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					                                                                                           Lyn Bracewell Phillips
                                                                                           AER CHAIR
        TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARD                                          Elaine Mendoza
                                                                                           AER VICE-CHAIR

            Academic Excellence and Research (AER) Committee                               Laurie Bricker
                                                                                           Joe B. Hinton
                                                                                           Brenda Pejovich
                   1200 East Anderson Lane, Room 2.140
                                                                                           A.W. “Whit” Riter
                               Austin, Texas                                               (Ex-Officio)
                         1:00 p.m., March 23, 2009                                         Charles “Trey” Lewis III,
              (or upon adjournment of the Participation and Success                        Student Representative

                        Committee meeting, whichever is later)

                                        AGENDA

I.     Welcome and Committee Chair’s meeting overview

II.    Consideration of adopting minutes from the January 5, 2009, Committee meeting

III.   Report on Higher Education Policy Institute
              - Review of preliminary analysis of the effects of tuition increases on application
              and enrollment decisions of students

IV.    Items for the April 2009 Board agenda related to the Academic Excellence and
       Research Committee

       A.      Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to statutory four-
               year review of degree programs, mission statements, and table of programs for
               the following institutions:

               1.   Angelo State University
               2.   Sul Ross State University
               3.   Sul Ross State University–Rio Grande College
               4.   Texas A&M International University
               5.   University of North Texas

       B.      Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to preliminary
               authority requests for the following institutions:

               ANGELO STATE UNIVERSITY

               1. Food Animal Science and Marketing (bachelor’s level)

               SAM HOUSTON STATE UNIVERSITY

               2. Instructional Technology (doctoral level)

               3. School Psychology (doctoral level)

               TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY-SAN MARCOS

               4. Developmental Education (doctoral level)

               THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON

               5. Environmental Science (bachelor’s level)
C.   Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to requests for a
     new degree program:

     TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY/TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY SYSTEM HEALTH
     SCIENCE CENTER

     1. Joint Master of Science (M.S.) degree and a Joint Doctor of Philosophy
        (Ph.D.) degree with a major in Neuroscience

     TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-COMMERCE /TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-TEXARKANA

     2. Step 2 Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree with a major in Educational
        Administration

     TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-CORPUS CHRISTI

     3. Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with a major in Mechanical Engineering

     TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER

     4. Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree with a major in Rehabilitation Sciences

D.   Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation certifying that Texas A&M
     University-Kingsville System Center-San Antonio, Tarleton State University
     System Center-Central Texas, and University of North Texas System Center-
     Dallas have met the legislatively established minimum threshold of full-time
     student equivalents (FTSE)

E.   Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to a request from
     Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi to change the degree designation of its
     existing Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Curriculum and Instruction to a Doctor of
     Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Curriculum and Instruction

F.   Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to Weatherford
     College to designate the teaching center located in Wise County as a branch
     campus

G.   Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to revisions to the
     three Associate of Arts in Teaching curricula intended for transfer to
     baccalaureate programs that lead to initial Texas teacher certification

H.   Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to the National
     Association of Schools of Theatre (NAST) being recognized as an accrediting
     agency in Texas

I.   Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s recommendation relating to a
     request from Texas College of Traditional Chinese Medicine for a Certificate of
     Authority to grant degrees in Texas
V.     Discussion of the programmatic aspects of funding items on the Agency Operations
       Committee agenda

       A. Grant Competitions
             1. Minority Health Research and Education Grant Program
             2. Nursing, Allied Health and Other Health-related Grant Program

       B. Allocation of unused Fiscal Year 2009 Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education
          State Leadership funds for use in Program Year 2008-2009

VI.    Discussion of staff activities and projects

       A. A Strategic Plan for the State of Texas to Meet Nursing Workforce Needs of 2013

VII.   Adjournment

Note: The Board will not consider or act upon any item before the Committee on Academic
Excellence and Research at this meeting. This meeting is not a regular meeting of the full
Board. Because the Board members who attend the committee meeting may create a quorum
of the full Board, the meeting of the Committee on Academic Excellence and Research is also
being posted as a meeting of the full Board.
                   Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                   AGENDA ITEM I


Welcome and Committee Chair’s meeting overview


RECOMMENDATION:             No action required


Background Information:

      Dr. Lyn Phillips, Chair of the Academic Excellence and Research Committee, will
welcome the Committee and provide opening remarks.




                                                                               3/23/09
                  Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                  AGENDA ITEM II


Consideration of adopting minutes from the January 5, 2009, Committee meeting


RECOMMENDATION:             Approval




                                                                            3/23/09
                       TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARD

                       Academic Excellence and Research (AER) Committee

                                            January 5, 2009
                                              10:00 a.m.

                               1200 East Anderson Lane, Room 2.140
                                           Austin, Texas


                                             Minutes

Committee Members Present: Elaine Mendoza, Vice Chair; Laurie Bricker; Joe B.
Hinton; Charles “Trey” Lewis

Committee Members Absent: Lyn Bracewell Phillips, Chair; Brenda Pejovich; A.W.,
“Whit” Riter, Ex-Officio

The meeting convened at 10:00 am.

I.      Welcome and Committee Chair’s opening remarks

Ms. Elaine Mendoza welcomed the members of the Committee and the audience. Ms. Mendoza
informed the Committee members that Dr. Lyn Phillips and Ms. Brenda Pejovich would not be
attending the meeting today.

II.     Public Hearing on the Tech Prep funding formula for program year 2009-2010

No public comments.

III.    Consideration of adopting minutes from the September 17, 2008, Committee meeting

On a motion by Ms. Bricker and seconded by Mr. Hinton, the motion was approved.

IV.     Report on Higher Education Policy Institute

Dr. Lee Holcombe, Director of the Institute, provided a brief overview and answered questions.

V.     Items for the January 2009 Board agenda related to the Academic Excellence and
       Research Committee

       A.     Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to a division of
              responsibilities for obligations of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
              and agency staff in relation to statutes, rules and regulations under the jurisdiction
              of the Academic Excellence and Research Committee

Dr. MacGregor Stephenson introduced the item. Dr. Stephenson indicated that the Board
requested a review by outside legal counsel of all rules and statutes governing the Texas Higher

                                                 1
Education Coordinating Board with a focus on determining what authority, including duties and
responsibilities, have been established for Board members versus Board staff.

Board staff agreed with most of the division of responsibilities between the Board and the Board
staff as designated by outside counsel. In cases where outside counsel suggested that the staff is
responsible but in current practice the Board has ultimate responsibility, Dr. Stephenson
recommended continuing the current practice.

On a motion by Ms. Bricker and seconded by Mr. Hinton, the motion was approved.

Ms. Mendoza indicated that the committee would be going out of agenda order and taking up
agenda item VI-P.

P.     Consideration of adopting the staff recommendations relating to the appointment of
       advisory committees and work groups not established in statute or rule

Dr. Stephenson introduced the item. Dr. Stephenson recommended that the Commissioner or his
designee consider staff recommendations and make the final appointments to non-statutory,
standing advisory committees that advise the staff.

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.


       B.     Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to statutory four-year
              review of degree programs, Mission Statements, and Table of Programs for the
              following institutions:

                       1.   Midwestern State University
                       2.   Sam Houston State University
                       3.   Stephen F. Austin State University
                       4.   Texas Southern University
                       5.   Texas State University-San Marcos

Dr. Stephenson indicated that the Texas Education Code, Section 61.051(e), directs the
Coordinating Board to review the Mission Statements and Tables of Programs of public institutions
of higher education across the state. This review normally takes place once every four years for
each institution. Dr. Stephenson gave a brief description of the proposed Mission Statement
revisions.

On a motion by Ms. Bricker and seconded by Mr. Hinton, the motion was approved.

       C.     Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to requests for a new
              degree program:

                      ANGELO STATE UNIVERSITY

                     1. Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree with a major in Physical
                        Therapy
Dr. Stephenson gave the background information and indicated that staff recommended approval.


                                                 2
On a motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.

                     TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY-SAN MARCOS

                     2. Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree with a major in Nursing and
                        creation of a School of Nursing within the College of Health Professions

Dr. Stephenson gave the background information and indicated that staff recommended approval.

On a motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.

                     THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

                     3. Master of Interior Design (MID) degree with a major in Interior Design

Dr. Stephenson gave the background information and indicated that staff recommended approval.

On a motion by Ms. Bricker and seconded by Mr. Hinton, the motion was approved.

                     THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER AT SAN ANTONIO

                     4. Bachelor of Science (BS) degree with a major in Dietetics & Nutrition and
                        a Master of Dietetics Studies (MDS) degree with a major in Dietetics
                        Studies

Dr. Stephenson gave the background information and indicated that staff recommended approval.

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms Bricker, the motion was approved.

                     THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS OF THE PERMIAN BASIN

                     5. Bachelor of Science (BS) degree with a major in Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Stephenson gave the background information and indicated that staff recommended approval.

On motion by Ms. Bricker and seconded by Mr. Hinton, the motion was approved.

                     UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

                     6. Bachelor of Science (BS) degree with a major in Petroleum Engineering

Dr. Stephenson gave the background information and indicated that staff recommended approval.

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.

       D.     Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s recommendation relating to requests
              from private postsecondary education institutions for a Certificate of Authority to
              grant degrees in Texas:

                     1. Academy of Oriental Medicine at Austin (AOMA)

                                               3
Dr. Stephenson indicated that the Academy of Oriental Medicine at Austin seeks renewal of its
Certificate of Authority to award the Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree with
major in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. The Academy of Oriental Medicine at Austin achieved
candidacy status from the Commission on Colleges, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
in June 2008. An on-site evaluation was conducted on October 6, 2008. The Board’s Certification
Advisory Council reviewed the evaluation team’s report and the College’s response to the
evaluation on December 8, 2008. The Certification Advisory Council voted unanimously to
recommend to the Commissioner to grant the Certificate of Authority to Academy of Oriental
Medicine at Austin.

On motion by Ms. Bricker and seconded by Mr. Hinton, the motion was approved.

                      2. American College of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (ACAOM)

Dr. Stephenson indicated that the American College of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine seeks
renewal of its Certificate of Authority to award the Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine
degree with major in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. The American College of Acupuncture
and Oriental Medicine became a candidate for accreditation by the Commission on Colleges,
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools in June 2008. An on-site evaluation was conducted
on November 17, 2008. The Board’s Certification Advisory Council reviewed the evaluation team’s
report and the College’s response to the evaluation on December 8, 2008. The Certification
Advisory Council voted unanimously to recommend to the Commissioner to grant the Certificate of
Authority to American College of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.

       E.      Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to the American Board
               of Funeral Service Education (ABFSE) being recognized as an accrediting agency in
               Texas

Dr. Stephenson indicated that Texas currently recognizes six regional accrediting agencies, two
national faith-based accrediting agencies, and five national accreditors of institutions. At the
January 2008 meeting, the Coordinating Board adopted amendments to Chapter 7 rules that
identified a process for allowing national accrediting agencies to apply for recognition. Those
agencies accredit private, primarily for-profit career schools and colleges. To date, five national
accreditors have applied for and received Board recognition. This is the sixth national accreditor to
request Board recognition.

Dr. Stephenson reported that The American Board of Funeral Service Education has been
continuously recognized by the United States Department of Education since 1972. The American
Board of Funeral Service Education serves as the national academic accreditation agency for
college and university programs in Funeral Service and Mortuary Science Education. The American




                                                 4
Board of Funeral Services accredits two single-purpose private institutions in Texas
(Commonwealth Institute of Funeral Services in Houston and the Dallas Institute of Funeral
Services) and two community college programs (San Antonio Community College and Amarillo
College).

Dr. Stephenson reported that the American Board of Funeral Service Education application was
evaluated by Board staff and the staff recommends Board recognition.

On motion by Ms. Bricker and seconded by Mr. Hinton, the motion was approved.

       F.      Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to a report on the
               2008 Research Assessment Program, in accordance with Texas Education Code,
               Chapter 144

Dr. Stephenson introduced the item. Dr. Stephenson indicated that the Coordinating Board is
required to evaluate selected special item-funded research projects. The Board staff, in
conjunction with the Legislative Budget Board staff, select projects to review on a biennial cycle.
In the fall, the Board staff coordinated evaluations of four projects in this review cycle. Projects are
reviewed for intrinsic merit, research performance, knowledge and instruction in emerging
technology, and economic development.

Dr. Stephenson indicated that two projects were reviewed at The University of Texas
Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas: Metroplex Medical Imaging Center and Innovations in
Medical Technology. Both projects received an evaluation of “very good” on the four sections of
the evaluations. Both were recommended for continued funding by the external review team.

Additionally, two projects were reviewed at the University of Houston: Partnership for Space
Exploration and Center for Commercial Development of Space. The Partnership project received
an evaluation of “fair” on three sections and “good” on one section of the evaluation. The primary
challenge for the project was lack of adequate resources. The Commercial Development of Space
received “very good” evaluations on all four sections. Both projects were recommended for
continued funding by the external review team.

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.

       G.      Discussion of the Undergraduate Education Advisory Committee’s report on
               Undergraduate Education for the 21st Century: Improving Undergraduate Education
               in Texas

Dr. Stephenson introduced the item. No action was required. Staff will work with committee
members to add some modifications to the report that will better align some of the sections with
current initiatives and legislative priorities. The report, with modifications, will be brought to the
Board meeting later this month.

       H.      Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to the report on
               Projecting the Need for Pharmacy Education

Dr. James Goeman gave a brief presentation. Mr. Charles “Trey” Lewis asked if there was a
reason why we have such good participation rates for African Americans in pharmacy and whether
we could apply those reasons for success to other groups. Dr. Goeman responded that he could

                                                   5
look further into it, but the primary reason is that one of the public pharmacy schools is located at
Texas Southern University, a historically Black institution.

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.

       I.      Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to the report on
               Projecting the Need for Veterinary Medical Education

Dr. Allen Michie gave a brief presentation.

On motion by Ms. Bricker and seconded by Mr. Hinton, the motion was approved.

       J.      Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to the report on
               Strategies to Increase the Number of Initial Licensure Registered Nurses and
               Nursing Faculty

Ms. Chris Fowler gave a brief presentation.

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.

       K.      Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s recommendation relating to an
               amendment to Chapter 5 by creating a new Section 5.51, Publishing of Doctoral
               Program Data

Dr. Stephenson indicated that this new rule would require all institutions with doctoral programs to
publish data on the 18 Characteristics of Doctoral Education, as recommended by the Graduate
Education Advisory Committee. The primary purposes of these characteristics are to provide
information to prospective students and to provide input to facilitate self study of doctoral
programs by the institution.

The location of publication will be on each institution’s website, as this represents the most likely
place that students and their parents would look for information about specific graduate programs.
The recommended timeline is for data collection to begin in academic year 2008-09, with all
institutions publishing the characteristics data by fall 2009, although institutions would be free to
publish earlier, if they were ready. Dr. Stephenson recommended approval of the amendment to
Chapter 5.

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.

       L.      Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s recommendation relating to
               amendments to Chapter 7 of Board rules concerning Degree-Granting Colleges and
               Universities Other Than Texas Public Institutions

Dr. Stephenson reported that revision to Chapter 7 rules relating to Degree-Granting Colleges and
Universities Other Than Texas Public Institutions were approved by the Board at the April 24,
2008, meeting. The rules were amended at the July 24, 2008, and the October 23, 2008, Board
meetings.



                                                  6
The new language in Chapter 7 concerns changes to obtaining a certificate of authorization or a
Certificate of Authority for institutions offering only religious degrees, standards of operation of
institutions, recognition of accrediting agencies, and changes to the Certificate of Authority
application process. Dr. Stephenson recommended approval of the proposed changes to
Chapter 7.

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.

       M.      Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to a Report on the
               Timely Graduation Incentive Pilot Project

Dr. Stephenson introduced the item. There were no questions or comments.

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.

       N.      Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to approve the appointment of
               an external evaluation committee to conduct a merit review of the Norman
               Hackerman Advanced Research Program

Dr. Stephenson reported that in order to be in compliance with the statute and Board rules
governing the Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program, the staff are asking the Board for
approval to appoint an external evaluation committee to conduct a merit review of the program.
Dr. Stephenson anticipates the selection of four national or internationally recognized researchers
in specific areas supported by the grants to draft a review of the program. The evaluation
committee would attend a one-day meeting in Austin with funded and non-funded project
investigators, institutional research officials, members of the Advisory Committee on Research
Programs, and Coordinating Board staff to draft the merit review. A draft would be provided to
the Board for their input and consideration of approval.

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.

       O.      Consideration of approving the Commissioner’s recommendation relating to the
               appointment of student representatives to the Distance Education Advisory
               Committee, the Graduate Education Advisory Committee, and the Undergraduate
               Education Advisory Committee

Ms. Linda Battles reported on the appointments of student representatives to the Coordinating
Board Advisory Committees.

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the motion was approved.

Agenda Item V-P was moved to the beginning of the agenda and was discussed after Agenda Item
V-A.

VI.    Discussion of the programmatic aspects of funding items on the Agency
       Operations Committee agenda

       A.      Institutional Audit Process for Funds Appropriated through the Research
               Development Fund


                                                   7
Dr. Stephenson indicated that this was an informational item to update Board members on the
institutional audit process for funds appropriated through the Research Development Fund.

       B.      Engineering Recruitment Program Summer Engineering Experience

Dr. Stephenson updated the Committee. He indicated that the Summer Engineering Experience
Program is one of two parts of the Engineering Recruitment Program. The other is a merit-based
scholarship program for engineering students. Eight-Hundred Thousand Dollars of state
appropriation goes to the scholarship program and $200,000 to the summer program. This
division of funds was established after consultation with the bill sponsor. Twenty-five institutions
are eligible to participate with a one-week summer program and contracts shall be executed in
February.

This process of fund distribution is different from what the current CB rules state, and staff will
rewrite the rules after the Board meeting.

       C.      Requests for applications regarding the allocation of Carl D. Perkins Career
               and Technical Education Improvement Act funds to colleges and consortia for Basic
               Grant, Tech Prep, and State Leadership activities for program year 2009-2010

Dr. Stephenson reported that the Coordinating Board annually, through the RFA process, requests
applications from eligible postsecondary institutions (community/technical colleges) for the award of
federal funds provided through Perkins. The institutions use these funds to support their Basic Grant,
Tech Prep, and Leadership programs and activities for the coming academic program year. A separate
RFA for each of the three areas will be posted in late March and the applications will be due May 15.
The request for applications for awards for program year 2009-2010 will be presented to the
Agency Operations Committee and the Board at their January meetings. Approximately $36 million
will be available for program year 2009-2010 (70:30 split).

       D.      Tech Prep funding formula for program year 2009-2010

Dr. Stephenson reported that annually the Coordinating Board is required by state law and Board
rules to hold a public hearing on the Tech Prep funding formula for the coming academic program
year. The hearing was held earlier today and there were no comments/testimony. The proposed
formula was developed and approved by the Tech Prep Consortia Directors in 1999, and has been
re-approved for each of the following years. The Tech Prep Directors re-approved the formula at
their August quarterly meeting. The funding formula is 65/35 percent split – 65 percent of the
funds is distributed equally among the 26 consortia as a base operating fund, and the remaining
35 percent is distributed among the consortia based upon the grades 9-12 student population
served by each consortium region. Texas receives about $8 million each year in federal funds for
Tech Prep activities.

       E.      Reallocation of unused Fiscal Year 2008 Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical
               Education funds for use in program year 2008-2009

Dr. Stephenson reported that Federal Perkins grants for career and technical education are
allocated annually and are to be expended during the program year. All funds not spent by grant
recipients during that year are de-obligated and made available for reallocation during the
subsequent year. The purpose of the recommendation is to authorize the Commissioner to


                                                   8
reallocate the de-obligated funds from program year 2007-2008 so they can be used in program
year 2008-2009. Approximately $7.5 million will be available for reallocation.

VII.    Discussion of staff activities and projects

        A. Report on award for Professional Development Module Grant

Dr. Vanessa L. Davis reported that, at the July 2008 meeting of the Agency Operations Committee,
approval was granted to release an RFP for the creation of Professional Development Modules for
Best Practices in Online and Hybrid Teaching. The RFP was subsequently posted and proposals
were reviewed by a panel of four Coordinating Board staff. Staff recommend that the grant be
awarded to the Lone Star College System.

        B. Report on award of Texas Transfer Success Regional Conferences Grant

Dr. Catherine Parsoneault reported that, at the July 2008 meeting of the Agency Operations
Committee, approval was granted to release an RFP for a Transfer Success Conference, as follow-
up to the Transfer Success Summit held in February 2008. The RFP was subsequently posted as
required, three notifications of intention regarding submitting a proposal were received, and one
actual proposal was received. A panel of three staff members reviewed the proposal and
determined that it met all the requirements set out in the RFP; the panel recommended that the
proposal be funded. The awarded proposal was submitted by the National Institution for the Study
of Transfer Students, University of North Texas. The contract has been finalized and funding is
expected to be distributed this week.

VIII.   Adjournment

On motion by Mr. Hinton and seconded by Ms. Bricker, the Committee meeting adjourned.




                                                      9
                   Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                   AGENDA ITEM III


Report on Higher Education Policy Institute


RECOMMENDATION:              No action required


Background Information:


         Dr. Holcombe will present results of a preliminary analysis of the effects of
tuition increases since deregulation on application and enrollment decisions of students.
A copy of the Executive Summary will be provided under separate cover to members for
subsequent review and reference.




                                                                                 3/23/09
                          Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                          AGENDA ITEM IV-A


Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to statutory four-year review of
degree programs, mission statements, and table of programs for the following institutions:

            1.   Angelo State University
            2.   Sul Ross State University
            3.   Sul Ross State University-Rio Grande College
            4.   Texas A&M International University
            5.   University of North Texas

RECOMMENDATIONS:

                 Angelo State University
                   Approve the revised Mission Statement

                 Sul Ross State University
                   Re-approval of existing Mission Statement

                 Sul Ross State University-Rio Grande College
                   Re-approval of existing Mission Statement

                 Texas A&M International University
                   Re-approval of existing Mission Statement

                 University of North Texas
                   Re-approval of existing Mission Statement


Background Information:

        Texas Education Code, Section 61.051(e), directs the Coordinating Board to review the
Mission Statements and Tables of Programs of public institutions of higher education across the
state. This review normally takes place once every four years for each institution.

       The Mission Statement takes the form of a narrative that addresses the fundamental
purpose of the institution with respect to its teaching, research, and public service responsibilities
from a regional, state, and national perspective.

         The Table of Programs is a chart that indicates what discipline areas the Coordinating
Board has approved as being within the institution's mission. The chart indicates areas in which the
institution already has programs, as well as areas appropriate for future program expansion.
Besides discipline area, the Table of Programs indicates what level of degree (from associate level
to professional) is authorized in a given discipline area.

         When the Coordinating Board approves expansions to an institution's Table of Programs, it
is not approving the specific programs that are indicated in the expansion. Rather, it is giving the
institution approval to propose the indicated new programs. Table of Programs preliminary
authority indicates that the Coordinating Board will consider this proposal for a program in the
                                                                                                3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-A
Page 2

indicated area, if the institution meets all of the Coordinating Board's standards related to program
quality, commitment of resources and cost effectiveness, and state and regional need.

       When recommending changes to institutional tables of programs, the staff is directed by
Board rules [Chapter 5, Subchapter B, Section 5.24. (a and b)] to consider the following factors:

5.24. Criteria and Approval of Mission Statements and Tables of Programs.

       (a)     In reviewing a request for preliminary authority to add a program to the institution’s
Table of Programs, the Board shall consider:

               (1)   a demonstrated need for a future program in terms of present and future
       vocational needs of the state and the nation,

             (2)     whether the proposed addition would complement and strengthen existing
       programs at the institution,

               (3)    whether a future program would unnecessarily duplicate other programs
       within the region, state, or nation, and

               (4)     whether a critical mass of students and faculty is likely to be available to
       allow the program to be offered at a high level of quality and to become self-sufficient on
       the basis of state funding.

         (b)    In reviewing a request for preliminary authority to add a doctoral program to the
institution’s Table of Programs, the Board shall consider the criteria set out in subsection (a) of this
provision and the following additional criteria:

              (1)     a demonstrated regional, state, or national unmet need for doctoral
        graduates in the field, or an unmet need for a doctoral program with a
        unique approach to the field;

             (2)     evidence that existing doctoral programs in the state cannot
       accommodate additional students (or accessibility to these programs is restricted), or that
       expanding existing programs is not feasible or would not best serve the state;

              (3)     if appropriate to the discipline, the institution has self-sustaining baccalaureate-
       and master’s-level programs in the field and/or programs in related and supporting areas;

              (4)      the program has the potential to obtain state or national prominence
       and the institution has the demonstrable capacity, or is uniquely suited, to offer the
       program and achieve that targeted prominence;

              (5)     demonstrated current excellence of the institution’s existing undergraduate and
       graduate degree programs and how this excellence shall be maintained with the development
       and addition of a high quality doctoral program; measures of excellence include the number
       of graduates and graduation rates that match or exceed those at peer institutions;

               (6)     satisfactory placement rates for graduates of the institution’s current doctoral
                                                                                               3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-A
Page 3

      programs, with comparison to peer group placement rates when available;

             (7)     how the program will address Closing The Gaps by 2015; and

             (8)     institutional resources to develop and sustain a high-quality program.

              (9)     where appropriate, a demonstration of plans for external accreditation,
      licensing, or other applicable professional recognition of the program.




                                                                                              3/23/09
                                                                                      Proposed
                                 MISSION STATEMENT

 INSTITUTION: Angelo State University                                   APB: October 2, 1987
                                                                       APB: October 27, 1995
                                                                        UPD: January 7, 1998
                                                                      APB: January 25, 2001
                                                                       APB: January 27, 2005
                                                                     UPD: September 5, 2006
                                                                        Revised: March 2009


Angelo State University, a member of the Texas Tech University System, delivers
undergraduate and graduate programs in the liberal arts, sciences, and professional disciplines.
In a learning-centered environment distinguished by its integration of teaching, research,
creative endeavor, service, and co-curricular experiences, ASU prepares students to be
responsible citizens and to have productive careers.
                                      MISSION STATEMENT

 INSTITUTION: Angelo State University                                       APB: October 2, 1987
                                                                           APB: October 27, 1995
                                                                            UPD: January 7, 1998
                                                                          APB: January 25, 2001
                                                                           APB: January 27, 2005
                                                                         UPD: September 5, 2006
                                                                            Revised: March 2009

       Angelo State University is a regional comprehensive coeducational institution of higher
learning offering programs in the liberal arts and fine arts, sciences, education for the health
professions, teacher education, and business administration, as well as courses of study
designed to meet entrance requirements for various professional schools.

       In the baccalaureate programs, the primary responsibility of Angelo State University is to
provide opportunities in higher education for the citizens of the State of Texas. The University,
through its diversified programs, seeks:

       to provide its students with a basis for making sound decisions and mature judgments
       which depend upon an understanding of the social, scientific, literary, artistic, political,
       and philosophic traditions of many cultures;

       to help each student reach maximum capability with respect to communications,
       effective reasoning, and analytical thinking, and to provide standards of physical and
       intellectual discipline which lead to optimal personal development and useful,
       responsible citizenship;

       to educate students for living and working in a competitive global society;

       to prepare interested, qualified students for graduate study and for scholarly
       occupations;

       to provide selected professional programs which supplement students’ general
       education and enable them to become competent in fields requiring specialized training;

       to conduct research with the intention of engaging the student in independent study.

        The purpose of the College of Graduate Studies is to provide advanced, specialized
training which will strengthen the academic and professional competence of the students. The
graduate programs are designed to develop students’ capacities for independent study, to train
students in the techniques of research, and to acquaint them with research in their fields of
study.

        In order to promote strong educational opportunities, the University encourages
programs of faculty research which add to the total body of knowledge, develop new and
improved techniques of instruction, and maintain the competence of faculty members in their
respective fields. Teaching is the foremost area of faculty contribution, however, followed by
creative or scholarly activity and service. Faculty, staff, and administration participate in a
campus culture in which students receive personal attention in academic advisement and
student support. Recruitment and retention of instructional and administrative personnel reflect
the University’s commitment to diversity.
Angelo State University                                                  APB: October 2, 1987
Mission Statement                                                       APB: October 27, 1995
Page 2                                                                   UPD: January 7, 1998
                                                                        APB: January 25, 2001
                                                                        APB: January 27, 2005
                                                                       UPD: September 5, 2006
                                                                          Revised: March 2009


        Angelo State University is committed to the equal consideration of all qualified applicants
for admission. Articulation with community colleges enables students to transfer credit.
Students are offered encouragement in their university lives through a variety of support
services, such as financial aid, residence life, social and career development, and counseling.
Cultural and athletic programs supplement academic programs to increase students’ awareness
of healthy and complete lifestyles. Access to the university’s physical and intellectual resources
is provided to students of varying capabilities. Alumni are encouraged to maintain contact.

        Partnerships with local, regional, and state agencies increase the university’s role in
public education, business, health, and information retrieval. Special research in agriculture is
supported by the Management, Instruction and Research Center, where applied research is
conducted primarily in domestic livestock production and range management. Both traditional
and technological learning resources are utilized in instruction and research and to provide
special services and programs of continuing education and distance education which contribute
to the cultural and economic welfare of the region served by the University. The University
strives to broaden the experience of its students and faculty through programs of international
education and exchange.

        Long-range planning, evaluation, and program assessment are part of the decision-
making process at all levels. The University’s commitment to improving quality extends to its
administrative services and provides support to maintain the infrastructure, expand information
resources, develop technological equipment and programs for academic and administrative
improvement, ensure fiscal responsibility, and promote public safety and institutional
advancement. Recognizing its responsibility to the community, the University offers many
cultural opportunities and business, health, educational, and volunteer services to the region.

        Angelo State University is committed to providing a wide range of high quality academic
programs and strives to develop in its students those qualities which will enable them to enrich
their personal lives, improve their abilities to serve and contribute to society, and become
leaders in their professions and their communities.
                                                                                         Current
                                                                                    (no changes)

                                      MISSION STATEMENT


INSTITUTION: Sul Ross State University &                                 APB: January 24, 1986
             Sul Ross State University-Rio Grande College                  APB: April 19, 1991
                                                                         APB: January 25, 2001
                                                                         APB: January 27, 2005


The ultimate goal of higher education is to produce graduates who will be effective leaders in
their chosen professions, valued members of their communities, and responsible citizens of
the world.

As a coeducational, comprehensive, public institution of higher education offering certificate
programs and associate, baccalaureate, and master’s degree programs, the mission of Sul
Ross Sate University and Sul Ross State University-Rio Grande College is to include the
following structure in all of its academic programs:

       From the core curriculum, students will acquire a common set of intellectual, physical,
       and aesthetic experiences designed to foster a broad appreciation for the human
       experience. Graduates will be expected to demonstrate the critical thinking skills, oral
       and written communication skills, and quantitative literacy that will be required for
       them to become effective leaders. Moreover, graduates will possess the in-depth
       knowledge necessary to either enter professions that are related to their areas of
       specialization, to achieve advanced levels of professional development, or to enter
       and successfully complete graduate programs of study.

       As a part of their education, students will develop qualities of good citizenship,
       including an appreciation for and commitment to performing their work
       conscientiously; learning to recognize, respect, and understand cultural diversity; and
       learning to recognize the implications of what they believe. Most importantly, they will
       acquire the skills and techniques which enable them to engage in self-learning, and a
       spirit of intellectual curiosity leading to independent and purposeful life-long learning.

In order to guarantee that this mission is carried out in the spirit of the goals of higher
education, Sul Ross State University has three major functions:

       1.      To enable optimal teaching and learning through quality faculty and staff,
               exceptional facilities, technology, and instructional resources, and effective
               student support services;

       2.      To support research which advances knowledge, enriches teaching,
               encourages professional development, and utilizes the distinctive environment
               of the Big Bend and Middle Rio Grande areas of Texas;

       3.      To serve as a resource for enrichment of the cultural, intellectual, social,
               and economic life of citizens of the region.
                                                                                            Current
                                                                                       (no changes)

                                           MISSION STATEMENT

INSTITUTION: Texas A&M International University                            APB: January 27, 1989
                                                                           APB: October 28, 1994
                                                                              APB: April 23, 1999
                                                                              APB: April 21, 2005

         Texas A&M International University, a member of The Texas A&M University System,
prepares students for leadership roles in their chosen profession in an increasingly complex,
culturally diverse state, national, and global society. A&M International provides students with a
learning environment anchored by the highest quality programs built on a solid academic
foundation in the arts and sciences. To fulfill its mission, the university offers a range of
baccalaureate and master’s programs and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in International
Business Administration, In addition to offering excellent undergraduate and graduate programs,
the university pursues a progressive agenda for global study and understanding across all
disciplines.

        Through instruction, faculty and student research, and public service, Texas A&M
International University embodies a strategic point of delivery for well-defined programs and
services that improve the quality of life for citizens of the border region, the state of Texas, and
national and international communities.

HISTORY
        Texas A&M International University was founded as Texas A&I University at Laredo and
was created by the 61st Session of the Texas Legislature, under House Bill 607, as a Center of
Texas A&I University at Kingsville. The enabling act called special attention to the necessity of
providing work leading to baccalaureate degrees in teacher education and business
administration. Organized under the upper-level concept, the center offered only junior and
senior level courses. Legislative intent required that the Center work in close cooperation with
Laredo Junior College (now Laredo Community College), which was already providing a general
academic program at the freshman and sophomore level, as well as community programs in the
area of Continuing Education. Classroom, library and administrative space were provided by
the junior college through a lease arrangement between the two institutions that enabled them
to share a 196-acre campus.

        The Board of Directors, acting through the President of Texas A&I University, issued a
statement of policy and procedure to govern the functioning of Texas A&I University at Laredo
from its opening in 1970. In keeping with the statement, initial programs included Bachelor of
Science degrees in Secondary Education and in Elementary Education, and the Bachelor of
Business Administration degree. In 1972 the Texas A&I University System was formed with
Texas A&I University at Laredo as a member. At this time, the university became a free
standing, degree-granting institution. In addition, the Bachelor of Arts degree was made
available in limited major fields. A survey conducted in Fall 1972 indicated a substantial
demand for graduate work. In response to the demand, authorization was requested and
received, in 1973, from the 63rd Legislature under Senate Bill 106, to initiate a graduate
program at Texas A&I University at Laredo.

       On September 1, 1977, the Texas Legislature recognized the special character of the
university, and the System, when it changed their names to Laredo State University and the
University System of South Texas.
Texas A&M International University                                         APB: January 27, 1989
Mission Statement                                                          APB: October 28, 1994
Page 2                                                                        APB: April 23, 1999
                                                                              APB: April 21, 2005


       The classification “Center” was removed from the enabling legislation in 1987 under
Senate Bill 658 of the 70th Legislative Session. Then on September 1, 1989, the university
became a part of The Texas A&M University System. In 1989, the 71st Legislative Session
authorized the creation of a Graduate School of International Trade at Laredo State University.
This program was implemented in 1990.

       The 73rd Legislative Session enacted Senate Bill 6, which was signed into law on
May 27, 1993. This legislation provided for the downward expansion of the university to
four-year status in the Fall 1995 and authorized program expansion to include doctoral level
programs. Senate Bill 6 also authorized the development of joint degree programs with
Mexican and Canadian institutions of higher education. In addition, S.B. 6 changed the
university’s name to Texas A&M International University, effective September 1, 1993,
confirming the action of the Board of Regents of The Texas A&M University System.

Role of the University

        Texas A&M International University is located along the U.S.-Mexico border in Laredo,
Texas. In the recent past, this geographical area has received intense interest because of rapid
industrial expansion, and the increased level of commerce between the two nations and the rest
of the international community.

        More trade flows through the Customs District of Laredo than through the other Customs
Districts of Southern California, Arizona, New Mexico and West Texas, combined. This
accelerated economic activity is creating an unprecedented growth in population.
Texas A&M International University serves a rapidly growing multicultural community of
approximately 200,000.

       These changes mark the beginning of a new era in this area of the state – the transition
from an economy dominated by the labor of hands to an economy that requires a wide range of
academic and technical skills. This shift in the economic forces and the underlying educational
needs of the border region give Texas A&M International University a dynamic mission and a
determination to be on the cutting edge of education, in an era of increased global competition.
The future emphasis of the university will expand the institution’s historically international
mission. All university programs and courses strive to extend this global awareness.

        The international emphasis of the university, and its accompanying cooperative
programs with universities worldwide, will provide all students with the unique opportunity to
develop a global perspective in their chosen area of specialization and also in their role in
society at large.

         In addition, the opportunity to study and learn in a campus setting that will have state of
the art telecommunications and technology provides students with the skills to meet the
changing needs of the 21st century. The processes by which students acquire the desired
knowledge must also provide them with the intellectual information and skills required to make
thoughtful use of the ideas they develop, given the continuing explosion of knowledge. As an
agent of change, the university must facilitate the development of students’ capacities to
Texas A&M International University                                         APB: January 27, 1989
Mission Statement                                                          APB: October 28, 1994
Page 3                                                                        APB: April 23, 1999
                                                                              APB: April 21, 2005

analyze specific and abstract relationships that they will internalize and apply within their
immediate societal and global contexts.

         The result of the educational experiences at Texas A&M International University should
be reflected in the ability of the students to observe features of the world in which they live, and
to apply specific and abstract measures of quality to their observations. These experiences
should prepare the students to make critical judgments that benefit society and are based on
fully realized and deeply held personal values. It is anticipated that these competencies will
equip students with the skills and attitudes that will prepare them to live a productive and
satisfying life in the 21st century.

Scope of the University

        Since its downward expansion in 1995 to a four-year status institution offering lower
division courses, Texas A&M International University has organized into three colleges and one
school. These units are the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Business
Administration, the College of Education and the Canseco School of Nursing.

       The scope of the university will continue to expand over the next decade with the
completion of the new campus and increased facilities. These additional program offerings will
provide the growing student population with skills and competencies to meet the demands of the
21st century from a global perspective.
                                                                               Current
                                                                          (no changes)
                                     MISSION STATEMENT

INSTITUTION: University of North Texas                             APB: April 20, 1990
                                                                APB: October 27, 1995
                                                                APB: January 25, 2001
                                                                  APB: April 21, 2005
                                                                   UPD: July 20, 2006

       The University of North Texas is a recognized student-centered public research
university where we harness the power of ideas though a culture of learning based on
diverse viewpoints, interdisciplinary endeavors, creativity and disciplined excellence.

        This is accomplished through a broad and balanced array of programs where
well-prepared students and dedicated scholars and artists collaborate with our local and
global communities in the creation, integration, application and dissemination of
knowledge. In this way, UNT creates an enriched and sustainable future for our
students, state, nation and world.
                        Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                       AGENDA ITEM IV-B


Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to preliminary authority requests
for the following institutions:

                       ANGELO STATE UNIVERSITY

                       1. Food Animal Science and Marketing (bachelor’s level)

                       SAM HOUSTON STATE UNIVERSITY

                       2. Instructional Technology (doctoral level)

                       3. School Psychology (doctoral level)

                       TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY-SAN MARCOS

                       4. Developmental Education (doctoral level)

                       THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON

                       5. Environmental Science (bachelor’s level)

Recommendation: Approval

Background Information:

         Texas Education Code, Section 61.051(e), directs the Coordinating Board to review the
Mission Statements and Tables of Programs of public institutions of higher education across the
state. This review normally takes place once every four years for each institution. However,
institutions may request changes to their Mission Statement and Table of Programs outside this
four-year cycle when circumstances warrant.

        The Table of Programs is a chart indicating discipline areas that the Coordinating
Board has approved as being within the institution's mission. The chart indicates areas in which
the institution already has programs, as well as areas appropriate for future program expansion.

       Besides discipline area, the Table of Programs indicates the level of degree (from
associate level to professional) authorized in a given discipline area.

       When the Coordinating Board approves expansions to an institution's Table of Programs,
it is not approving the specific programs that are indicated in the expansion. Rather, it is giving
the institution approval to propose the indicated new programs. Table of Programs preliminary
authority indicates that the Coordinating Board will consider this proposal for a program in the
indicated area if the institution meets all of the Coordinating Board's standards related to
program quality, commitment of resources and cost effectiveness, and state and regional need.



                                                                                           3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-B
Page 2

        When recommending changes to institutional Tables of Programs, the staff is directed
by Board rules [Chapter 5, Subchapter B, Section 5.24 (a and b)] to consider the following
factors:

5.24.    Criteria and Approval of Mission Statements and Tables of Programs.
         (a)     In reviewing a request for preliminary authority to add a program to the
institution’s Table of Programs, the Board shall consider:
                 (1)     a demonstrated need for a future program in terms of present and future
                 vocational needs of the state and the nation,

                (2)    whether the proposed addition would complement and strengthen
        existing programs at the institution,

                (3)    whether a future program would unnecessarily duplicate other programs
        within the region, state, or nation, and

                (4)    whether a critical mass of students and faculty is likely to be available to
        allow the program to be offered at a high level of quality and to become self-sufficient
        on the basis of state funding.

         (b)    In reviewing a request for preliminary authority to add a doctoral program to the
institution’s Table of Programs, the Board shall consider the criteria set out in subsection (a) of
this provision and the following additional criteria:

              (1)     a demonstrated regional, state, or national unmet need for doctoral
        graduates in the field, or an unmet need for a doctoral program with a
        unique approach to the field;

              (2)     evidence that existing doctoral programs in the state cannot
        accommodate additional students (or accessibility to these programs is restricted), or that
        expanding existing programs is not feasible or would not best serve the state;

                (3)   if appropriate to the discipline, the institution has self-sustaining
        baccalaureate- and master’s-level programs in the field and/or programs in related and
        supporting areas;

               (4)      the program has the potential to obtain state or national prominence
        and the institution has the demonstrable capacity, or is uniquely suited, to offer the
        program and achieve that targeted prominence;

                 (5)  demonstrated current excellence of the institution’s existing undergraduate
        and graduate degree programs and how this excellence shall be maintained with the
        development and addition of a high quality doctoral program; measures of excellence
        include the number of graduates and graduation rates that match or exceed those at peer
        institutions;

               (6)     satisfactory placement rates for graduates of the institution’s current
        doctoral programs, with comparison to peer group placement rates when available;
                                                                                           03/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-B
Page 3


             (7)     how the program will address Closing The Gaps by 2015; and

             (8)     institutional resources to develop and sustain a high-quality program.

              (9)     where appropriate, a demonstration of plans for external accreditation,
      licensing, or other applicable professional recognition of the program.




                                                                                       03/23/09
                               Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                            Projected New Five-Year Costs For New Programs and/or
                             Administrative Changes Requested in Agenda Item IV-C


Institutions                                                New Costs to    New Formula
                                                             Institutions   Income to
                                                                            Institutions


TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY/TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
SYSTEM HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER
Joint M.S. degree and Joint Ph.D. degree with a major
in Neuroscience                                         $     1,891,763     $     405,264

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-COMMERCE/TEXAS A&M
UNIVERSITY-TEXARKANA
Step 2 Ed.D. degree with a major in Educational
Administration                                          $     1,814,747     $     657,388

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-CORPUS CHRISTI
B.S. degree with a major in Mechanical Engineering      $     3,270,197     $     905,225

TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER
Ph.D. degree with a major in Rehabilitation Sciences $          755,000     $     285,332




TOTAL                                                   $     7,731,707     $   2,253,209




                                                                                            3/23/09
                       Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                    AGENDA ITEM IV-C (1)

Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to a request from Texas A&M
University and Texas A&M University System Health Science Center to create a joint Master of
Science (M.S.) degree and a joint Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree with a major in
Neuroscience



RECOMMENDATION:           Approval and authorization to create a joint Master of Science (M.S.)
                          degree and a joint Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree with a major
                          in Neuroscience. Staff recommend approval with the understanding
                          that the institutions will submit annual reports for five years
                          assessing progress in the implementation of the proposal.


             BACKGROUND INFORMATION AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

       Texas A&M University (TAMU) and Texas A&M University System Health Science Center
(TAMUSHSC) propose to offer a joint Master of Science degree in Neuroscience and a joint
Doctor of Philosophy degree in Neuroscience. The interdisciplinary programs would be
administered by the Faculty of Neuroscience of the two institutions, under the aegis of the
Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Neuroscience (IGPN). According to the consultants, the
proposed program would be nationally distinctive from the outset due to its unique
collaboration among the health science center’s College of Medicine, and the university’s
College of Science and College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. The degrees
would be jointly conferred by TAMU and TAMUSHSC, with the names of both institutions
appearing on diplomas.

      The interdisciplinary Neuroscience programs would call upon faculty from the TAMU
Colleges of Agriculture & Life Sciences, Education, Liberal Arts, Science, and Veterinary
Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, as well as interdisciplinary faculties already established for
Genetics and Toxicology. Faculty would also come from the health science center College of
Medicine (M.D. program and Biomedical Sciences) and the Institute of Biosciences and
Technology. The interdisciplinary Faculty of Neuroscience, which includes faculty members from
each of these areas, has been in existence since 1993. The approval of these programs would
extend to health science center students opportunities in neuroscience that have previously only
been available to students through programs at the university. Formalization of the programs
would also facilitate the acquisition of training grant funding from the National Institutes of
Health.

      Admission to either program would require completion of a bachelor’s degree and
compliance with all requirements for admission to graduate studies at TAMU and TAMUSHSC.
Students in the Neuroscience program would be admitted to both institutions. Students selected
to enter the proposed programs would be able to pursue the master’s degree or go directly into
the doctoral program.

                                                                                        3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-C (1)
Page 2



For the Ph.D. program, students entering with a bachelor’s degree would complete a total of 96
semester credit hours (SCH), including the 32 SCH required for the master’s degree plus an
additional 64 SCH of free electives, including special topic and research courses. Students
entering with a master’s degree would complete a total of 64 SCH, including 6 SCH of core
courses, 19 SCH of designated electives, and 39 SCH of free electives, including special topics
and research courses. Students holding unrelated bachelor’s degrees would be required to take
up to an additional 12 SCH of leveling undergraduate courses assessed on an individual basis
according to their academic and experiential backgrounds.

                                            NEED

Employment Opportunities            Neuroscience, the study of the brain and behavior, is the
                                    most rapidly developing field of intellectual inquiry today.
                                    Most doctorally-prepared neuroscientists go directly into
                                    research, often as a faculty member at a university. The
                                    U.S. Department of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook
                                    Handbook 2009 (OOH) does not sufficiently address job
                                    opportunities for neuroscientists separately from other
                                    biological scientists, but it does so for medical scientists,
                                    predicting significant (20.2%) growth in opportunities for
                                    doctorally-degreed medical scientists from 2006 to 2016.
                                    (Note that OOH does not include faculty positions in its
                                    data collection.) The Association of Neurosciences
                                    Departments and Programs (ANDP) recently reported that
                                    the job market is strong for doctorally-prepared
                                    neuroscientists, in contrast to some other biological
                                    sciences fields where the market is more competitive.
                                    Jobs.Phd.org listed 40 current job openings for Ph.D.
                                    neuroscientists on 2-17-09, and careerjet.com listed 181
                                    such jobs on the same date. Close to 18 percent of the
                                    research budget for the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
                                    is currently devoted to neuroscience research, with both
                                    research funding and training grants available. TAMU also
                                    notes that the National Science Foundation devotes a
                                    substantial percentage of its available funding to
                                    neuroscience. The recent stimulus package will also
                                    increase funding for science, with neuroscience likely to
                                    receive substantially increased funding.

Projected Enrollment                The proposed program would initially admit four to six
                                    students per year. Although the interdisciplinary Faculty of
                                    Neuroscience does not recruit since it does not currently
                                    host a program, the institution reports an estimated 100
                                    inquiries per year across the five primary participating
                                    departments.




                                                                                         3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-C (1)
Page 3

Plan to Recruit             The program would recruit potential students locally,
Underrepresented Students   regionally, and nationally. TAMU and TAMUSHSC have
                            developed recruitment strategies to accomplish better
                            diversity throughout their graduate-level programs,
                            including targeted financial aid awards and other funding.
                            The Neuroscience program would be able to make use of
                            diversity fellowships and other opportunities to recruit a
                            diverse student body. The institution reports that the
                            Graduate Diversity Program has been very successful and
                            has brought diverse students into a wide range of
                            graduate programs.

                            The Faculty of Neuroscience would establish an
                            undergraduate summer internship program designed to
                            bring in approximately a dozen undergraduates interested
                            in pursuing a Neuroscience degree at Texas A&M
                            University. The program would be modeled after the
                            successful program in the TAMUSHSC. The Neuroscience
                            faculty would target individuals from underrepresented
                            groups from colleges and universities within the state of
                            Texas. The program would be jointly administered by the
                            undergraduate and graduate advisors and will be initiated
                            in year three of the programs.

Existing State Programs     There are 10 existing doctoral-level programs in
                            neuroscience or neurobiology offered at three public
                            universities (The University of Texas at Austin, The
                            University of Texas at Dallas, and The University of Texas
                            at San Antonio) and five health-related institutions in
                            Texas. Several of these programs have specific
                            specializations; none offers the synergistic collaboration
                            between a university and a health science center that the
                            current proposal does. The two Neuroscience programs at
                            MD Anderson Cancer Center are joint programs offered
                            with The University of Texas Health Science Center
                            Houston.

                            The same three public universities and four health-related
                            institutions currently offer the master’s degree in
                            Neuroscience. The master’s degree in Neuroscience is
                            being phased out at The University of Texas at San
                            Antonio.

Faculty                     The interdisciplinary Faculty of Neuroscience has been in
                            existence since 1993. Sixty-seven faculty members
                            contribute to the Faculty of Neuroscience in some way.
                            The largest contributors of faculty time are the
                            Department of Psychology, Division of Behavioral and
                            Cellular Neuroscience; the Department of Biology; the
                            College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences;

                                                                               3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-C (1)
Page 4
                               and the College of Medicine Department of Neuroscience
                               and Experimental Therapeutics. Direct contribution to the
                               graduate programs would include a minimum of 16.5 FTE
                               faculty. Additional faculty would be available as needed
                               through the Faculty Reinvestment Plan.

Other Personnel                Ten paid graduate assistantships would be available for
                               students each year. One new full-time clerical staff
                               member and one quarter-time student worker would
                               support the program.

Facilities and Equipment       Ample space is currently available to support a doctoral
                               program. In addition to research labs and facilities in
                               several university departments, health science center labs,
                               and veterinary and medical school facilities, the new Life
                               Sciences Building, currently under construction, would
                               provide additional laboratory space and administrative
                               space to provide the interdisciplinary program with a
                               home. The expert consultants wrote appreciatively of the
                               facilities and equipment currently available and were
                               genuinely excited about the Life Science Center.

Library, Supplies, Materials   Current library holdings are appropriate for the support of
                               the proposed programs. Supplies and materials are
                               budgeted and would be sufficient for the program needs,
                               especially considering the collaborative opportunities
                               between the contributing institutions.

Clinical/Internship Sites      n/a

Accreditation                  No accreditation exists for graduate programs in
                               Neuroscience.

Sustainability                 TAMU/HSC reports that the program would be self-
                               supporting within five years.

Consultants                    These neuroscience consultants reviewed the proposed
                               program and participated in a site-visit: Rebecca Burwell,
                               Brown University; Cedric Williams, University of Virginia;
                               and Michael Zigmond, University of Pittsburgh School of
                               Medicine.




                                                                                   3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-C (1)
Page 5

FIVE-YEAR COSTS                                                         SOURCES OF FUNDING

Personnel1                                     $1,240,543               Reallocated Funds5                           $2,292,872

Facilities                                                 $0           Anticipated new                                 $405,264
and Equipment2                                                          Formula Funding

Library, Supplies, and Materials3                  $15,928              Other State Funding                                      $0

Other (Travel & Operating)4                      $635,292               Other (interest income,                                  $0
                                                                         designated funds,
                                                                         and/or federal funds)

Est. 5-year Costs                          $1,891,763                   Est.5-Year Revenue                       $2,698,136

The chief executive officer of the institution has certified, and staff have
determined, that the institution will have funds sufficient to support the proposed
program.
__________________________
1 Faculty for this program are on hand at TAMU and TAMUSHSC. Line item includes new costs for faculty ($0), graduate
assistantships ($851,940), and clerical staff ($388,603).
2
  Facilities and equipment are on hand.
3
  Includes 50% new and 50% reallocated funds to supplement already existing resources.
4
  Includes travel to ANDP annual meeting ($14,866); trainee travel awards ($112,579), seminar series ($106,183), symposium
(32,468), tuition remission ($165,196), recruiting top-level graduate students and other start-up costs ($144,000), and summer
internship program ($60,000).
5
  Includes reallocations from the existing College of Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, and College of Liberal Arts, TAMU/and
TAMUSHSC. A detailed budget is included with the proposal.




                                                                                                                           3/23/09
                                      KEY ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES
                                          TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
Academically organized into eight colleges: (1) Agriculture and Life Sciences, (2) Architecture, (3)
Education and Human Development, (4) Engineering, (5) Geosciences, (6) Liberal Arts, (7) Science, (8)
Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences; a Mays Business School; a School of Military Sciences; an
Office of Graduate Studies; and the George Bush School of Government and Public Service.

Offers a total 14 baccalaureate, 112 master's, 87 doctoral, and the state's only veterinary medicine
program. (04/08)

                                                Fall             Fall           Fall       % Change        Institutional        CTG
 Enrollment                                    2000             2006           2007       Fall 2000 to     CTG Target      Completion
                                                                                            Fall 2007         Fall 2010
 Total                                       44,026           45,380          46,542             5.7%            50,000            93%
 White                                       33,673           33,386          33,697             0.1%            34,148            99%
 African-American                             1,065            1,355           1,413            32.7%             1,682            84%
 Hispanic                                     3,684            4,941           5,282            43.4%             6,710            79%
 Asian                                        1,381            1,702           1,875            35.8%
 Other                                        4,223            3,996           4,275             1.2%


 Fall 2007 Gender                  Undergraduate              Master's       Doctoral                Professional Post-Bacc Total
 Male                                     19,393                2,982          1,961                         132        245 24,713
 Female                                   17,894                2,009          1,354                         373        199 21,829


                                                                  FY              FY                FY                     % Change
 Degrees Awarded by Level
                                                                 2000            2006              2007           FY 2000 to FY 2007
 Total Degrees                                                  9,508          10,584            10,627                       11.8%
 Associate's                                                        0               0                 0                          N/A
 Baccalaureate                                                  7,512           8,163             8,132                         8.3%
 Master's                                                       1,388           1,761             1,768                       27.4%
 Doctoral                                                         490             535               598                       22.0%
 Professional                                                     118             125               129                         9.3%


 First-Time Undergraduate                  Entering Cohort       Entering Cohort        Entering Cohort                  Point Change
 Persistence Rate After One Year                  Fall 2000             Fall 2004              Fall 2006         Fall 2000 to Fall 2006
 Total                                              96.0%                 97.1%                  97.1%                               1.1
 White                                              96.3%                 97.3%                  97.5%                               1.2
 African-American                                   91.9%                 96.7%                  97.8%                               5.9
 Hispanic                                           94.4%                 95.5%                  95.6%                               1.2
 Asian                                              98.0%                 96.9%                  97.7%                             - 0.3
 Other                                              94.4%                 98.7%                  88.7%                             - 5.7


                                                                      FY                  FY                   FY           % Change
 Research Expenditures
                                                                     2004                2005                 2006          FY 2004 to
 ($ Millions)
                                                                                                                              FY 2006
 Total                                                          $390.655            $434.864               $446.112             14.2%


 Administrative costs as a percentage of                FY 2000             FY 2006          FY 2007                   Point Change
 operating budget                                                                                                 FY 2000 to FY 2007
 Total                                                        4.2%            4.5%               4.1%                           - 0.1
                                KEY ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES
                     TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY SYSTEM HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER
Organized into five colleges and schools: (1) Biomedical Sciences, (2) Dentistry (Dallas), (3) Medicine, (4)
Nursing (5) Pharmacy (Kingsville), and (6) Rural Public Health; and an Institute of Biomedical Sciences
and Technology.

Offers 3 baccalaureate, 13 master's, 4 master's certificate, 14 doctoral, and 3 special professional degree
programs. (04/08)

                                            Fall        Fall            Fall      % Change        Institutional        CTG
 Enrollment                                2000        2006            2007      Fall 2000 to     CTG Target      Completion
                                                                                   Fall 2007         Fall 2010
 Total                                     1,014       1,312           1,432           41.2%             1,800          80%
 White                                       610         702             710           16.4%                856         83%
 African-American                             33          75              85          157.6%                110         77%
 Hispanic                                     85         171             210          147.1%                280         75%
 Asian                                       205         238             290           41.5%
 Other                                        81         126             137           69.1%


 Fall 2007 Gender                  Undergraduate     Master's        Doctoral                   Professional Post-Bacc Total
 Male                                          0          98              61                             60          0 649
 Female                                      60          185              62                             23          0 783


                                                        FY               FY                 FY                    % Change
 Degrees Awarded by Level
                                                       2000             2006               2007          FY 2000 to FY 2007
 Total Degrees                                          217              254                346                       59.4%
 Associate's                                             25               39                 48                       92.0%
 Baccalaureate                                           26               28                 29                       11.5%
 Master's                                                35               76                135                      285.7%
 Doctoral                                                12               13                 25                      108.3%
 Professional                                           144              137                157                        9.0%


                                                              FY                  FY                   FY         % Change
 Research Expenditures
                                                             2004                2005                 2006        FY 2004 to
 ($ Millions)
                                                                                                                    FY 2006
 Total                                                  $ 42.720              $ 50.456            $ 49.176            15.1%


 Administrative costs as a percentage of           FY 2000          FY 2006          FY 2007                  Point Change
 operating budget                                                                                        FY 2000 to FY 2007
 Total                                                  %             7.7%               6.6%                           N/A
                       Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                    AGENDA ITEM IV-C (2)


Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to a request from Texas A&M
University-Commerce and Texas A&M University-Texarkana to offer a Step 2 Doctor of
Education (Ed.D.) degree with a major in Educational Administration


RECOMMENDATION:              Approval and authorization to create a Step 2 Doctor of Education
                             (Ed.D.) degree with a major in Educational Administration in
                             cooperation between Texas A&M University-Commerce and Texas
                             A&M University-Texarkana.


             BACKGROUND INFORMATION AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

        Texas A&M University-Commerce (TAMUC) currently offers the Doctor of Education
(Ed.D.) degree in Educational Administration at its main campus. This on-campus program has
approximately 63 full- and part-time Ed.D. students. TAMUC currently offers doctoral degrees in
six areas with a doctoral student enrollment of 348. TAMUC and Texas A&M University-
Texarkana (TAMUT) have spent the last two years developing plans for the delivery of a
cooperative Ed.D. in Educational Leadership at TAMUT. As a Step 2 doctoral degree, TAMUC
would continue to administer the degree program, and all curricular changes and decisions
would be made by TAMUC faculty. TAMUT faculty would be involved in the student admissions
and advising process, would be allowed to teach courses, and would serve on student
dissertation committees as co-chairs with TAMUC faculty. Courses would be offered at
Texarkana, Commerce, and the TAMUC teaching site in Mesquite. Because more than 50
percent of the coursework would be offered off the Commerce campus, the program would be
considered a distance education doctoral degree program. As such, the Distance Education
Advisory Committee has considered the program and recommends approval as a distance
education doctoral program. The program would appear on TAMUT’s program inventory with
the designation that it is a Step 2 doctoral program with TAMUC; TAMUC and TAMUT would
award degrees jointly.

        There are currently 19 doctoral degrees in Educational Administration at Texas public
universities. However, with the exception of Texas Tech University’s program, which is offered
to specific locations via interactive video conferencing, none are offered at a distance. The
closest program to Texarkana is at TAMUC 119 miles away, and the second closest program is
at Stephen F. Austin State University over 150 miles away. The proposed Step 2 program would
provide students, especially full-time working adults, in the Texarkana region with the
opportunity to complete an Ed.D. in Educational Administration.

        Students in the proposed doctoral program would complete the same degree
requirement as those students at TAMUC. The degree consists of a minimum of 60 semester
credit hours (SCH) for students with a Master of Education and 90 SCH for students without a
Master of Education. A comprehensive exam administered in Commerce would be required of all
students. All students would also be required to attend face-to-face coursework on the
Commerce campus during the first semester of their second year of courses. A dissertation

                                                                                       3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-C (2)
Page 2

would be required of all students. The dissertation committee would be chaired by a TAMUC
faculty member and co-chaired by a TAMUT faculty member. After the first cohort of graduates,
TAMUT faculty may have the opportunity to serve as primary chairs of dissertation committees.

                                           NEED

Employment Opportunities           The American Association of School Administrators
                                   reported in its 2007 “State of the Superintendency Study”
                                   that 85 percent of superintendents surveyed reported an
                                   inadequate supply of educational leaders to fulfill the
                                   existing and anticipated demand for school
                                   superintendents. The American Association of School
                                   Administrators also reports that 60 percent of all school
                                   superintendents in the United States hold a doctorate. The
                                   Texas Association of School Administrators lists 29 current
                                   openings for school superintendents in Texas. Need for an
                                   Ed.D. in Educational Administration is well-established.
                                   According to data collected by the Texas Education
                                   Agency, Educational Service Region VIII, the region in
                                   which Texarkana lies, lags the state average in doctorally-
                                   trained school administrators and superintendents.
                                   Whereas 23 percent of all Texas school superintendents
                                   hold a doctorate, only 15 percent of Region VIII
                                   superintendents hold a doctorate. Furthermore, while 4
                                   percent of all Texas principals hold a doctorate, only 1
                                   percent of Region VIII principals hold a doctorate.

Projected Enrollment               TAMUT currently has 348 students enrolled in its six
                                   doctoral programs, 180 in its doctoral-level education
                                   programs. Based upon a survey of Master of Education
                                   degree recipients, TAMUT projects 12-15 students enrolled
                                   in the doctoral program during its first cohort. Students
                                   will be enrolled in two-year cohorts. A student needs
                                   assessment survey conducted in October 2007 by TAMUT
                                   indicated that 82 percent of the respondents, all graduates
                                   of TAMUT’s Master of Education in Educational
                                   Administration program, reported a very high or high
                                   interest in participating in the proposed cooperative
                                   doctoral program.

Plan to Recruit Underrepresented   TAMUC has historically attracted members of
Students                           underrepresented and minority groups, including
                                   racial/ethnic minority group members, first-
                                   generation college students, and women. The
                                   president of TAMUC has set a goal for the
                                   university to become a Hispanic-Serving Institution
                                   within the next three years. A Strategic Enrollment

                                                                                         3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-C (2)
Page 3

                            Management Plan has been developed that targets
                            underrepresented groups, and a new Strategic
                            Marketing Plan targeting underrepresented groups
                            will be developed later this spring. Recruitment for
                            this proposed program would also target
                            underrepresented groups with specific brochures
                            and recruiting materials developed for this purpose.

Existing State Programs     There are currently 19 Ed.D. in Educational
                            Administration programs at Texas public
                            universities. The closest program to Texas A&M
                            University-Texarkana is at Texas A&M University-
                            Commerce, 119 miles away. Only one of the 19
                            programs is offered at a distance: Texas Tech
                            University offers its Ed.D. in Educational
                            Administration to cohorts in Abilene, Amarillo,
                            Fredericksburg, Marble Falls, and, most recently,
                            Midland. For 2008, fall enrollments for programs
                            are as follows: Lamar University, 55; Prairie View
                            A&M University, 57; Sam Houston State University,
                            92; Stephen F. Austin State University, 42; Tarleton
                            State University, 69; Texas A&M University, 197;
                            Texas A&M University-Commerce, 63; Texas A&M
                            University-Kingsville, 57; Texas Southern
                            University, 22; Texas State University, 55; Texas
                            Tech University, 37; The University of Texas at
                            Arlington, 29; The University of Texas at Austin,
                            216; The University of Texas at El Paso, 55; The
                            University of Texas at San Antonio, 65; The
                            University of Texas-Pan American, 63; University of
                            Houston, 51; University of Houston-Clear Lake, 54;
                            University of North Texas, 90.

                          QUALITY AND RESOURCES

Faculty                     Ten faculty members from TAMUC and seven
                            faculty members from TAMUT would form the core
                            program faculty. Two of the faculty members from
                            TAMUT would be new hires made in 2010 and 2012
                            for this program. Faculty from both campuses
                            would teach courses in the program, work with
                            graduate students, and serve on dissertation
                            committees. Faculty at TAMUC would take the lead
                            in all curriculum and program decisions and would
                            initially serve as chief dissertation advisors. The
                            faculty are all doctorally trained.


                                                                               3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-C (2)
Page 4

Other Personnel                       TAMUC would add secretarial support, and TAMUT
                                      would add one half-time administrative/secretarial
                                      support position.

Facilities and Equipment              No additional facilities or space would be needed
                                      on the TAMUC or TAMUT campus. TAMUT currently
                                      has the technological infrastructure in place to
                                      deliver online and iTV courses as a part of the
                                      program.

Library, Supplies, Materials          Because the program currently exists at TAMUC,
                                      library holdings are already in place. The TAMUT
                                      library currently has over 10,000 education
                                      monographs as well as numerous databases that
                                      include holdings in educational administration and
                                      leadership.

Educator Certification Program        Both TAMUC and TAMUT are accredited by the
                                      State Board of Educator Certification (SBEC) for the
                                      Standard Principal and Standard Superintendent
                                      Certificates.

        NEW FIVE-YEAR COSTS                               SOURCES OF FUNDING

Personnel                        $853,377        Anticipated New                $657,388
                                                     Formula Funding
Graduate Student Funding         $796,370        Other State Funding            $0


Facilities and Equipment         $0              Reallocation of Existing       $390,041
                                                 Resources
Library, Supplies, and           $165,000        Federal Funding                $525,000
Materials
Other                            $0              Other Funding                  $284,569

Est. 5-Year Costs                $1,814,747      Est. 5-Year Revenues           $1,856,998

The Chief Executive Officer of the institution has certified, and staff have
determined, that the institution will have funds sufficient to support the proposed
program.

Estimated formula funding generated by the institution in years three through five of the
proposed program would total $657,595.




                                                                                           3/23/09
                                      KEY ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES
                                     TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-COMMERCE
Academically organized into three colleges: (1) Arts and Sciences, (2) Business and Technology, and (3)
Education and Human Services.

Offers 59 baccalaureate, 41 master's, and 6 doctoral degree programs. (04/08)

                                                Fall             Fall           Fall       % Change        Institutional         CTG
 Enrollment                                    2000             2006           2007       Fall 2000 to     CTG Target       Completion
                                                                                            Fall 2007         Fall 2010
 Total                                        7,483             8,496          8,879            18.7%             9,550             93%
 White                                        5,484             5,606          5,751             4.9%             5,825             99%
 African-American                             1,140             1,574          1,529            34.1%             1,600             96%
 Hispanic                                       387               670            779           101.3%             1,250             62%
 Asian                                           84               155            179           113.1%
 Other                                          388               491            641            65.2%


 Fall 2007 Gender                  Undergraduate              Master's       Doctoral                   Professional Post-Bacc Total
 Male                                      1,978                  967            110                              0        253 3,308
 Female                                    3,187                1,631            229                              0        524 5,571


                                                                  FY              FY                 FY                    % Change
 Degrees Awarded by Level
                                                                 2000            2006               2007          FY 2000 to FY 2007
 Total Degrees                                                  1,662           2,206              2,229                      34.1%
 Associate's                                                        0               0                  0                         N/A
 Baccalaureate                                                  1,026           1,247              1,278                      24.6%
 Master's                                                         590             916                906                      53.6%
 Doctoral                                                          46              43                 45                      - 2.2%
 Professional                                                       0               0                  0                         N/A


 First-Time Undergraduate                  Entering Cohort       Entering Cohort        Entering Cohort                  Point Change
 Persistence Rate After One Year                  Fall 2000             Fall 2004              Fall 2006         Fall 2000 to Fall 2006
 Total                                              83.0%                 82.5%                  78.2%                              - 4.8
 White                                              82.9%                 83.6%                  81.0%                              - 1.9
 African-American                                   86.5%                 77.9%                  74.2%                            - 12.3
 Hispanic                                           76.5%                 93.1%                  71.9%                              - 4.6
 Asian                                             100.0%                 83.3%                  93.3%                              - 6.7
 Other                                              62.5%                 75.0%                  61.5%                              - 1.0


                                                                     FY                   FY                   FY            % Change
 Research Expenditures
                                                                    2004                 2005                 2006           FY 2004 to
 ($ Millions)
                                                                                                                               FY 2006
 Total                                                            $ 0.610              $ 1.098              $ 1.182              93.8%


 Administrative costs as a percentage of                FY 2000             FY 2006          FY 2007                   Point Change
 operating budget                                                                                                 FY 2000 to FY 2007
 Total                                                    11.6%              10.4%               9.8%                           - 1.8
                                     KEY ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES
                                    TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-TEXARKANA
Academically organized into three colleges: (1) Arts and Sciences and Education, (2) Business, (3)
Health and Behavioral Sciences; and an Office of Graduate Studies.

Offers 21 baccalaureate and 13 master's degree programs. (04/08)

                                                Fall             Fall           Fall       % Change        Institutional        CTG
 Enrollment                                    2000             2006           2007       Fall 2000 to     CTG Target      Completion
                                                                                            Fall 2007         Fall 2010
 Total                                        1,195             1,625          1,605            34.3%             3,031           53%
 White                                        1,029             1,262          1,205            17.1%             2,119           57%
 African-American                               124               253            284           129.0%                598          47%
 Hispanic                                        23                77             76           230.4%                169          45%
 Asian                                            4                 9             15           275.0%
 Other                                           15                24             25            66.7%


 Fall 2007 Gender                  Undergraduate              Master's       Doctoral                    Professional Post-Bacc Total
 Male                                       262                    68              0                               0        109 439
 Female                                     709                   205              0                               0        252 1,166


                                                                 FY              FY                  FY                    % Change
 Degrees Awarded by Level
                                                                2000            2006                2007          FY 2000 to FY 2007
 Total Degrees                                                   308             533                 500                       62.3%
 Associate's                                                       0               0                   0                         N/A
 Baccalaureate                                                   243             314                 316                       30.0%
 Master's                                                         65             219                 184                      183.1%
 Doctoral                                                          0               0                   0                         N/A
 Professional                                                      0               0                   0                         N/A


 First-Time Undergraduate                  Entering Cohort       Entering Cohort        Entering Cohort                  Point Change
 Persistence Rate After One Year                  Fall 2000             Fall 2004              Fall 2006         Fall 2000 to Fall 2006
 Total                                                  N/A                   N/A                    N/A                            N/A
 White                                                  N/A                   N/A                    N/A                            N/A
 African-American                                       N/A                   N/A                    N/A                            N/A
 Hispanic                                               N/A                   N/A                    N/A                            N/A
 Asian                                                  N/A                   N/A                    N/A                            N/A
 Other                                                  N/A                   N/A                    N/A                            N/A


                                                                     FY                   FY                    FY          % Change
 Research Expenditures
                                                                    2004                 2005                  2006         FY 2004 to
 ($ Millions)
                                                                                                                              FY 2006
 Total                                                            $ 0.189              $ 0.200               $ 0.057           - 70.0%


 Administrative costs as a percentage of                FY 2000             FY 2006          FY 2007                   Point Change
 operating budget                                                                                                 FY 2000 to FY 2007
 Total                                                    27.6%              17.0%               16.1%                         - 11.5
                       Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                     AGENDA ITEM IV-C (3)

Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to a request from Texas A&M
University-Corpus Christi for a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Mechanical
Engineering


RECOMMENDATION:               Approval and authorization to implement a Bachelor of Science (B.S.)
                              degree program in Mechanical Engineering.


             BACKGROUND INFORMATION AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

        The proposed mechanical engineering program would fit and be aligned with the
research mission of Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi (TAMU-CC) for the maritime sciences
in the Gulf of Mexico. TAMU-CC currently has bachelor’s degree programs in mechanical
engineering technology and electrical engineering technology, and these would be the
foundation for the proposed bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering. The programs would
share lab space, faculty, and courses. The institution is forming the Engineering Alliance of
Hispanic Serving Institutions (EAHSI) to address the 7th- to 12th- grade pipeline issue for South
Texas and to enhance the education of sufficiently well-prepared secondary students who can
successfully enter STEM fields. TAMU-CC is forming this initiative together with Texas A&M
University-Kingsville, Texas A&M International University, Del Mar College, Coastal Bend
Community College, and Laredo Community College.

                                             NEED

Employment Opportunities       The Corpus Christi area is host to three dozen engineering firms
                               with 7,000 to 10,000 employees. The Texas Workforce
                               Commission projects an annual need of 10 to 15 mechanical
                               engineers for the region. The Coastal Bend Workforce
                               Development Board estimated 40 to 45 future job openings.

Projected Enrollment           TAMU-CC estimates enrollment of 122 full-time equivalent (FTE)
                               students by the fifth year of the program, with a freshmen class
                               of 40. Almost all students are expected to enroll as full-time
                               students.

Plan to Recruit                TAMU-CC is in the process of establishing the EAHSI to
Underrepresented Students      increase the number of high school students prepared to enter
                               STEM disciplines in higher education and to ensure their
                               success. The effort is based on the NSF funded and successful
                               Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions, of which
                               TAMU-CC is a member. Founding members of EAHSI will be
                               TAMU-CC, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, Texas A&M
                               International University, Del Mar College, Coastal Bend
                               Community College, and Laredo Community College.




                                                                                         3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-C (3)
Page 2

                               TAMU-CC has numerous other STEM outreach initiatives, such
                               as summer programs, bridge programs, or teacher workshops
                               training, and quality grants.

Existing State Programs        Bachelor’s programs in mechanical engineering are offered at
                               Lamar University, Midwestern State University, Prairie View
                               A&M University, Texas A&M University, Texas A&M University-
                               Kingsville, Texas Tech University, University of Houston,
                               University of North Texas, West Texas A&M University and at
                               The University of Texas System Schools: Arlington, Austin,
                               Dallas, El Paso, Pan American, Permian Basin, San Antonio,
                               and Tyler.

                               TAMU-CC would tailor the program to its research interests
                               related to the Gulf of Mexico marine environment.

                                QUALITY AND RESOURCES

Faculty                        TAMU-CC has two core faculty members with terminal
                               mechanical engineering degrees and plans to hire three
                               additional core faculty and one support faculty in electrical
                               engineering. This would allow for an appropriate student/faculty
                               ratio and would give it the necessary faculty pool for
                               accreditation.

Other Personnel                The institution would create 2.5 FTE new clerical or staff
                               positions, including a program coordinator for the new EAHSI
                               initiative. The average cost would be $120,000 per year.

Facilities and Equipment       The program would use existing lab facilities from its
                               engineering technology program but would purchase additional
                               equipment for $750,000 during the first five years.

Library, Supplies, Materials   Adequate library resources for mechanical engineering would
                               have to be purchased for full-text reference sources, standards,
                               technical manuals, data bases, and monographs. Total five-
                               year cost for the library resources is estimated at $127,000.
                               Total cost for laboratory supplies and materials would be
                               $42,000 for five years.

Accreditation                  The institution is planning to apply for accreditation through the
                               Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)
                               during year five of the program. In the meantime, it plans to
                               apply for temporary approval by the Board for Professional
                               Engineers.




                                                                                          3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-C (3)
Page 3



FIVE-YEAR COSTS                                         SOURCES OF FUNDING

Personnel                                               Reallocated Funds                         $988,248
   New personnel1                $1,242,956
   Reassignments                 $1,008,251

Facilities and                                          Anticipated New
  Equipment                        $750,000                 Formula Funding2                      $905,225


Library, Supplies,                                      Special Item Funding                             $0
Materials                          $168,990
                                                        Other
Other                                                      HEAF                                  $492,800
   ABET accreditation              $100,000                Industry Donations                    $570,000
                                                           Tuition                             $1,529,642

Est. 5-Year Costs              $3,270,197               Est. 5-Year Revenues                  $4,465,105

The Chief Executive Officer of the institution has certified that the institution will
have funds sufficient to support the proposed program and that the new programs
will not reduce the effectiveness or quality of existing programs at the institution.

Estimated formula funding generated by the institution in years three through five of the
proposed program would total $884,415.




1
    Includes new faculty.
2
    Formula funding for students new to the institution because of the program for years three through five
    of the program. Dollar amount calculated by Coordinating Board staff.

                                                                                                    3/23/09
                                    KEY ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES
                                 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-CORPUS CHRISTI
Academically organized into five colleges: (1) Business, (2) Education, (3) Liberal Arts, (4) Science and
Technology, and (5) Nursing and Health Sciences; and a School of Visual and Performing Arts.

Offers a total of 38 undergraduate, 28 master's, and 4 doctoral degree programs. (08/06)

                                                Fall             Fall           Fall       % Change        Institutional         CTG
 Enrollment                                    2000             2006           2007       Fall 2000 to     CTG Target       Completion
                                                                                            Fall 2007         Fall 2010
 Total                                        6,823             8,585          8,563            25.5%             9,466             90%
 White                                        3,749             4,546          4,361            16.3%             4,733             92%
 African-American                               177               343            381           115.3%                473            81%
 Hispanic                                     2,640             3,291          3,284            24.4%             3,786             87%
 Asian                                          133               201            205            54.1%
 Other                                          124               204            332           167.7%


 Fall 2007 Gender                  Undergraduate              Master's       Doctoral                   Professional Post-Bacc Total
 Male                                      2,728                  483             50                              0         17 3,278
 Female                                    4,119                1,022            119                              0         25 5,285


                                                                  FY              FY                 FY                    % Change
 Degrees Awarded by Level
                                                                 2000            2006               2007          FY 2000 to FY 2007
 Total Degrees                                                  1,309           1,571              1,737                       32.7%
 Associate's                                                        0               0                  0                         N/A
 Baccalaureate                                                    910           1,183              1,300                       42.9%
 Master's                                                         395             374                416                        5.3%
 Doctoral                                                           4              14                 21                      425.0%
 Professional                                                       0               0                  0                         N/A


 First-Time Undergraduate                  Entering Cohort       Entering Cohort        Entering Cohort                  Point Change
 Persistence Rate After One Year                  Fall 2000             Fall 2004              Fall 2006         Fall 2000 to Fall 2006
 Total                                             87.5%%                81.1%%                 80.8%%                              - 6.7
 White                                             88.0%%                83.6%%                 82.0%%                              - 6.0
 African-American                                  88.9%%                86.1%%                 87.7%%                              - 1.2
 Hispanic                                          86.3%%                77.7%%                 78.7%%                              - 7.6
 Asian                                           100.0%%                 92.0%%                 83.3%%                            - 16.7
 Other                                             80.0%%                54.5%%                 66.7%%                            - 13.3


                                                                     FY                   FY                   FY            % Change
 Research Expenditures
                                                                    2004                 2005                 2006           FY 2004 to
 ($ Millions)
                                                                                                                               FY 2006
 Total                                                           $ 13.683             $ 12.073             $ 13.707               0.2%


 Administrative costs as a percentage of                FY 2000             FY 2006          FY 2007                   Point Change
 operating budget                                                                                                 FY 2000 to FY 2007
 Total                                                    15.3%               8.9%               8.6%                           - 6.7
                        Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                     AGENDA ITEM IV-C (4)



Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to a request from Texas Tech
University Health Science Center to create a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) program with a major
in Rehabilitation Sciences



RECOMMENDATION:            Approval and authorization to create a Ph.D. in Rehabilitation
                           Sciences. Staff recommend approval with the understanding that
                           the institution will submit annual reports for five years confirming the
                           presence of faculty and other resources consistent with institutional
                           commitments. The reports will also provide an assessment of
                           student progress.


              BACKGROUND INFORMATION AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

       The doctoral degree proposed by the Texas Tech University Health Science Center
(TTUHSC) would serve the State of Texas by educating future rehabilitation sciences faculty
members to meet chronic and increasingly critical shortages of appropriately qualified faculty
members to teach in the disciplines of occupational therapy, physical therapy, and athletic
training. Seven similar programs exist nationally. None are in Texas or bordering states.

       The proposed program would be housed in the School of Allied Health Sciences in the
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences. Faculty members would be drawn primarily from the
existing programs in physical therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training, and other related
programs throughout the School of Allied Health Sciences.

       A shortage of qualified faculty to teach in Rehabilitation Sciences programs across the
country is made even more urgent by several factors: the retirements of existing faculty, a
rising student demand for rehabilitation education at all levels, and rising clinical demand as the
baby boomers begin to retire. Changes in accreditation standards dictate that faculty members
in Physical Therapy graduate programs must have doctorates. Many faculty members in
programs across the country have Master’s degrees in addition to clinical practice experience.
There is therefore a growing demand for Ph.D. programs that would allow existing faculty to
upgrade their Physical Therapy degrees to a Ph.D. For this reason, the emphasis at TTUHSC
would be on pedagogy and general research rather than training for clinical practice.

       Students in the proposed program would complete 87 semester credit hours (SCH),
including 69 SCH of course work and 18 SCH of dissertation. Up to 24 SCH may be transferred
from an approved Master’s program. Students must pass a preliminary exam after 20 SCH, pass
a qualifying exam for admission to candidacy, and complete a doctoral dissertation. The
curriculum consists of 28 SCH of core courses in rehabilitation sciences, 5 SCH in pedagogy, 9
SCH in prescribed electives, 3 hours in Schools of Allied Health Sciences electives, 24 SCH in
research methodologies, and 18 SCH in dissertation research.
                                                                                           3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-C (4)
Page 2

Employment Opportunities           Graduates are intended to be faculty members in
                                   rehabilitation sciences programs, and their various
                                   academic subdivisions, in Texas and around the country. It
                                   is possible for graduates to work in clinical practice, but
                                   this is not the primary aim of the program. There is
                                   currently a shortage of faculty for existing programs, and
                                   demand is projected to rise as existing programs continue
                                   their trend of expansion. Also, the baby boomer generation
                                   of current faculty will begin retiring in greater numbers:
                                   the American Occupational Therapy Association projects
                                   the retirement of nearly 40 percent of current occupational
                                   therapy faculty by 2020. Even more importantly,
                                   accrediting standards for rehabilitation sciences graduate
                                   programs have changed to require all graduate faculty to
                                   have Ph.D.s. Many existing faculty will therefore be looking
                                   to complete Ph.D.s in Rehabilitation Sciences or related
                                   fields. Since other universities are facing similar shortages,
                                   graduates trained in general research and pedagogy in
                                   rehabilitation sciences are projected to have little trouble
                                   finding faculty jobs in Texas or elsewhere.

Projected Enrollment               The proposed program would initially admit at least three
                                   students per year. The program would require
                                   approximately four years of post-baccalaureate work to
                                   complete, so full enrollment would be 12 students during
                                   the initial four years. After five years, at least 3 students
                                   would graduate each year, with ongoing program growth
                                   expected.

Plan to Recruit Underrepresented
Students                           The Ph.D. program would recruit students locally,
                                   regionally and nationally. The program would develop a
                                   recruitment plan seeking applications from all types of
                                   students, including Hispanics and African Americans.
                                   Recruitment strategies would include website postings;
                                   personal contact with graduates of our entry-level clinical
                                   programs in athletic training, occupational therapy, and
                                   physical therapy; emails to clinical programs and clinicians;
                                   advertising in professional journals; and participation in
                                   employment booths at conferences. The expertise and
                                   knowledge base of personnel in the School's Office of
                                   Admissions and Student Affairs would be engaged to
                                   promote recruitment of a diverse pool of applicants. An
                                   additional resource for Hispanic and African American
                                   recruitment is the University's Center for International and
                                   Multicultural Affairs.




                                                                                         3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-C (4)
Page 3

Existing State Programs        There is only one existing doctoral-level program in
                               Rehabilitation Sciences in Texas at the University of Texas
                               Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB). Rehabilitation
                               Sciences is a curriculum track within the Ph.D. degree
                               program of Preventative Medicine and Community Health
                               with a total enrollment of 11 students. The emphasis at
                               the UTMB program is designed to educate clinical
                               practitioners in aspects of clinical care and clinical trial
                               research. In contrast, the proposed Ph.D. program at
                               TTUHSC is focused on training future faculty members in
                               multi-disciplinary research and pedagogy.

Faculty                        There are five core faculty members who would teach
                               courses and supervise dissertations in the proposed
                               program. All core faculty have terminal degrees in the
                               field. Also available are 11 part-time faculty and 23
                               support faculty from the School of Allied Health Sciences.

Other Personnel                Graduate students may serve as teaching or research
                               assistants under the supervision of faculty. Existing clerical
                               and support staff would support the program.

Facilities and Equipment       Ample space is currently available to support a doctoral
                               program. There are four fully operational laboratories to
                               accommodate faculty and student research as part of the
                               Center for Rehabilitation Research at TTUHSC, which has
                               been a major investment for the institution since approved
                               in 2002. Additional facilities are available throughout
                               TTUHSC and Texas Tech University.

Library, Supplies, Materials   Current library holdings are appropriate for the support of
                               the proposed program. The TTUHSC library is a member
                               of the Association of Research Libraries, an honor given to
                               less than 10 percent of medical libraries. The library
                               subscribes to all of the major professional rehabilitation
                               journals, and the TTUHSC library is in full partnership with
                               the other four libraries in the TTUHSC system and the
                               nearby library at Texas Tech University. Inter-library loan
                               is also available. There is also strong institutional-level
                               administrative support for online teaching and the use of
                               classroom technology.

Accreditation                  There is no relevant accrediting agency for a non-clinical
                               program such as this one.

Sustainability                 TTUHSC reports that the program would be self-supporting
                               within three years.



                                                                                     3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM IV-C (4)
Page 4

Consultants                        The following rehabilitation sciences consultants reviewed
                                   the proposed program and participated on a site visit: Dr.
                                   Peter Esselman, University of Washington; Dr. Carl
                                   Mattacola, University of Kentucky; and Dr. Mary Rodgers,
                                   University of Maryland.




FIVE-YEAR COSTS                                  SOURCES OF FUNDING

Personnel                            $312,000    Reallocated Funds               $978,550

Facilities                                       Anticipated new                 $285,332
and Equipment                               $0   Formula Funding

Library, Supplies, and Materials      $50,000    Other State Funding               $38,850

Program Administration                $53,000    Other (interest income,         $312,750
Other (Student Stipends)             $340,000    designated funds, and/or
                                                 federal funds)



Est. 5-year Costs                   $755,000     Est.5-Year Revenue          $1,615,482

The chief executive officer of the institution has certified, and staff have
determined, that the institution will have funds sufficient to support the proposed
program.




                                                                                      3/23/09
                                 KEY ACCOUNTABILITY MEASURES
                         TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER
Organized into five schools: (1) Allied Health Sciences, (2) Biomedical Sciences, (3) Medicine, (4)
Nursing, and (5) Pharmacy.

Offers 5 baccalaureate, 16 master's, 7 doctoral, and 5 special professional degrees. (04/08)

                                            Fall        Fall            Fall      % Change        Institutional        CTG
 Enrollment                                2000        2006            2007      Fall 2000 to     CTG Target      Completion
                                                                                   Fall 2007         Fall 2010
 Total                                     1,719       2,458           2,616           52.2%             3,100          84%
 White                                     1,293       1,624           1,676           29.6%             2,139          78%
 African-American                             30         126             134          346.7%                232         58%
 Hispanic                                    172         299             326           89.5%                590         55%
 Asian                                       180         247             278           54.4%
 Other                                        44         162             202          359.1%


 Fall 2007 Gender                  Undergraduate     Master's        Doctoral                   Professional Post-Bacc Total
 Male                                        85          201              79                              0          5 870
 Female                                     523          621              95                              0         34 1,746


                                                        FY               FY                 FY                    % Change
 Degrees Awarded by Level
                                                       2000             2006               2007          FY 2000 to FY 2007
 Total Degrees                                          446              900                987                      121.3%
 Associate's                                              0                0                  0                         N/A
 Baccalaureate                                          175              430                526                      200.6%
 Master's                                                98              256                250                      155.1%
 Doctoral                                                 3               16                 19                      533.3%
 Professional                                           170              198                192                       12.9%


                                                              FY                  FY                   FY         % Change
 Research Expenditures
                                                             2004                2005                 2006        FY 2004 to
 ($ Millions)
                                                                                                                    FY 2006
 Total                                                  $ 10.836               $ 9.212            $ 12.609            16.4%


 Administrative costs as a percentage of           FY 2000          FY 2006          FY 2007                  Point Change
 operating budget                                                                                        FY 2000 to FY 2007
 Total                                                  %             4.1%               3.9%                           N/A
                      Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                      AGENDA ITEM IV-D


Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation certifying that Texas A&M University-
Kingsville System Center-San Antonio, Tarleton State University System Center-Central Texas,
and University of North Texas System Center-Dallas have met the legislatively established
minimum threshold of full-time student equivalents (FTSE)


RECOMMENDATION: Approval


Background Information:

   1. Sec. 87.841(d) of the Texas Education Code stipulated that “Texas A&M University-San
      Antonio may not operate as a general academic teaching institution until the Texas
      Higher Education Coordinating Board certifies that enrollment at the Texas A&M
      University-Kingsville System Center-San Antonio has reached an enrollment equivalent
      of:
               (1) 1,000 full-time students for one semester if the legislature authorizes
               revenue bonds to be issued to finance educational and related facilities for the
               institution, and the bonds are issued for that purpose; or
               (2) 2,500 full-time students for one semester if the conditions specified by
               Subdivision (1) are not satisfied.”

       The Coordinating Board staff have certified that Texas A&M University-Kingsville System
       Center-San Antonio has exceeded the minimum threshold of FTSEs. The spring 2009
       FTSE count was 1,035. The tuition revenue bond reference in (1) has been authorized,
       but not issued.

   2. Section 105.501(d) of the Texas Education Code stipulates that “the University of North
      Texas at Dallas may operate as a general academic teaching institution with its own
      chief executive officer, administration, and faculty only after the Texas Higher Education
      Coordinating Board certifies that enrollment at the University of North Texas System
      Center at Dallas has reached an enrollment equivalent to 1,000 full-time students for
      one semester.”

       The Coordinating Board staff have certified that the University of North Texas System
       Center-Dallas has exceeded the minimum threshold of FTSEs. The spring 2009 FTSE
       count was 1,003.

   3. Sec. 87.861(d) of the Texas Education Code stipulates that “Texas A&M University-
      Central Texas may not operate as a general academic teaching institution until the
      Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board certifies that enrollment at the Tarleton
      State University System Center-Central Texas in Killeen has reached an enrollment
      equivalent of 1,000 full-time students for one semester.”

       The Coordinating Board staff have certified that Tarleton State University System
       Center-Central Texas has exceeded the minimum threshold of FTSEs. The spring 2009
       FTSE count was 1,204.
                                                                                        3/23/09
                           Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                           AGENDA ITEM IV-E

Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to a request from Texas A & M
University-Corpus Christi to change the degree designation of its existing Doctor of Education
(Ed.D.) in Curriculum and Instruction to a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Curriculum and
Instruction


RECOMMENDATION:               Approval


Background Information:

         In February 2007, the Texas A&M University System approved a request from Texas
A&M University-Corpus Christi to change the title of its doctoral degree in Curriculum and
Instruction with an emphasis in Reading from a Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) to a Doctor of
Philosophy (Ph.D.). After review by Coordinating Board staff, the proposal was returned to the
institution. Faculty revised and updated the proposal and resubmitted it to the Coordinating
Board in June 2008.

        Coordinating Board staff reviewed the revised proposal and asked an outside consultant
to evaluate the proposal. Dr. Elizabeth Graue, Director of Graduate Training at the Wisconsin
Center for Education Research and Professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the
University of Wisconsin-Madison, was selected as the external reviewer. Dr. Graue evaluated
the proposal “in terms of quality of resources (including faculty) and integrity of graduate
training and education.” Her analysis included a review of the program’s strengths as well as a
number of suggested changes that should be made before transitioning from a practice-based
Ed.D. to a research-based Ph.D. Based on her report, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi has made a
number of changes to their proposal.

         Approval for this change is based on the understanding that the Ph.D. in Curriculum and
Instruction with concentrations in Literacy Studies and Curriculum Studies would include the
following: the curriculum is research-focused and provides greater flexibility to meet the demands of
an expanding job market; the core faculty for the program are appropriately engaged in research
activities consistent with doctoral study leading to the Ph.D.; students would continue to be directed
in conducting research aimed to develop and contribute to the knowledge base, rather than the
“practitioner” research that generally typifies Ed.D. focused inquiry; and there are no additional costs
to the institution or the state for the revised program.




                                                                                           3/23/09
                       Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                      AGENDA ITEM IV-F


Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to Weatherford College to
designate the teaching center located in Wise County as a branch campus


RECOMMENDATION: Approval


Background Information:

       Coordinating Board Rules Chapter 8, Subchapter D, Section 8.73, stipulate that the
governing board of a community college district may establish and operate a branch campus
through conversion of an extension center or extension facility, provided that each course and
program has been approved and is subject to the continuing approval of the Coordinating
Board.

       Weatherford College began offering Coordinating Board-approved classes in Decatur,
Wise County, Texas, at the beginning of the fall 2000 semester. At the January 2007 meeting,
the Coordinating Board approved a request from Weatherford College to hold a branch campus
maintenance tax election in Wise County. The election was held on November 4, 2008, and the
maintenance tax referendum passed.

         The Wise County Commissioner’s Court has been authorized by passage of the
maintenance tax to levy the tax for the 2009 year. However, the commissioner’s court will not
officially levy the tax until September 2009 when it levies other taxes.

        Weatherford College currently serves 957 students in Wise County. The education
center in Decatur has a current enrollment of 553 students. The following semester credit hour
and continuing education (CE) programs are currently available at the Decatur center: General
Education, AA degree, AS degree, AAT degree, Law Enforcement Academy, Truck Driving
Academy, Health Professions Certificates, Certified Nurse Aide, Medication Aide, Phlebotomy,
Medical Assistant, Computer Skills, Computer-Aided Drafting, Personal Enrichment Defensive
Driving, Alcohol Awareness for Minors, Ballroom Dancing/Yoga, Teacher Preparation/Alternative
Teacher Education (Planned for summer 2009), and Welding.




                                                                                        3/23/09
                        Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                       AGENDA ITEM IV-G


Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to revisions to the three Associate
of Arts in Teaching curricula intended for transfer to baccalaureate programs that lead to initial
Texas teacher certification


RECOMMENDATION: Approval


Background Information:

          At its July 2004 meeting, the Board adopted the three Associate of Arts in Teaching
(AAT) curricula which were aligned with the requirements of the State Board for Educator
Certification (SBEC). Over the past year, SBEC has changed those certification requirements. In
order to keep the AAT functioning as an effective instrument for supplying the state with new
teachers, it is essential to modify the AAT curricula so they will be aligned with the new SBEC
standards and the requirements of public university baccalaureate degree programs that lead to
initial licensure for teachers.

         Staff began the process of revision by convening a work group composed of public two-
year and four-year institution representatives as well as Texas Education Agency (TEA) and
SBEC staff. This work group took into consideration the new SBEC standards, the 120-hour
limitation of baccalaureate degrees, and the transfer history of the original AAT curricula since
2004. On February 13, 2009, the work group issued their recommendation to staff.

       The work group’s changes to the AAT curricula can be summarized as follows:

           Revision of the three AAT curricula: one for Early Childhood through 6th grade, one
           for grades 4-8, and one for high school and special education;
           All three curricula capped at 60 semester credit hours; and
           Texas Early Childhood Articulation (TECA) courses have been removed from EC-6
           curriculum.

      Staff concurs with the work group’s revisions to the AAT curricula and recommends
approval as submitted.




                                                                                           3/23/09
Agenda Item IV-G                                                           Page 1


        Associate of Arts in Teaching              Associate of Arts in Teaching
            (as approved in 2004)                       (proposed revision)
    Leading to Initial Texas Teacher              Leading to Initial Texas Teacher
              Certification                                 Certification
     EC-4 Early Childhood Degree                                EC-6
          Specialization Only1

AAT Components – Total: 60-66 SCHs             AAT Components – Total: 60 SCHs
      core curriculum (42-48 SCHs)                   Completed core curriculum (42-48
      2
        MATH 1350 and MATH 1351 or                   SCHs) PLUS:
      equivalent (6 SCHs)
      TECA 1303, TECA 1311, TECA 1318,                MATH 1350, MATH 1351, or
      and TECA 1354                                   equivalent (3-6 SCHs)
                                                      Additional science beyond the core
EC-Grade 4 Certification (areas)                      curriculum (3-6 SCHs)
   EC-4 Generalist (Early Childhood degree            EDUC 1301 and EDUC 2301 (3-6
   specialization ONLY1)                              SCHs)

                                               EC-Grade 6 Certification (areas)
                                                     EC-6 Generalist
1
 The Early Childhood degree specialization           EC-6Bilingual Generalist
refers only to the degree program offered at         EC-6 ESL Generalist
a university and not to a particular SBEC            EC-6 other content area teaching
certification area. All EC-4 Generalists             fields/academic
(except EC-4 Generalist Bilingual and EC-4           disciplines/interdisciplinary TBA
Generalist ESL) no matter the university
degree specialization take the same TExES
examination for certification and are
certified to teach in any EC-4 classroom.
2
 By Board policy adopted January 1997, all
EC-4 and 4-8 teacher certification degree
programs are required to include 6-9 hours
of math and 6-9 hours of science beyond
the core curriculum requirements. The
science component of the EC-4 Early
Childhood degree specialization must be
fulfilled but may be taken at the receiving
university.
Agenda Item IV-G                                                          Page 2

    Associate of Arts in Teaching                Associate of Arts in Teaching
           (as approved in 2004)                      (proposed revision)
   Leading to Initial Texas Teacher             Leading to Initial Texas Teacher
             Certification                                Certification
 EC-4 (except Early Childhood Degree                       4-8, EC-12
      Specialization), 4-8, EC-12

AAT Components – Total: 60-66 SCHs           AAT Components – Total: 60 SCHs
      core curriculum (42-48 SCHs)                 Completed core curriculum (42-48
      MATH 1350 and MATH 1351 or                   SCHs) PLUS:
      equivalent (6 SCHs)
      science (6 SCHs)                              MATH 1350 and MATH 1351 or
      EDUC 1301 and EDUC 2301 (6                    equivalent (3-6 SCHs)
      SCHs)                                         Additional science beyond the core
                                                    curriculum (3-6 SCHs)
EC-Grade 4 Certification (areas)                    EDUC 1301 and EDUC 2301 (3-6
      EC-4 Generalist (all specializations          SCHs)
      except early childhood degree
      specialization)
      EC-4 Bilingual Generalist              Grades 4-8 Certification (areas)
      EC-4 ESL Generalist                          4-8 Generalist
      EC-4 other content area teaching             4-8 Bilingual Generalist
      fields/academic                              4-8 ESL Generalist
      disciplines/interdisciplinary TBA            4-8 English Language Arts &
                                                   Reading
Grades 4-8 Certification (areas)                   4-8 English Language Arts &
      4-8 Generalist                               Reading and Social Studies
      4-8 Bilingual Generalist                     4-8 Mathematics
      4-8 ESL Generalist                           4-8 Science
      4-8 English Language Arts &                  4-8 Mathematics and Science
      Reading                                      4-8 Social Studies
      4-8 English Language Arts &                  4-8 other content area teaching
      Reading and Social Studies                   fields/academic
      4-8 Mathematics                              disciplines/interdisciplinary TBA
      4-8 Science
      4-8 Mathematics and Science            EC-Grade 12 Certification (areas)
      4-8 Social Studies
      4-8 other content area teaching               EC-12 Special Education
      fields/academic                               EC-12 other content area teaching
      disciplines/interdisciplinary TBA             fields/academic
                                                    disciplines/interdisciplinary TBA
EC-Grade 12 Certification (areas)

        EC-12 Special Education
        EC-12 other content area teaching
        fields/academic
        disciplines/interdisciplinary TBA
Agenda Item IV-G                                                               Page 3

     Associate of Arts in Teaching                   Associate of Arts in Teaching
            (as approved in 2004)                         (proposed revision)
    Leading to Initial Texas Teacher                Leading to Initial Texas Teacher
              Certification                                   Certification
          8-12, Other EC-12                                8-12, Other EC-12
AAT Components – Total: 60-66 SCHs              AAT Components – Total: 60 SCHs
      core curriculum (42-48 SCHs)                    Completed core curriculum (42-48
      EDUC 1301 and EDUC 2301 (6 SCHs)                SCHs) PLUS:
      content area teaching fields/academic           EDUC 1301 and EDUC 2301 (up to 6
      disciplines (12 SCHs)                           SCHs)
                                                      content area teaching fields/academic
Grades 8-12 Certification (areas)                     disciplines (up to 12 SCHs)
       8-12 History
       8-12 Social Studies                      Grades 8-12 Certification (areas)
       8-12 Mathematics                                8-12 History
       8-12 Life Sciences                              8-12 Social Studies
       8-12 Physical Sciences                          8-12 Mathematics
       8-12 Science                                    8-12 Life Sciences
       8-12 English Language Arts & Reading            8-12 Physical Sciences
       8-12 Computer Science                           8-12 Science
       8-12 Technology Applications                    8-12 English Language Arts & Reading
       8-12 Health Science Technology                  8-12 Computer Science
       Education                                       8-12 Technology Applications
       8-12 Speech                                     8-12 Health Science Technology
       8-12 Journalism                                 Education
       8-12 Business Education                         8-12 Speech
       8-12 Marketing Education                        8-12 Journalism
       8-12 Mathematics & Physics                      8-12 Business Education
       8-12 Agricultural Sciences and                  8-12 Marketing Education
       Technology                                      8-12 Mathematics & Physics
       6-12 Technology Education                       8-12 Agricultural Sciences and
       8-12 Foreign Languages                          Technology
       8-12 Family and Consumer Sciences               6-12 Technology Education
       8-12 Dance                                      8-12 Foreign Languages
       8-12 Mathematics & Physical Science &           8-12 Family and Consumer Sciences
       Engineering                                     8-12 Dance
       8-12 Human Development and Family               8-12 Mathematics & Physical Science &
       Science                                         Engineering
       8-12 Hospitality, Nutrition and Food            8-12 Human Development and Family
       Science                                         Science
       8-12 Other content area teaching                8-12 Hospitality, Nutrition and Food
       fields/academic disciplines TBA (i.e.,          Science
       Chemistry)                                      8-12 Other content area teaching
                                                       fields/academic disciplines TBA (i.e.,
EC-Grade 12 Certification (areas)                      Chemistry)
       EC-12 Music
       EC-12 Physical Education                 EC-Grade 12 Certification (areas)
       EC-12 Art                                       EC-12 Music
       EC-12 Health                                    EC-12 Physical Education
       EC-12 Theatre                                   EC-12 Art
       EC-12 Technology Applications                   EC-12 Health
       EC-12 Languages other than English              EC-12 Theatre
       EC-12 Other content area teaching               EC-12 Technology Applications
       fields/academic disciplines TBA                 EC-12 Languages other than English
                                                       EC-12 Other content area teaching
                                                       fields/academic disciplines TBA
                      Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                     AGENDA ITEM IV-H

Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation relating to the National Association of
Schools of Theatre (NAST) being recognized as an accrediting agency in Texas


RECOMMENDATION: Approval


Background Information:

        The practice of accreditation arose in the United States more than 50 years ago. The
goal of accreditation is to ensure that education provided by institutions of higher education
meets acceptable levels of quality. Accrediting agencies, which are private education
associations of regional or national scope, develop evaluation criteria and conduct peer
evaluations to assess whether or not those criteria are met. Institutions and/or programs
that request an agency’s evaluation and that meet an agency’s criteria are then “accredited”
by that agency.

        At its January 2008 meeting, the Coordinating Board adopted amendments to
Chapter 7 rules that identified a process for allowing national accrediting agencies to apply
for recognition. Those agencies accredit private, primarily for-profit career schools and
colleges. Texas currently recognizes six regional accrediting agencies, two national faith-
based accrediting agencies, and six national accrediting agencies.

        The National Association of Schools of Theatre (NAST) has been continuously
recognized by the United States Department of Education (USDE) since 1982. The NAST
was founded in 1965 to improve educational practices and maintain high professional
standards in theater education and has been designated by the USDE as the agency
responsible for the accreditation of all theater curricula. The NAST also has been recognized
by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation and is a member of the Association of
Specialized and Professional Accreditors.

         The NAST currently accredits 150 institutions in the United States. Eight of those
institutions are in Texas, seven of which are at universities and colleges and one is at a
private institution. The NAST application was evaluated by Coordinating Board staff and
meets all criteria for recognition.




                                                                                       3/23/09
                      Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                     AGENDA ITEM IV-I

Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s recommendation relating to a request from
Texas College of Traditional Chinese Medicine for a Certificate of Authority to grant degrees
in Texas


RECOMMENDATION: Pending


Background Information:

        The Texas College of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCTCM) seeks approval for a
Certificate of Authority to award the Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree
with a major in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. TCTCM is the oldest institution of
acupuncture and oriental medicine in Texas; its mission is to educate the students in a
rigorous learning environment, train qualified practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine,
provide high quality complementary health care services, and further the knowledge of
acupuncture and Chinese medicine through research.

       An on-site evaluation was conducted at TCTCM on February 23-24, 2009. The
Coordinating Board’s Certification Advisory Council reviewed the evaluation team’s report
and TCTCM’s response to the evaluation report at its March 10, 2009, meeting. The
Commissioner has the authority to approve, modify, or disapprove the council’s
recommendation and will forward his recommendation to the Committee for consideration.




                                                                                      3/23/09
                      Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                      AGENDA ITEM V-A

Discussion of the programmatic aspects of funding items on the Agency Operations
Committee agenda

     A.     Grant Competitions

              1. Minority Health Research and Education Grant Program
              2. Nursing, Allied Health and Other Health-related Grant Program


RECOMMENDATION: No action required

Background Information:

   1. Minority Health Research and Education Grant Program funds for the 2010-
      2011 biennium

        The Coordinating Board requests applications from public and independent general academic
and health-related institutions to award grants through a program established as a result of the
State’s Multi-State Tobacco Lawsuit Settlement (Texas Education Code Sections 63.301-Section 63-
302.) Grants are funded by interest earnings from the permanent fund for the program, which was
created in 1999 as a result of the Settlement.

       For the 2008-2009 biennium, grants awarded under the program were used to support
projects leading to the recruitment, preparation, and retention of minority students in health degree
programs. Consistent with the goals and objectives of Closing the Gaps, the 2009 Request(s) for
Proposals (RFP) document will continue to solicit educational pipeline projects. The RFP(s) will
contain background information, definitions, instructions, and forms for completing the applications.

      Assuming that the 81st Texas Legislature re-appropriates the interest earnings from the
permanent fund to the Board, approximately $2.25 million will be available for project funding for the
2010-2011 biennium.

   2. Nursing, Allied Health and Other Health-related Education Grant Program
      for the 2010-2011 biennium

       The Coordinating Board requests applications from hospitals and institutions of higher
education that offer programs leading to the initial licensure of registered nurses to award grants
through a program established as a result of the Multi-State Tobacco Lawsuit Settlement (Texas
Education Code Sections 63.202 (f) and (g)). Grants are funded by interest earnings from the
permanent fund for the program, which was created in 1999 as a result of the settlement.

       For the 2008-09 biennium, grants awarded under the program were used to support
partnerships among nursing programs and between nursing programs and hospitals to test new
educational models for producing more nurse graduates. Consistent with the goals and objectives of


                                                                                        3/23/09
AGENDA ITEM V-A
Page 2

Closing the Gaps, the 2009 Request(s) for Proposals (RFP) document will continue to solicit projects
that will test new models for producing more nurse graduates. The RFP(s) will contain background
information, definitions, and instructions and forms for completing the applications.

      Assuming that the 81st Texas Legislature re-appropriates the interest earnings from the
permanent fund to the Board, approximately $4.05 million will be available for project funding for the
2010-2011 biennium.

      These items will be discussed and voted on at the April 29, 2009, Agency Operations
Committee meeting.




                                                                                       3/23/09
                   Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                   AGENDA ITEM V-B


Allocation of unused Fiscal Year 2009 Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education State
Leadership funds for use in Program Year 2008-2009


RECOMMENDATION:              No action required


Background Information:

       State Leadership projects are required by federal law to have statewide impact
on Career Technical Education (CTE) by increasing excellence in programs, teaching
methodology, and/or students’ outcomes.

       On July 24, 2008, the Board adopted the Agency Operations Committee’s
recommendation regarding the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education
Improvement Act funds to colleges and consortia for State Leadership activities for
program year 2008-2009 for $2,758,387, including unobligated funds. One of these
projects was awarded to Midland College in the amount of $100,000 for the Workforce
Education Course Manual (WECM) maintenance project.

       The Board, at its January 2009 meeting, approved the reallocation of 2007-2008
carry-over funds and unobligated 2008-2009 funds for use in the current program year. A
portion ($200,000) of the unobligated State Leadership funds was set aside in anticipation
of a WECM project amendment along with other projects that are being developed.

        Specifically, this project amendment is a request for funding to support additional
WECM Course Review Workshops during May and June 2009. These workshops are needed
to review courses identified during the fall 2008 Career Clusters/Programs of Study Vertical
Alignment Workshops and to review identified Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP)
areas for which a large number of comments were received during the fall 2008 semester.
These identified areas necessitate review of WECM course descriptions and end-of-course
outcomes to better align with secondary CTE courses and to meet changes in technology
and workforce trends.

       This request would amend the original 2008-2009 WECM project. The
amendment adds three additional workshops consisting of 17 teams. The additional
workshops and teams will meet concurrently with the original teams during May and
June 2009. The amount to be awarded for these additional workshops is $45,580. This
amount is a portion of the unobligated funds approved by the Board in July, included in
the contract approved by the Commissioners in September, and set aside by the Board
in January for this purpose.




                                                                                 3/23/09
                         Committee on Academic Excellence and Research

                                         AGENDA ITEM VI-A


Discussion of staff activities and projects

       A.   A Strategic Plan for the State of Texas to Meet Nursing Workforce Needs of 2013


RECOMMENDATION: No action required


Background Information:

       Chris Fowler, Senior Program Director, will discuss a statewide strategic plan for nursing in
the context of previous Board action, current and future staff activities, and projected workforce
needs.




                                                                                            3/23/09

				
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