2002 - Chapter XI, Stabilization and Price-Support Programs by farmservice

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									CHAPTER XI

STABILIZATION AND PRICE-SUPPORT PROGRAMS
The statistics in this chapter relate to activities of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), cropland diversion and production adjustment programs, and marketing agreement and order programs for fruits and vegetables. Statistics for Federal Milk Marketing Order programs are contained in chapter VIII. Table 11-1.—Commodity Credit Corporation: Price-supported commodities owned as of Dec. 31, 1991–2000 1 (Inventory quantity)
Year Barley Million bushels 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ 7 5 5 5 5 (3) (3) 1 1 (3) Butter and butter oil Million pounds 566 628 564 111 (3) 0 0 0 0 0 Cheese Million pounds 28 15 (3) 0 0 0 (3) 0 0 0 Corn Million bushels 265 125 54 44 42 30 2 15 26 36 Cotton upland 1,000 bales 1 (6) 7 (6)146 (6) 90 (8) (8) (2) (8) (8) (2) Sorghum grain Million bushels 43 8 3 1 1 0 (2) 1 1 (3) Nonfat dry milk Million pounds 283 (7)62 25 44 25 (3) 30 111 161 602 Oils and oilseeds

(2) (2) (2) (2) (2) 0 (2) 0 (3) (2) Value of all commodities owned 5 Million dollars 2,375 1,719 833 715 654 435 364 363 347 2,257

Year

Oats Million bushels

Rice 4 Million cwt. (3) (3) (2) 0 0 0 0 (2) (3) (2) (3) 1 (2) (2) (2) 0 0 0 (3) (2)

Rye Million bushels 0 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Soybeans Million bushels (3) 0 (3) (3) (2) 0 0 3 7 10

Honey Million pounds 9 (3) 4 13 1 0 0 0 0 0

Wheat Million bushels 161 165 168 144 141 96 93 107 104 109

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

................... ................... ................... ................... ................... ................... ................... ................... ................... ...................

1 Commodities which were owned by CCC in some years but not shown in this table are as follows: blended foods, cottonseed and products, naval stores, wheat products, corn products, oat products, rice products, vegetable oil, mixed feed, lin2 Less than 50,000 seed oil, evaporated milk, meat, tallow, egg mix-dry, foundation seeds, peanut products, and sugar. 3 Less than 500,000 units. 4 Rough basis; includes milled rice in rough equivalent. 5 The total value of all comunits. modities owned by CCC, including price-supported commodities not shown and commodities acquired under programs other 6 Includes extra long staple, cotton. 7 Includes infant than price-support programs, less reserve for losses on inventory. 8 Less than 500 units. formula. FSA, Financial Management Division, (703) 305–1205.

XI–1

XI–2

STABILIZATION AND PRICE-SUPPORT PROGRAMS Table 11-2.—Commodity Credit Corporation: Loans made, United States and Territories, by crop years, 1994–99 1
1994 Commodity Unit Quantity pledged Face amount 1,000 dollars 26,709 53,474 27,149 0 20,475 168 19,827 1,126 35,579 280,983 102 12,148 1,589 0 157,360 419,022 0 148 Quantity pledged 1995 Face amount 1,000 dollars 26,697 1,232,669 880,572 2,662 965,070 256 27,211 673 255,629 649,003 159 12,856 889,582 0 24,601 294,851 9,717 880

Barley .......................................... Corn ............................................. Cotton .......................................... Seed cotton upland ..................... Sugar Cane and Beet ................. Flaxseed ...................................... Honey .......................................... Oats ............................................. Peanuts ....................................... Rice ............................................. Rye .............................................. Sorghum grain ............................. Soybeans ..................................... Storage facility and equipment .... Tobacco ....................................... Wheat .......................................... Sunflower Seed ........................... Canola Seed ................................

1,000 bushels 1,000 bushels 1,000 bales ..... 1,000 pounds .. 1,000 pounds .. 1,000 Cwt ....... 1,000 pounds .. 1,000 bushels 1,000 Pounds 1,000 cwt ........ 1,000 bushels 1,000 bushels 1,000 bushels ......................... 1,000 pounds .. 1,000 bushels 1,000 cwt ........ 1,000 Cwt .......

18,122 26,318 111 0 95,300 19 39,652 1,202 111,104 42,118 64 6,536 297 0 90,815 163,320 0 17 1996

17,953 677,115 3,495 5,137 4,805,154 29 54,427 704 819,032 100,992 102 7,248 182,027 0 12,255 114,182 1,130 95 1997

Commodity

Unit

Quantity pledged

Face amount 1,000 dollars 41,110 1,764,291 869,911 4,765 383,460 190 1,484 34,856 447,790 36,106 957,948 0 3,813 505,268 22,380 902 39 ......................... .........................

Quantity pledged

Face amount 1,000 dollars 49,108 2,062,308 1,109,629 1,245 344,775 550 2,533 41,182 427,602 30,346 1,378,812 ......................... 631,219 677,866 25,730 3,214 69 178 2,147

Barley .......................................... Corn ............................................. Cotton 3 ........................................ Seed cotton ................................. Sugar Cane and Beet ................. Flaxseed ...................................... Oats ............................................. Peanuts ....................................... Rice ............................................. Sorghum grain ............................. Soybeans ..................................... Storage facility and equipment .... Tobacco ....................................... Wheat .......................................... Sunflower Seed ........................... Canola Seed ................................ Safflower Seed ............................ Mustard Seed .............................. Sunflower Seed (non-oil) .............

1,000 bushels 1,000 bushels 1,000 bales ..... 1,000 pounds .. 1,000 pounds .. 1,000 Cwt ....... 1,000bushels .. 1,000 Pounds 1,000 cwt ........ 1,000 bushels 1,000 bushels ......................... 1,000 pounds .. 1,000 bushels 1,000 cwt ........ 1,000 Cwt ....... 1,000 Cwt ....... 1,000 Cwt ....... 1,000 Cwt .......

28,836 970,590 3,381 131,356 1,837,547 21 1,526 322,668 68,920 20,383 195,997 ......................... 1,719 194,795 2,534 96 5 ......................... .........................

32,894 1,129,915 4,315 2,420 1,593,076 59 2,380 418,969 67,614 17,487 265,224 ......................... 263,998 262,852 2,801 334 10 19 231

1998 Commodity Unit Quantity pledged Face amount 1,000 dollars 49,108 2,062,308 1,109,629 1,245 344,775 550 ......................... 2,533 41,182 427,602 ......................... 30,346 1,378,812 ......................... 631,219 677,866 25,730 3,214 69 178 2,147 ......................... .........................
2 Loans

1999 2 Quantity pledged Face amount 1,000 dollars 22,712 2,590,443 2,339,291 1,033 830,856 2,249 12,386 1,803 128,283 711,875 ......................... 29,794 1,488,423 ......................... 741,506 398,367 18,326 1,998 247 259 3,724 1,232 2,466
3 Includes

Barley .......................................... Corn ............................................. Cotton 3 ........................................ Seed cotton ................................. Sugar Cane and Beet ................. Flaxseed ...................................... Honey .......................................... Oats ............................................. Peanuts ....................................... Rice ............................................. Rye .............................................. Sorghum grain ............................. Soybeans ..................................... Storage facility and equipment .... Tobacco ....................................... Wheat .......................................... Sunflower Seed ........................... Canola Seed ................................ Safflower Seed ............................ Mustard Seed .............................. Sunflower Seed (non-oil) ............. Crambe Oilseed .......................... Mohair ..........................................

1,000 bushels 1,000 bushels 1,000 bales ..... 1,000 pounds .. 1,000 pounds .. 1,000 Cwt ....... 1,000 pounds .. 1,000bushels .. 1,000 Pounds 1,000 cwt ........ 1,000 bushels 1,000 bushels 1,000 bushels ......................... 1,000 pounds .. 1,000 bushels 1,000 cwt ........ 1,000 Cwt ....... 1,000 Cwt ....... 1,000 Cwt ....... 1,000 Cwt ....... 1,000 Cwt ....... 1,000 Pounds

32,894 1,129,915 4,315 2,420 1,593,076 59 ......................... 2,380 418,969 67,614 ......................... 17,487 265,224 ......................... 263,998 262,852 2,801 334 10 19 231 ......................... .........................

13,556 1,420,878 9,109 1,553 (531,880) 242 (86,491) 1,652 471,028 110,806 ......................... 17,193 286,823 ......................... 364,012 154,276 1,994 206 35 28 404 142 879

1 Includes loans made directly by Commodity Credit Corporation. long staple cotton and upland cotton. FSA, Financial Management Division, (703) 605–0747.

through Sept. 30, 1996.

extra

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

XI–3

Table 11-3.—Commodity Credit Corporation: Loan transactions for fiscal year 1999, by commodities 1
Loans outstanding Oct. 1, 1998 2 1,000 dollars Basic commodities: Corn ....................... Cotton ..................... Seed cotton ............ Peanuts .................. Rice ........................ Tobacco 4 ............... Wheat ..................... Total .................... Designated nonbasic commodities: Barley ..................... Sorghum ................. Honey ..................... Oats ........................ Rye ......................... Sugar, beet ............ Sugar, cane ............ Sunflower seed ...... Flaxseed ................. Canola seed ........... Safflower seed ....... Rapeseed ............... Mustard seed ......... Crambe Oilseed ..... Sunflower seed, non oil. Total .................... Other nonbasic commodities: Soybeans ............... Total .................... Other loans: Storage facility and equipment 5. Total .................... Adjustment for lag activity 6. Grand total
1 Loans 7

Commodity

Unit

New loans made

Repayments

Collateral acquired in settlement 1,000 dollars 82,788 38,339 0 13 1,398 0 67,525 190,063

Loans outstanding Sept. 30, 1999 Loans written off 3 Quantity collateral remaining pledged 1,000 units 187,307 506 0 20,841 26,342 631,083 128,732 XXXXX

Value 2

1,000 dollars 2,743,659 2,438,986 1,033 109,942 697,628 679,102 537,014 7,207,364

1,000 dollars 2,247,361 1,564,937 1,027 97,744 570,564 372,825 364,993 5,219,451

1,000 dollars 410,929 857,449 6 65,074 183,573 0 50,724 1,567,755

1,000 dollars 344,729 129,285 0 (30,257) 172,053 1,544,304 331,770 2,491,884

Bushel ...... Bale ......... Pound ...... Ton .......... Cwt .......... Pound ...... Bushel ...... ..................

342,148 151,024 0 22,632 229,960 1,238,027 277,998 2,261,789

Bushel ...... Bushel ...... Pound ...... Bushel ...... Bushel ...... Pound ...... Pound ...... Cwt .......... Cwt .......... Cwt .......... Cwt .......... Cwt .......... Cwt .......... Cwt .......... Cwt .......... ..................

14,399 9,722 2,587 1,657 0 0 0 5,025 1,061 1,747 68 0 199 489 699 37,653

29,897 36,057 16,586 2,112 0 326,251 504,605 18,878 2,763 6,759 293 0 242 1,855 3,719 950,017

22,353 29,837 9,428 1,666 0 183,677 229,071 12,297 1,643 5,709 261 0 284 1,923 3,281 501,430

2,856 2,914 0 229 0 17,055 44,125 2,250 926 910 0 0 17 0 16 71,298

1,404 4,404 70 316 0 0 0 6,444 534 634 9 0 44 391 167 14,417

17,683 8,624 9,675 1,558 0 125,519 231,409 2,912 721 1,253 91 0 96 30 954 400,525

11,034 4,947 (193,504) 1,393 0 (2,752,912) 703,188 317 79 133 13 0 11 11 104 XXXXX

Bushel ...... ..................

130,888 10,193

1,525,414 8,410

1,226,236 10,170

73,049 0

219,923 82

137,094 8,351

26,605 5,508

.................. ..................

141,081 0 2,440,523

1,533,824 0 9,691,205

1,236,406 0 6,957,287

73,049 0 334,410

220,005 0 1,802,177

145,445 0 3,037,854

XXXXX 0 XXXXX

...

..................

2 Book value of outstanding loans; includes face amounts and made directly by Commodity Credit Corporation. 3 Includes transfers to accounts receivable. 4 Charge offs represents pre-No Net Cost Tobacco loans any charges paid. 5 This program was closed out during FY 1993. 6 Represents current year activity not - 1981 and prior crop loans. 7 Table may not add due to rounding. processed during regular operation cycle. FSA, Financial Management Division, (703) 305–1205

XI–4

STABILIZATION AND PRICE-SUPPORT PROGRAMS Table 11-4.—Commodity Credit Corporation: Selected inventory transactions, programs and commodity, fiscal year 2000
Quantity Program and commodity Unit Inventory Oct. 1, 1999 Thousands Purchases Thousands 1,756 56,583 120,624 3,675 25,183 89 0 0 xxx 116,375 1,063,356 352,924 4,048 30,096 16,409 0 0 1,014 0 0 6,814 458,000 0 0 0 xxx 480 193 0 33 0 0 0 6,716 133,353 73 xxx 692,985 0 0 xxx 158,686 0 0 264,000 580,619 0 93,940 15,316 46,118 3,086 xxx 0 Collateral acquired from loans Thousands 1,763 46,728 0 1,688 0 208 0 0 xxx 26,513 0 0 0 205 0 0 81 26 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 xxx 90 244 2 0 44 0 0 14,177 0 98 xxx 0 0 0 xxx 0 0 0 292,046 0 0 0 0 0 0 xxx 0 Sales 1 Thousands 3,973 87,516 118,233 5,590 25,183 509 0 0 xxx 154,500 1,060,650 352,924 4,309 30,307 16,409 0 81 1,043 0 0 5,060 107,335 0 0 0 xxx 570 440 2 33 44 0 0 16,480 133,353 174 xxx 687,476 0 0 xxx 159,958 0 0 0 581,720 0 0 15,316 46,118 3,224 xxx 0 Inventory Sept. 30, 2000 Thousands 407 30,758 2,391 317 0 29 0 0 xxx 107,220 2,706 0 0 9 0 0 4 2 0 0 1,754 553,864 0 0 0 xxx 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 9,237 0 3 xxx 11,228 0 0 xxx 1,438 0 0 556,046 1,279 0 93,940 0 0 89 xxx 0

Feed grains:. Barley ............................................. Corn ............................................... Corn products ................................ Grain sorghum ............................... Sorghum grits ................................ Oats ............................................... Oats, rolled .................................... Rye ................................................. Total feed grains ........................ Wheat (A) .......................................... Wheat flour ........................................ Wheat products, other ....................... Rice, milled ........................................ Rice, rough ........................................ Rice, brown ....................................... Rice, cereal ....................................... Cotton, extra long staple ................... Upland Cotton ................................... Dairy products: Butter ............................................. Butter oil ......................................... Cheese ........................................... Milk, dried ...................................... Milk UHT ........................................ Infant formula ................................. Evaporated milk ............................. Total dairy products ................... Oils and oilseeds: Canola seed ................................... Sunflower seed .............................. Sunflower seed, non-oil ................. Sunflower seed oil, processed ...... Peanuts, farmers’ stock ................. Peanut products ............................. Peanut butter ................................. Soybeans ....................................... Soybean meal ................................ Flaxseed ........................................ Totals oils and oilseeds ............. Blended foods ................................... Grains and seeds: Feed for Government facilities ...... Foundation seeds .......................... Total grains and seeds .............. Peas, dry whole ................................. Honey ................................................ Denatured alcohol ............................. Sugar, cane and beet ........................ Vegetable oil products ....................... Egg mix, dry ...................................... Meat ................................................... Pork bellies ........................................ Plants and seeds ............................... Other (B) ............................................ Total inventory operations ............. Additional Adjustment for lag activity See footnotes at end of table.

Bushel Bushel Pound Bushel Pound Bushel Pound Bushel

............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............

861 14,963 0 544 0 242 0 0 xxx 118,832 0 0 262 15 0 0 3 6 0 0 0 203,198 0 0 0 xxx 1 8 0 0 0 0 0 4,823 0 7 xxx 5,719 0 0 xxx 2,711 0 0 0 2,380 0 0 0 0 227 xxx 0

........................ Bushel ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ Cwt ................ Cwt ................ Pound ............ Pound ............ Bale ............... Bale ............... Pound Pound Pound Pound Pound Pound Pound ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............

........................ Cwt. ............... Cwt. ............... Cwt. ............... Cwt. ............... Pound ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ Bushel ............ Pound ............ Cwt. ............... ........................ Pound ............ Cwt ................ Pound ............ ........................ Pound ............ Pound ............ Gallon ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ ........................ ........................ ........................

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002 Table 11-4.—Commodity Credit Corporation: Selected inventory transactions, programs and commodity, fiscal year 1999—Continued
Value Program and commodity Unit Inventory Oct. 1, 1998 1,000 dollars Feed grains:. Barley ............................................. Corn ............................................... Corn products ................................ Grain sorghum ............................... Sorghum grits ................................ Oats ............................................... Oats, rolled .................................... Rye ................................................. Total feed grains ........................ Wheat (A) .......................................... Wheat flour ........................................ Wheat products, other ....................... Rice, milled ........................................ Rice, rough ........................................ Rice, brown ....................................... Rice, cereal ....................................... Cotton, extra long staple ................... Upland Cotton ................................... Dairy products: Butter ............................................. Butter oil ......................................... Cheese ........................................... Milk, dried ...................................... Milk UHT ........................................ Infant formula ................................. Evaporated milk ............................. Total dairy products ................... Oils and oilseeds: Canola seed ................................... Sunflower seed .............................. Sunflower seed, non-oil ................. Sunflower seed oil, processed ...... Peanuts, farmers’ stock ................. Peanut products ............................. Peanut butter ................................. Soybeans ....................................... Soybean meal ................................ Flaxseed ........................................ Totals oils and oilseeds ............. Blended foods ................................... Grains and seeds: Feed for Government facilities ...... Foundation seeds .......................... Total grains and seeds .............. Peas, dry whole ................................. Honey ................................................ Denatured alcohol ............................. Sugar, cane and beet ........................ Vegetable oil products ....................... Egg mix, dry ...................................... Meat ................................................... Pork bellies ........................................ Plants and seeds ............................... Other (B) ............................................ Total inventory operations ............. Additional Adjustment for lag activity Bushel Bushel Pound Bushel Pound Bushel Pound Bushel ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ 1,519 39,554 0 961 0 266 0 0 42,299 425,695 0 0 3,336 97 0 0 1,191 1,440 0 0 0 206,418 0 0 0 206,418 5 72 0 0 0 0 0 25,149 0 62 25,283 628 0 0 0 403 0 0 0 776 0 0 0 0 5,862 713,429 .................. 713,429
1 Includes

XI–5

Purchases 1,000 dollars 2,599 116,981 11,583 7,164 2,987 93 0 0 141,406 362,144 71,105 26,271 44,898 195,356 2,192 0 0 253,013 0 0 7,822 463,252 0 0 0 471,074 4,594 1,773 0 575 0 0 0 36,217 11,158 667 50,391 82,902 0 0 0 20,545 0 0 54,126 163,301 0 75,881 11,891 28,338 23,061 2,077,895 .................. 2,077,895

Collateral acquired from loans 1,000 dollars 2,937 85,220 0 3,002 0 231 0 0 91,391 69,335 0 0 0 1,125 0 0 34 6,859 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 881 2,238 16 0 13 0 0 73,890 0 906 77,063 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 61,180 0 0 0 0 0 0 306,987 .................. 306,987

Sales 1 1,000 dollars 6,252 171,921 11,331 10,505 2,987 550 0 0 203,546 457,774 70,884 26,271 48,230 196,513 2,192 0 33,251 260,599 0 0 5,838 109,498 0 0 0 115,336 5,473 4,032 16 575 13 0 0 86,875 11,158 1,600 104,270 82,300 0 0 0 20,770 0 0 0 163,491 0 0 (11,891) (28,338) 26,661 1,771,858 .................. 1,771,858

Inventory Sept. 30, 1999 1,000 dollars 802 69,834 251 622 (0) 41 0 0 71,550 399,400 221 0 4 65 0 0 (32,026) 713 0 0 1,984 560,172 0 0 0 562,156 7 51 0 0 0 0 0 48,380 0 35 48,467 1,231 0 0 0 178 0 0 115,306 587 0 75,881 23,782 56,675 2,263 1,326,453 .................. 1,326,453

........................ Bushel ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ Cwt ................ Cwt ................ Pound ............ Pound ............ Bale ............... Bale ............... Pound Pound Pound Pound Pound Pound Pound ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............

........................ Cwt. ............... Cwt. ............... Cwt. ............... Cwt. ............... Pound ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ Bushel ............ Pound ............ Cwt. ............... ........................ Pound ............ Cwt ................ Pound ............ ........................ Pound ............ Pound ............ Gallon ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ Pound ............ ........................ ........................ ........................

sales, commodity donations, transfers to other government agencies and inventory adjustment. (A) Excludes wheat set aside for Food Security Wheat Reserve (FSWR). (B) Includes beans, dry edible, and fish, canned salmon. Table may not add due to rounding. FSA, Financial Management Division, (703) 305–1205.

XI–6

STABILIZATION AND PRICE-SUPPORT PROGRAMS

Table 11-5.—Commodity Credit Corporation: Cost value of export and domestic commodity dispositions, by type of disposition, fiscal year 2000 1
(In Thousands) Domestic Commodity Dollar sales Transfers to other Government agencies 1,000 dollars 0 3,025 5,072 0 0 0 0 197,945 40,567 1,931 0 0 2,220 0 0 0 0 0 0 30,720 0 0 0 0 0 0 6,076 0 449 0 28,338 0 23,631 4,707 222 2,401 0 0 18,552 0 0 13,763 379,619 Inventory adjustments and other recoveries (domestic) 1,000 dollars 6,252 139,687 0 7,966 0 550 0 120,787 0 0 0 196,513 0 293,842 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 1,600 4,048 78,841 0 0 0 0 6,584 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 856,683

Donations 1

Total domestic

1,000 dollars Feed grains: Barley ................................................................. Corn ................................................................... Corn products .................................................... Grain sorghum ................................................... Sorghum grits ..................................................... Oats .................................................................... Oats, rolled ......................................................... Wheat .................................................................... Wheat flour ............................................................ Wheat products, other ........................................... Rice, milled ............................................................ Rice, rough ............................................................ Rice, brown and textured soy ............................... Cotton, extra long staple and upland .................... Rye ........................................................................ Dairy products: Butter oil ............................................................. Butter .................................................................. Cheese ............................................................... Milk evaporated infant formula .......................... Milk, dried ........................................................... Oils and oilseeds:. Peanut products ................................................. Peanut butter ..................................................... Peanuts, farmer’s stock ..................................... Soya flour ........................................................... Flaxseed ............................................................. Sunflower Seed (oil & non-oil) ........................... Soybeans ........................................................... Nutritional Powdered Beverage ............................. Blended foods ........................................................ Dry Vegetable Burger ............................................ Grains and seeds:. Feed for Government facilities ........................... Foundation seeds .............................................. Field Seeds ........................................................ Vegetable Seeds ................................................ Peas, dried whole .................................................. Dry edible beans ................................................... Honey .................................................................... Sugar ..................................................................... Vegetable oil products ........................................... Meat ....................................................................... Poultry, Frozen Chicken ........................................ Other ...................................................................... Total 2 ................................................................. See footnotes at end of table. 0 29,668 6,245 2,619 2,975 0 0 107,932 30,316 24,335 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 44,871 0 0 0 0 0 575 13,191 0 81,773 0 0 0 0 0 20,548 22,047 0 0 144,906 87,772 0 36,666 656,439

1,000 dollars 0 32,693 11,317 2,619 2,975 0 0 305,877 70,883 26,266 0 0 2,220 0 0 0 0 0 0 75,591 0 0 0 0 0 575 19,267 0 82,222 0 28,338 0 23,631 4,707 20,770 24,448 0 0 163,458 87,772 0 50,429 1,036,058

1,000 dollars 0 233 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,016 0 (183) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,066

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

XI–7

Table 11-5.—Commodity Credit Corporation: Cost value of export and domestic commodity dispositions, by type of disposition, fiscal year 2000 1—Continued
(In Thousands) Export Commodity Public law 480 Title II/III 1,000 dollars Feed Grains:. Barley ................................................. Corn .................................................... Corn products ..................................... Grain sorghum ................................... Sorghum grits ..................................... Oats .................................................... Oats, rolled ......................................... Wheat ..................................................... Wheat flour ............................................ Wheat products, other ........................... Rice, milled ............................................ Rice, rough ............................................ Rice, brown and textured soy ................ Cotton, extra long staple and upland .... Rye ......................................................... Dairy products: Butter oil ............................................. Butter .................................................. Cheese ............................................... Milk evaporated infant formula ........... Milk, dried ........................................... Oils and oilseeds:. Peanut products ................................. Peanut butter ...................................... Peanuts, farmer’s stock ..................... Soya flour ........................................... Flaxseed ............................................. Sunflower Seed (oil & non-oil) ........... Soybeans ........................................... Nutritional Powdered Beverage ......... Blended foods ........................................ Dry Vegetable Burger ............................ Grains and seeds:. Feed for Government facilities ........... Foundation seeds ............................... Field Seeds ........................................ Vegetable Seeds ................................ Peas, dried whole .................................. Dry edible beans .................................... Honey ..................................................... Sugar ..................................................... Vegetable oil products ........................... Meat ....................................................... Poultry, Frozen Chicken ........................ Other ...................................................... Total 2 .................................................
1 Includes

Donations 1 1,000 dollars 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 15 0 12 0 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 32 0 949 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 78 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 34 0 0 4 1,139

Total export 3 1,000 dollars 6,252 139,920 15 7,966 12 550 0 120,787 1 4 0 196,513 0 293,850 0 0 0 5,838 0 40,732 0 0 13 0 1,600 4,048 78,841 0 78 0 0 6,584 0 0 0 10 0 0 34 0 0 4 903,652

Total export and domestic 1,000 dollars 6,252 172,613 11,332 10,585 2,987 550 0 426,664 70,884 26,270 0 196,513 2,220 293,850 0 0 0 5,838 0 116,323 0 0 13 0 1,600 4,623 98,108 0 82,300 0 28,338 6,584 23,631 4,707 20,770 24,458 0 0 163,492 87,772 0 50,433 1,939,710

0 0 4,790 0 39,966 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 44,764

donations under section 202,407,416, Section 210, P.L. 85-540 and miscellaneous donations under various 2 Totals may not add due to rounding. 3 Includes Sales, PL 480 Titles I, II and III, Transfers to other authorizations. Other Agencies and Donations. FSA, Financial Management Division, (703) 305–1205.

XI–8

STABILIZATION AND PRICE-SUPPORT PROGRAMS

Table 11-6.—Commodity Credit Corporation: Investment in price-support operations, by quarters, 1991–2000 1
Date 1991: March ............... June ................. 1992: March ............... June ................. 1993: March ............... June ................. 1994: March ............... June ................. 1995: March ............... June ................. 1996: March ............... June ................. 1997: March ............... June ................. 1998: March ............... June ................. 1999: March ............... June ................. 2000: March ............... June .................
1 Reflects

Inventory after revaluation Million dollars 2,375.1 3,168.2 2,167.0 2,047.0 1,688.2 1,606.1 1,281.3 1,211.6 774.2 705.1 649.6 574.6 436.0 406.0 386.1 436.1 384.3 480.7 500.8 650.7

Loans held CCC Million dollars 4,930.5 3,267.1 5,045.0 2,944.2 6,104.7 4,564.0 4,263.2 3,048.1 7,624.1 4,969.6 3,715.1 2,177.9 3,753.0 2,154.0 5,058.9 3,376.7 6,231.0 5,022.0 5,160.5 4,545.3

Total loans outstanding Million dollars 4,930.5 3,267.1 5,045.0 2,944.2 6,104.7 4,564.0 4,263.2 3,048.1 7,624.1 4,969.6 3,715.1 2,177.9 3,753.0 2,154.0 5,058.9 3,376.7 6,366.5 5,157.5 5,160.5 4,739.6

Total investment Million dollars 7,305.6 6,435.3 7,212.0 4,991.2 7,792.9 6,170.1 5,544.5 4,259.6 8,398.3 5,674.7 4,364.7 2,752.5 4,189.0 2,560.0 5,445.0 3,812.8 6,615.3 5,502.7 5,661.3 5,196.0

total CCC loans and inventories. FSA, Financial Management Division, (703) 305–1205.

Table 11-7.—Farm Service Agency programs: Payments to producers, by program and commodity, United States, calendar years 1996–2000
Program and commodity Production flexibility ....................................... Feed grains deficiency/diversion ................... Wheat deficiency ........................................... Rice deficiency .............................................. Cotton (upland and ELS) deficiency ............. Cotonseed Payment Program ....................... Sugar PIK Diversion ...................................... Wool and mohair ........................................... Peanut Marketing Assistance ........................ Oilseed Program ........................................... Loan deficiency ............................................. Dairy indemnity .............................................. Milk diversion ................................................. Dairy termination ........................................... Milk Marketing Fee ........................................ Disaster ......................................................... Emergency feed / livestock assistance ......... Lamb Meat Adjustment assistance ............... Tobacco loss/disaster assistance ................. Disaster reserve assist. prgm (livestock) ...... Producer storage ........................................... Conservation reserve .................................... Pasture Recovery Program ........................... Agricultural conservation ............................... Rural clean water program ............................ Colorado river salinity .................................... Forestry incentive .......................................... Emergency conservation ............................... Waterbank ..................................................... Environ. quality incentives program (EQIP) .. American Indian livestock assist. program ... Options pilot program .................................... Potato diversion program .............................. Market gains .................................................. Noninsured assistance program (NAP) ........ Karnal bunt fungus ........................................ Dairy Disaster Assistance ............................. Marketing Loss Assistance ........................... Small hog operation program ........................ Dairy market loss assistance ........................ Other 1 .................................................... Grand Total ............................................
1 Includes

1996 1,000 dollars 5,973,002 (384,393) (473,223) 174,795 (104,884) 0 0 55,689 0 0 (11) 235 0 0 82,057 3,926 84,508 0 0 8,094 24 1,667,984 0 93,435 62 0 0 24,924 0 18,153 0 143 0 (158) 41,786 9,628 0 0 0 0 (1,120) 7,274,656

1997 1,000 dollars 6,119,814 (559,718) (8,969) (41) (5,851) 0 0 14 0 0 (58) 206 0 0 16,535 1,840 17,638 0 0 85,254 (1) 1,610,742 0 44,453 2 0 0 33,726 0 44,662 0 (3) 5,220 (34) 43,382 8,614 0 0 0 0 (517) 7,456,910

1998 1,000 dollars 6,000,580 (3,458) (857) 21 (797) 0 0 90 0 0 1,782,986 446 0 0 1 1,959 (41) 0 0 8,456 (1) 1,429,561 0 17,527 0 0 0 24,547 0 76,621 0 0 0 171,127 22,661 8,760 8,839 2,809,144 0 0 (620) 12,357,552

1999 1,000 dollars 5,046,071 (875) (229) (101) (184) 0 0 (4) 0 0 5,894,531 99 0 0 (2) 1,944,755 269,510 0 0 41,102 (1) 1,452,520 0 9,009 0 0 0 40,394 0 93,274 6,235 0 0 884,649 53,283 1,200 188 5,464,805 123,207 200,085 5,718 21,529,239

2000 1,000 dollars 5,048,750 (317) (155) (2) (228) 77,627 105,649 7,424 94,089 459,985 6,481,453 35 0 0 0 1,212,186 189,028 12,244 345,202 4,016 0 1,551,429 27,007 2,846 (1) 0 0 60,627 0 95,516 5,334 43 0 1,127,283 39,574 1,373 (11) 5,462,333 55 670,788 6,265 23,087,447

Wetlands Reserve Program, Arkansas Beaver Lake Program, animal waste, naval stores, clean lakes, interest penalty, pik storage, 90 day rule, and interest on CCC-6s. FSA Budget/Corporate Programs Branch, (202) 720–5148.

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

XI–9

Table 11-8.—Farm Service Agency programs: Payments received, by States, 1999 and 2000
Payments State 1999 AL .............................. AK .............................. AZ .............................. AR .............................. CA .............................. CO ............................. CT .............................. DE .............................. FL .............................. GA ............................. HI ............................... ID ............................... IL ................................ IN ............................... IA ............................... KS .............................. KY .............................. LA .............................. ME ............................. MD ............................. MA ............................. MI ............................... MN ............................. MS ............................. MO ............................. MT ............................. NE .............................. NV .............................. NH ............................. NJ .............................. NM ............................. NY .............................. NC ............................. MD ............................. OH ............................. OK ............................. OR ............................. PA .............................. RI ............................... SC .............................. SD .............................. TN .............................. TX .............................. UT .............................. VT .............................. VA .............................. WA ............................. WV ............................. WI .............................. WY ............................. PR .............................. VI ............................... GU ............................. MI ............................... AS .............................. Total 1 ..................... may not add due to rounding. FSA, Budget, Corporate Programs Branch, (202) 720–5148.
1 Total

2000 178,825 1,756 108,080 808,137 663,873 373,653 8,708 19,795 76,390 361,746 824 211,179 1,800,700 852,891 2,061,918 1,402,069 232,028 418,987 11,656 68,275 10,163 401,856 1,411,338 440,187 717,167 492,065 1,412,514 2,676 3,921 10,254 92,209 120,206 287,833 975,752 650,898 531,995 105,161 95,670 877 127,478 791,450 226,550 1,926,582 30,379 12,239 100,712 270,363 11,218 503,168 39,831 64,741 73 211 8 4 21,529,239 170,399 1,669 107,169 899,901 671,494 357,587 10,994 25,908 58,844 389,170 939 282,633 1,944,781 938,907 2,302,163 1,309,667 448,329 451,117 13,829 88,415 10,974 392,311 1,537,407 462,509 869,595 492,296 1,410,502 3,823 4,744 22,491 79,403 159,977 446,588 1,183,748 678,514 439,780 139,406 147,944 1,218 143,970 790,036 298,917 1,646,642 36,184 26,150 152,096 353,732 23,487 603,736 37,217 17,996 89 6 44 0 23,087,447

XI–10

STABILIZATION AND PRICE-SUPPORT PROGRAMS

Table 11-9.—Commodity Credit Corporation: Loans made in fiscal year 2000 for crop year 1999, by States and Territories 1
State or Territory Barley 1,000 dollars 0 (16) 0 0 (351) 330 0 65 0 (4) 0 (2,699) (2) 11 7 0 0 39 0 16 90 0 (47) (2,024) 0 4 (3,603) (38) 0 0 0 (33) (5) (12,854) 11 0 357 0 71 2 237 0 (8) (228) 0 264 974 (31) (12) 18 (19,459) Corn Cotton Flaxseed Honey Oats Oilseeds Peanuts 1,000 1,000 dollars dollars 0 304 0 0 0 33 0 0 0 0 1,238 0 0 0 0 0 0 (64) 21 (83) 0 0 14 0 53 0 0 0 0 0 303 0 0 (37,567) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42 0 45 0 0 0 16 0 199 0 308 0 0 0 0 0 0 162 0 0 0 (232) (3,609) 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 106,734 0 0 0 0 1,540 0 0 0 95 0 54 0 0 0 0 (526) 82 0 0 0 (25) 0 60 0 445 68,761

Alabama ................................................. Alaska .................................................... Arizona ................................................... Arkansas ................................................ California ................................................ Colorado ................................................ Connecticut ............................................ Delaware ................................................ Florida .................................................... Georgia .................................................. Hawaii .................................................... Idaho ...................................................... Illinois ..................................................... Indiana ................................................... Iowa ....................................................... Kansas ................................................... KCMO Commodity OPS ........................ Kentucky ................................................ Louisiana ............................................... Maine ..................................................... Maryland ................................................ Massachusetts ....................................... Michigan ................................................ Minnesota .............................................. Mississippi ............................................. Missouri ................................................. Montana ................................................. Nebraska ............................................... Nevada .................................................. New Jersey ............................................ New Mexico ........................................... New York ............................................... North Carolina ....................................... North Dakota ......................................... Ohio ....................................................... Oklahoma .............................................. Oregon ................................................... Peanut Associations .............................. Pennsylvania ......................................... South Carolina ....................................... South Dakota ......................................... Tennessee ............................................. Texas ..................................................... Utah ....................................................... Vermont ................................................. Virginia ................................................... Washington ............................................ West Virginia ......................................... Wisconsin .............................................. Wyoming ................................................ Total ................................................ See footnotes at end of table.

1,000 1,000 1,000 dollars dollars dollars (482) 48,212 0 0 0 0 (2,016) 3,366 .............. 709 32,793 0 (187) 531,223 0 (7,054) 0 0 (415) 0 0 (117) 0 0 (42) 1,597 0 (1,508) 13,875 0 0 0 0 (165) 0 183 40,804 0 0 32,996 0 0 281,021 0 0 13,085 0 0 0 (796,412) 0 1,018 0 0 1,202 51,162 0 0 0 0 86 0 0 (14) 0 0 4,893 0 0 88,273 0 179 933 758,937 0 22,824 16,420 0 (26) 0 20 73,695 0 0 0 0 0 (1,787) 0 0 101 (1,310) 0 (2,440) 0 0 4,324 24,020 0 10,915 0 1,681 11,075 0 0 1,287 (4,459) 0 (26) 0 0 0 0 0 (3,959) 0 0 1,156 1,284 0 49,353 0 132 2,661 57,243 0 43,417 589,144 0 (86) 0 0 (7) 0 0 414 2,265 0 (438) 0 10 (588) 0 0 5,614 0 0 (235) 0 0 670,264 1,329,360 2,205

1,000 1,000 dollars dollars 91 (11) 0 (15) 103 0 928 0 1,610 19 280 46 1 0 0 0 391 0 39 25 0 0 284 (7) 0 18 0 0 579 43 206 (12) 0 0 0 19 66 0 3 (61) 0 0 0 0 436 (36) 722 (147) 143 2 42 2 1,111 (112) 794 9 0 0 42 6 0 0 482 (98) 2 (2) 1,718 (305) 6 25 0 (51) 320 5 0 0 29 (66) 29 (21) 4,134 169 0 0 819 (3) 96 4 0 0 0 3 382 113 7 0 688 1 0 0 16,583 (438)

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

XI–11

Table 11-9.—Commodity Credit Corporation: Loans made in fiscal year 2000 for crop year 1999, by States and Territories 1—Continued
State or Territory Rice 1,000 dollars Alabama .............. Alaska .................. Arizona ................ Arkansas .............. California ............. Colorado .............. Connecticut .......... Delaware ............. Florida .................. Georgia ................ Hawaii .................. Idaho .................... Illinois ................... Indiana ................. Iowa ..................... Kansas ................. KCMO Commodity OPS ................. Kentucky .............. Louisiana ............. Maine ................... Maryland .............. Massachusetts ..... Michigan .............. Minnesota ............ Mississippi ........... Missouri ............... Montana ............... Nebraska ............. Nevada ................ New Jersey .......... New Mexico ......... New York ............. North Carolina ..... North Dakota ....... Ohio ..................... Oklahoma ............ Oregon ................. Peanut Associations ................. Pennsylvania ....... South Carolina ..... South Dakota ....... Tennessee ........... Texas ................... Utah ..................... Vermont ............... Virginia ................. Washington .......... West Virginia ....... Wisconsin ............ Wyoming .............. Total .................
1 Loans

Seed Cotton 1,000 dollars 0 0 0 0 647 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (14) 0 0 (685) 0 0 (159) 0 0 0 0 (211)

Sorghum 1,000 dollars 0 0 0 0 0 323 0 0 0 27 0 0 (105) (10) (5) 2,584 0 0 880 0 0 0 0 121 0 603 0 (470) 0 0 (374) 0 13 0 0 (80) 0 0 (2) 14 122 51 1,964 0 0 (23) 0 0 0 0 5,633

Soybeans 1,000 dollars (745) 0 0 21,855 0 0 0 (45) (51) (599) 0 0 (21,025) (5,615) 63,346 1,038 0 (7,386) 1,102 0 (1,471) 0 5,942 16,957 (2,489) 16,130 3 23,874 0 (665) 5 1,323 95 12,896 (7,853) (524) 0 0 1,044 2,968 26,157 (936) 313 0 (30) 2,741 0 19 (3,010) 0 145,364

Sugar 1,000 dollars 0 0 0 0 0 54,908 0 0 162,078 0 5,539 0 0 0 0 0

Tobacco 1,000 dollars 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Wheat

Mohair

Total 1,000 dollars 47,099 (31) 1,486 307,011 542,206 40,706 (414) (224) 163,877 11,588 5,539 (1,322) 19,060 29,817 345,060 (10,784) (1,469,839) 400,358 152,574 (42) (1,373) (14) (2,287) 216,824 769,590 65,666 (87,583) 95,399 92 (2,361) (3,730) (2,142) 214,662 (17,298) 5,775 (3,442) 3,884 106,734 (2,936) 4,599 104,231 145,902 660,108 11,342 (37) 6,695 34,082 (580) 3,085 (1,229) 2,907,383

0 0 0 242,153 9,787 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14,313 0 0 0 0 0 12,049 8,724 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 293 (17,292) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 270,027

1,000 1,000 dollars dollars (270) 0 0 0 0 0 8,567 6 (542) 0 (9,382) 17 0 0 (127) 0 (32) 0 (205) 0 0 0 1,068 0 (683) 0 2,435 0 47 22 (28,010) 22 0 (334) 45 0 (78) 0 491 (19,167) 15 789 (85,229) (2,860) 92 43 (2,479) (1,376) 639 (38,328) 2,511 303 3,219 0 (53) (819) 22,287 1,480 (13,016) (737) 0 896 17,080 13 (533) (1,121) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 112 54 87 0 0 165 0 0 109 0 82 0 0 0 0 100 0 7,581 0 0 0 0 0 0 49 8,408

0 (635,860) 0 407,002 83,804 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (14,008) 0 131,863 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 185,808 10,479 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 47,779 12,239 0 0 15,879 0 0 0 510,560 0 0 0 0 85,110 0 0 0 820 0 0 362 0

43,242 (143,361)

made directly by Commodity Credit Corporation. As far as possible, loans have been distributed according to the location of producers receiving the loans. Direct loans to cooperative associations for the benefit of members have been dis2 Includes flaxseed and other oilseeds. tributed according to the location of the association. FSA, Financial Management Division, (703) 305–1277.

XI–12

STABILIZATION AND PRICE-SUPPORT PROGRAMS

Table 11-10.—Fruit, vegetable, and tree nut marketing agreement and order programs, 2000–2001
Program Estimated number of commercial producers Number Citrus fruits (2000-01 season): Florida oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, and tangelos ............................................... Florida limes ............................................................................................................... Texas oranges and grapefruit .................................................................................... Deciduous fruits (2000 season): California fresh pears and peaches 1 ......................................................................... California nectarines ................................................................................................... California olives .......................................................................................................... California desert grapes ............................................................................................. California kiwifruit ....................................................................................................... Florida avocados ........................................................................................................ Washington apricots ................................................................................................... Washington sweet cherries ........................................................................................ Washington, Oregon, and California winter pears ..................................................... Tart cherries (7 States) 2 ............................................................................................ Washington and Oregon Bartlett pears ...................................................................... Washington and Oregon fresh prunes 3 ..................................................................... Cranberries (10 States) 4 ............................................................................................ Hawaiian papayas ...................................................................................................... Dried fruits (2000 season): California dates ........................................................................................................... California dried prunes ............................................................................................... California raisins ......................................................................................................... Vegetables (2000-01 season): Florida tomatoes ......................................................................................................... Idaho and Eastern Oregon onions ............................................................................. South Texas melons ................................................................................................... South Texas onions .................................................................................................... Georgia onions (Vidalia) ............................................................................................. Walla Walla onions ..................................................................................................... Potatoes (2000-01 season): Colorado ..................................................................................................................... Idaho and Eastern Oregon ......................................................................................... Oregon and Northern California ................................................................................. Southeastern States (Virginia-North Carolina) ........................................................... Washington ................................................................................................................. Nuts (2000 season): California almonds ...................................................................................................... California walnuts ....................................................................................................... Oregon and Washington hazelnuts ............................................................................ Peanuts 5 .................................................................................................................... Spearmint oil (2000 season) 6 ........................................................................................ (Total 36 programs) 7 ..........................................................................................
1 Value

Farm value 1,000 dollars 242,248 4,180 20,933 116,152 106,256 32,328 95,000 13,480 15,184 4,730 140,000 120,907 52,541 31,055 2,716 106,827 15,879 17,835 168,840 285,874 491,259 94,790 56,543 71,982 50,804 4,983 105,658 185,752 23,984 6,946 57,304 681,649 289,190 21,374 844,808 16,229 4,596,220

11,000 52 234 1,800 1,800 1,200 80 360 135 200 1,500 1,700 900 1,600 100 1,100 400 100 1,250 4,500 100 280 33 78 144 65 261 950 238 85 380 6,000 5,000 800 23,000 179 ............................

2 The tart cherry order covers the States of Michigan, New York, Pennsylof non-Bartlett pears is not available. 3 Farm value is available only for fresh and processed comvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin. 4 Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, bined. 5 There is only a marketing agreement (No. 146) for peanuts. It and Long Island in New York. (Only top 5 are reported). covers the States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Missouri, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. The marketing agreement covers about 95 percent of all peanuts; figures here are for all U.S. peanuts. Non-signers to the Agreement must meet the same quality and 6 The marketing order regulates the handling of spearmint inspection requirements that apply under the Agreement 146. oil produced in the States of Washington, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, Oregon, and California. The farm value is the sum 7 Total of values for Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, the only significant producing States in the marketing order area. number of producers cannot be determined from totals for individual commodities; some producers produce more than one commodity. AMS, Fruit and Vegetable Programs, (202) 720–2615.


								
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