada AIDS Foundation Advisory Board; Rocky Mountain Psychological Association; North
American Public Health Forum; Scientific Committee on Epidemiology of the International
Commission on Occupational Health; American Public Health Association: Ethics Forum;
Nevada Public Health Association; and the Nevada POLST Initiative, a statewide effort to
improve the transfer of patients between health care facilities.
With tight budgets creating an historical challenge for public entities, collaborations are critical
to the full development of many programs and projects. MPH faculty have developed
relationships and collaborations with the Washoe County School District, the state’s second
largest school district, to provide content for continuing education credit for physical education;
Washoe County Health District supporting the Childhood Obesity Forum; health literacy
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programming for the Nevada Geriatric Education Center, providing geriatric curriculum for the
Veteran’s Affairs system.

Communities are often best reached in large numbers through the media. The growth, ubiquity
and diversity of multimedia provide an opportunity to serve and engage the community at its
convenience and in a manner best suited to the individual. The messages of public health can
now be disseminated in a diverse array of formats. CHS faculty media interviews, for example,
may be accessed later online, sent to others as links, transcribed and emailed or broadcast as
MP3, streaming audio or imbedded on websites. CHS is pleased that its public health interviews
have been captured by KUNR radio (Nevada Secretary of State’s Living Will Lockbox project -
Hardwick, HIV in Prisons and Jails - Clements-Nolle, a gastroschisis study - Elliott) and ABC
News, 13 Las Vegas (Triage in Pandemics - Klugman) and may continually engage new
audiences.
Although the message of public health may now be disseminated in a variety of ways, the
message must be continually updated, verified and evaluated. As with any profession, it is left to
the professionals in that field to assure standards of excellence. Therefore, it is important that
academic public health professionals participate in the review and evaluation of public health
publications, grants and programs. To that end, CHS faculty have provided review and
evaluation for numerous journals such as Occupational and Environmental Medicine and the
American Journal of Public Health and to organizations such as the American Society of
Bioethics and the Humanities; University of Texas Health Science Center; Ministry of
Development, General Secretariat for Research and Technology, Greece. Current and recent
faculty grants with a service component are provided in Table 3.2.b.




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Table 3.2.b. Grants/contracts with Service Component for Each of the Last 3 Years.
Project Name               Principal Investigator &   Funding Source              Funding     Community Group
                           Department                                             Period
                                                                                  Start/End
Preventing Gun Violence    Loomis (PI) EPI            ASIS International          2007-2008   ASIS International
In The Workplace
Community Health           Yang, Smith-Gagan          DHHS-ACF/NV-DHHS            2008-2009   Nevada State Health Division;
Nurse/EPSDT                (Co-PI) EPI                                                        Nevada Division of Health
                                                                                              Care Financing and Policy

Physician Train/ EPSDT    Yang, Smith-Gagan           DHHS-ACF/NV-DHHS           2008-2009    Nevada Medical Association;
Billing                   (Co-PI) EPI                                                         Nevada State Health Division;
                                                                                              Nevada Division of Health
                                                                                              Care Financing and Policy
Parent Usage Of EPSDT:    Yang, Smith-Gagan           DHHS-ACF/NV-DHHS           2008-2009    Nevada State Health Division;
Outreach                  (Co-PI) EPI                                                         Nevada Division of Health
                                                                                              Care Financing and Policy
Community Health Nurse/   Yang, Smith-Gagan           DHHS-ACF/NV-DHHS           2009-2010    Nevada State Health Division;
EPSDT                     (Co-PI) EPI                                                         Nevada Division of Health
                                                                                              Care Financing and Policy
Physician Train/ EPSDT    Yang, Smith-Gagan           DHHS-ACF/NV-DHHS           2009-2010    Nevada Medical Association;
Billing                   (Co-PI) EPI                                                         Nevada State Health Division;
                                                                                              Nevada Division of Health
                                                                                              Care Financing and Policy
Parent Usage Of EPSDT:    Yang, Smith-Gagan           DHHS-ACF/NV-DHHS           2009-2010    Nevada State Health Division;
Outreach                  (Co-PI) EPI                                                         Nevada Division of Health
                                                                                              Care Financing and Policy
Assessing The HIV         Clements-Nolle              CDC Supplemental Grant     2008-2009    Northern Nevada
Prevention Needs Of Men   (Co-PI) EPI                 PS04-012 through the                    HIV/AIDS/STD Planning
Who Have Sex With Men                                 Nevada State Health                     Council
In Nevada: A Strategic                                Division
Planning Proposal
Colon Cancer Screening    Devereux (Co-PI) SBH        NIH/NCRR                   2009-2011    Nevada Cancer Institute;

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Program Navigator                                                                                 Nevada Colon Cancer
Evaluation                                                                                        Partnership
Tribal Management         Smith-Gagan, Yang              DHHS-HIS-WASHOE              12/2009-    Washoe Tribe of Nevada and
Grant/Type 2 Diabetes     (Co-PI) EPI                    TRIBE NV & CA                6/2010      California

Washoe Tribal Health      Smith-Gagan EPI                DHHS-HRSA/WASHOE             11/2009-    Washoe Tribe of Nevada and
Center                                                   TRIBE NV&CA                  3/1/2010    California

West Region               Clements-Nolle EPI             SAMSHA/CSAP                  2009-2014   State leaders and community
Epidemiologist            (epidemiologist on project);                                            prevention practitioners in 11
                          Center for the Application                                              states, six pacific jurisdictions,
                          of Substance Abuse                                                      and six tribes (The West
                          Technologies (grant PI)                                                 Region).
Assessing Pre-Schoolers    Constantino SBH (trainer);    USDA/NIFA/AFRI               2009-2013   Cooperative Extension –
Motor Skills              Southern Area Cooperative                                               Southern Nevada area
                          Extension (grant PI)
Project Play              Constantino SBH                Unfunded project to          2009-       Jessie Beck Elementary School
                                                         engage elementary-school
                                                         youth in physical activity
                                                         at a community school
Leadership Coach For      Constantino SBH (coach);       NACCHO/CDC                   2010 -      Washoe County District Health
Community Health Action   Washoe County District         ACHIEVE (Action                          Department
Response Team (Chart)     Health Department (grant       Communities for Health,
                          PI)                            Innovation, and
                                                         Environmental Change)




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3.2.c. Identification of measures by which the program evaluates success of its service efforts, along with data regarding the
program’s performance against those measures for each of the last three years.

Table 3.2.c. Service-related goals and objectives, and data on performance from 2007-2010.
3) Goal: “To engage with multiple communities           Data Source      2007 to 2008     2008 to 2009        2009 to 2010
through professional and scholarly service.”                             Data             Data                Data
Objectives:
1. By 2011, 40% of faculty will co-author reports and Digital Measures 56%                21%                 31%
    publications with colleagues at other units on
    campus.
2. By 2011, 30% of faculty will co-author reports,      Digital Measures 25%              36%                 35%
    publications, and presentations with community      and Staff Survey
    members.
3. By 2011, 15% of faculty will provide workshops,      Digital Measures 17%              19%                 26%
    trainings and continuing education opportunities to
    public health professionals.
4. By 2011, 15% of faculty will provide technical       Digital Measures 22%              25%                 26%
    assistance to the community, including but not
    limited to, program evaluations, consulting, data
    analysis, grant partnerships.
5. By 2011, 10% of UNR faculty is members of            Digital Measures 56%              63%                 47%
    community boards or committees.
6. By 2011, 10% of UNR SCHS committees will             Program Director N/A              N/A                 17%
    include a community member.




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3.2.d. A description of student involvement in service.
Although many students entering the MPH program already have a strong history of service, the
MPH curriculum, the Public Health Club, internships and research all encourage and support
student service. Including service as a component of the MPH curriculum provides students with
exposure to the variety of opportunities available to them. However, it is also critical that
students pursue such service on their own, recognizing the value that service brings to the
community and themselves. SCHS MPH students have demonstrated their independent
commitment to service through numerous community activities. They have been involved in
Global Voice Volunteering, a Virginia City, NV program to provide volunteers to a variety of
community projects; offered sports injury prevention programs to local high schools; served on
the advisory board of the Reno Housing Authority, served as Secretary for Sierra Nevada
Journeys, a non-profit organization providing experiential education to the local school district;
and have been involved with the WIC mobile dental van.
Several courses currently incorporate service activity into the curriculum. Dr. Clements-Nolle
has provided a variety of service experience to her students in her classes CHS 476/676: HIV-
Psychosocial and Health. Students have been involved in HIV testing and outreach, the Larry
Bryant Event Fashion Show Benefit, AIDS Memorial, the National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS
Day and World AIDS day (using red ribbons to raise awareness for HIV/AIDS on campus in
2008). In 2009 students from this course developed a chapter of Hope for Hoops, raising $4000
for AIDS orphans in Africa, raising the second largest amount of 50 such events. Other courses
apply course work to service, such as Ms. Fitch’s CHS 720: Program Planning and Grant
Writing in which students develop program plans for community organizations and agencies. As
an aspect of their courses, students have also hosted a smoking cessation event (CHS 695),
provided data analysis (CHS 725, CHS 753) and evaluated community agencies and federally
funded grant projects (CHS 720, CHS 721).

The Public Health Club established by our MPH students has also provided opportunities for a
variety of community activities. The club has sponsored food drives, a triathlon, and annual
events associated with Public Health Week and World AIDS Day.

Internships serve a variety of purposes, one of which may be including service. Prior to our
current internship and capstone curriculum, students had the option of developing projects. Many
of these involved service and represent the vastness of the scope of public health, for example:
Weapons of mass destruction preparedness training presented to Northern Nevada physicians
and nurses, implementation of a school-wellness program, development of a fund for dental care
for homeless high school students, assessment of Planned Parenthood Mar Monte’s Teen Talk
program, development of a community health report card and analysis of participants in the
Tahoe Adaptive Ski School. Such a variety of experiences expose students to areas of public
health they may not have otherwise explored or considered.

Many MPH students have had an opportunity to engage in research and publish with a faculty
mentor. Some of these efforts involve community service. Examples include: medication therapy
management program for seniors, nutrition in the garden at a local elementary school,
conducting a needs assessment at a community-based organization for people living with
HIV/AIDS, and providing a training session about working with older adults for community

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health workers.

3.2.e. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met
Strengths
       Extensive demonstration of faculty involvement in service activities
       Opportunities and expectations for service incorporated in the SCHS curriculum
       Improved communication and dissemination of student service opportunities

Suggested Improvements
      Improved tracking of student and faculty professional and community service activities
      Increase the time and expand the role of the internship coordinator to allow for creation
      and maintenance of a formal mechanism for coordinating and monitoring student service
      opportunities
      Modify faculty annual evaluation guidelines to include more specific directions on
      requirement for service to the community and distinguish it from university-related
      service
      Encourage more presentations and publications based on service activities




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3.3 Workforce Development. The program shall engage in activities that support the
professional development of the public health workforce.

As the state’s historic land-grant institution, the University of Nevada, Reno has an explicit
mission to disseminate education, consultation, and research across the state.

3.3a. A description of the program’s continuing education activities, including policies,
needs assessment, procedures, practices, and evaluation that support continuing education
and workforce development strategies.

Policies and Institutional Support.

SCHS Level
The school’s mission statement includes five goals, with the third goal being “to engage with
multiple communities through professional and scholarly service.” This goal includes engaging
the public health workforce in training and development activities. Objective 3.3 provides a
measurable outcome of workshops, training, and continuing education activities.

The self-study committee devised and began to execute a plan to support workforce
development. Improvements in formal support included raising awareness among the faculty of
the importance of engaging in workforce development and potentially offering additional
incentives and rewards for the activity. The topic was brought to the faculty steering committee
and specific development activities will be discussed at a faculty bi-annual retreat.

University Level
Workforce development for the State of Nevada is a core mission of this university. UNR offers
a vigorous extended studies program; the involvement of SCHS is outlined below. The
University of Nevada School of Medicine, also part of the Division of Health Sciences,
administers a state-wide program that offers an extensive, state-of-the-art infrastructure for tele-
conferencing and CME/CEU seminars. The university also offers various settings for workforce
development activity including lecture series. Below in section 3.3d specific participation in
these are listed.

Associate Dean for Workforce Development
The UNR Division of Health Sciences, which houses the MPH program, hired an associate dean
in 2005 to lead workforce development initiatives. The Associate Dean for Workforce
Development served the units of the division, with primary emphasis on public health. The
position was funded through a grant from the State of Nevada Health Division. The associate
dean’s mandate was “to promote public health workforce recruitment, retention and
improvement throughout the university and the professions utilized in public health and social
services agencies.”

The projects and activities undertaken by the associate dean included:

 In March 2007, created and proposed a plan to develop a series of professional development
programs and certificate program for state public health workers to be offered by the SCHS. The
proposal was presented; a preliminary needs assessment was conducted; and an action plan for

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implementation was developed. Although the State did not follow through with implementation
due to severe budget crisis in state and lack of funding for employee development activities,
the findings are still valid and will be pursued when funds become available.

Facilitated and convened a statewide workforce development task force for the Department of
Health and Human Services for the State of Nevada, as per the request of its Director (Spring
2007). This resulted in a joint meeting of all state agency directors and university administrators
from both UNR and UNLV. A survey of needs and action plans were created for joint
collaborations.

As directed by the administrator of the State of Nevada Health Division, the associate dean was
asked to conduct a strategic communication needs analysis and facilitate a forum with all
stakeholders in the state, including local health district personnel and state officials, to formulate
strategic relationship building plan and strategies in Spring 2008.

Served as a consultant and facilitator for an organizational development intervention to
strengthen personnel and develop leadership competencies for staff and administrators in the
Nevada Early Intervention Services unit of the Division of Health (June 2008).

State and Regional Level
The state capital and many state health agencies are located in Carson City, about 30 miles away
from the UNR campus. In addition, Reno traditionally serves as a central hub for many of the
rural sections of the state. This provides the potential for the MPH program to become a
convenient training center for the public health workforce. We have many connections with the
state government and have placed many MPH graduates in positions there. However, no formal
training programs are established and much more can be done to serve workforce development
imperatives. Other state and regional support systems include the Great Basin Public Health
Leadership Institute, explained below in 3.3d.

National Level
The new public health exam and other new credentials requirements may create a new demand in
the state for workforce development training. The movement towards credentialing will raise the
priority of workforce development activity and should promote demand for training from the
MPH program. For example, the need for training will potentially strengthen linkages with the
State Health Division.

Needs Assessment. The program has examined and utilized the results of needs assessments
provided by the University Division of Health Sciences and by the state government and others
in the state (see below).

2006 Survey Results
The Nevada State Health Division published the results of a survey of the public health
workforce in 2006. Data were collected in 2005 by the Nevada State Health Division in
collaboration with the UNLV’s School of Community Health Sciences. The survey found that
99% of the workforce was interested in additional training on various topics and in various
settings. Ninety-three percent (93%) sought additional training for job knowledge and skills,


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while 79% said it was required for their current positions. On-site training was most preferred
(46%); off-site workshops were the second preference (24%); and, 21% preferred a certificate
program offered by the university.

When asked how likely they were to participate in a certificate program, 33% of workers were
very likely; 20% somewhat likely; and, 26% likely, for a total of potential interest among 79% of
state public health workers. The most requested certificate topic was health care administration
(43%), followed by public health leadership (38%), and principles of public health (37%).

Forum for Healthy Nevada
In response to this report, a forum with state government officials was convened in January 2007
by the UNR health sciences associate dean for external relations (attached in Appendix K). This
was entitled “Forum for Healthy Nevada” and the major goal was workforce development.
Participants included the Director of the UNR School of Community Health Sciences, the
Director of the State Division of Health and Human Services, and many others. Preparing a
diverse workforce emerged as a main theme of this meeting, and plans were made for several
next steps, including proposals to the legislative session. The state then entered a severe budget
crisis, but these efforts have built an institutional foundation with a capacity for further action.

Future Needs Assessment
Plans for future needs assessment will be discussed at the Fall 2010 faculty retreat.

Procedures, Practices, and Evaluation: The program collects data on workforce development
activity via the electronic annual review system. Pursuant to program goal 3.3, the program will
define workforce development activity as offering certificate programs, continuing education,
and lectures to the public health workforce. As a goal, the program will expect activity from
15% of faculty members each year. The program will assess workforce development activity
with every annual performance evaluation. Language on how to more accurately reflect
workforce development activities was provided for the 2009 annual evaluation. The program will
re-evaluate its workforce development activity every fall faculty retreat.

3.3b. A description of certificate programs or other non-degree offerings of the program,
including enrollment data for each of the last three years.

Certificate program wholly administered by the MPH program:

Certificate program in Health Care Ethics
The Graduate Certificate in Bioethics provides an opportunity for graduate students and working
professionals in the health care fields to gain knowledge and skills in the specialized area of
bioethics. The program seeks to teach students the core competencies called for by the American
Society for Bioethics and Humanities. These objectives include (1) ethical assessment skills, (2)
process skills, and (3) interpersonal skills. This program provides a specialization that can be
productively used to enhance one's current career or to supplement work in another degree.
Courses are offered in evening, weekend, intensive, and web-based formats in addition to
traditional class meetings. Students must have a B (3.0) or better average in each course to earn
the certificate and all course work must be completed within 5 years of matriculation. Approved


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electives can count for both the MPH degree and the health care ethics certificate when relevant
for the student’s program of study. In the last five years, one MPH student has obtained the
ethics certificate.

Extended studies courses supported by the MPH program:
The University Extended Studies program is a mechanism for continuing professional education.
The office markets courses taught at non-traditional times to the community. Faculty from the
MPH program have offered courses through extended studies. For example, the MPH program
planned to offer “Health Care Management, Public Health and Health Policy in Canada” in
Summer 2010, to be taught by affiliate faculty and listing the school’s course number. The
course was to be offered in Toronto, Canada but due to low course enrollment was canceled. It is
being planned again for Summer 2011.

Certificate programs affiliated with / partly supported by the MPH program:

Certificate programs in Gerontology:
The Gerontology Academic Program prepares student scholars from a variety of disciplines to
provide the highest quality of service to Nevada’s elder population. The Gerontology Certificate
Program has been deemed a Program of Merit by the Association for Gerontology in Higher
Education.
UNR administers a 24-credit gerontology certificate program in the Division of Health Sciences.
In addition, an online distance-learning certificate program is administered by several Nevada
campuses in partnership. The University of Nevada, Reno and the University of Nevada, Las
Vegas in concert with Nevada State College and the Nevada Geriatric Education Center offer an
online option for their respective certificate programs. Approved electives can count for both the
MPH degree and the gerontology certificate when relevant for the student’s program of study.
Six MPH students have obtained the gerontology certificate.

   3.3c. A list of the continuing education programs offered by the program, including
   number of students served, for each of the last three years. Those that are offered in a
   distance learning format should be identified.

   3.3c.1. Summary Table of Students Served in Continuing Education Programs.
                     2007-2008            2008-2009           2009-2010
   Number of         190                  40                  145
   Students




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   3.3c Table of Students Served in Continuing Education Programs: Detailed Information.
Faculty       Organization      # of           Professional or Description                                               Year
                                Participants   Academic
Mel           Truckee           45             Professional    8-06 Faculty Development Week--Celebrate What's           2007
Minarik       Meadows                                          Right with the World
              Community                                        8-07 Faculty Development Week--Leadership
              College
Craig         University        75             Professional    "Professional Inoculation" looking at medical             2008
Klugman       Medical Center                                   professionalism and dealing with the health care crisis
              Southern Nevada                                  in Nevada brought on by Southern Endoscopy crisis.
Craig         Renown            70             Professional    Critical Reflections on Evidence of Effectiveness and     2008
Klugman/D                                                      Ethics in the Management of Tuberculosis."
Freedman
Mel            Nevada Mental      40            Academic          Current research in spirituality and health.           2008
Minarik        Health Assn.
Dan Cook       Stanford           20            Professional      Medication Therapy Management and Health               2009
               GRECC                                              Literacy. Palo Alto CA and Reno NV, CEUs
               Geriatric Core
               Curriculum
               Series
Dan Cook       Nevada Geriatric   25            Professional      Medication Management, Health Literacy, and Aging.     2009
               Education                                          Reno NV and 6 other locations by interactive video,
               Center, Faculty                                    CEUs certified
               Training Series
Dan Cook       Washoe County      100           Professional      "How 'Big Food' Markets to Children," Washoe           2009
               Health District                                    County Obesity Forum to statewide audience of public
                                                                  health and other professionals receiving CEU's.




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Other activities open to the public health professional workforce include Lecture Series such as
the Division of Health Sciences Grand Rounds, public talks sponsored or co-sponsored by the
School. Examples include a talk by a visiting scholar (Alice Eagly) in March 2010 on women
and leadership co-sponsored with the PhD program in Social Psychology.

3.3d. A list of other educational institutions or public health practice organizations, if any,
with which the program collaborates to offer continuing education.

Washoe County Health District (e.g. Obesity Forum Fall 2009)
Nevada Public Health Association
Northern Nevada Chapter of the Nevada Public Health Association

State of Nevada Health Division:
Although we do not have any formal training programs, we have many formal and informal
relationships between the MPH program and the State Health Division. Several UNR MPH
graduates now work there. Many of these working relationships involve research and technical
support activity, but workforce training activity has been limited. In 2006, an associate dean at
the Division of Health Sciences designed and proposed a certificate program in public health
management in partnership with the State Health Division. The plan included state support for
the participants, and for the training to be embedded in official job descriptions. Unfortunately
this plan has not yet been implemented in part due to the recent economic situation of the state.

Nevada Geriatric Education Center:
The Nevada Geriatric Education Center (NGEC) was established in October 1992, joining a
nationwide network of similar centers. The NGEC is currently receiving grant funds from the
Health Resources and Services Administration for the Department of Health and Human
Services. The NGEC is committed to improving the health care delivered to older adults by
providing education, information and resources to health professionals and faculty. The NGEC
administers several ongoing statewide lecture series that offer workforce development education,
often with CEUs. Dr. Cook from the faculty has contributed lectures to the health literacy and
aging series, for example.

Renown Regional Medical Center
Truckee Meadows Community College
Nevada Mental Health Association

Palo Alto Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center:
The Reno Veterans Administration hospital participates in the Stanford GRECC, which offers
continuing education including a geriatrics lecture series. For example, Dr. Cook from our
faculty gave a lecture in 2009.

Great Basin Public Health Leadership Institute:
Faculty participate in trainings and provide service activities to the Great Basin Public Health
Leadership Institute which is a workforce development nonprofit organization developed in
partnership by Nevada and Utah’s public health professionals.

Pacific Public Health Training Center:

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Nevada is included in the region served by the federally-funded PPHTC. Examples of utilization
of this resource are unknown, but it exists as a potential vehicle for workforce development. In
fact, the training modules could support or supplement local plans for trainings.

Northwest Center for Public Health Practice:
Nevada is not included in the region served by this federally-funded project, but Northern
Nevada and rural Nevada may feel a cultural and geographic affinity to the work of this center.
Examples of utilization of this resource are unknown, but it is potentially a resource for
workforce development.

3.3e. An assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

The criterion is met, with commentary.

       The program has met its internal goals. Workforce development activity occurs, but is
       not supported systematically with planning. The program has room to expand its
       workforce development activity and should do so in order to strengthen the program and
       to improve public health in Nevada.

Strengths:
       The committee found that substantial and various workforce training activity occurs
       through the efforts of faculty with diverse backgrounds and interests. Reporting
       procedures were recently improved using the electronic annual review system already in
       place. Additionally, the self-study committee on workforce development implemented an
       agenda to raise awareness among the faculty and to devise institutional support and other
       incentives that will encourage workforce training.

Suggested Improvements:
      Beyond the explicitly stated goal of the program, the self-study found few structural or
      system-level supports for workforce development activity. Workforce training has not
      been systematically organized or specifically supported by formal policies, procedures or
      planning. The program should consider making this area a priority for enhancement in
      the planning cycles ahead. For example, the program might bring to fruition a public
      health continuing education course, possibly in coordination with the state health
      division, as early steps have already been taken towards this goal.
      Enhanced alumni relations to identify the demand for appropriate training activity.
      Develop existing or new certificate programs, with online components, that will provide
      greater outreach to the statewide workforce.
      Workforce development activities might be specifically rewarded or incentivized
      somehow among the faculty, such as being listed among the criteria for excellence during
      annual reviews.




Self Study, June 2010                                                                Page 101
UNR School of Community Health Sciences


4.0 Faculty, Staff and Students

4.1 Faculty Qualifications. The program shall have a clearly defined faculty which, by
virtue of its distribution, multidisciplinary nature, educational preparation, research and
teaching competence, and practice experience, is able to fully support the program’s
mission, goals and objectives.

4.1.a. A table showing primary faculty who support the degree programs offered by the
program. It should present data effective at the beginning of the academic year in which
the self-study is submitted to CEPH and should be updated at the beginning of the site visit.
This information must be presented in table format and include at least the following: a)
name, b) title/academic rank, c) FTE or % time, d) tenure status or classification*, e)
gender, f) race, g) graduate degrees earned, h) discipline in which degrees were earned, i)
institutions from which degrees were earned, j) current teaching areas, k) current research
interests, and l) current and past public health practice activities. *Note: classification
refers to alternative appointment categories that may be used at the institution. See CEPH
Data Template F.
Table 4.1.a lists faculty qualifications for the SCHS. The table includes a couple research
assistant professors but all have primary appointments within the school. The school has an
appropriate mix of junior and senior faculty and sufficient faculty numbers to support the
epidemiology and social/behavioral health emphases.
Faculty come from diverse educational backgrounds and institutional environments in order to
provide a breadth of training experiences for students.




Self Study, June 2010                                                              Page 102
UNR School of Community Health Sciences

Table 4.1.a. (Template F) Current Core Faculty Supporting Degree Offerings of Program by Specialty Area.
alty Area
Department/Speci




                                             Name



                                                        Rank
                                                        Title/Academic


                                                                           Classification*
                                                                           Tenure Status or

                                                                                               FTE

                                                                                                     Gender



                                                                                                                      Race or Ethnicity

                                                                                                                                          Earned
                                                                                                                                          Graduate Degrees




                                                                                                                                                                    Institution




                                                                                                                                                                                              Discipline




                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Teaching Area




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Research Interest




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Activities
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Current/Past PH
                            Jeff Angermann          Research             Non-                 1.0    M        White,                      PhD                University           Enviro.                  Public Health              Integrative
       MPH - Epidemiology




                                                    Assistant            Tenure                               Non-                                           of                   Chemistry                Biology;                   enviro.
                                                    Professor            Track                                Hispanic                                       California           and                      Toxicology;                physiology
                                                                                                                                                             at Davis             Toxicology               Biomarkers
                                                                                                                                                                                                           of Human
                                                                                                                                                                                                           Disease
                            Kristen                 Associate            Tenured              1.0    F        White,                      MPH,               University           Social                   Epi.;                      HIV/AIDS                      Senior
                            Clements-Nolle          Professor                                                 Non-                        PhD                of                   Behavioral;              HIV/AIDS                   substance                     Epidemi-
                                                                                                              Hispanic                                       California           Epi.                                                use, suicide,                 ologist San
                                                                                                                                                             at                                                                       and inter-                    Francisco
                                                                                                                                                             Berkeley                                                                 personal                      Department
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      violence                      of Public
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Health
                            Leslie Elliott          Assistant            Tenure               1.0    F        White,                      MPH,               University           Occupation               Advanced                   occupational                  Senior
                                                    Professor            Track                                Non-                        PhD                of North             al Health                Epi.: Chronic              and enviro.                   Epidemi-
                                                                                                              Hispanic                                       Carolina             Nursing;                 disease Epi.               health                        ologist,
                                                                                                                                                             at Chapel            Epi.                                                                              Washoe
                                                                                                                                                             Hill                                                                                                   County
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Health
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    District
                            John Hsieh              Professor            Tenured              1.0    M        Asian                       PhD                University           Biostats.                Health                     life table                    Senior Public
                                                                                                                                                             of North                                      Analysis;                  analysis;                     Health
                                                                                                                                                             Carolina                                      Advanced                   Multi-                        Scientist,
                                                                                                                                                             at Chapel                                     Biostatistics              variable                      Health and
                                                                                                                                                             Hill                                                                     methods;                      Welfare
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      survival                      Canada
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      analysis
                            Dana Loomis             Director,            Tenured              1.0    M        White,                      MS,                University           Geology;                 Global                     occupational
                                                    Professor                                                 Non-                        MS-                of North             Env.Scnces               Health                     & environ.
                                                                                                              Hispanic                    PH                 Carolina             &Engnrng;                Exposure                   health &
                                                                                                                                          PhD.               at Chapel            Epi.                     Assessment                 epi; epi
                                                                                                                                                             Hill                                                                     methods

Self Study, June 2010                                                                                                                                                               Page 103
UNR School of Community Health Sciences

alty Area
Department/Speci




                                  Name



                                             Rank
                                             Title/Academic


                                                                Classification*
                                                                Tenure Status or

                                                                                    FTE

                                                                                          Gender



                                                                                                           Race or Ethnicity

                                                                                                                               Earned
                                                                                                                               Graduate Degrees




                                                                                                                                                         Institution




                                                                                                                                                                                Discipline




                                                                                                                                                                                                         Teaching Area




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Research Interest




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Activities
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Current/Past PH
                   Mingen Lu             Assistant            Tenure               1.0    M        Asian                       MS,                Shanghai             Mathmtics             Biostatistics;              panel count
                                         Professor            Track                                                            PhD,               Normal               Mathmtics             Applied                     data
                                                                                                                               Ph D.              University           Biostatstics          Health                      analysis,
                                                                                                                                                  Shanghai,                                  Analysis                    survival data
                                                                                                                                                  China;                                                                 analysis,
                                                                                                                                                  NE                                                                     longitudinal
                                                                                                                                                  University                                                             data
                                                                                                                                                  Boston;                                                                analysis,
                                                                                                                                                  University                                                             multivariate
                                                                                                                                                  of Iowa,                                                               survey
                                                                                                                                                  Iowa City                                                              method-
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         ology
                   Julie Smith-          Research             Non-                 1.0    F        White,                      MPH,               University           Generalist;           Cancer Epi.                 methods to
                   Gagen                 Assistant            Tenure                               Non-                                           of South                                                               determine
                                         Professor            Track                                Hispanic                    PhD                Florida;             Epi.                                              the
                                                                                                                                                  University                                                             distribution
                                                                                                                                                  of                                                                     and
                                                                                                                                                  California                                                             determinants
                                                                                                                                                  at Davis                                                               of cancer
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         with viral
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         etiology or
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         co-factor
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         involvement

                   Wei Yang              Professor            Tenure               1.0    M        Asian                       MD,                Nanjing              Medicine;             Enviro.                     Enviro. Epi.;                 Occupational
                                                              Track                                                            MS,                Medical              Nutrition;            Health;                     Health                        Medicine
                                                                                                                                                  College,             Enviro.               Informatics                 informatics;                  Physician;
                                                                                                                                                  China; U             Sciences                                          Behavior                      Clinical Epi.;
                                                                                                                               PhD                Nevada,              and Health                                        risk factors                  State Chief
                                                                                                                                                  Reno                                                                                                 Biostatcn




Self Study, June 2010                                                                                                                                                    Page 104
UNR School of Community Health Sciences

alty Area
Department/Speci




                                                       Name



                                                                  Rank
                                                                  Title/Academic


                                                                                     Classification*
                                                                                     Tenure Status or

                                                                                                         FTE

                                                                                                               Gender



                                                                                                                             Race or Ethnicity

                                                                                                                                                 Earned
                                                                                                                                                 Graduate Degrees




                                                                                                                                                                           Institution




                                                                                                                                                                                                   Discipline




                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Teaching Area




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Research Interest




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Activities
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Current/Past PH
                                        Jamie Anstee          Eval.                Non-                 .24    F        White,                   MA,                University           Social                 Program                      Social class,
       MPH – Social/Behavioral Health




                                                              Coord-               tenure                               Non-                     PhD                of                   Psychology             Evaluation                   Aging,
                                                              inator;              track                                Hispanic                                    Nevada,                                     Methods                      Gender
                                                              Admin.                                                                                                Reno
                                                              Faculty

                                        Jennifer              Internship           Non-                 1.0    F        White,                   MPH                University           Public                 Field Studies;               HIV/AIDS,                        Consultant to
                                        Bennett               Coord-               tenure                               Non-                                        of                   Health                 lifespan                     health care                      Nevada
                                                              inator,              track                                Hispanic                                    Nevada,              Leadership             health                       access, rural                    Public Health
                                                              Admin.                                                                                                Reno                                                                     health                           Foundation
                                                              Faculty

                                        Marie Boutte          Associate            Tenured              .13    F        White,                   MS,                University           Comm.                  Medical                      stigma and
                                                              Professor                                                 Non-                     MA,                of                   Health                 Anthroplgy;                  Machado-
                                                                                                                        Hispanic                 PhD                California           Nursing                Toxic                        Joseph
                                                                                                                                                                    San                                         Communities                  disease;
                                                                                                                                                                    Francisco;           Anthro-                                             atomic
                                                                                                                                                                    University           polgy                                               fallout and
                                                                                                                                                                    of                                                                       radiation
                                                                                                                                                                    California           Anthro-                                             compen-
                                                                                                                                                                    Berkeley             pology                                              sation

                                        Elizabeth             Director;            Non-                 .15    F        White,                   PhD                University           Social                 Program                      Gender,
                                        Christiansen          Admin.               tenure                               Non-                                        of                   Psychology             Evaluation                   youth,
                                                              Faculty              track                                Hispanic                                    Nevada,                                     Methods                      development
                                                                                                                                                                    Reno

                                        Nora                  Associate            Tenured              1.0    F        White,                   MS,                University           Physical               Social                       Physical
                                        Constantino           Professor                                                 Non-                                        Nevada,              Education;             Behavioral                   activity
                                                                                                                        Hispanic                                    Reno;                                       Health                       across the
                                                                                                                                                                    Univ. of             Exercise                                            lifespan
                                                                                                                                                 PhD                Southern             Physiology
                                                                                                                                                                    California


Self Study, June 2010                                                                                                                                                                     Page 105
UNR School of Community Health Sciences

alty Area
Department/Speci




                                 Name



                                            Rank
                                            Title/Academic


                                                               Classification*
                                                               Tenure Status or

                                                                                   FTE

                                                                                         Gender



                                                                                                       Race or Ethnicity

                                                                                                                           Earned
                                                                                                                           Graduate Degrees




                                                                                                                                                     Institution




                                                                                                                                                                               Discipline




                                                                                                                                                                                                         Teaching Area




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Research Interest




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Activities
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Current/Past PH
                   Daniel Cook          Assistant            Tenure               1.0    M        White,                   PhD                City                 Political                Scientific                   Health and
                                        Professor            Track                                Non-                                        University           Science                  Writing,                     safety
                                                                                                  Hispanic                                    of New                                        Health                       regulation
                                                                                                                                              York,                                         Policy,                      and policy
                                                                                                                                              Graduate                                      Tobacco
                                                                                                                                              Center                                        Control

                   Paul Devereux        Associate            Tenured              1.0    M        White,                   PhD                University           Social                   Social                       Social
                                        Professor                                                 Non-                                        of                   Psychology               Behavioral                   isolation,
                                                                                                  Hispanic                                    Nevada,                                       Health                       emotion and
                                                                                                                                              Reno                                                                       aging,
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         cancer
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         screening

                   Amy Fitch            Lecturer             Non-                 .20    F        White,                   MPH                University           Epi. and                 Program                      Health
                                                             Tenure                               Non-                                        of                   Biostat-                 Planning;                    promotion;
                                                             Track                                Hispanic                                    California           istics                   Evaluation                   physical
                                                                                                                                              Berkeley                                                                   activity;
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         built envnt;
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         program
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         planning
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         and
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         evaluation
                   Michelle             Assistant            Tenure               1.0    F        White,                   MS,                Florida              Nutrition                Program                      promotion
                   Granner              Professor            Track                                Non-                     PhD                State                and Food                 Planning;                    of physical
                                                                                                  Hispanic                                    Univ.;               Sciences;                Evaluation;                  activity,
                                                                                                                                              University           Health                   Health                       nutrition,
                                                                                                                                              of South             Promotion,               Behavior                     and weight
                                                                                                                                              Carolina,            Education,               Theory                       manage-
                                                                                                                                              Arnold               and                                                   ment; CBPR
                                                                                                                                              School of            Behavior                                              evaluation
                                                                                                                                              Public
                                                                                                                                              Health

Self Study, June 2010                                                                                                                                                Page 106
UNR School of Community Health Sciences

alty Area
Department/Speci




                                  Name



                                             Rank
                                             Title/Academic


                                                                Classification*
                                                                Tenure Status or

                                                                                    FTE

                                                                                          Gender



                                                                                                        Race or Ethnicity

                                                                                                                            Earned
                                                                                                                            Graduate Degrees




                                                                                                                                                      Institution




                                                                                                                                                                            Discipline




                                                                                                                                                                                                   Teaching Area




                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Research Interest




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Activities
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Current/Past PH
                   Mel Minarik           Lecturer             Non-                 1.0    F        White,                   MPH,               University           Health               Health Policy             personal                      Hospital
                                                              Tenure                               Non-                     PhD                of                   Service              and Admin.                leadership,                   admin.;
                                                              Track                                Hispanic                                    Nevada,              Manage-                                        health                        Medical
                                                                                                                                               Reno;                ment;                                          service                       records
                                                                                                                                               University           Eductnl.                                       continuum,                    administrator
                                                                                                                                               of                   Leadership                                     org.
                                                                                                                                               California                                                          behavior /
                                                                                                                                               Los                                                                 devlpmt.;
                                                                                                                                               Angeles                                                             spirituality
                                                                                                                                                                                                                   and health
                   Judith Sugar          Associate            Tenured              .45    F        White,                   MA,                York                 Social and           Aging                     Gerntology;
                                         Professor                                                 Non-                     PhD                University           Behavioral                                     retirement
                                                                                                   Hispanic                                    Toronto,             Health                                         issues;
                                                                                                                                               Canada                                                              health
                                                                                                                                                                                                                   literacy




Self Study, June 2010                                                                                                                                                Page 107
UNR School of Community Health Sciences


4.1.b. If the program uses other faculty in its teaching programs (adjunct, part-time,
secondary appointments, etc), summary data on their qualifications should be provided in
table format and include at least a) name, b) title/academic rank, c) title and current
employment, d) FTE or % time allocated to teaching program, e) gender, f) race, g)
graduate degrees earned, h) disciplines in which degrees were earned, and i) contributions
to the teaching program. See CEPH Data Template G.
Part-time instructors who were hired on a per course basis in the last 3 years are reflected as
other faculty in Table 1.6.e. Table 4.1.b.1. (Template G) shows current other faculty. The
School has identified a number of well-qualified public health personnel who support the
program, however we do not need to depend on other faculty to support our mission. Adjunct
and affiliate faculty who receive salary support from outside the School and who have most
typically served on MPH student committees are not listed in Table 1.6.e. This faculty
complement brings extensive practical experience to the School by serving as instructors,
lecturers, mentors, and collaborators. The School also has long-standing collaborative
relationships for teaching and research with other colleges and schools at UNR and with
academic colleagues and practitioners throughout the community and state. Table 4.1.b.2. is a
listing of adjunct and affiliate faculty. There are no formal agreements with affiliate faculty.
Adjunct faculty are required to sign contracts each year and typically provide support in a
specific area (e.g., collaboration on a grant-funded research project).




Self Study, June 2010                                                                     Page 108
UNR School of Community Health Sciences



Table 4.1.b. (Template G) Current Other Faculty Used to Support Teaching Program (Adjunct, Part-Time, Secondary, etc.).
Department/Specialty Name Title/Academic Title &          FTE Gender Race or Highest Discipline        Teaching
Area                          Rank           Current                    Ethnicity Degree               Areas
                                             Employer                             Earned

MPH –
Social/Behavioral
Health

                        Peggy Associate      Associate  .43     F       C          MA       Education   Cultural
                        Dupey Professor      Dean for                                       and         Diversity
                                             Admissions                            PhD      Sociology;
                                             and                                            Counseling
                                             Student                                        and
                                             Affairs;                                       Educational
                                                                                            Psychology
                                             University
                                             of Nevada
                                             School of
                                             Medicine




Self Study, June 2010                                                                                           Page 109
UNR School of Community Health Sciences



Table 4.1.b.2. UNR School of Community Health Sciences Adjunct & Affiliate Faculty.
 Other Faculty at UNR
 Economics                              Wendel       Jeanne       Ph.D.
 Environmental Sciences & Health        Miller       Glenn        Ph.D.

Sanford Center for Aging                   Sacks        Teresa       M.P.H.
Social Psychology                          Murray       Colleen      Ph.D., F.T.
Medicine                                   Brown        L.D.         M.D., M.P.H.
Medicine/Center for Education and Health   Ford         Caroline     M.P.H.
Services Outreach
Medicine/Center for Education and Health   Charles      Patty        Dr.P.H., M.P.H.
Services Outreach
Medicine/Center for Education and Health   Packham      John         Ph.D.
Services Outreach
Medicine                                   Jennings     Enid         M.P.H., C.H.E.S.
Nursing                                    Ruchala      Patsy        DNSc, R.N.
Nursing                                    Hubbert      Ann          Ph.D., R.N.,
                                                                     C.T.N.
Nursing                                    Running      Alice        Ph.D., R.N.,
                                                                     A.P.N.
Nutrition                                  Benedict     Jamie        Ph.D., R.D.
Nutrition                                  Omaye        Stanley      Ph.D.
Sociology/Social Psychology                Elliott      Marta        Ph.D.
Sociology/Social Psychology                Stewart      Mary White   Ph.D.
Center for the Application for Substance   Shadley      Meri         Ph.D.
Abuse Technologies
Nursing                                    Longo        Bernadette   Ph.D., R.N.
Nevada System of Higher Education          Trevisan     Maurizio     M.D., M.S.
Community Members
Concentra                                  Khan         Amy          M.D., M.P.H.
Washoe County Health District              Todd         Randall      Dr.P.H.
Washoe County Health District              Anderson     Mary         M.D., M.P.H.
Program Evaluation Consultant              Hunsberger   Dina         Ph.D., M.P.H.
Washoe County Health District              Hadayia      Jennifer     M.P.A.
Program Evaluation Consultant              McConnell    Sara         M.P.A.
Nevada State Health Division               Whitley      Richard      M.S.
Nevada State Health Division               Azzam        Ihsan        M.D., M.P.H.
Desert Research Institute                  Zielinska    Barbara      Ph.D.
Desert Research Institute                  Chow         Judy         Ph.D.



Self Study, June 2010                                                              Page 110
UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Adjunct Faculty
Medicine                                     Sanders        Mary            Ph.D.
Medicine                                     Crawford       Jason           M.D., M.P.H.
WCHD                                         Chen           Lei             Ph.D.
St Mary's Regional Medical Center            Barella        Lisa            Ph.D., M.B.A.
University of Alexandroupolis, Greece        Panagiotidis   Mihalis         Ph.D.


4.1.c. Description of the manner in which the faculty complement integrates perspectives
from the field of practice, including information on appointment tracks for practitioners, if
used by the program.
Faculty members comprise former public health practitioners and are well integrated with the
public health practice community. Faculty participate and serve as executive board members for
the Nevada Public Health Association, and the Northern Nevada Chronic Disease Coalition, as
examples.
A major way faculty integrate practice is the use of course guest lecturers from public health
practice professionals. In addition, students travel to public health practice sites in the
community and provide service as part of coursework. Public health professionals serve as
members of student committees and we have obtained approval from the University’s graduate
school to allow each student committee to contain 1 member to be a representative from a
community agency (most typically, the internship preceptor). The student’s culminating project
must be a collaboration with a public health community group. Applied scholarly work is as
important to successful promotion and tenure as is theoretical or lab-based work.
4.1.d. Identification of outcome measures by which the program may judge the
qualifications of its faculty complement, along with data regarding the performance of the
program against those measures for each of the last three years.
As examples from Table 4.1.d., faculty have met or exceeded the program’s objectives in regards
to being members of community boards/committees, providing technical assistance to the
community, publishing, and increasing grant funding. Other objective targets which have not
been met every year include publishing/presenting with community members and being
recognized for leadership.
Table 4.1.d. Goals and objectives related to faculty performance.
1) Goal: “To develop the knowledge           2007 to 2008    2008 to 2009     2009 to 2010
base for public health through               Data            Data             Data
research.”
Objectives:
1. At least 60% of faculty will publish an   75%             71%              63%
    article in a peer-reviewed journal by
    2011.
2. At least 70% of faculty will present      88%             71%              59%
    research results at a conference by
    2011.
3. At least 70% of faculty will submit       69%             71%              75%
    one proposal for grant funding by
Self Study, June 2010                                                                  Page 111
UNR School of Community Health Sciences


   2011.
4. Number of new external fund awards           31%            43%            44%
   and amount of awards per FTE will
   increase 5% by 2011.                         $187,299 per   $92,312 per    $84,671 per
                                                faculty FTE    faculty FTE    faculty FTE

    2006-2007 Baseline:                         >5% increase
    3 faculty received grants
    Total amount = $261,090
    $18,649 amount/faculty FTE
2) Goal: “To be recognized for                  2007 to 2008   2008 to 2009   2009 to 2010
leadership in public health.”                   Data           Data           Data
Objectives:
1. At least 25% of faculty holding              39%            38%            21%
    positions on advisory boards, review
    panels, study sections, editor positions,
    and other influential bodies by 2015.
2. 30% of faculty will share health-            17%            19%            37%
    related information with community or
    media by 2011.
3) Goal: “To engage with multiple               2007 to 2008   2008 to 2009   2009 to 2010
communities through professional and            Data           Data           Data
scholarly service.”
Objectives:
1. By 2011, 40% of faculty will co-             56%            21%            31%
    author reports and publications with
    colleagues at other units on campus.
2. By 2011, 30% of faculty will co-             25%            36%            35%
    author reports, publications, and
    presentations with community
    members.
3. By 2011, 15% of faculty will provide         17%            19%            21%
    workshops, trainings and continuing
    education opportunities to public
    health professionals.
4. By 2011, 15% of faculty will provide         22%            25%            21%
    technical assistance to the community,
    including but not limited to, program
    evaluations, consulting, data analysis,
    grant partnerships.
5. By 2011, 10% of UNR faculty is               56%            63%            47%
    members of community boards or
    committees.
6. By 2011, 10% of UNR SCHS                     N/A            N/A            17%
    committees will include a community
    member.

Self Study, June 2010                                                                 Page 112
UNR School of Community Health Sciences



4.1.e. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is met.

Strengths
       There are sufficient numbers of faculty with the appropriate expertise to provide a quality
       MPH program with emphases in social/behavioral health and epidemiology.
       The faculty receive external funding to support their research, are involved with the
       community, are recognized as leaders, and are contributing to the field with presentations
       and publications.

Suggested improvements
      Recent faculty retirements and attrition have reduced the number of senior faculty.
      Future hires should focus on attracting high quality senior-level faculty.




Self Study, June 2010                                                                    Page 113
UNR School of Community Health Sciences


4.2. Faculty Policies and Procedures. The program shall have well-defined policies and
procedures to recruit, appoint and promote qualified faculty, to evaluate competence and
performance of faculty, and to support the professional development and advancement of
faculty.

4.2.a. A faculty handbook or other written document that outlines faculty rules and
regulations.

The UNR faculty handbook is available at http://sites.unr.edu/administrative-
manual/misc/misccellaneous/7004.aspxand. A handbook for part-time faculty is also available at
http://www.unr.edu/provost/ . The university bylaws are available at
http://www.unr.edu/facultysenate/bylaws/index.html

4.2.b. Description of provisions for faculty development, including identification of support
for faculty categories other than regular full-time appointments.
There are numerous opportunities and support for faculty, although there have been some cuts in
recent years due to budget considerations. Junior Faculty in tenure-track positions are eligible
for research grants of up to $15,000 offered by the university and three School faculty have
received grants. There are identified mentors at the school and college level for junior faculty.
Until 2009, an Excellence in Teaching Program provided training and classroom observations.
To supplement this program, the School has had lunch brown bag meetings with senior and
junior faculty to discuss classroom management and teaching issues, and instituted a peer
classroom observation procedure in which all School faculty participate in observing and
providing feedback to other School faculty.
Each year, the University gives out a $5,000 Excellence in Research Award, a Foundation
Professor honor for excellence in teaching and research, a $5,000 Distinguished Community
Outreach Award, an advisor award, a faculty mentor award, and $10,000 in F. Donald Tibbits
Teaching Awards. All full-time university faculty and staff (advisor award) are eligible. In 2008,
Kristen Clements-Nolle was the runner-up for the Tibbits Teaching Award. The Division of
Health Sciences also has a teaching award and faculty in the school have been nominated
multiple times and Nora Constantino won the award in 2007. The Nevada System of Higher
Education also gives out advisor, teaching and research awards to all member institutions
consisting of UNLV, and the Desert Research Institute.
Sabbatical and development leaves are available to academic and administrative faculty after 6
years of service and every 10 years thereafter. This program enables faculty to be reassigned to
projects that lead to professional advancement in instructional, service, or research areas. The
program permits reassignments that may be for one-half year or less at full base salary, or more
than one-half year up to one full year at two-thirds base salary. In recent years, three faculty have
taken leaves to obtain public health leadership training, pursue novel scholarship, and to author a
book on Veterans exposed to atomic matter. Faculty exchange programs are available and one
faculty member will be teaching in Mexico during the 2010 summer months. Research and
departmental funds are used to bring seminar speakers to campus and there are funds for faculty
and staff to attend professional conferences, meetings, and workshops. There are opportunities
for non-tenure track appointments and two faculty are currently supported as research assistant


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professors. New tenure-track faculty are provided start-up funds obtained from the Vice-
President for Research Office to support the successful launch of their research efforts.

The School also has 5 adjunct and 29 affiliate faculty (see section 4.1.b). Affiliate faculty are
people the School has identified as content experts in public health who have played a role
(or could help) in the development and direction of the SCHS. This designation also represents
the School’s support for them and their work. Affiliate faculty typically are people who have
taught in our program or have been involved in some other way. Potentially, they are people
who could serve as resources for students (as committee members for MPH students, for
example). Affiliate faculty may also act in an advisory role in guiding the school’s direction and
development. There are no formal obligations or responsibilities associated with this
designation. To become affiliate faculty, a nominee’s CV is circulated for approval by a vote of
the faculty at large. See below for a listing of adjunct and affiliate faculty.

4.2.c. Description of formal procedures for evaluating faculty competence and
performance.

Each January, faculty members submit annual review documents summarizing their
accomplishments in teaching, research, and service for the previous calendar year to the School’s
Personnel Committee. The committee reviews the document and assesses strengths and
weaknesses, and recommends a ranking of excellent, commendable, satisfactory or
unsatisfactory to the School Director. These evaluations are used by the School and University
administration for retention, tenure and merit raise decisions.

The School’s policies and procedures for evaluating faculty for tenure and promotion are
included in our bylaws (Appendix L). Tenure track faculty must be tenured by the end of their
sixth year as an untenured assistant professor. An applicant for tenure, promotion, or both must
submit a file containing required evidence of performance in teaching, research, and service, plus
supporting materials. Materials related to teaching performance include student and peer
teaching evaluations, and summaries of courses taught and students advised. Evidence of
research and scholarship includes a compilation of peer-reviewed papers, other publications,
research grant production, and presentations at scientific meetings. Also, at least five external
reviews of the candidate’s research are obtained from well-known scholars in the candidate’s
field. In addition, the file includes evidence of service to the School, the University, the
community, and the candidate’s profession.

Initially, the file is reviewed by the School Promotion and Tenure Committee, which consists of
faculty members in the School. Applications for tenure alone are reviewed by Committee
members at or above the current faculty member’s rank, and applications for promotion are
reviewed by Committee members at or above the rank sought. Tenure at or promotion to
associate professor requires that the candidate be rated excellent in scholarship or teaching, and
at least good in the other areas (teaching or service). Tenure at or promotion to professor requires
that the candidate be rated excellent in scholarship, excellent in either teaching or service, and
good or excellent in the other category. All school committee members are required to vote by
written ballot; these ballots and justifications are added to the file. From there the packet is
evaluated by the Division promotion and tenure committee and then the university committee.
All materials are forwarded to the Vice President of Health Sciences, and the VP must write a

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letter of evaluation for inclusion in the file. The entire file is forwarded to the provost’s office.
Since 2005, all 4 School faculty who applied for tenure successfully obtained promotion and
tenure.

4.2.d. Description of the processes used for student course evaluation and evaluation of
teaching effectiveness.
All courses are evaluated by students every semester. In the last year, a web-based course
evaluation form was introduced and the School has a 78% response rate from students. Since
junior faculty currently in the tenure-track process began their tenure period with a paper-and-
pencil evaluation format, the personnel committee decided to retain that procedure for junior
faculty to maintain consistency in their evaluation method. In the future, all faculty will be
evaluated using the online form.
Course evaluation forms will be provided in the onsite resource file. In addition, faculty conduct
course evaluations throughout the semester rather than obtaining feedback only at the end of the
semester when the course is over. In addition to assessment at the end of the semester, a number
of faculty integrate student evaluation opportunities throughout the course. Faculty who receive
lower student evaluations (typically below 3.5 on a 5-point scale) work with the Director and/or
the Personnel Committee to establish a development plan to improve their teaching.

4.2.e. Description of the emphasis given to community service activities in the promotion
and tenure process.

An applicant for tenure, promotion, or both must submit evidence of providing external service
to the community in addition to providing internal service to the School, Division or the
university. The community may include local, national or international entities and community
service activities may involve governmental and non-governmental agencies, industry,
professional associations and periodicals. The kind and amount of community service expected
vary with rank of tenure/promotion sought. Those seeking tenure or promotion to Associate
Professor are expected to have demonstrated participation in public-health related community
service such as membership/leadership in regional professional organization, presentations or
publications based on community service activities with community co-authors, volunteering to
help with a community event, or technical assistance to a community-based organization. Those
seeking tenure or promotion to Professor are expected to have demonstrated service engagement
on national or international level in addition to local services such as manuscript or grant review
for national or international journals or agencies, on national advisory committees, on editorial
board of periodicals, national media interviews regarding public health issues or events.
4.2.f. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is met.

Strengths
       There are a number of faculty development opportunities.
       There are clear guidelines for faculty recruitment, evaluation and promotion.



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Suggested Improvements
      Include more explicit instructions for community service activities in the faculty
      promotion and tenure process.




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4.3 Faculty and Staff Diversity. The program shall recruit, retain, and promote a diverse
faculty and staff, and shall offer equitable opportunities to qualified individuals regardless
of age, gender, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion, or national origin. In addition,
our School recognizes the contributions to diversity of those from urban, rural, and
frontier communities.
4.3.a. Summary demographic data on the program’s faculty, showing at least gender and
ethnicity; faculty number should be consistent with those show in the table in 4.1a. Data
must be presented in a table format. See CEPH Data Template H.

Table 4.3.a. (Template H) Summary Demographic Data for Current Core & Other Faculty.
                          Core Faculty     Other Faculty         TOTAL
                          #          %     #           %         #         %
           Male           7          37                          7         35
African American          0
Caucasian                 4          22                          4         20
Hispanic/Latino           0
Asian/Pacific Islander    3          17                          3         15
Native American/Alaska    0
     Native
Unknown/Other               0
International Male          0
          Female            12         63          1           33          13          65
African American            0
Caucasian                   12         63          1           33          13          65
Hispanic/Latino             0
Asian/Pacific Islander      0
Native American/Alaska      0
     Native
Unknown/Other               0
International               0
TOTAL                       19                     1                       20          100%

In addition, 16% of current faculty are gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender (GLBT).

4.3.b Summary demographic data on the program’s staff, showing at least gender and
ethnicity. Data must be presented in table format. See CEPH Data Template I.
Table 4.3.b. (Template I) Summary Demographic Data for Staff.*
                                       Staff                   TOTAL
African American Male
Caucasian Male
Hispanic/Latino Male
Asian/Pacific Islander Male            1                       1
Native American/Alaska Native Male
Unknown/Other Male


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Table 4.3.b. (Template I) Summary Demographic Data for Staff.*
                                               Staff                     TOTAL
International Male
African American Female                        1**                       1**
Caucasian Female                               3                         3
Hispanic/Latino Female
Asian/Pacific Islander Female                  1                         1
Native American/Alaska Native Female
Unknown/Other Female
International Female
TOTAL                                          6                         6
* Staff are those individuals not defined as students or faculty
**Part-time

4.3.c. Description of policies and procedures regarding the program’s commitment to
providing equitable opportunities without regard to age, gender, race, disability, sexual
orientation, religion or national origin.

The MPH Program values the importance of a diverse faculty, staff, and student body, and
follows procedures that are consistent with the policies of the University and those that are
reflected in the School’s mission, goals, and objectives. Objectives to guide us in meeting this
goal are listed in Table 4.3.f.

Equal Employment Opportunity Statement. The University of Nevada, Reno is committed to
Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action in recruitment of its students and employees
and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, creed, national origin,
veteran status, physical or mental disability, or sexual orientation. The University of Nevada,
Reno employs only United States citizens and aliens lawfully authorized to work in the United
States. Women and under-represented groups are encouraged to apply. (University
Administrative Manual, Revised January 15, 2010, p. 110).
Affirmative Action Plan
The University of Nevada, Reno is a federal government supply and service contractor, subject
to the affirmative action requirements of Executive Order 11246, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
as amended, and the Vietnam Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, Section 4212.
Because the University has $50,000 or more in annual contracts with the federal government and
employs 50 or more employees, we are required to prepare annual written Affirmative Action
Plans for minorities and women, for covered veterans, and for persons with disabilities.
Failure to comply with these laws and their implementing regulations, which are enforced by the
Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP), can result in debarment of the
University from future contracts and subcontracts.
Affirmative Action is a term that encompasses any measure adopted by an employer to correct or
to compensate for past or present discrimination or to prevent discrimination from recurring in
the future. Affirmative Action goes beyond the simple termination of a discriminatory practice.
As stipulated in federal regulations, a prerequisite to the development of a satisfactory

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Affirmative Action Plan (AAP) is the evaluation of opportunities for protected group members,
as well as an identification and analysis of problem areas inherent in their employment. Also,
where a statistical analysis of the employee workforce reveals a numeric disparity between
incumbency and availability of minorities or women, an adequate AAP details specific
affirmative action steps to guarantee equal employment opportunity. These steps are keyed to the
problems and needs of protected group members. For minorities and women, such steps include
the development of hiring and promotion goals to rectify the disparity between incumbency and
availability.

Responsibility for the development of the Affirmative Action Plan resides with the Office of
Human Resources. Communication of placement goals and action oriented programs shall be
communicated to the various constituencies. (University Administrative Manual, Revised
January 15, 2010, p. 116).
Sexual Harassment. It is the policy of the University of Nevada, Reno that the sexual harassment
of students, employees, and users of university facilities is unacceptable and prohibited. This
stance is consistent with the university’s efforts to maintain equal employment opportunity,
equal educational opportunity, nondiscrimination in programs, services, and use of facilities, and
the Affirmative Action program. In keeping with this policy, the University of Nevada, Reno is
undertaking a plan of action to protect employees, students, and users of university facilities
from sexual harassment and to rid the University of such conduct. For a complete copy of the
Sexual Harassment Policy, see Section 1,911. (University Administrative Manual, Revised
January 15, 2010, p. 110). These policies are also posted on the University’s website and
available for review during the site visit.

4.3.d. Description of recruitment and retention efforts used to attract and retain a diverse
faculty and staff, along with information about how these efforts are evaluated and refined
over time.

Faculty. Recruitment of faulty is an ongoing process for the SCHS. To ensure students are
receiving the best education, the School is committed to recruiting the best and most qualified
candidates. External recruitment has taken the form of advertisements on the university’s
website, at various conferences (i.e., APHA, Nevada Public Health Association), in relevant
professional journals (depending on budget and timeline), and on targeted diversity sites
(available at UNR’s office of Human Resources website
http://www.unr.edu/hr/documents/employment/DiversityOutreach_AdvertisingResourcesInfo.do
c).
The university’s Human Resources office works to support all of the colleges and schools in
recruiting and retaining strong minority candidates for faculty positions. The School makes a
specific effort to recruit diverse candidates, although it is limited by the available applicant pool.
The demographics of Northern Nevada also influence the decisions of potential job applicants
from diverse backgrounds.
The Search Chair guides the committee on their responsibilities related to EEO/AA goals, the
importance of applying a uniform process to all applicants and the desired end result which could be a
ranking of applicants or a selection of those deemed appropriate to hire for the position (Faculty
Human Resources Recruitment Manual, p. 6). The Search Committee’s responsibilities toward

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diversity include complying with OFCCP (Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs), which
ensures due consideration for under-represented groups (UNR Faculty Human Resources Recruitment
Manual, Appendix F, p. 46) available at:
http://www.unr.edu/hr//documents/employment/recruitmentmanualfinalinfo.doc

The Faculty Search Rules are sensitive to the ways in which the conduct of a search can
influence the diversity of the applicant pool and of candidates hired. In addition, three distinct
rules within the faculty search process directly address diversity (bolded within the list below).
The Faculty Search Rules (listed below) can be found in the University Administrative Manual,
Revised January 15, 2010, pp. 166-167.
Faculty Search Rules. The University of Nevada, Reno is committed to Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action in recruitment of its faculty. The university adheres to all federal
and state laws and regulations and our policy is to hire the most qualified applicant. The
following policies have been established to ensure a fair and equitable search process that
conforms to applicable laws, regulations, and policies.

1. Search committees should be diverse (there should be representation from under-
represented groups).
2. Search committee members, the chair, and the coordinator must disclose any relationship with
candidates to the search chair. This includes, but is not limited to teacher/student, research
collaboration, professional association, or personal relationship.
3. All searches must be open for a minimum of four weeks.
4. The following Recruitment/Outreach Guidelines must be met by the search committee:
         a. Advertisement/posting in two sites, with at least one diversity publication/website.
         b. Fifteen additional contacts by the committee to include:
                 i. Individuals (professional contacts)
                 ii. Institutions of higher education
                 iii. Listservs
                 iv. Discipline publications (journals, newsletters)
5. For administrative positions, minimum qualifications must match the Position Description
Questionnaire (PDQ).
6. The EEO Summary Report must be distributed to the search committee by the search
coordinator when the search closes to applicants or before interviews are conducted.
7. The screening process (including interview questions) must be job related and standardized
for all candidates.
8. HR approval is required at the following stages of the process:
         a. Initial requisition (request for fill)
          b. Applicant pool
          c. First interview
          d. Second interview
          e. Request to offer/compliance form
9. The search coordinator must update the status in e-SEARCH whenever a candidate declines
an interview or a job offer.
10. The search coordinator is required to submit justification on the compliance form in e-
SEARCH for salary offers over the acceptable mid-range.


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11. The signed pre-employment certification must be submitted with the new hire paperwork for
the successful candidate.
12. Campus interviews must be conducted with at least two finalists unless waived by the HR
department.
13. References must be verified in at least the candidate(s) selected for the position.
14. Documents that are specified in the Recruitment Manual must be uploaded to the e-
SEARCH system at the conclusion of the search. Any documents that are not able to be uploaded
to e-SEARCH must be retained by the department for three years.

Faculty Retention. The School attends to the development and retention of all faculty members.
New faculty are supported through a mentoring program within the School whereby new faculty
are paired with more senior faculty and encouraged to attend university- and division-sponsored
tenure and promotion activities. All faculty are evaluated annually, with extensive third, fourth,
and fifth year reviews. Within the School, teaching is peer-reviewed and feedback is provided
annually. The School encourages and supports collaborations and service responsibilities across
the School, the Division of Health Sciences, and the University as a way to enrich opportunities
for diversity.

Staff Recruitment and Retention. All appointments must be approved by University’s Business
Center North (BCN) Human Resources office and comply with Affirmative Action and State of
Nevada requirements. Job announcements are posted on NV APPS, BCN Human Resources, and
WorkReno.com websites. Included on these websites is the University of Nevada, Reno Equal
Employment Opportunity Statement, which is listed in section 4.3c. The compliance checklist
for hiring includes questions regarding the diversity of the interview panel, and diversity of the
applicant pool. Given that the School has only three staff positions (two administrative staff
positions and one student worker), we have been somewhat successful in achieving a diverse
staff through our hiring of student workers.

4.3.e. Description of efforts, other than recruitment and retention of core faculty, though
which the program seeks to establish and maintain an environment that supports diversity.
The School is supported in its diversity efforts by various programs throughout the University.
Three programs on campus focus on diversity and offer undergraduate majors or minors,
master’s degrees, certificates, or specialization (see list below). The Gender, Race, and Identity
Program is dedicated to assuring that UNR students develop a deep understanding of the impact
of race, class, ethnicity, and gender on their identities, as well as their society. This Program has
several core faculty and over 30 affiliate faculty drawn from many departments on campus:
Anthropology, Basque Studies, Community Health Sciences, Computer Science and
Engineering, Counseling and Educational Psychology, Curriculum, Criminal Justice, Educational
Specialties, English, Foreign Languages and Literature, Geography, History, Music and Dance,
Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Social Work, and Sociology. Three members of our
School (Boutté, Cook, and Sugar) are Faculty Affiliates of this program.

       Developmental Disabilities Program                     Graduate Interdisciplinary
       Undergraduate Interdisciplinary                        Specialization
       Minor                                                  Gender, Race, and Identity Program

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       Women’s Studies: Undergraduate                          Center for Basque Studies
       Major and Minor                                         Center for Excellence in
       Ethnic Studies: Undergraduate                           Developmental Disabilities
       Minor                                                   Center for Holocaust, Genocide and
       Holocaust, Genocide and Peace                           Peace Studies
       Studies: Undergraduate Minor                            Center for Student Cultural Diversity
       Religious Studies: Undergraduate                        Disability Resource Center
       Minor                                                   Latino Research Center
       Gender, Race, and Identity: M.A.,                       Office of International Students and
       Graduate Certificate                                    Scholars
       Gerontology Programs                                    Sanford Center for Aging
       Undergraduate Minor                                     University Studies Abroad
       Gerontology Certificate                                 Consortium (USAC)
       A number of additional academic                         Veteran Services and
       programs and resources are available                    Admissions/University Veterans’
       to engage and nurture faculty, staff,                   Coalition
       and student diversity, including:

4.3.f. Identification of outcome measures by which the program may evaluate its success in
achieving a diverse faculty and staff, along with data regarding the performance of the
program against those measure for each of the last three years.

Table 4.3.f. Outcome Measures, Targets, and Data for Faculty and Staff Diversity.
5) Goal: To expose students to diversity in     2007 to 2008 2008 to 2009 2009 to 2010
multiple venues.                                Data          Data             Data
Objectives:
1. Faculty and staff are representative of      Women:        Women            Women
    women, underrepresented minority, and       Faculty: 50% Faculty: 56% Faculty: 65%
    other diverse groups in the relevant labor  Staff: 67%    Staff: 100%      Staff: 83%
    markets* by 2015.
    Relevant Labor Market Targets:              Minority      Minority         Minority
    Women: Faculty:54%; Staff: 46%              Faculty: 17% Faculty: 19% Faculty: 15%
    Minority: Faculty:16%; Staff: 21%           Staff: 50%    Staff: 25%       Staff: 50%
2. Efforts to recruit diverse faculty and staff No Search     No Search        3 specific
    will increase by 5% for each new hire.                                     efforts
3. By 2011, 50% of faculty address issues       50%           59%              58%
    affecting underrepresented populations in
    their work.
*The relevant labor markets used for comparison are Washoe County Labor Force for staff and
Public Health PhD Graduates for faculty (ASPH, 2004).
No faculty searches occurred during the academic years 2007-2008 and 2008-2009. For the
search in 2009-2010, the above policies on recruiting a diverse faculty were followed. Three
additional efforts were undertaken to specifically attract a diverse labor market (as reflected in
Table 4.3.f.). Personal letters from the School’s director were sent to program directors and
faculty who either offered training in health disparities at their institutions (e.g., housed a Center

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for Health Disparities) or who specialized in research in minority health issues. Secondly, search
announcements were sent to people listed in the Directory of Women and Minority Doctoral
Researchers who had public health backgrounds. Finally, search advertisements were placed in
publications which addressed issues of minority health and with DHHS’s Office of Minority
Health. UNR’s EEO race summary of applicants for this search showed: 4 Non-Disclosed, 14
Asian, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, 4 African American, 2 Latino/Hispanic, and 9 White.

4.3.g.Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is met.

Strengths
       Our faculty are diverse in terms of age, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, and
       national origin. Currently, there is an equal number of male and female faculty.
       The University has policies in place to facilitate recruitment and retention of diverse
       faculty.
       The School, through specific activities and mentoring, encourages and maintains a
       productive environment for recruitment and retention of minority faculty (see 4.3.d,
       4.3.e).
       We have been successful at recruiting and retaining student workers from diverse
       backgrounds.
       The School is committed to increasing the diversity of its faculty and staff.

   Suggested Improvements
      In addition to increasing diversity in its tenure-track ranks, the School should consider
      clinical faculty and adjunct appointments as a means to diversify its faculty. However,
      the School can only hire from a pool of qualified applicants, and securing a diverse pool
      is challenging for the University as a whole.
      Our current diversity does not fully reflect the ethnic diversity of the community, which
      contains individuals who are Native American and Hispanic. In terms of staff, we are
      currently limited to two full-time administrative staff positions and one student worker to
      support the School’s operations (compared to Center staff).
      Another strategy would be to recruit more diverse students into the program (i.e., Native
      American, African American, and Hispanic individuals), and offer encouragement and
      support for them to apply for doctoral programs. These students would add diversity to
      the pool of qualified candidates for faculty recruitment.
      The School should engage in ongoing data collection and annual review of these
      indicators toward the objective of diversifying the faculty and staff.




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4.4 Student Recruitment and Admissions. The program shall have student recruitment and
admissions policies and procedures designed to locate and select qualified individuals
capable of taking advantage of the program’s various learning activities, which will enable
each of them to develop competence for a career in public health.

4.4.a. Description of the Program’s recruitment policies and procedures
Recruitment Policy. The University of Nevada Reno School of Community Health Sciences
Master of Public Health Program recruits qualified and dedicated students with a diverse range
of interests, educational and work related backgrounds, to bring into their programs of study a
vast repertoire of experiences and motivations for advancing their public health careers. We
value the backgrounds of our students and know that they contribute to classroom and
experiential learning for the student, their colleagues, and faculty in the program.
Therefore, in both our recruitment and selection process we recognize and value diversity in our
MPH student body the MPH program. We adhere to the university's affirmative action and equal
opportunity policies and all of its requirements in admission activities. Our program admits
qualified students regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin,
disability, or veteran’s status. Further details will be discussed in section 4.5.

Recruitment Procedures. The responsibility and activities of recruitment for MPH students are
multidimensional and involve many people including:
       Graduate Director – based upon applicant inquiries, meets with all applicants face-to-face
       when possible before applications are completed;
       The Graduate Faculty and Graduate Committee – integral in recruiting and retaining our
       students by engagement with students in their areas of interest;
       “Graduate Special” students – graduate students not enrolled in the MPH program but
       who take our core courses as a way of evaluating the program’s potential for them
       UNR Graduate School staff who attend certain Graduate School fairs in other states (e.g.,
       diversity fairs);
       Our current MPH students who participate through word of mouth and answering
       requests from potential applicants;
       Our Website;
       Our collaborative academic programs – University of Nevada School of Medicine and
       Orvis School of Nursing;
       Academic Fairs – both at UNR and at other non-MPH Universities;
       Career fairs – locally, for students coming back into academics to become more
       marketable;
       Community Health Sciences undergraduate students – the large undergraduate program
       represents a source of motivated successful students who are interested in the MPH; the
       Graduate Director annually visits 400-level classes for recruitment purposes;
       County/State Health Department Seminars and Outreach;
       APHA/NPHA meetings, booths and workshops/student presentations;
       Other undergraduate students from UNR – from networking and advertisement of
       classes;
       Faculty networks – in-state and out of state;

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       Internships – MPH students meet others who are interested in their work;
       Word of mouth – students, faculty, preceptors, professional networks throughout the
       community;
       Business networking by the Graduate Director in monthly community meetings – this
       effort reaches out to non-traditional students who are in the workplace, some who are not
       even currently in the health field;
       Alumni referrals – as alumni numbers grow, so do referrals;
       Social Networking – by students and through the Facebook MPH Group.

We continue to look for unique opportunities to recruit students in different areas as identified by
our current students, colleagues, alumni, and other community support networks.

4.4.b. Statement of admissions policies and procedures.
The Graduate Committee annually reviews admission requirements for the MPH program to
insure its consistency with our program’s mission, modifying as necessary.
Admissions are for Fall semesters only with a final deadline of February 15 for applications. This
deadline represents a change from a twice-yearly admissions process and was instituted to assist
students in staying on course progression for graduation.
The Graduate School receives and processes their required materials (transcripts and official test
scores) from the student in their information system, Nolij. Then, the Graduate Director (via the
Administrative Assistant by accessing Nolij) receives other materials (see 7, 8, 9 below) from the
applicant. The student’s folder, when complete is forwarded to the Graduate Director.
Then monthly, at least two members of the Graduate Committee will evaluate any complete
applications for admission. There must be agreement by both members for admission. If not, a
third member will also review the application and could refer it to the monthly Graduate
Committee for review.
For MPH students approved for admission, notifications by email are then sent out by the
Graduate Director for acceptance to those students with requests for any additional information
as well as instructions for their enrollment in classes and their advisor. In addition, for students
who are not admitted, an email is also sent to them as well indicating the areas that need further
strengthening for a future admission. In concert, our Administrative Assistant notifies the
Graduate School as well through the Nolij computer-based information system.
Admissions Policies. Qualifications for Admission to the Master's Program in Public Health
Please note: Prospective students must meet the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and School
of Community Health Sciences requirements for graduate status:
http://www.unr.edu/grad/prospective/apply.asp which includes graduating with a Bachelor’s
degree with a GPA or 2.75 or higher.
Once the admission qualifications for UNR are met, an application for admission to the MPH
program may be made.

Admissions criteria:

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   1. Completed an undergraduate degree from an accredited college/university.
   2. Undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher on a 4-point scale.
   3. Graduate Record Exam (GRE) general test. We expect that students will achieve a
      minimum score of 1000 between the math and verbal portions of the exam. For additional
      information: http://www.gre.org. The university’s institutional code to receive GRE test
      score reports is 4844. Other standardized exams such as the MCAT, LSAT, GMAT,
      DAT are allowable in place of the GRE. For students with terminal degrees (Ph.D.,
      Ed.D.) and professional degrees (M.D., D.D.S.), the GRE requirement is waived.
   4. (For International Students) A minimum TOEFL score of 500. For additional
      information: http://www.toefl.org. The university’s institutional code to receive TOEFL
      test score reports is 4844.
   5. Provided 3 letters of recommendation specifying the student’s interest and suitability for
      the MPH program.
   6. Provide a sample of academic writing for review of writing abilities.
   7. Provide an “admissions essay” discussing why they are choosing to pursue an MPH and
      which specialization they are interested in – epidemiology or social behavioral health.

In addition, pre-requisite coursework is required for admission into the MPH Program.
Applicants will have:
    1. Completed undergraduate or graduate courses in statistics. Statistics must be completed
        prior to taking CHS 780: Biostatistics in Public Health and CHS 712: MPH
        Epidemiology. The MPH student may be able to take a statistics course in summer school
        prior to starting their progression of study in fall.
    2. Students who have not completed an undergraduate patho-physiology course must
        complete CHS 200 - Public Health Biology, a course that grounds a student in health
        science. It is preferable that the student have this background/course before applying, but
        with the Graduate Director approval, this course can be taken after admission is
        approved.

While relevant work in the health field is not required for admission into the program, evidence
of this helps ensure a proper alignment and knowledge of public health values consistent with
our MPH program. However, we also do encourage students with non-health related
backgrounds. It adds to the diversity of experiences of students who will now choose public
health as a future direction without having had that background in their past.

4.4.c. Examples of recruitment materials and other publications and advertising that
describe, at the minimum, academic calendars, grading, and the academic offerings of the
program.
Online recruitment materials:
UNR MPH Website: http://hhs.unr.edu/schs//mph_specializations.html
UNR MPH Epidemiology Specialization: http://hhs.unr.edu/schs/mph_epi_prog.html
UNR MPH Social Behavioral Health Specialization: http://hhs.unr.edu/schs/mphsbh_prog.html
UNR MPH Application Process: http://hhs.unr.edu/schs/mph_sbh_prog.html
UNR On-Line Catalogue:
http://www.collegesource.org/displayinfo/catalink.asp?pid={BEBD014F-27B7-4E88-8602-
907D92100065}&oig={5A4EB770-8240-435B-B867-8595F430D8C9}&vt=5

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UNR Graduate School: http://www.unr.edu/grad/
UNR Academic Calendars: http://www.unr.edu/catalog/
Additional recruitment materials to be developed.
MPH Student Handbook (see Appendix M).

4.4.d. Quantitative Information on the number of applicants, acceptances, and enrollment,
by specialty area for each of the last three years.

Table 4.4.d. (Template J) Quantitative Information on Applicants, Acceptances, and
Enrollments by Program Area, 2007 to 2010.
                                  Academic Year       Academic Year      Academic Year
                                   2007 to 2008        2008 to 2009       2009 to 2010
MPH --             Applied               3                   7                   9
Epidemiology       Accepted              3                   7                   8
                   Enrolled              3                   7                   7
MPH --             Applied               7                   3                  12
Social/Behavioral Accepted               7                   3                  12
Health             Enrolled              7                   3                  10
                   Accepted              2                   1                   0
                   Enrolled              2                   1                   0
MPH/MD**           Applied               0                   0                   4
                   Accepted              0                   0                   4
                   Enrolled              0                   0                   4
**Accepted students beginning 2009-2010.

Our acceptance rates are high. We feel this reflects well on our pre-application advisement with
prospective students (see section 4.6.a.). We spend time as needed with prospective students to
ensure our program matches their career interests including arranging for them to meet with
current students and alumni. In addition, many students apply after taking 1 or 2 courses as a
graduate special (see below). In those cases, both the student and the faculty have realized that
our program is the right fit for the student. There are cases in which students do not reflect their
desired area of emphasis (e.g., epidemiology or social/behavioral health) in the application.
These students are more likely to be rejected: Of the 7 who applied in 2009-2010 and did not
select an emphasis, only 3 were accepted (43%; data not reflected in Table 4.4.d.). For those we
accept, we work with the incoming student to determine the best area of emphasis for them based
on their stated purpose for choosing an MPH, their career plans, and their strengths. None of the
3 accepted with area unspecified enrolled.



4.4.e. Quantitative information on the number of students enrolled in each specialty area
identified in the instructional matrix, including headcounts of full- and part-time students
and a full-time equivalent conversion, for each of the last three years. Explain any
important trends or patterns, including a persistent absence of students in any Program or
specialization.

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Table 4.4.e. (Template K) Students Enrolled in Each Degree Program by Area of
Specialization, 2007 to 2010.
                             2007 to 2008            2008 to 2009          2009 to 2010
                        HC      HC      FTE     HC      HC      FTE    HC HC FTE
                        FT      PT              FT      PT             FT     PT
MPH –                     9        1     9.56     10       6     12.72  11      9    15.06
Epidemiology
MPH --                    4        5     6.83     5        6      9.17   5     13    11.22
Social/Behavioral
Health
MPH/MD**                NA      NA      NA      NA      NA      NA       3      1     3.83
**NA = not applicable. Accepted students beginning 2009-2010.

In addition to the students enrolled in a degree program, there are currently about 15 students
who are taking MPH courses as graduate specials. Graduate specials can take up to 9 credits
without being admitted to a degree program. Graduate special status allows potential students to
learn more about the MPH program. Almost every graduate special student decides to apply to
the program.

4.4.f. Identification of outcome measures by which the Program may evaluate its success in
enrolling a qualified student body, along with data regarding the performance of the
Program against those measures for each of the last three years.

Table 4.4.f. Outcome Measures, Targets, and Data for Students Admitted to MPH
Program.
Goal: “To prepare future public health       2007-2008      2008-2009      2009-2010
practitioners, researchers, educators and
leaders.”

Objective 1): Recruitment/Admissions

1a. By 2011, 80% of students enrolled in the     53%             67%           70%
    MPH program will have an overall
    undergraduate GPA that exceeds 3.2.
1b. By 2011, 40% of students enrolled in the     31%            33%             47%
    MPH program will have verbal and
    quantitative GRE scores that exceed the 50th
    percentile.*
*N = those students with GRE scores. A few students complete other entrance exams (e.g.,
MCAT, LSAT).

4.4.g. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is met with commentary.

Strengths

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       Graduate Director and faculty value personal meetings with prospective students.
       High follup-up applications for prospective students inquiring about program.
       Overall faculty involvement in recruitment and admissions.
       Supportive MPH student base for word-of-mouth marketing.
       Potential students are known due to personal contact prior to admission and are well
       screened for good match with program.
       Diverse backgrounds/degrees of applicants.
       Alumni support through the School’s advisory board.

Suggested Improvements
      Improved website design and content.
      More formal written materials to hand out to referral areas and potential students.
      Workshops on public health issues on campus for currents students.
      Webinars for our community partners.
      Continue enhancements of our strengths.
      Obtain resources to recruit externally from UNR (e.g., resources to go to APHA or
      similar conferences to reach out to potential students).
      Develop 4 + 1 Program BS/MPH – students complete their BS and MPH in four years.




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4.5 Student Diversity. Stated application, admission, and degree-granting requirements
and regulations shall be applied equitably to individual applicants and students regardless
of age, gender, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion or national origin.
4.5.a. Description of policies, procedures and plans to achieve a diverse student population.
The MPH program values diversity within its students, faculty, and staff. The program seeks to
recruit, retain, and serve diverse populations and to contribute to a climate of tolerance,
inclusion, and collaboration within the program, the University, and the community. We believe
that diversity supports and creates a rich learning environment, more effective public health
professionals and initiatives. Key program values - professionalism, integrity, diversity,
community/collaboration and, building knowledge and learners - were collectively established
by faculty, staff, and students and reflect a culture of inclusion.
Diversity issues are interspersed throughout the curriculum - addressing the majority of the
ASPH competencies in diversity and culture (60% of the competencies in the MPH core and
100% in the Social and Behavioral Health specialty area). Many courses focus on diversity
issues, including world health, cultural diversity, rural health issues, HIV/AIDS, and most
recently, a course on health care systems in other countries that will include course activities
conducted in Toronto, Canada is planned for summer 2011.
The University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and does not discriminate
against faculty, students or staff on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, creed, national
origin, veteran status, physical or mental disability, or sexual orientation in any program or
activity it operates. (http://www.unr.edu/eoaa/ada.html). The University’s Division of Student
Services’ (http://www.unr.edu/stsv/vpstsv/) policy statement includes a commitment to diversity
with seventeen objectives to foster and support diversity in the areas of student learning and
success; hiring, training, and professional development; and collaboration and outreach.

4.5.b. Description of recruitment efforts used to attract a diverse student body, along with
information about how these efforts are evaluated and refined over time.
Specific efforts to recruit a diverse student body have included efforts to personally encourage
diverse undergraduate students to apply to the program, to recruit from diverse groups affiliated
with UNR, and graduate school diversity `recruitment fairs. Students who express an interest in
the program are contacted and provided with information about the program and the field.

The program expects and fosters student success. The Graduate Director and the Graduate
Committee oversee program efforts to recruit and retain a diverse student body. The MPH
Student Affairs Committee assesses student progress, identifies potential student difficulties, and
supports students and faculty to promote student success. These committees meet monthly and at
least three times a semester, respectively, in order to review activities and revise strategies as
needed. The entire faculty serves a crucial role in advising and mentoring students as they
investigate career options and interests, during their graduate school application process, and
throughout the program. The program is aware of the need to help students transition as they
begin a new academic program and move to a new geographical or cultural location. The
program actively seeks to assist students in this transition; for example, the program often
facilitates social networking for students with similar backgrounds/cultural experiences.

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All of these recruitment and retention efforts are tracked qualitatively to monitor what efforts are
taking place, where modifications need to be made, and identifying new opportunities to increase
and maintain a diverse student body. Feedback is regularly sought from students, alumni, and
faculty and used to make improvements.

The University has several programs that support recruitment and retention of a diverse student
body. The University participates in Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education’s
(WICHE) Western Regional Graduate Program (WRGP) which provides graduate students from
14 states reduced tuition rates. The University maintains a website
(http://www.unr.edu/diversity/) that provides information and resources for diverse groups. The
site also provides committee reports related to diversity issues from five regularly-standing
diversity committees. The Graduate School offers Diversity Fellowships for incoming students
which covers 100% of tuition costs. In 2007, an incoming MPH student unsuccessfully applied
for the fellowship following a recommendation by the School’s Graduate Program Director. The
student was awarded a departmental graduate assistantship position, however.
The University’s Center for Student Cultural Diversity (http://www.unr.edu/stsv/cscd/) provides
numerous “programs and services that promote recruitment and retention, the pursuit of
academic success and graduation” for students that self-identify as African American, Asian
American/Pacific Islander, American Indian, Hispanic/Latino, first-generation college students,
low-income, and lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgendered. Several diversity groups exist on
campus including, the Black Culture Cooperative, Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Project, Las
Culturas, Intertribal Higher Education Program, Pride Collaborative, and Mosaic. The Office of
International Students and Scholars provides (http://www.unr.edu/oiss/students/clubs.html)
programs and a very active International Club. The Associated Students of the University of
Nevada and the Graduate Student Association (http://www.unr.edu/gsa/default.html) run
household item and food pantry programs for students in need of temporary assistance, as well as
support over a dozen student-led diversity groups.
The graduate catalog (http://www.unr.edu/grad/forms/grad_catalog.asp) and Graduate Student
Association (GSA) handbook
(www.unr.edu/grad/forms/docs/GraduateSurvivalHandbook06.pdf) cover information regarding
local housing, transportation, health care resources, and cultural/recreation opportunities; as well
as GSA-sponsored activities and funding, graduate student rights and responsibilities, academic
services, and vital information and resources available for international students. The handbook
also provides information regarding policies and procedures to address academic problems, legal
issues, student advocacy, sexual harassment, counseling services, and financial crisis assistance.

4.5.c. Quantitative information on the demographic characteristics of the student body,
including data on applicants and admissions, for each of the last three years. Data must be
presented in table format. See CEPH Data Template L.

Table 4.5.c. (Template L) Demographic Characteristics of Student Body from 2007 to 2010.
                                      2007-2008          2008-2009        2009-2010
                                     M        F         M        F       M         F
                        Applied               1                  1
African American        Accepted              1                  1
                        Enrolled              1                  1

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


                          Applied                     13       1          6         6        15
Caucasian                 Accepted                    13       1          6         6        15
                          Enrolled                    12       1          6         5        13
                          Applied                      1       1          1
Hispanic/Latino           Accepted                     1       1          1
                          Enrolled                     1       1          1
Asian Pacific Islander Applied                         1                            2         1
                          Accepted                     1                            1         1
                          Enrolled                                                            1
Native                    Applied
American/Alaska           Accepted
Native                    Enrolled
                          Applied                      2                  1                   1
Unknown/Other             Accepted                     2                  1                   1
                          Enrolled
                          Applied            1         2                  2         6         5
International             Accepted           1         2                  2         3         4
                          Enrolled           1                            2         1         3
                          Applied            1        20       2         11        14        22
TOTAL*                    Accepted           1        20       2         11        10        21
                          Enrolled           1        14       2         10         6        17
*Total includes students accepted into some emphases which are not being submitted for
accreditation review due to: 1) need to update the curriculum (MSN/MPH) and 2) the emphasis
is no longer viable due to the loss of faculty (environmental/occupational health and health
policy/administration). The numbers are: 3 students in MSN/MPH, 2 students in EOH, and 4
students in health policy/administration. Of the 9 students accepted, 5 remain in the program.

4.5.d. Identification of measures by which the program may evaluate its success in
achieving a demographically diverse student body, along with data regarding the
program’s performance against these measures for each of the last three years.
The program has adopted goals and objectives to promote recruitment of a diverse student body.
These targets, with data for the last three years where available, are presented in Table 4.5.d.1.

Table 4.5.d.1. Outcome Measures for Student Diversity in the MPH Program.
Outcome                Target            2007-2008         2008-2009      2009-2010
Measure

Number and      By 2011, efforts to                1                  1                   2
type of         recruit
                                              Attended            Attended          Attended
recruitment     underrepresented             California          California         California
efforts for     populations for the         Diversity Fair      Diversity Fair     Diversity and
students        MPH program will                                                    Women in
                increase by 10%.                                                      Higher
                                                                                  Education Fairs

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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Race/ethnicity   By 2011, historically          13%                25%                 4%
information      underrepresented
for students     racial/ethnic
admitted to      populations will
the program      comprise 20% of the
                 students enrolled in the
                 MPH program.
Work or          By 2011, 20% of MPH            100%               90%                73%
volunteer        applicants will report
experience       experience working
reported in      with underrepresented
students’        populations.
program
applications


The program includes a number of international students from countries including Belize, Africa,
India, and China who are not reflected in our data on underrepresented students. The faculty felt
that the objective should focus on historically underrepresented minorities in the United States.
However, the students have commented that the diversity represented by students from other
countries has greatly enhanced their learning experiences. In addition to historically
underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities, we have had a number of openly
gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender students which speaks to our inclusive environment and further
enriches the students’ experiences. In the newly admitted cohort for 2010-2011, 3 students (of
14 accepted) are members of a racial/ethnic minority group (21%).

4.5.e. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is partially met.

Strengths
       Support in program and from faculty and University values, policies, and resources for a
       diverse student body.
       Some procedures to foster student success and involvement.
       History of diverse students in the program.

Suggested Improvements
      Develop strategic plan to increase recruitment and enrollment of students from diverse
      populations.
      Add statements of inclusion and diversity, as well as the program’s values, on school and
      program websites, recruitment materials, brochures, and program student handbook.
      Increase outreach and recruitment efforts that are tailored for diverse populations.
      Seek to increase financial support for diverse students.



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4.6. Advising and Career Counseling. There shall be available a clearly explained and
accessible academic advising system for students, as well as readily available career and
placement advice.
The MPH Program provides personal academic advising and career and placement counseling
for its students.

4.6.a. Description of the advising and counseling services, including sample orientation
materials such as student handbook.
Advising. Applicant advising- Interested students initially meet with the Graduate Director to
explore options and to ask questions about the admission process and coursework. Students with
particular foci of interest are then referred to faculty in that area of emphasis for more formal
advisement.
Formal Advising – Upon admission, MPH students are matched with an advisor based upon their
program specialization and personal interests. The advisor assists them with their Program of
Study (POS) and course selection, and begins the development of their MPH experience.
Advisors meet with students each semester, assisting in planning their coursework, then working
with them to find an appropriate internship. They also assist the student while they are in the
MPH Capstone Course, all in alignment with the student’s career goals and objectives.
MPH Student Fall Orientation - An annual half-day orientation is held in August for new MPH
students. It is a time to meet faculty, other students and alumni, and to become familiar with the
MPH Student handbook (see Appendix M) and to ask any questions. Those who do not come to
the orientation meet with the Graduate Director and/or advisor to receive the information
provided at orientation.
MPH Graduate Special - At UNR, students who are not officially admitted into a program of
study, and/or are in the process of completing their application, may take up to 9 units of classes.
When admitted to the MPH program, these courses can transfer into their program of study. The
number of Graduate Special students is an indicator of interest in the program and of future
admissions. All Graduate Special students are initially advised by the Graduate Director and/or a
course faculty member until admitted into the program. However, with the increasing numbers
of Graduate Specials in the program this past year, there needs to be greater emphasis, tracking,
and advisement of these students, in order to assist them in transitioning into our MPH program
in order to keep them on progression.
Mentoring - The mentorship is formalized with the advisor and committee chair (if different),
although many other faculty are involved with mentoring students. Students are also mentored by
other graduate assistants, second year students, former and current colleagues of students,
graduate assistant supervisors, internship supervisors, alumni, and guest speakers. Mentoring
relationships come from many places and create connections throughout the student body. A
significant source of mentoring occurs during the student’s culminating experience when the
advisor in his/her role as committee chair and the other project committee members guide the
student through that process and discuss the student’s career plans. We value this professional
development aspect of our relationships.



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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


Career Counseling
Career counseling is done both formally and informally. In the formal manner, we are a central
hub for career opportunities and internship postings from many organizations in the Northern
Nevada area as well as out of the area employers. These are posted on the graduate Bulletin
Board, shared on our list-serve as well as our WebCampus site for our students. The other more
formal resources are both the Graduate School and the Graduate Student Association
http://www.unr.edu/gsa/ who represent groups committed to the professional development of our
students at UNR. They host a Graduate School Fairs each Fall for all UNR students to explore
graduate programs including the MPH program.
We have continued support from the College of Business Career Development staff and website:
http://www.business.unr.edu/career/ They also host Career Fairs each semester that our students
attend.
There is a Counseling Service on campus which support students personal and family needs:
http://www.unr.edu/stsv/cs/

In the less formal and more MPH Program specific career counseling, there are many who
contribute to the students’ future: their advisor, other MPH faculty, alumni, and
faculty/community mentors.
One of the purposes of our MPH Student Affairs Committee is also to support MPH students’
wellness - our faculty has been great support for students who have non-cognitive issues.

4.6.b. Description of the procedures by which students may communicate their concerns to
program officials, including information about how these procedures are publicized and
about the aggregate number of complaints submitted for each of the last three years.
See section 1.4.e.

4.6.c. Information about student satisfaction with advising and counseling services
In the past three years, there have been 3 requests by students to change advisors. This is a small
percentage and is one indicator that there is satisfaction with the services provided. We also
understand and support students in seeking out advising and career support from many sources
beyond their advisor and beyond our walls.

Each semester, the Graduate Assistants are surveyed confidentially about their relationships with
their supervising faculty member. Results are reviewed by the Graduate Program Director and
the Graduate Committee. Aggregate feedback from the students is shared with all faculty who
have served as supervisors.
The results from the MPH alumni survey (see Table 2.7.f.2.) demonstrate that all graduates from
2007-2008 who returned surveys rate the quality of advisement from fair to excellent. All 2008
alumni who returned surveys (the data for the most recent year available) rated the advisement
quality as excellent. Interviews with all the MD/MPH students were conducted by the Graduate
Program Director at the end of their first year in the program and the students completed a
evaluation of the program using Survey Monkey. The students were very satisfied with their


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UNR School of Community Health Sciences


experiences with faculty and in the classroom (2 of 3 rated their experience as “excellent”; the 3 rd
as “good”). Although this feedback is encouraging, it must be noted that response rates for the
alumni survey are low and there are a limited number of dual MD/MPH students.

4.6.d. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.
This criterion is met.

Strengths
       Faculty commitment to student success.
       Counseling and advisement are built into the program and students receive guidance and
       provide feedback at various points as they progress through program.
       MPH Alumni now in key management positions around the Northern Nevada area.
       Strong support from the College of Business Career Development Center.
       Many paths to advisement and career counseling supported and encouraged.

Suggested Improvements
      Increasing website content about career opportunities.
      Student surveys during their programs of study regarding satisfaction of advising
      services.
      Increasing response rates in alumni survey regarding advising and career counseling.




Self Study, June 2010                                                                      Page 137

				
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