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2002 - Chapter IX, Farm Resources, Income and Expenses

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					CHAPTER IX

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES
The statistics in this chapter deal with farms, farm resources, farm income, and expenses. Many of the series are estimates developed in connection with economic research activities of the Department. For convenience the tables have been arranged in general groups. These groups, with the beginning table indicated, are as follows: Economic trends, table 9-1. Farm property, table 9-2. Population and employment, table 9-15. Farm production and distribution, table 9-23. Price and income, table 9-29. Costs and expenses, table 9-41. Table 9-1.—Economic trends: Data relating to agriculture, United States, 1991–2000
Prices paid by farmers 1 Year Total including interest, taxes, and wage rates Index numbers 1990–92=100 100 101 104 106 108 115 119 113 111 116 Prices received by farmers 1 Farm income 2

Production items

Gross farm income 6

Production expenses

Net farm income

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

........................... ........................... ........................... ........................... ........................... ........................... ........................... ........................... ........................... ...........................

Index numbers 1990–92=100 100 101 103 106 108 115 118 114 113 118 Disposable personal income 3

Index numbers 1990–92=100 100 98 101 100 102 112 107 102 95 96

Billion dollars 191.9 200.6 205.0 216.0 210.8 235.8 238.5 231.8 235.3 241.5

Billion dollars 153.4 152.8 160.4 167.2 173.8 181.0 190.0 189.0 191.0 195.1

Billion dollars 38.5 47.8 44.7 48.9 36.9 54.8 48.5 42.9 44.3 46.4

Year

National income 3

Industrial production 4 Index numbers 1992= 100 97.0 100.0 103.5 109.1 114.3 119.6 127.7 134.0 139.6

Consumer prices all items 5 Index numbers 1982–84= 100 136.2 140.3 144.5 148.2 152.4 156.9 160.5 163.0 166.6

Producer prices consumer foods 5 Index numbers 1982= 100 124.1 123.3 125.7 126.8 129.0 133.6 134.5 134.3 135.1

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................

Billion dollars 4,756.6 4,994.9 5,251.9 5,556.8 5,876.7 6,210.4 6,618.4 7,038.1 7,469.7

Billion dollars 5,085.4 5,390.4 5,610.0 5,888.0 6,200.9 6,547.4 6,937.0 7,391.0 7,789.6

1 U.S. Department of Agriculture - NASS. 2 U.S. Department of Agriculture - ERS. 3 U.S. Department of Com4 Federal Reserve Board. 5 U.S. Department of Labor. 6 Includes cash receipts from farm marketings, govmerce. ernment payments, nonmoney income (gross rental value of dwelling and value of home consumption), other income (machine hire custom work and recreational income), and value of change in farm inventories. ERS, Farm Structure,Performance and Well being Branch, (202) 694–5592. E mail contact is roger@ERS.USDA.gov

IX–1

IX–2

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-2.—Farms: Number, land in farms, and average size of farm, U.S., 1992–2001 1
Year 1992 ....................... 1993 ....................... 1994 ....................... 1995 ....................... 1996 ....................... 1997 ....................... 1998 ....................... 1999 ....................... 2000 ....................... 2001 3 ..................... Farms 2 Number 2,107,840 2,201,590 2,197,690 2,196,400 2,190,500 2,190,510 2,191,360 2,192,070 2,172,280 2,157,780 Land in farms 1,000 acres 978,503 968,845 965,935 962,515 958,675 956,010 953,500 947,440 943,090 941,210 Average size farm Acres 464 440 440 438 438 436 435 432 434 436

1The farm definition was changed in 1993 to include maple syrup, short rotation woody crops, and places with 5 or more 2 A farm is any establishment from which $1,000 or more of agricultural products were sold or would normally be horses. 3 Preliminary. sold during the year. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

Table 9-3.—Farms: Percent of farms, land in farms, and average size, by economic sales class, United States, 2000–2001 1
Percent of total Economic sales class 2000 $1,000–$2,499 .................... $2,500–$4,999 .................... $5,000–$9,999 .................... $10,000–$19,999 ................ $20,000–$39,999 ................ $40,000–$99,999 ................ $100,000–$249,999 ............ $250,000–$499,999 ............ $500,000–$999,999 ............ $1,000,000+ ........................ Total ................................
1 Economic

Average size farm Land 2000 2001 2 Acres 71 117 169 269 426 654 1,113 1,500 2,421 3,490 436

Farms 2001 2 Percent 25.3 15.3 13.4 12.5 8.7 8.6 8.9 4.1 2.0 1.2 100.0 2000

2001 2 Percent 4.1 4.1 5.2 7.7 8.5 12.9 22.7 14.1 11.1 9.6 100.0
2 Preliminary.

Percent 26.8 15.1 12.1 10.2 9.0 10.7 9.3 3.8 3.0 ...................... 100.0

Percent 4.4 4.2 4.9 5.6 8.6 16.1 22.8 13.9 19.5 ...................... 100.

Acres 71 121 176 238 415 653 1,064 1,588 2,822 ...................... 434

Sales Classes changed for 2001 to standard government groupings. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

Table 9-4.—Number of farms: Economic sales class by region and United States, 1999–2001
Region and year Economic Sales Class Total $1,000-$9,999 Number NE: 1 1999 ........... 2000 ........... 2001 ........... NC: 2 1999 ........... 2000 ........... 2001 ........... South: 3 1999 ........... 2000 ........... 2001 ........... West: 4 1999 ........... 2000 ........... 2001 ........... US: 1999 ........... 2000 ........... 2001 ........... 75,100 73,900 72,800 340,600 333,800 329,300 611,900 601,500 602,740 166,740 164,350 161,750 1,194,340 1,173,550 1,166,590 $10,000-$99,999 Number 37,100 38,000 38,100 299,900 297,200 290,300 224,120 227,220 225,580 87,730 87,130 88,030 648,850 649,550 642,010 $100,000 & over Number 22,900 22,000 22,200 183,500 183,800 185,700 88,980 89,280 88,080 53,500 54,100 53,200 348,880 349,180 349,180 Number 135,100 133,900 133,100 824,000 814,800 805,300 925,000 918,000 916,400 307,970 305,580 302,980 2,192,070 2,172,280 2,157,780

1 CT, ME, MA, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, and VT. 2IL, IN, IA, KS, MI, MN, MO, NE, ND, OH, SD, WI. 3 AL, AR, DE, FL, 4 AK, AZ, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, NM, OR, UT, WA, WY. GA, KY, LA, MD, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–3

Table 9-5.—Land in farms: Economic sales class by region and United States, 1999– 2001
Region and year Economic Sales Class Total $1,000-$9,999 1,000 Acres NE: 1 1999 ........... 2000 ........... 2001 ........... NC: 2 1999 ........... 2000 ........... 2001 ........... South: 3 1999 ........... 2000 ........... 2001 ........... West: 4 1999 ........... 2000 ........... 2001 ........... US: 1999 ........... 2000 ........... 2001 ........... 5,580 5,470 5,150 33,900 32,500 31,600 64,343 60,898 61,480 29,205 28,815 27,815 133,028 127,683 126,045 $10,000-$99,999 1,000 Acres 5,800 5,900 5,850 108,500 106,700 103,300 96,307 96,707 92,185 77,885 76,885 72,445 288,492 286,192 273,780 $100,000 & over 1,000 Acres 8,980 8,880 9,130 211,600 214,200 217,900 123,480 124,875 128,355 181,860 181,260 186,000 525,920 529,215 541,385 1,000 Acres 20,360 20,250 20,130 354,000 353,400 352,800 284,130 282,480 282,020 288,950 286,960 286,260 947,440 943,090 941,210

1 CT, ME, MA, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, and VT. 2IL, IN, IA, KS, MI, MN, MO, NE, ND, OH, SD, WI. 3 AL, AR, DE, FL, 4 AK, AZ, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, NM, OR, UT, WA, WY. GA, KY, LA, MD, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

Table 9-6.—Land in farms: Classification by tenure of operator, United States, 1910–2000
Tenure of operator Year Land in farms Full owners 1910 ................................................... 1920 ................................................... 1925 ................................................... 1930 1 ................................................ 1935 ................................................... 1940 1 ................................................ 1945 ................................................... 1950 1 ................................................ 1954 ................................................... 1959 1 ................................................ 1964 1 ................................................ 1969 1 ................................................ 1974 1 ................................................ 1978 1 ................................................ 1982 1 ................................................ 1987 1 ................................................ 1992 1 ................................................ 1997 2 ................................................ 1998 2 ................................................ 1999 2 ................................................ 2000 2 ................................................
1 Includes

Part owners Percent 15.2 18.4 21.3 24.9 25.2 28.2 32.5 36.4 40.7 44.0 48.0 51.8 52.6 55.3 53.8 53.9 55.7 62.2 60.2 61.6 62.3

Managers Percent 6.1 5.7 4.7 6.4 5.8 6.5 9.3 9.2 8.6 9.8 10.2 ...................... ...................... ...................... ...................... ...................... ...................... ...................... ...................... ...................... ......................

All tenants Percent 25.8 27.7 28.7 31.0 31.9 29.4 22.0 18.3 16.5 14.8 13.1 13.0 12.0 12.0 11.5 13.2 13.0 11.2 11.2 12.8 11.4

Acres 878,798,325 958,676,612 924,319,352 990,111,984 1,054,515,111 1,065,113,774 1,141,615,364 1,161,419,720 1,158,191,511 1,123,507,574 1,110,187,000 1,062,892,501 1,017,030,357 1,014,777,234 986,796,579 964,470,625 945,531,506 932,475,414 900,415,615 870,720,495 994,997,682

Percent 52.9 48.3 45.4 37.6 37.1 35.9 36.1 36.1 34.2 31.0 28.7 35.3 35.3 32.7 34.7 32.9 31.3 26.7 28.6 25.6 26.4

2 Excludes Alaska and Hawaii. Alaska and Hawaii. ERS, Resource Economics Division, (202) 694–5575. Data for 1910–1992 is from the Census of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Commerce. Data for 1997-2000 is from ERS Agricultural Resource Management Study.

IX–4

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-7.—Farms: Classification by tenure of operator, United States, 1910–2000
Tenure of operator Year Farms Full owners 1910 ................................................... 1920 ................................................... 1925 ................................................... 1930 1 ................................................ 1935 ................................................... 1940 1 ................................................ 1945 ................................................... 1950 1 ................................................ 1954 ................................................... 1959 1 ................................................ 1964 1 ................................................ 1969 1 ................................................ 1974 1 ................................................ 1978 1 ................................................ 1982 1 ................................................ 1987 1 ................................................ 1992 1 ................................................ 1997 2 ................................................ 1998 2 ................................................ 1999 2 ................................................ 2000 2 ................................................
1 Includes

Part owners Percent 9.3 8.7 8.7 10.4 10.1 10.1 11.3 15.3 18.2 21.9 24.8 24.6 27.2 30.2 29.3 29.2 31.0 35.4 33.9 33.9 34.1

Managers Percent .9 1.1 .6 .9 .7 .6 .7 .4 .4 .6 .6 ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................

All tenants Percent 37.0 38.1 38.6 42.4 42.1 38.8 31.7 26.9 24.0 20.5 17.1 12.9 11.3 12.3 11.6 11.5 11.3 9.3 9.6 7.8 8.2

Number 6,365,822 6,453,991 6,371,640 6,295,103 6,812,350 6,102,417 5,859,169 5,388,437 4,783,021 3,710,503 3,157,857 2,730,250 2,314,013 2,257,775 2,240,976 2,087,759 1,925,300 2,049,384 2,054,709 2,186,950 2,166,060

Percent 52.7 52.2 52.0 46.3 47.1 50.6 56.4 57.4 57.4 57.1 57.6 62.5 61.5 57.5 59.2 59.3 57.7 55.3 56.5 58.3 57.7

2 Excludes Alaska and Hawaii. Alaska and Hawaii. ERS, Resource Economics Division, (202) 694–5575. Data for 1910-1992 is from the Census of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Commerce. Data for 1997-2000 is from ERS Agricultural Resource Management Study.

Table 9-8.—Farms: Classification by Tenants and Part Owners, United States, 1900–97
Land rented by operators 1 Year Land in farms Tenants 1900 1910 1920 1925 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1954 1959 1964 1969 1974 1978 1982 1987 1992 1997 ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... ................................................... Million acres 841.8 878.8 958.7 924.3 990.1 1,054.5 1,165.1 1,141.6 1,161.4 1,158.2 1,123.0 1,110.2 1,063.3 1,017.0 1,029.7 986.2 964.5 945.5 931.8 Million acres 195.1 225.5 4 265.0 264.9 307.3 336.8 313.2 251.6 212.2 192.6 166.8 144.9 137.6 122.3 124.1 113.6 126.9 122.7 108.1 Part-owners Million acres 2 71.1 3 51.3 5 54.7 96.3 125.2 134.3 155.9 178.9 196.2 212.3 234.1 248.1 241.8 258.4 285.3 269.9 275.4 282.2 270.0 Total Million acres 266.2 277.8 319.7 361.2 432.5 471.1 469.1 430.5 408.4 404.9 400.9 6 393.0 379.4 380.7 406.3 383.5 402.3 404.9 378.1 Percentage of land rented Percent 31.6 31.6 33.3 39.0 43.6 44.6 44.0 37.7 35.2 34.9 35.7 35.4 35.7 37.4 39.4 38.9 41.7 42.8 40.6

1 Columns 3,4, and 5 refer only to land rented from others and operated, so subleased land is not included. Numbers of land rented are comparable in the same year, but definitions change over time. Basic sources are 1969 Census of Agriculture, table 5, p.14; 1974 Census of Agriculture, table 3, pp.1-6; 1978 Census of agriculture, vol. 1, part 51, table 5, pp. 124-127; 1982 Census of Agriculture, vol. 1, part 51, table 48, p. 49; 1987 Census of Agriculture vol. 1 part 51, table 48, p.49; 1992 Census of Agriculture vol. 1, part 51, table 46, p.53; 1997 Census of Agriculture, vol. 1, part 51, chapter 1, table 2Sum of part owners and owner/tenant, 1900 Census of Agriculture, 46, p. 57; and earlier census volumes as noted. 3Assumes land leased by part-owners is the difference between the average size of full-owner and parttable 20, pp.308. owner farms. Acreage leased by part-owners is this difference times the number of part-owners. 1910 Census of Agriculture, 41920 Census of Agriculture, vol. VI, part 1, table 5, p.19. 5Assumes same prochapter 11, table 1 and 3, pp.97-99. 6 1964 Census of Agriculture, vol. II, chapter 8, p.757. portion of owner and part-owner as in 1910. ERS, Resource Economics Division, (202) 694–5529. Data from the Census of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic Research Service.

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002 Table 9-9.—Farms: Number and land in farms, by States, 2000 and 2001
Farms 1 State 2000 AL ...................................................... AK ...................................................... AZ ...................................................... AR ...................................................... CA ...................................................... CO ..................................................... CT ...................................................... DE ...................................................... FL ...................................................... GA ..................................................... HI ....................................................... ID ....................................................... IL ........................................................ IN ....................................................... IA ....................................................... KS ...................................................... KY ...................................................... LA ...................................................... ME ..................................................... MD ..................................................... MA ..................................................... MI ....................................................... MN ..................................................... MS ..................................................... MO ..................................................... MT ..................................................... NE ...................................................... NV ...................................................... NH ..................................................... NJ ...................................................... NM ..................................................... NY ...................................................... NC ..................................................... ND ..................................................... OH ..................................................... OK ..................................................... OR ..................................................... PA ...................................................... RI ....................................................... SC ...................................................... SD ...................................................... TN ...................................................... TX ...................................................... UT ...................................................... VT ...................................................... VA ...................................................... WA ..................................................... WV ..................................................... WI ...................................................... WY ..................................................... US ..................................................
1A

IX–5

Land in farms 2001 2 Number 47,000 580 7,300 48,000 88,000 30,000 3,900 2,500 44,000 50,000 5,300 24,000 76,000 63,000 93,500 63,000 88,000 29,000 6,700 12,400 6,000 52,000 79,000 42,000 108,000 26,600 53,000 3,000 3,100 9,600 15,000 37,500 56,000 30,300 78,000 86,000 40,000 59,000 700 24,000 32,500 91,000 227,000 15,000 6,600 49,000 39,000 20,500 77,000 9,200 2,157,780 2000 1,000 acres 9,000 920 26,700 14,600 27,800 31,600 360 580 10,300 11,100 1,440 11,900 27,700 15,500 32,800 47,500 13,600 8,100 1,270 2,100 570 10,400 28,600 11,100 30,000 56,700 46,400 6,800 420 830 44,000 7,700 9,200 39,400 14,900 34,000 17,200 7,700 60 4,800 44,000 11,700 130,000 11,600 1,340 8,700 15,700 3,600 16,200 34,600 943,090 2001 2 1,000 acres 8,900 920 26,600 14,600 27,700 31,300 360 570 10,200 11,000 1,440 11,900 27,700 15,400 32,700 47,400 13,600 8,050 1,260 2,100 560 10,400 28,500 11,000 29,900 56,500 46,400 6,800 420 830 44,000 7,600 9,100 39,400 14,800 34,000 17,200 7,700 60 4,800 44,000 11,800 130,000 11,600 1,340 8,700 15,700 3,600 16,200 34,600 941,210

Number 47,000 580 7,500 48,000 87,500 29,500 3,900 2,600 44,000 50,000 5,500 24,500 78,000 64,000 95,000 64,000 90,000 29,500 6,800 12,400 6,100 52,000 79,000 43,000 109,000 27,600 54,000 3,000 3,100 9,600 15,200 38,000 57,000 30,300 80,000 85,000 40,000 59,000 700 24,000 32,500 90,000 226,000 15,500 6,700 49,000 40,000 20,500 77,000 9,200 2,172,280

farm is any establishment from which $1,000 or more of agricultural products were sold or would normally be sold dur2 Preliminary. ing the year. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

IX–6

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES Table 9-10.—Land: Utilization, by States, 1997
Cropland State Used for crops 1 1,000 acres 2,298 34 951 7,635 8,675 8,899 131 434 0 2,465 5,00 101 4,197 23,140 12,516 24,259 26,955 4,889 4,053 324 1,344 160 7,098 20,090 4,602 12,956 14,527 20,314 546 84 526 1,313 3,162 4,487 24,460 10,576 9,793 3,853 4,187 22 1,660 17,313 4,307 22,613 1,252 342 2,572 6,854 664 7,803 2,064 348,701 Idle 1,000 acres 533 26 187 413 706 1,780 8 7 0 288 733 150 753 932 516 1,578 2,964 766 563 77 62 12 705 1,707 677 1,645 2,374 1,299 56 6 40 474 317 476 2,858 556 1,184 566 299 2 335 1,909 596 5,092 234 10 242 1,018 50 799 257 38,839 Used only for pasture 1,000 acres 1,639 8 116 2,034 1,246 736 27 11 0 896 1,395 42 816 853 658 2,074 3,789 3,205 869 65 149 39 500 1,041 1,184 5,413 1,672 1,942 265 22 68 639 633 927 1,500 895 5,360 919 695 6 538 2,542 2,587 12,335 558 132 1,526 528 697 959 759 67,512 Grassland pasture 2 Forest land 3 Special use areas 4 1,000 acres 1,423 143,013 10,092 1,450 20,996 5,699 299 102 0 4,676 1,854 769 5,266 1,901 1,102 1,550 1,620 996 1,395 520 731 553 2,468 4,398 848 1,740 6,414 1,423 5,726 317 728 6,360 3,810 2,264 1,489 1,153 1,477 3,593 2,379 61 1,032 1,575 2,203 5,363 5,058 337 1,468 6,639 699 2,182 6,332 285,544 Other land 5 Total land area 6

AL ....................... AK ....................... AZ ....................... AR ....................... CA ....................... CO ...................... CT ....................... DE ....................... DC ...................... FL ....................... GA ...................... HI ........................ ID ........................ IL ........................ IN ........................ IA ........................ KS ....................... KY ....................... LA ....................... ME ...................... MD ...................... MA ...................... MI ....................... MN ...................... MS ...................... MO ...................... MT ...................... NE ....................... NV ....................... NH ...................... NJ ....................... NM ...................... NY ....................... NC ...................... ND ...................... OH ...................... OK ...................... OR ...................... PA ....................... RI ........................ SC ....................... SD ....................... TN ....................... TX ....................... UT ....................... VT ....................... VA ....................... WA ...................... WV ...................... WI ....................... WY ...................... US ...................
1 Cropland

1,000 acres 1,860 1,226 40,509 2,006 22,343 27,867 30 8 0 5,455 1,336 961 21,165 1,559 1,158 1,477 12,560 1,491 1,582 37 208 35 1,606 1,544 1,946 6,010 46,039 21,828 46,278 40 29 52,188 1,314 814 11,329 1,376 17,314 22,395 910 3 465 22,594 1,123 98,059 23,737 212 1,533 7,406 481 1,844 44,873 580,165

1,000 acres 21,911 87,936 16,306 18,392 32,579 18,781 1,682 376 0 14,605 23,004 1,189 17,123 4,058 4,342 1,944 1,492 12,348 13,691 16,952 2,424 2,675 18,667 14,820 18,589 13,411 19,165 797 8,199 4,551 1,507 14,084 15,405 18,638 441 7,567 6,233 26,664 15,852 356 12,418 1,588 13,265 11,767 13,832 4,462 15,345 17,418 11,899 15,701 5,085 641,536

1,000 acres 2,815 132,796 4,571 1,398 13,277 2,623 923 313 39 6,172 3,544 898 3,641 3,137 2,666 2,878 2,987 1,733 5,729 1,778 1,338 1,542 5,313 7,353 2,179 2,921 2,965 1,599 9,204 720 1,850 2,615 5,581 3,574 2,079 4,087 2,593 3,450 4,364 220 2,824 1,051 2,298 12,396 7,916 425 2,657 2,749 925 5,472 2,777 300,957

1,000 acres 32,480 365,039 72,731 33,328 99,823 66,386 3,101 1,251 39 34,558 37,068 4,111 52,961 35,580 22,957 35,760 52,367 25,429 27,882 19,753 6,256 5,016 36,358 50,954 30,025 44,095 93,156 49,202 70,275 5,740 4,748 77,673 30,223 31,180 44,156 26,209 43,954 61,441 28,685 669 19,271 48,573 26,380 167,625 52,588 5,920 25,343 42,612 15,415 34,761 62,147 2,263,254

2 Grassland and other nonforest pasture and harvested, crop failure, and cultivated summer fallow. 3 Excludes reserved and other forest land duplicated in parks and other special uses of land. Includes forested range. 4 Includes rural transportation areas, Federal and State areas used primarily for recreation and wildlife purgrazing land. 5 Miscellaneous areas such as marshes, open swamps, poses, military areas, farmsteads, and farm roads and lanes. 6 Approximate land area as estabbare rock areas, and deserts, including urban and other special uses not inventoried. lished by the Bureau of the Census in conjunction with the 1990 Census of Population. ERS, Resource Economics Division, (202) 694–5528. Estimates based on reports and records of the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Commerce, and public land administering and conservation agencies. Estimates developed for years coinciding with a Census of Agriculture.

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002 Table 9-11.—Land in farms: 1 Irrigated land, by States, 1959–97
State 1959 1,000 acres 17 ................ 1,152 712 7,396 2,685 5 16 414 34 141 2,577 10 17 18 762 9 485 2 11 20 40 15 100 30 1,875 2,078 543 1 74 732 58 66 48 12 198 1,384 17 (3) 25 116 11 5,656 1,062 2 31 1,007 1 32 1,470 33,164 76 (3) 33,240 1964 1,000 acres 12 (3) 1,125 974 7,599 2,690 14 18 1,217 64 144 2,802 14 17 22 1,004 14 581 4 16 24 49 18 123 59 1,893 2,169 825 3 96 813 79 97 51 17 302 1,608 23 1 19 130 11 6,385 1,092 2 51 1,150 2 62 1,571 37,057 89 (3) 37,145 1969 1,000 acres 11 1 1,178 1,010 7,240 2,895 9 20 1,365 79 146 2,761 51 34 21 1,522 20 702 6 22 19 77 36 150 156 1,841 2,857 753 2 72 823 55 59 63 22 524 1,519 19 2 15 148 12 6,888 1,025 (3) 37 1,224 3 106 1,523 39,122 91 (3) 39,213 1974 1,000 acres 14 1 1,153 949 7,749 2,874 7 20 1,559 112 142 2,859 54 33 39 2,010 11 702 6 23 19 97 78 162 150 1,759 3,967 778 2 89 867 55 51 71 22 515 1,561 18 2 10 152 10 6,594 970 1 28 1,309 2 128 1,460 41,243 70 (3) 41,313 1978 2 1,000 acres 59 1 1,196 1,683 8,506 3,431 7 34 1,980 463 159 3,475 130 75 101 2,686 14 681 7 28 17 226 272 309 320 2,070 5,683 881 2 77 891 56 90 141 25 602 1,881 15 3 32 335 13 6,947 1,169 1 42 1,639 1 235 1,662 50,350 (4) (4) 50,350 1982 1,000 acres 66 1 1,098 2,022 8,461 3,201 7 44 1,585 575 146 3,450 166 132 91 2,675 23 694 6 39 17 286 315 431 403 2,023 6,039 830 1 83 807 52 81 163 28 492 1,808 18 2 81 376 18 5,576 1,082 1 43 1,638 1 259 1,565 49,002 (4) (4) 49,002 1987 1,000 acres 84 2 914 2,406 7,596 3,014 7 61 1,623 640 149 3,219 208 170 92 2,463 38 647 6 51 20 315 354 637 535 1,997 5,682 779 3 91 718 51 138 168 32 478 1,648 30 4 81 362 38 4,271 1,161 2 79 1,519 3 285 1,518 46,386 (4) (4) 46,386 1992 1,000 acres 82 2 956 2,702 7,571 3,170 6 62 1,783 725 134 3,260 328 241 116 2,680 28 898 10 57 20 366 370 883 709 1,978 6,312 556 2 80 738 47 113 187 29 512 1,622 23 3 76 371 37 4,912 1,143 2 62 1,641 3 331 1,465 49,404 (4) (4) 49,404

IX–7

1997 1,000 acres 77 3 1,014 3,717 8,713 3,430 7 73 1,862 749 77 3,494 350 250 125 2,707 58 943 22 69 25 393 380 1,076 882 1,994 6,939 765 3 93 805 69 156 180 34 506 1,949 36 3 86 344 46 5,425 1,212 3 85 1,705 3 342 1,719 55,058 (4) (4) 55,058

AL .............. AK ............. AZ ............. AR ............. CA ............. CO ............. CT ............. DE ............. FL .............. GA ............. HI .............. ID .............. IL ............... IN .............. IA ............... KS ............. KY ............. LA .............. ME ............. MD ............ MA ............. MI .............. MN ............ MS ............. MO ............ MT ............. NE ............. NV ............. NH ............. NJ .............. NM ............ NY ............. NC ............. ND ............. OH ............. OK ............. OR ............. PA ............. RI .............. SC ............. SD ............. TN ............. TX ............. UT ............. VT ............. VA ............. WA ............ WV ............ WI .............. WY ............ US ......... PR ............. VI ............... Total ......
1 Data

2 Data for 1978 not directly comparable with earlier censuses as it includes may not add because of rounding. 3 Less than 500 acres. 4 Not estimates from the direct enumeration sample for farms not represented on the mail list. available. Note: Data from the Census of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Commerce. Beginning in 1997 Census of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture. ERS, Resource Economics Division, (202) 694–5528.

IX–8

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-12.—Farm real estate: Value of farmland and buildings, by States, 1996–2000 1
Total value of land and buildings State Jan. 1, 1996 AL .................. AZ 2 ................ AR .................. CA .................. CO ................. CT .................. DE .................. FL .................. GA ................. ID ................... IL .................... IN ................... IA ................... KS .................. KY .................. LA .................. ME ................. MD ................. MA ................. MI ................... MN ................. MS ................. MO ................. MT ................. NE .................. NV 2 ............... NH ................. NJ .................. NM 2 ............... NY .................. NC ................. ND ................. OH ................. OK ................. OR ................. PA .................. RI ................... SC .................. SD .................. TN .................. TX .................. UT 2 ................ VT .................. VA .................. WA ................. WV ................. WI .................. WY ................. 48 States ....
1 Total

Jan. 1, 1997 Million dollars 13,056 11,368 15,836 71,750 19,175 2,261 1,509 23,320 16,159 11,520 55,044 29,172 52,800 26,838 18,765 9,758 1,498 6,930 2,936 15,912 31,719 11,466 30,401 16,820 28,768 2,501 945 5,893 8,744 9,750 19,000 15,483 28,161 19,380 16,800 17,710 423 7,000 14,300 19,800 72,851 6,326 1,995 16,544 18,212 3,885 19,305 7,439 857,227

Jan. 1, 1998 Million dollars 13,680 11,938 16,963 74,385 19,900 2,261 1,543 23,744 17,063 12,240 59,214 32,136 56,100 27,408 20,155 9,922 1,523 6,678 2,970 17,368 33,524 12,180 32,207 16,905 29,928 2,680 945 5,810 8,821 9,984 19,552 15,840 30,396 20,740 16,512 18,403 423 7,252 15,312 21,539 77,980 6,576 2,037 16,896 18,683 4,033 20,336 7,681 900,362

Jan. 1, 1999 Million dollars 13,984 11,781 17,873 77,006 20,034 2,331 1,595 23,504 18,256 12,971 62,325 34,410 58,410 27,550 20,808 9,862 1,524 6,930 3,135 19,240 35,424 12,540 34,013 16,872 31,088 2,827 945 5,810 8,691 10,452 20,925 15,996 33,078 21,250 17,200 19,250 390 7,372 15,840 23,205 79,605 6,978 2,104 17,748 18,683 3,852 22,331 7,612 935,610

Jan. 1, 2000 Million dollars 14,623 31,703 17,956 78,942 21,865 2,371 1,623 25,090 20,062 13,841 64,747 35,511 56,723 27,193 21,335 9,846 1,515 7,758 3,058 21,227 33,273 11,947 36,033 20,513 31,640 2,820 955 5,911 9,936 10,229 22,806 16,334 32,437 21,061 17,798 19,497 365 7,350 16,855 23,913 82,724 10,822 2,083 18,102 18,216 3,974 25,330 8,181 988,094

Million dollars 12,804 11,017 15,049 69,600 18,135 2,261 1,505 23,005 15,504 10,890 53,010 27,144 47,850 26,268 18,200 9,794 1,507 6,842 2,907 15,052 30,076 10,912 28,595 16,907 28,304 2,279 945 5,964 8,587 9,828 18,050 15,282 27,118 18,598 16,240 17,252 423 6,800 13,640 18,360 71,280 5,833 1,997 16,192 17,584 3,626 18,758 7,128 824,898

value of land and buildings is derived by multiplying average value per acre of farm real estate by the land in 2 Value of All land and Buildings adjusted to include reservation land value. farms. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002 Table 9-13.—Land utilization, United States, selected years, 1940–97
Major land uses 1940 Million acres 368 31 68 650 608 ............... 179 1,904 1950 Million acres 377 32 69 631 601 ............... 194 1,904 1959 Million acres 359 33 66 633 728 147 305 2,271 1969 Million acres 333 51 88 604 723 174 291 2,264 1978 Million acres 369 26 76 587 703 203 301 2,265 1987 Million acres 331 68 65 591 648 335 227 2,265 1992 Million acres 337 56 67 591 648 340 224 2,263

IX–9

1997 Million acres 349 39 67 580 642 351 235 2,263

Cropland used for .... Idle cropland ......................... Cropland used only for pasture .............................. Grassland pasture 2 .............. Forest land 3 ......................... Special uses 4 ....................... Other land ............................ Total land area 5 ...............
1 Cropland

crops 1

2 Grassland and other nonforest pasture and harvested, crop failure, and cultivated summer fallow. 3 Excludes reserved and other forest land duplicated in parks and other special uses of land. Includes forested range. 4 Includes urban and transportation areas. Federal and State areas used primarily for recreation and wildlife grazing land. 5 Remeasurement and increases in reserviors account for purposes, military areas, farmsteads and farm roads and lanes. changes in total land areas except for the major increase in 1959 when data for Alaska and Hawaii were added. ERS, Resource Economics Division, (202) 694–5528. Estimates based on reports and records of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Commerce, and public land administering and conservation agencies.

Table 9-14.—Farm real estate: Average value per acre of land and buildings, by State, Mar. 1, 1970, and Jan. 1, 1997–2001
State Mar. 1, 1970 Dollars AL ........................ AZ 1 ...................... AR ........................ CA ........................ CO ....................... CT ........................ DE ........................ FL ........................ GA ....................... ID ......................... IL .......................... IN ......................... IA ......................... KS ........................ KY ........................ LA ........................ ME ....................... MD ....................... MA ....................... MI ......................... MN ....................... MS ....................... MO ....................... MT ....................... NE ........................ NV 1 ...................... NH ....................... NJ ........................ NM 1 ..................... NY ........................ NC ....................... ND ....................... OH ....................... OK ....................... OR ....................... PA ........................ RI ......................... SC ........................ SD ........................ TN ........................ TX ........................ UT 1 ...................... VT ........................ VA ........................ WA ....................... WV ....................... WI ........................ WY ....................... 48 States ..........
1 Excludes

Jan. 1, 1997 Dollars 1,360 920 1,070 2,500 590 5,950 2,580 2,200 1,430 960 1,980 1,870 1,600 565 1,350 1,190 1,170 3,150 5,150 1,530 1,090 980 1,010 291 620 366 2,250 7,100 215 1,250 2,000 390 1,890 570 960 2,300 6,500 1,400 325 1,650 554 780 1,500 1,880 1,160 1,050 1,170 215 926

Jan. 1, 1998 Dollars 1,440 987 1,150 2,610 618 5,950 2,660 2,240 1,510 1,020 2,130 2,060 1,700 577 1,450 1,210 1,190 3,180 5,210 1,670 1,160 1,050 1,070 294 645 392 2,250 7,000 217 1,280 2,080 401 2,040 610 960 2,390 6,500 1,480 348 1,810 593 807 1,520 1,920 1,190 1,090 1,240 222 974

Jan. 1, 1999 Dollars 1,520 1,070 1,220 2,770 630 6,300 2,750 2,260 1,630 1,090 2,250 2,220 1,770 580 1,530 1,210 1,200 3,300 5,500 1,850 1,230 1,100 1,130 296 670 420 2,250 7,000 217 1,340 2,250 406 2,220 625 1,000 2,500 6,500 1,520 360 1,950 610 855 1,570 2,040 1,190 1,070 1,370 220 1,020

Jan. 1, 2000 Dollars 1,680 1,180 1,250 2,850 670 6,600 2,800 2,400 1,880 1,170 2,380 2,350 1,820 590 1,600 1,250 1,250 3,600 5,900 2,150 1,280 1,180 1,250 350 695 440 2,300 7,100 217 1,410 2,500 415 2,300 634 1,020 2,720 6,600 1,600 380 2,150 630 900 1,650 2,200 1,200 1,150 1,700 240 1,080

Jan. 1, 2001 Dollars 1,800 1,300 1,300 2,910 695 6,900 2,830 2,570 2,100 1,210 2,450 2,450 1,860 605 1,770 1,270 1,300 3,800 6,000 2,250 1,320 1,220 1,380 375 725 460 2,400 7,400 224 1,500 2,800 425 2,400 640 1,050 2,840 6,700 1,650 405 2,240 640 975 1,750 2,300 1,190 1,220 2,000 260 1,130

200 70 260 479 95 921 499 355 234 177 490 406 392 159 253 321 161 640 565 326 226 234 224 60 154 53 239 1,092 42 273 333 94 399 173 150 373 734 261 84 268 148 92 224 286 224 136 232 41 196

Native American Reservation Land. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

IX–10

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES Table 9-15.—Land values, cropland and pasture: By States, 2000–2001
2000 2001 Nonirrigated cropland Dollars .................. .................. 980 1,400 450 .................. .................. 1,680 1,380 770 .................. .................. .................. 630 .................. 1,120 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 950 1,250 350 860 .................. .................. .................. 260 .................. .................. .................. .................. 535 1,100 .................. .................. .................. 505 .................. 535 670 .................. .................. 700 .................. .................. 260 .................. .................. Pasture 2 Dollars 1,300 360 1,000 1,000 360 .................. .................. 1,570 2,150 850 1,080 1,540 700 375 1,400 1,150 .................. 3,400 .................. 1,080 440 1,000 860 230 230 270 .................. 8,900 150 560 2,400 155 1,600 415 405 1,920 .................. 1,450 190 2,240 570 420 .................. 2,050 490 900 760 165 3,950 524
2 Other

State Cropland 1 Dollars 1,460 4,600 1,080 5,960 887 .................. 2,750 3,340 1,400 1,490 2,500 2,400 1,970 666 1,750 1,110 .................. 3,500 .................. 2,000 1,270 983 1,290 486 1,110 1,900 .................. 7,900 1,440 1,160 2,400 425 2,420 548 1,570 3,120 .................. 1,240 510 2,240 770 2,740 .................. 2,150 1,340 1,600 1,600 815 4,550 1,490

Irrigated cropland Dollars .................. 4,600 1,190 6,400 1,700 .................. .................. 4,120 1,500 1,900 .................. .................. .................. 1,030 .................. 1,060 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 1,100 1,910 1,440 1,580 1,900 .................. .................. 2,600 .................. .................. .................. .................. 780 2,150 .................. .................. .................. 740 .................. 880 3,250 .................. .................. 3,500 .................. .................. 980 .................. ..................

Cropland 1 Dollars 1,600 5,000 1,140 5,870 911 .................. 2,780 3,540 1,530 1,570 2,570 2,500 2,000 680 2,000 1,140 .................. 3,700 .................. 2,100 1,300 1,010 1,390 502 1,140 2,000 .................. 8,100 1,500 1,240 2,700 430 2,500 556 1,650 3,260 .................. 1,250 555 2,320 768 2,955 .................. 2,300 1,310 1,700 1,900 866 4,610 1,540

Irrigated cropland Dollars .................. 5,000 1,260 6,300 1,750 .................. .................. 4,370 1,700 2,020 .................. .................. .................. 1,080 .................. 1,070 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 1,120 1,940 1,500 1,600 2,000 .................. .................. 2,700 .................. .................. .................. .................. 760 2,300 .................. .................. .................. 780 .................. 870 3,500 .................. .................. 3,400 .................. .................. 1,040 .................. ..................

Nonirrigated cropland Dollars .................. .................. 1,030 1,400 460 .................. .................. 1,800 1,500 790 .................. .................. .................. 640 .................. 1,160 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 980 1,350 360 900 .................. .................. .................. 275 .................. .................. .................. .................. 545 1,120 .................. .................. .................. 550 .................. 545 750 .................. .................. 680 .................. .................. 280 .................. ..................

Pasture 2 Dollars 1,450 380 1,000 1,040 370 .................. .................. 1,680 2,400 850 1,100 1,700 710 390 1,450 1,160 .................. 3,450 .................. 1,120 480 1,040 950 255 245 270 .................. 9,100 150 590 2,600 165 1,700 420 405 2,000 .................. 1,500 200 2,320 580 450 .................. 2,100 500 950 900 180 3,900 547

AL .................. AZ .................. AR .................. CA .................. CO ................. CT .................. DE .................. FL .................. GA .................. ID ................... IL .................... IN ................... IA ................... KS .................. KY .................. LA .................. ME ................. MD ................. MA ................. MI ................... MN ................. MS ................. MO ................. MT .................. NE .................. NV .................. NH .................. NJ .................. NM ................. NY .................. NC .................. ND .................. OH ................. OK .................. OR ................. PA .................. RI ................... SC .................. SD .................. TN .................. TX .................. UT .................. VT .................. VA .................. WA ................. WV ................. WI .................. WY ................. Other States .. US ...........
1 Other

cropland States include CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, and VT.

pasture States include CT, DE, ME, MA, NH, RI,

and VT. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002 Table 9-16.—Cash rents, cropland and pasture: By States, 2000–2001
2000 State Cropland Dollars 33.00 135.00 69.00 .................. 55.00 .................. 56.20 .................. 50.00 98.00 119.00 100.00 115.00 36.50 74.00 55.20 .................. 54.20 .................. 60.00 77.90 61.00 .................. 23.80 88.00 .................. .................. 51.00 .................. 32.00 45.00 35.50 74.00 .................. 90.00 40.00 .................. 24.20 .................. 60.00 27.00 .................. .................. 36.50 .................. 26.00 65.00 .................. 70.00 Irrigated cropland Dollars .................. 135.00 80.00 300.00 90.00 .................. .................. .................. 91.00 120.00 .................. .................. .................. 67.00 .................. 70.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 80.00 .................. 49.70 117.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 120.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 53.00 57.00 .................. .................. 160.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. Nonirrigated cropland Dollars .................. .................. 50.00 .................. 18.00 .................. .................. 32.00 39.10 44.00 .................. .................. .................. 35.50 .................. 51.90 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 52.00 62.00 17.30 66.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 26.00 67.00 .................. .................. .................. 39.80 .................. 21.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. Pasture Dollars 17.00 .................. .................. 9.00 5.20 .................. .................. 15.00 22.00 .................. 33.00 .................. 29.00 12.80 .................. 14.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. 18.00 14.00 20.00 4.80 11.30 .................. .................. .................. 1.70 .................. 21.00 9.50 .................. 7.80 .................. 32.00 .................. .................. 11.00 18.00 6.00 11.00 .................. 16.00 .................. .................. 38.00 3.50 8.50 Cropland Dollars 36.00 135.00 67.00 .................. 65.00 .................. 57.50 .................. 54.00 95.00 119.00 100.00 117.00 39.00 72.00 62.00 .................. 55.50 .................. 60.00 80.50 62.00 .................. 24.50 88.00 .................. .................. 47.00 .................. 33.00 48.00 36.00 76.00 .................. 90.00 42.00 .................. 27.50 .................. 59.50 27.00 .................. .................. 36.50 .................. 26.00 66.00 .................. 71.00 2001 Irrigated cropland Dollars .................. 135.00 78.00 290.00 100.00 .................. .................. .................. 97.00 115.00 .................. .................. .................. 72.00 .................. 74.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 79.00 .................. 46.00 117.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 110.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 53.00 58.00 .................. .................. 165.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. Nonirrigated cropland Dollars .................. .................. 47.00 .................. 22.00 .................. .................. 32.00 38.00 48.00 .................. .................. .................. 36.00 .................. 56.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 54.00 65.00 18.00 65.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. 27.00 70.00 .................. .................. .................. 40.00 .................. 21.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. .................. ..................

IX–11

Pasture Dollars 18.00 .................. .................. 11.00 4.80 .................. .................. 15.00 23.00 .................. 33.00 .................. 30.00 12.60 .................. 16.00 .................. .................. .................. .................. 19.00 16.00 22.50 4.50 11.30 .................. .................. .................. 1.60 .................. 22.00 9.80 .................. 8.30 .................. 32.00 .................. .................. 11.20 18.50 7.20 13.00 .................. 16.50 .................. .................. 36.00 3.50 9.20

AL .................. AZ .................. AR .................. CA .................. CO ................. CT .................. DE .................. FL .................. GA .................. ID ................... IL .................... IN ................... IA ................... KS .................. KY .................. LA .................. ME ................. MD ................. MA ................. MI ................... MN ................. MS ................. MO ................. MT .................. NE .................. NV .................. NH .................. NJ .................. NM ................. NY .................. NC .................. ND .................. OH ................. OK .................. OR ................. PA .................. RI ................... SC .................. SD .................. TN .................. TX .................. UT .................. VT .................. VA .................. WA ................. WV ................. WI .................. WY ................. 48 Sts .........

NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

IX–12

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-17.—Farm assets and claims: Comparative balance sheet of the farming sector, excluding operator households, United States, Dec. 31, 1991–2000 1
Item ASSETS Physical assets: Real estate ..................................... Non-real estate: Livestock 2 ...................................... Machinery and motor vehicles ....... Crops stored on and off farms 3 .... Purchased inputs ........................... Financial assets: 4 Total 5 ......................................... CLAIMS Liabilities: Real estate debt ............................ Non-real estate debt to— Reporting institutions 6 ............... Nonreporting creditors 7 ............. Total liabilities 5 ....................... Proprietors’ equity ............................. Total 5 ............................................. Item ASSETS Physical assets: Real estate ..................................... Non-real estate: Livestock 2 ...................................... Machinery and motor vehicles ....... Crops stored on and off farms 3 .... Purchased inputs ........................... Financial assets: 4 Total 5 ......................................... CLAIMS Liabilities: Real estate debt ............................ Non-real estate debt to— Reporting institutions 6 ............... Nonreporting creditors 7 ............. Total liabilities 5 ....................... Proprietors’ equity ............................. Total 5 .............................................
1 Farms

1991 Billion dollars 624.8 68.1 85.9 22.2 2.6 40.5 844.2

1992 Billion dollars 640.8 71.0 85.4 24.2 3.9 43.1 868.3

1993 Billion dollars 677.6 72.8 86.4 23.3 3.8 46.3 910.2

1994 Billion dollars 704.1 67.9 88.1 23.3 5.0 47.6 936.1

1995 Billion dollars 740.5 57.8 89.4 27.4 3.4 49.1 967.6

74.9 51.3 13.0 139.2 705.0 844.2 1996 Billion dollars 769.5 60.3 89.8 31.7 4.4 49.0 1004.8

75.4 50.4 13.2 139.1 729.2 868.3 1997 Billion dollars 808.2 67.1 90.1 32.9 5.1 49.7 1053.1

76.0 51.7 14.2 142.0 768.2 910.2 1998 Billion dollars 840.4 63.4 91.7 29.9 5.0 54.8 1085.3

77.7 53.9 15.2 146.8 789.3 936.1 1999 Billion dollars 886.4 73.2 92.3 28.3 4.0 56.6 1140.8

79.3 55.3 16.2 150.8 816.8 967.6 2000 8 Billion dollars 929.5 76.8 92.0 27.9 4.9 57.1 1188.3

81.7 57.0 17.4 156.1 848.7 1004.8

85.4 61.2 18.8 165.4 887.7 1051.6

89.6 63.6 19.6 172.9 912.4 1085.3

94.2 61.9 20.3 176.4 964.4 1140.8

97.5 65.2 21.3 184.0 1004.3 1188.3

2 Horses and mules are excluded. 3 Excludes are defined as places with sales greater than $1,000 annually. all crops held on farms including crops under loan to Commodity Credit Corporation, and crops held off farms as security for 4 Includes farm share of currency and demand deposits. 5 Total of rounded data. 6 Loans of all operCCC loans. 7 Loans and credits extended by ating banks, the Farm Credit System, and direct loans of the Farm Service Agency. 8 Preliminary. dealers, merchants, finance companies, individuals, and others. ERS, Farm Sector Performance and Well-Being Branch, (202) 694–5586.

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–13

Table 9-18.—Farm labor: Number of workers on farms and average wage rates, United States, 1993–2002 1
Year Total workers Number 1993. Jan ................................................. Apr .................................................. July ................................................. Oct .................................................. 1994. Jan ................................................. Apr .................................................. July ................................................. Oct .................................................. 1995. Jan ................................................. Apr .................................................. July ................................................. Oct .................................................. Annual average .......................... 1996. Jan ................................................. Apr .................................................. July ................................................. Oct .................................................. Annual average .......................... 1997. Jan ................................................. Apr .................................................. July ................................................. Oct .................................................. Annual average .......................... 1998. Jan ................................................. Apr .................................................. July ................................................. Oct .................................................. Annual average .......................... 1999. Jan ................................................. Apr .................................................. July ................................................. Oct .................................................. Annual average .......................... 2000. Jan ................................................. Apr .................................................. July ................................................. Oct .................................................. Annual average .......................... 2001. Jan ................................................. Apr .................................................. July ................................................. Oct .................................................. Annual average .......................... 2002. Jan .................................................
1 Beginning

Self-employed and unpaid workers 2 Number 1,737 1,832 2,163 2,038 1,703 1,876 2,129 2,006 1,691 1,821 2,258 2,127 1,967.1 1,749 1,919 (6) (6) 2,010 (6) (6) (6) (6) 1,989.9 (6) (6) (6) (6) 1,946.6 (6) (6) (6) (6) 2,048.4 (6) (6) (6) (6) 2,062.3 (6) (6) (6) (6) 2,049.8 (6)

Ag service workers 3 Number 157 224 358 283 140 240 341 279 140 214 348 302 (5) 115 207 331 291 (5) 131 207 340 283 (5) 141 202 379 263 (5) 157 160 319 290 (5) 172 217 203 288 (5) 165 215 335 262 (5) 183

Hired workers 3 Number

4

Hired workers 3

4

Wage rates 6.40 6.37 6.07 6.26 6.54 6.42 6.21 6.46 6.73 6.49 6.44 6.58 6.54 6.89 6.76 6.55 6.97 6.78 7.20 7.03 6.88 7.31 7.35 7.61 7.49 7.25 7.60 7.47 7.94 7.83 7.58 7.83 7.77 8.10 8.09 7.93 8.29 8.10 8.66 8.31 8.29 8.59 8.44 8.96

2,505 2,884 3,583 3,249 2,480 2,919 3,510 3,165 2,460 2,857 3,672 3,383 ........................ 2,462 2,906 (6) (6) ........................ (6) (6) (6) (6) ........................ (6) (6) (6) (6) ........................ (6) (6) (6) (6) ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................ ........................

611 828 1,062 928 637 803 1,040 880 629 822 1,066 954 868.5 598 780 1,015 935 832 624 808 1,069 1,004 876.5 661 803 1071 983 879.5 705 867 1,155 989 929 685 840 1,084 952 890.3 691 804 1,039 991 873.3 731

in July 1984, three surveys a year were conducted in the 48 contiguous States and Hawaii. In 1989, January 2 Includes was added to the survey program. Data are obtained from establishments for the week that includes the 12th. farm operators and partners doing 1 or more hours of farm work and other unpaid workers working 15 hours or more during 3 Includes all persons doing farm work for pay during the survey the survey week without cash wages. 4 Excludes agricultural service workers. 5 Annual average not computed. 6 Discontinued. week. NASS, Economic, Environmental and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

IX–14

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-19.—Farm labor: Number of hired workers on farms and average wage rates, by States and regions, 2001 1 2
Workers on farms State and region 3 Hired Field Dollars per hour 8.42 7.98 7.65 6.57 7.30 7.65 9.12 8.58 7.86 7.56 8.45 7.35 8.06 7.57 6.71 7.96 *7.79 9.07 *7.76 Livestock Dollars per hour 7.45 7.01 7.82 7.26 7.25 7.90 8.26 9.06 8.61 6.62 8.47 7.71 8.22 7.76 7.35 8.81 *8.68 ............................. *8.07 Farm wage rates Type of worker Field and livestock Dollars per hour 7.86 7.59 7.73 6.84 7.29 7.67 8.57 8.88 8.49 7.15 8.46 7.53 8.19 7.68 6.91 8.13 *7.95 9.10 *7.87 All hired workers 4 Dollars per hour 9.06 8.47 8.34 7.18 7.88 8.29 9.53 10.10 9.05 7.73 9.11 7.98 8.63 8.72 7.72 9.06 *8.78 10.66 *8.66

Thousands Jan. 7–13, 2001 Northeast I ................. Northeast II ................ Appalachian I ............. Appalachian II ............ Southeast .................. FL .............................. Lake ........................... Cornbelt I ................... Cornbelt II .................. Delta .......................... N. Plains .................... S. Plains .................... Mountain I .................. Mountain II ................. Mountain III ................ Pacific ........................ CA .............................. HI ............................... US (49 States) ....... Apr. 8–14, 2001 Northeast I ................. Northeast II ................ Appalachian I ............. Appalachian II ............ Southeast .................. FL .............................. Lake ........................... Cornbelt I ................... Cornbelt II .................. Delta .......................... N. Plains .................... S. Plains .................... Mountain I .................. Mountain II ................. Mountain III ................ Pacific ........................ CA .............................. HI ............................... US (49 States) ....... See footnotes at end of table. 28 31 22 27 20 55 38 34 14 17 32 65 19 18 18 43 *203 7 *691

41 35 28 27 37 63 43 51 21 34 37 77 23 29 22 61 168 7 804

8.28 7.95 7.32 6.85 7.01 7.75 8.93 8.09 8.19 6.55 8.21 7.10 7.11 7.37 6.92 7.75 7.82 9.06 7.61

7.92 6.60 7.39 7.36 7.53 7.90 8.82 8.69 8.55 7.34 8.20 7.71 7.16 7.58 6.80 8.75 9.02 ............................. 8.01

8.11 7.60 7.34 7.03 7.05 7.77 8.87 8.23 8.41 6.65 8.20 7.33 7.14 7.44 6.90 7.87 7.96 9.03 7.71

8.98 8.42 7.70 7.31 7.61 8.40 9.57 8.62 8.80 7.09 8.89 7.86 7.48 7.99 7.46 8.40 8.59 10.67 8.31

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–15

Table 9-19.—Farm labor: Number of hired workers on farms and average wage rates, by States and regions 1 2, 2001—Continued
Workers on farms State and region 3 Hired Field Dollars per hour 8.12 7.41 7.22 6.77 7.19 7.50 8.21 7.65 7.80 6.63 7.96 6.58 7.08 7.36 7.00 8.41 7.97 *9.38 7.70 Livestock Dollars per hour 7.19 7.85 7.89 7.34 7.50 7.65 7.66 8.13 8.08 6.47 7.98 7.23 7.73 8.05 8.52 9.40 9.49 ............................. 7.89 Farm wage rates Type of worker Field and livestock Dollars per hour 7.79 7.50 7.39 7.04 7.26 7.53 8.00 7.75 7.94 6.60 7.97 6.85 7.37 7.64 7.46 8.50 8.10 *9.44 7.75 All hired workers 4 Dollars per hour 8.26 8.23 7.79 7.29 7.69 8.65 8.38 8.66 8.10 6.93 8.24 7.23 7.61 8.28 8.12 8.88 8.76 *11.08 8.29

Thousands July 8–14, 2001 Northeast I ................. Northeast II ................ Appalachian I ............. Appalachian II ............ Southeast .................. FL .............................. Lake ........................... Cornbelt I ................... Cornbelt II .................. Delta .......................... No. Plains .................. So. Plains .................. Mountain I .................. Mountain II ................. Mountain III ................ Pacific ........................ CA .............................. HI ............................... US (49 States) ....... October 7–13, 2001 Northeast I ................. Northeast II ................ Appalachian I ............. Appalachian II ............ Southeast .................. FL .............................. Lake ........................... Cornbelt I ................... Cornbelt II .................. Delta .......................... No. Plains .................. So. Plains .................. Mountain I .................. Mountain II ................. Mountain III ................ Pacific ........................ CA .............................. HI ............................... US (49 States) .......
1 Excludes

52 50 62 39 32 48 76 69 29 37 38 85 34 24 18 97 242 7 1,039

48 45 40 29 37 51 74 57 41 43 41 68 27 21 17 89 *255 8 *991

8.24 7.21 7.52 7.04 7.61 7.70 9.14 8.84 8.06 6.83 8.37 7.16 6.99 7.65 6.87 9.34 7.91 9.32 8.01

7.50 7.33 8.57 7.77 7.28 8.00 8.59 9.29 9.26 7.37 8.46 7.97 7.70 8.09 8.13 9.87 9.56 ............................. *8.39

8.03 7.24 7.80 7.33 7.56 7.74 8.97 8.91 8.52 6.91 8.40 7.52 7.31 7.78 7.25 9.39 8.04 9.39 *8.09

8.79 7.97 8.26 7.59 8.07 8.84 9.21 9.53 8.78 7.13 8.68 8.01 7.72 8.08 7.85 9.70 *8.57 10.78 *8.59

2 Includes all persons doing work for pay during the survey week. 3 Regions agricultural service workers. consist of the following: Northeast I: CT, ME, MA, NH, NY, RI, VT; Northeast II: DE, MD, NJ, PA; Appalachian I: NC, VA; Appalachian II: KY, TN, WV; Southeast: AL, GA, SC; Lake: MI, MN, WI; Cornbelt I: IL, IN, OH; Cornbelt II: IA, MO; Delta: AR, LA, MS; No. Plains: KS, NE, ND, SD; So. Plains: OK, TX; Mountain I: ID, MT, WY; Mountain II: CO, NV, UT; Mountain 4 Includes field, livestock, supervisors, and other workers doing work for pay during the surIII: AZ, NM; Pacific: OR, WA. vey week. * Revised. NASS, Economic, Environmental and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

IX–16

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-20.—Farm production and output: Index numbers of total output, and gross production of livestock and crops, by groups, United States, 1987–96
[1992=100] Livestock and products Year Farm output 88 83 89 94 94 100 94 107 101 106 All livestock and products 1 92 93 94 95 98 100 100 108 110 109 Meat animals 2 95 97 97 96 99 100 100 102 103 100 Dairy products 3 94 96 95 98 98 100 99 114 115 115 Poultry and eggs 4 81 83 86 92 96 100 104 110 114 119

1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996

..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....

Crops Year All crops 86 75 86 92 92 100 90 106 96 103 Feed crops 5 84 62 85 88 86 100 76 102 83 98 Food grains 6 84 76 83 107 82 100 96 97 90 93 Oil crops 7 88 72 88 87 94 100 85 115 99 107 Cotton and cotton seed 92 96 75 96 109 100 100 122 110 117

1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996

..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....

Crops Year Tobacco 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 69 78 80 94 96 100 94 85 93 80 Vegetables and melons 8 90 81 85 93 97 100 97 113 108 112 Fruits and nuts 9 95 102 98 97 96 100 107 111 102 102 Other crops 10 82 86 89 94 97 100 99 105 110 110

1 Includes wool, mohair, horses, mules, honey, beeswax, bees, goats, rabbits, aquaculture, and fur animals. These items 2 Cattle and calves, sheep and lambs, and are not included in the separate groups of livestock and products shown. 3 Butter, butterfat, wholesale milk, retail milk, and milk consumed on farms. 4 Chicken eggs, commercial broilers, hogs. 5 Feed grains and forage crops. 6 All wheat, rye, and rice. 7 Soybeans, peanuts harvested for chickens, and turkeys. 8 Potatoes, sweetpotatoes, dry edible beans, dry field peas, truck crops for procnuts, sunflower seed, and flaxseed. 9 Fruits, berries, and tree nuts having value. Citrus production is essing, and truck crops for fresh market having value. 10 Includes sugar crops, floriculture based on year of harvest for 1960 to date; earlier years are based on year of bloom. and ornamentals, forest products, legums and grass seeds, hops, mint, broomcorn, popcorn, hemp fiber and seed, and flax fiber. ERS, Environmental Indicators and Resource Accounting Branch (202) 694–5601.

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–17

Table 9-21.—Hired farmworkers: Number of Workers and Median Weekly Earnings, 1999–2001 1
Workers Characteristics 1999 All workers ..................................... 15–19 years old ......................... 20–24 years old ......................... 25–34 years old ......................... 35–44 years old ......................... 45–54 years old ......................... 55 years old and older ............... Male ........................................... Female ....................................... White 4 ........................................ Black and other races 4 .............. Hispanic ..................................... Schooling completed Less than 5th grade ............... 5th-8th grade .......................... 9th-12th grade (no diploma) .. High school diploma ............... Beyond high school ................ Full-time (35 or more hours per week) ............................ Part-time (less than 35 hours per week) ............................
1 Represents

Median Weekly Earnings 2 2001 3 Thousands 745 109 87 171 189 108 81 601 144 366 38 341 79 158 174 203 131 601 144 1999 Dollars 280 110 250 325 338 325 276 300 240 300 260 280 246 258 208 333 360 320 105 2000 Dollars 280 140 280 313 300 350 270 300 246 320 270 280 260 276 238 338 385 319 120 2001 3 Dollars 300 132 280 313 342 345 360 320 248 320 314 300 300 280 250 346 400 345 130

2000 Thousands 878 123 104 204 208 127 111 720 158 414 56 408 117 185 186 226 164 709 169

Thousands 840 131 124 196 174 122 93 678 162 425 54 361 95 189 174 228 154 668 172

average number of persons 15 years old and over in the civilian noninstitutional population who were em2 ‘‘Median weekployed per week as hired farmworkers. Based on the Current Population Survey microdata earnings file. ly earnings’’ is the value that divides the earnings into two equal parts, one part having earnings above the median and the other part having earnings below the median. ‘‘Earnings’’ refers to the weekly earnings the farmworker usually earns at a 3 Preliminary. 4 Excludes persons of farmwork job, before deductions, and includes any overtime pay or commissions. Hispanic origin. ERS, Food Assistance, and Rural Economy Branch, (202) 694–5438.

Table 9-22.—Crops: Area, United States, 1992–2001
Principal crops Year Feed grains 1 1992 .................... 1993 .................... 1994 .................... 1995 .................... 1996 .................... 1997 .................... 1998 .................... 1999 .................... 2000 4 ................. 2001 4 ................. 1,000 acres 95,908 82,405 92,071 82,694 93,817 90,840 88,931 86,218 87,708 83,586 Area harvested Food grains 2 1,000 acres 66,284 65,926 65,493 64,433 65,968 66,259 62,677 57,718 56,468 52,222 Total 3 1,000 acres 306,652 295,503 307,905 301,349 313,202 317,662 311,485 312,222 307,519 303,818 Area planted total 3 1,000 acres 326,453 319,518 323,699 318,289 333,682 332,072 329,983 329,556 328,325 324,928 Commercial vegetables, harvested area 4 1,000 acres 3,323.2 3,260.2 3,531.9 3,432.3 3,371.8 3,270.3 3,303.6 3,419.9 3,513.5 3,399.2 Fruits and nuts, bearing area 5 1,000 acres 3,586.6 3,677.0 3,748.4 3,825.6 3,919.2 4,004.2 4,024.9 4,068.7 4,098.0 4,065.1

1 Corn for grain, oats, barley, and sorghum for grain. 2 Wheat, rye, and rice. 3 Crops included in area planted and area harvested are corn, sorghum, oats, barley, winter wheat, rye, durum wheat, other spring wheat, rice, soybeans, peanuts, sunflower, cotton, dry edible beans, potatoes, and sugarbeets. Harvested acreage for all hay, tobacco, and sugarcane 4 For the 2000 crop year many changes occurred to the National Vegetable Esare used in computing total area planted. timation Program. Nine new commodities were added to the program. Additionally, States were added or dropped from the seasonal program. Some States were discontinued for the seasonal forecasts but remained in the program on an annual basis. When comparing 2001 and 2000 data to 1999 data, comparable States should be used as noted in the table foot5 Includes notes. If you need assistance, contact Biz Wallingsford at (202) 720-2157 or Debbie Flippin at (202) 720-3250. the following fruits and nuts: Citrus fruits—oranges, tangerines, Temples, grapefruit, lemons, limes, tangelos, and K-Early Citrus (area is for the year of harvest); deciduous fruits—commercial apples, peaches, pears, grapes, cherries, plums, prunes, apricots, bananas, nectarines, figs, kiwifruit, olives, avocados, papayas, dates, berries, guavas, cranberries, pineapples and strawberries; nuts—almonds, hazelnuts, macadamias, pistachios, and walnuts. NASS, Crops Branch, (202) 720–2127.

IX–18

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-23.—Crops: Area, yield, production, and value, United States, 2000–2001
Area harvested Crop 2000 1,000 acres Grains & Hay: Barley 2 ................................................................... Corn for Grain ........................................................ Corn for Silage ....................................................... Hay, All .................................................................. Alfalfa ................................................................. All Other ............................................................. Oats 2 ..................................................................... Proso Millet ............................................................ Rice ........................................................................ Rye 2 ...................................................................... Sorghum for Grain ................................................. Sorghum for Silage ................................................ Wheat, All 2 ............................................................ Winter 2 ............................................................... Durum ................................................................. Other Spring ....................................................... Oilseeds: Canola .................................................................... Cottonseed ............................................................. Flaxseed ................................................................ Mustard Seed ........................................................ Peanuts .................................................................. Rapeseed ............................................................... Safflower ................................................................ Soybeans for Beans .............................................. Sunflower ............................................................... Cotton, Tobacco & Sugar Crops: Cotton, All .............................................................. Upland ................................................................ Amer-Pima ......................................................... Sugarbeets ............................................................. Sugarcane .............................................................. Tobacco ................................................................. Dry Beans, Peas & Lentils: Austrian Winter Peas ............................................. Dry Edible Beans ................................................... Dry Edible Peas ..................................................... Lentils ..................................................................... Wrinkled Seed Peas .............................................. Potatoes & Misc.: Coffee (HI) ............................................................. Ginger Root (HI) .................................................... Hops ....................................................................... Maple syrup ........................................................... Mushrooms ............................................................ Peppermint Oil ....................................................... Potatoes, All ........................................................... Winter ................................................................. Spring ................................................................. Summer .............................................................. Fall ...................................................................... Spearmint Oil ......................................................... Sweet Potatoes ...................................................... Taro (HI) ................................................................ See footnotes at end of table. 5,213.0 72,440.0 6,082.0 59,854.0 23,077.0 36,777.0 2,329.0 370.0 3,039.0 296.0 7,726.0 262.0 53,133.0 35,072.0 3,572.0 14,489.0 1,498.0 .................... 517.0 43.2 1,336.0 3.9 197.0 72,408.0 2,647.0 13,053.0 12,884.0 169.0 1,373.0 1,032.3 472.4 4.1 1,607.5 179.0 214.0 .................... 6.8 0.3 36.1 .................... .................... 90.5 1,348.0 17.0 75.6 63.2 1,192.2 21.7 94.9 0.5 2001 1 1,000 acres 4,289.0 68,808.0 6,148.0 63,511.0 23,812.0 39,699.0 1,905.0 580.0 3,314.0 255.0 8,584.0 336.0 48,653.0 31,295.0 2,789.0 14,569.0 1,455.0 .................... 578.0 44.2 1,400.5 3.1 177.0 73,000.0 2,580.0 13,810.0 13,551.0 259.0 1,243.7 1,029.2 432.6 7.1 1,243.0 196.8 197.0 .................... 6.3 0.4 35.9 .................... .................... 78.5 1,241.3 14.0 76.2 58.6 1,092.5 19.5 93.5 0.4 Bushel .... Bushel .... Ton ......... Ton ......... Ton ......... Ton ......... Bushel .... Bushel .... Pound .... Bushel .... Bushel .... Ton ......... Bushel .... Bushel .... Bushel .... Bushel .... Pound .... Ton ......... Bushel .... Pound .... Pound .... Pound .... Pound .... Bushel .... Pound .... Pound .... Pound .... Pound .... Ton ......... Ton ......... Pound .... Pound .... Pound .... Pound .... Pound .... NA .......... Pound .... Pound .... Pound .... NA .......... NA .......... Pound .... Cwt ......... Cwt ......... Cwt ......... Cwt ......... Cwt ......... Pound .... Cwt ......... Pound .... 61.1 136.9 16.8 2.54 3.48 1.95 64.2 19.8 6,281 28.3 60.9 10.6 42.0 44.7 30.7 38.4 1,334 .................... 20.8 855 2,444 1,474 1,434 38.1 1,339 632 626 1,105 23.7 35.0 2,229 1,780 1,643 1,955 1,415 .................... 1,280 50,000 1,871 .................... .................... 78 381 292 290 304 392 101 145 .................... 58.2 138.2 16.6 2.47 3.37 1.93 61.3 33.2 6,429 27.3 59.9 11.1 40.2 43.5 30.0 35.2 1,374 .................... 19.8 930 3,027 1,306 1,365 39.6 1,349 698 687 1,257 20.7 33.8 2,314 1,366 1,572 1,920 1,471 .................... 1,210 45,000 1,861 .................... .................... 81 358 294 286 309 367 105 154 .................... Unit 2000 2001 1 Yield per harvested acre

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–19

Table 9-23.—Crops: Area, yield, production, and value, United States, 2000–2001— Continued
Production Crop Unit 2000 Thousands Grains & Hay: Barley 2 ................................................................... Corn for Grain ........................................................ Corn for Silage ....................................................... Hay, All .................................................................. Alfalfa ................................................................. All Other ............................................................. Oats 2 ..................................................................... Proso Millet ............................................................ Rice ........................................................................ Rye 2 ...................................................................... Sorghum for Grain ................................................. Sorghum for Silage ................................................ Wheat, All 2 ............................................................ Winter 2 ............................................................... Durum ................................................................. Other Spring ....................................................... Oilseeds: Canola .................................................................... Cottonseed ............................................................. Flaxseed ................................................................ Mustard Seed ........................................................ Peanuts .................................................................. Rapeseed ............................................................... Safflower ................................................................ Soybeans for Beans .............................................. Sunflower ............................................................... Cotton, Tobacco & Sugar Crops: Cotton, All .............................................................. Upland ................................................................ Amer-Pima ......................................................... Sugarbeets ............................................................. Sugarcane .............................................................. Tobacco ................................................................. Dry Beans, Peas & Lentils: Austrian Winter Peas ............................................. Dry Edible Beans ................................................... Dry Edible Peas ..................................................... Lentils ..................................................................... Wrinkled Seed Peas .............................................. Potatoes & Misc.: Coffee (HI) ............................................................. Ginger Root (HI) .................................................... Hops ....................................................................... Maple syrup ........................................................... Mushrooms ............................................................ Peppermint Oil ....................................................... Potatoes, All ........................................................... Spearmint Oil ......................................................... Sweet Potatoes ...................................................... Taro (HI) ................................................................ See footnotes at end of table. Bushel .... Bushel .... Ton ......... Ton ......... Ton ......... Ton ......... Bushel .... Bushel .... Cwt ......... Bushel .... Bushel .... Ton ......... Bushel .... Bushel .... Bushel .... Bushel .... Pound .... Ton ......... Bushel .... Pound .... Pound .... Pound .... Pound .... Bushel .... Pound .... Bale ........ Bale ........ Bale ........ Ton ......... Ton ......... Pound .... Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... 318,728 9,915,051 102,156 151,921 80,347 71,574 149,545 7,320 190,872 8,386 470,526 2,773 2,232,460 1,566,023 109,805 556,632 1,998,310 6,435.6 10,730 36,930 3,265,505 5,750 282,545 2,757,810 3,544,428 17,188.3 16,799.2 389.1 32,541 36,114 1,052,998 73.0 26,409.0 3,499.0 3,029.0 680.0 8,700.0 13,500.0 67,576.8 .................... 867,124 7,067.0 513,621.0 2,199.0 13,794.0 7,000.0 2001 1 Thousands 249,590 9,506,840 102,352 156,703 80,266 76,437 116,856 19,250 213,045 6,971 514,524 3,728 1,957,643 1,361,479 83,556 512,608 1,998,515 7,533.0 11,455 41,106 4,239,450 4,050 241,665 2,890,572 3,480,696 20,084.0 19,406.0 678.0 25,754 34,801 1,000,936 97 19,541 3,779 2,898 640 7,600 16,200 66,832.1 .................... 853,350 6,343 444,766 2,052 14,355 6,400 2000 1,000 dollars 649,130 18,499,002 .................... 11,416,651 6,707,454 4,709,197 175,797 35,034 1,049,961 21,830 847,075 .................... 5,782,107 3,893,961 301,356 1,586,790 133,994 667,800 35,569 3,739 896,097 560 29,878 12,466,572 246,869 4,260,417 4,073,161 187,256 1,113,030 941,791 1,955,221 596 413,986 18,589 30,157 9,895 23,055 8,910 126,217 33,924 867,351 76,277 2,591,091 19,919 210,869 3,710 2001 1 1,000 dollars 535,472 19,209,312 .................... 12,611,560 7,543,627 5,067,933 175,923 38,807 895,757 20,243 997,864 .................... 5,553,815 3,750,695 266,353 1,536,767 175,677 678,597 48,558 4,959 1,003,099 437 26,316 12,439,597 317,473 3,383,732 3,080,414 303,318 .................... .................... 1,916,234 1,067 392,937 21,943 27,714 8,862 17,860 7,290 127,926 28,223 862,936 68,706 2,933,853 18,645 233,346 3,392 Value of production

Pound .... Pound .... Pound .... Gallons ... Pound .... Pound .... Cwt ......... Pound .... Cwt ......... Pound ....

IX–20

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-23.—Crops: Area, yield, production, and value, United States, 2000–2001— Continued
Area harvested 3 Crop 2000 Acres 444,700 20,380 65,220 1,460 6,140 .................... 40,320 .................... 1,710 80 .................... 1,150 12,400 2,000 58,450 39,880 36,600 4,700 15,400 946,450 680 5,300 35,500 36,000 1,650 155,480 66,060 20,700 38,000 86,000 4,110 47,650 812,900 153,500 62,800 2,800 40,600 11,300 5,800 200 500,000 28,650 17,700 .................... 74,600 193,000 2001 1 Acres 431,200 19,430 .................... 1,460 6,160 .................... 40,580 .................... 1,610 70 .................... 1,200 12,200 2,300 63,220 38,770 34,300 4,500 14,000 977,970 .................... 5,300 36,500 36,000 1,900 151,820 64,630 20,100 37,000 86,000 4,410 46,100 814,800 145,200 63,800 1,200 39,900 10,800 5,500 200 525,000 28,500 17,800 .................... 78,000 196,000 Unit 2000 2001 1 Yield per harvested acre 4

Apples, commercial crop ........................................... Apricots ...................................................................... Avocados 5 ................................................................. Bananas .................................................................... Blackberries (OR) ...................................................... Blueberries ................................................................ Cultivated ............................................................... Wild (ME) ............................................................... Boysenberries ............................................................ Loganberries (OR) ..................................................... Raspberries ............................................................... Black (OR) ............................................................. Red ........................................................................ All (CA) .................................................................. Cherries, sweet ......................................................... Cherries, tart .............................................................. Cranberries ................................................................ Dates (CA) ................................................................. Figs (CA) ................................................................... Grapes ....................................................................... Guava (HI) ................................................................. Kiwifruit (CA) ............................................................. Nectarines (CA) ......................................................... Olives (CA) ................................................................ Papayas (HI) ............................................................. Peaches ..................................................................... Pears ......................................................................... Pineapples (HI) .......................................................... Plums (CA) ................................................................ Prunes, dried (CA) .................................................... Prunes and plums, fresh basis (excluding ................ CA) ............................................................................ Strawberries .............................................................. Oranges 6 ................................................................... Grapefruit 6 ................................................................ Lemons 6 .................................................................... Limes 6 (FL) ............................................................... Tangerines 6 .............................................................. Tangelos 6 (FL) .......................................................... Temples 6 (FL) ........................................................... K-Early Citrus 6 (FL) .................................................. Almonds 7 (CA) .......................................................... Hazelnuts (filberts) 7 .................................................. Macadamia nuts 7 (HI) ............................................... Pecans 8 .................................................................... Pistachios 7 (CA) ....................................................... Walnuts 7 (CA) ........................................................... See footnotes at end of table.

Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton

......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... .........

12.00 4.75 3.67 9.93 3.66 .................... 2.25 .................... 2.63 2.88 .................... 1.67 3.46 5.40 3.53 3.62 7.71 3.09 3.63 8.12 11.70 6.42 7.52 1.47 16.50 8.35 14.60 .................... 5.18 7.92 5.82 20.50 16.0 18.0 13.4 9.29 11.3 8.76 15.2 25.0 1.15 0.79 1.41 .................... 1.63 1.24

11.00 4.23 .................... 9.60 2.77 .................... 2.42 .................... 1.87 0.79 .................... 1.59 3.73 4.61 3.64 4.76 7.81 3.89 2.95 6.67 .................... 4.72 7.53 3.72 14.50 8.05 15.00 .................... 5.68 4.82 4.72 18.10 15.2 17.0 15.7 9.17 9.25 8.80 10.2 10.0 1.32 1.68 1.52 .................... 1.03 1.56

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–21

Table 9-23.—Crops: Area, yield, production, and value, United States, 2000–2001— Continued
Total production Crop Unit 2000 Thousands 5,331.9 96.9 239.3 14.5 22.5 .................... 92.7 55.5 4.5 0.2 .................... 1.9 43.3 10.8 206.5 144.3 282.1 14.5 55.9 7,688.0 8.0 34.0 267.0 53.0 273 1,300.0 967.2 354.0 197.0 681.1 23.9 978.7 12,997 2,762 840 26 458 99 88 5 573.4 22.5 25.0 104.9 121.5 239.0 2001 1 Thousands 4,717.6 82.3 .................... 14.0 18.0 .................... 100.1 37.6 3.0 0.1 .................... 2.0 46.0 10.6 230.1 184.7 267.9 17.5 41.3 6,521.2 .................... 25.0 275.0 134.0 275 1,218.7 970.8 323.0 210.0 414.4 20.8 833.2 12,390 2,469 1,000 11 369 95 56 2 693.3 48.0 27.0 157.5 80.5 305.0 2000 1,000 dollars 1,325,641 32,346 325,555 10,440 21,437 .................... 176,571 44,732 5,225 296 .................... 5,687 33,600 40,392 274,225 52,488 96,211 17,835 15,226 3,072,217 2,051 13,888 106,256 34,743 16,007 489,116 250,273 101,530 87,115 154,770 5,247 1,085,590 1,666,100 411,332 298,677 9,728 108,192 11,232 9,173 356 654,653 20,039 29,500 238,768 240,570 296,360 2001 1 1,000 dollars 1,514,301 26,472 .................... 10,640 14,042 .................... 165,238 22,945 4,133 50 .................... 1,724 45,940 45,156 281,024 50,703 110,125 27,825 15,183 2,794,241 .................... .................... 127,642 90,096 14,130 495,944 290,155 96,337 66,443 101,080 5,380 1,085,405 1,636,250 269,812 239,267 4,249 99,151 7,758 5,098 187 685,440 33,600 31,320 216,373 167,440 .................... Value of production

Apples, commercial crop ........................................... Apricots ...................................................................... Avocados 5 ................................................................. Bananas 9 .................................................................. Blackberries (OR) ...................................................... Blueberries ................................................................ Cultivated ................................................................... Wild (ME) ................................................................... Boysenberries ............................................................ Loganberries (OR) ..................................................... Raspberries ............................................................... Black (OR) ................................................................. Red ............................................................................ All (CA) ...................................................................... Cherries, sweet ......................................................... Cherries, tart .............................................................. Cranberries ................................................................ Dates (CA) ................................................................. Figs (CA) ................................................................... Grapes ....................................................................... Guava 9 (HI) ............................................................... Kiwifruit (CA) ............................................................. Nectarines (CA) ......................................................... Olives (CA) ................................................................ Papayas 9 (HI) ........................................................... Peaches ..................................................................... Pears ......................................................................... Pineapples 9 (HI) ....................................................... Plums (CA) ................................................................ Prunes, dried (CA) .................................................... Prunes and plums, fresh basis ................................. (excluding CA) ........................................................... Strawberries 9 ............................................................ Oranges 6 10 .............................................................. Grapefruit 6 10 ............................................................ Lemons 6 10 ............................................................... Limes 6 10 (FL) ........................................................... Tangerines 6 10 .......................................................... Tangelos 6 10 (FL) ...................................................... Temples 6 10 (FL) ....................................................... K-Early Citrus 6 10 (FL) .............................................. Almonds 9 (CA) .......................................................... Hazelnuts (filberts) 9 .................................................. Macadamia nuts 9 (HI) ............................................... Pecans 9 .................................................................... Pistachios 9 (CA) ....................................................... Walnuts 9 (CA) ........................................................... See footnotes at end of table.

Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton

......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... .........

IX–22

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-23.—Crops: Area, yield, production, and value, United States, 2000–2001— Continued
Area harvested Crop 2000 Acres Commercial Vegetables: Fresh Market Artichokes 11 ....................................................... Asparagus 11 ....................................................... Beans, lima ........................................................ Beans, snap ....................................................... Broccoli 11 ........................................................... Brussel sprouts 11 ............................................... Cabbage ............................................................. Cantaloups ......................................................... Carrots ................................................................ Cauliflower 11 ...................................................... Celery 11 ............................................................. Corn, sweet ........................................................ Cucumbers ......................................................... Eggplant ............................................................. Escarole/endive .................................................. Garlic 11 .............................................................. Honeydew melons .............................................. Lettuce, head ..................................................... Lettuce, leaf ........................................................ Lettuce, Romaine ............................................... Onions 11 ............................................................ Peppers, bell 11 ................................................... Spinach .............................................................. Tomatoes ........................................................... Watermelons ...................................................... Greens: 11 Collards ........................................................... Kale ................................................................. Mustard ........................................................... Turnip .............................................................. Okra ................................................................ Peppers, Chile ................................................ Pumpkins ........................................................ Radishes ......................................................... Squash ............................................................ Processing: Beans, lima ........................................................ Beans, snap ....................................................... Beets .................................................................. Cabbage for sauerkraut ..................................... Carrots ................................................................ Corn, sweet ........................................................ Cucumbers for pickles ....................................... Peas, green ........................................................ Spinach .............................................................. Tomatoes ........................................................... See footnotes at end of table. 8,800 77,400 6,070 93,100 144,300 2,600 78,490 98,670 102,710 47,160 26,200 246,100 53,300 6,480 5,170 34,800 26,000 184,900 49,500 49,450 166,170 62,350 31,220 123,170 164,960 13,100 4,760 10,230 10,530 2,900 31,500 34,800 13,600 53,800 49,750 218,380 7,470 7,510 20,150 459,700 104,710 277,240 14,720 289,600 2001 1 Acres 8,000 72,150 7,090 94,200 140,800 2,200 80,240 98,630 101,660 48,050 27,900 255,900 54,800 5,700 5,270 31,200 25,200 193,600 55,500 56,100 158,690 56,720 31,250 127,870 156,900 14,100 4,510 9,160 10,500 3,020 31,850 34,700 14,200 51,900 51,100 196,480 6,650 6,950 17,980 446,450 104,860 210,340 14,040 274,760 Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... 115 29 26 63 145 180 331 212 298 165 703 107 205 263 181 160 193 377 238 320 432 270 156 306 228 140 195 159 132 68 104 257 90 164 1.18 3.82 15.15 27.73 25.75 6.86 5.86 1.91 9.28 37.49 125 29 28 64 145 180 326 231 308 168 675 108 199 275 168 158 189 375 211 290 423 261 132 289 257 119 193 114 107 60 98 240 90 149 1.31 3.56 16.72 25.09 24.32 7.04 5.64 1.84 10.11 33.66 Unit 2000 2001 1 Yield per harvested acre

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–23

Table 9-23.—Crops: Area, yield, production, and value, United States, 2000–2001— Continued
Production Crop Unit 2000 Thousands Commercial Vegetables: Fresh Market Artichokes 11 ....................................................... Asparagus 11 ....................................................... Beans, lima ........................................................ Beans, snap ....................................................... Broccoli 11 ........................................................... Brussel sprouts 11 ............................................... Cabbage ............................................................. Cantaloups ......................................................... Carrots ................................................................ Cauliflower 11 ...................................................... Celery 11 ............................................................. Corn, sweet ........................................................ Cucumbers ......................................................... Eggplant ............................................................. Escarole/endive .................................................. Garlic 11 .............................................................. Honeydew melons .............................................. Lettuce, head ..................................................... Lettuce, leaf ........................................................ Lettuce, Romaine ............................................... Onions 11 ............................................................ Peppers, bell 11 ................................................... Spinach .............................................................. Tomatoes ........................................................... Watermelons ...................................................... Greens: 11. Collards ........................................................... Kale ................................................................. Mustard ........................................................... Turnip .............................................................. Okra ................................................................ Peppers, Chile ................................................ Pumpkins ........................................................ Radishes ......................................................... Squash ............................................................ Processing: Beans, lima ........................................................ Beans, snap ....................................................... Beets .................................................................. Cabbage for sauerkraut ..................................... Carrots ................................................................ Corn, sweet ........................................................ Cucumbers for pickles ....................................... Peas, green ........................................................ Spinach .............................................................. Tomatoes ........................................................... Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Cwt Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... 1,012 2,272 158 5,894 20,880 468 25,990 20,965 30,598 7,760 18,425 26,401 10,950 1,704 936 5,581 5,008 69,628 11,765 15,830 71,721 16,861 4,884 37,665 37,629 1,838 929 1,626 1,395 197 3,267 8,949 1,225 8,812 58,890 833,490 113,160 208,270 518,880 3,155,540 613,160 530,050 136,650 10,858,240 2001 1 Thousands 1,000 2,084 202 6,018 20,420 396 26,193 22,765 31,315 8,063 18,823 27,661 10,891 1,565 886 4,937 4,761 72,512 11,734 16,293 67,081 14,814 4,138 36,962 40,374 1,676 870 1,040 1,124 181 3,109 8,312 1,271 7,741 66,900 698,650 111,180 174,360 437,240 3,142,840 591,520 386,770 141,930 9,248,260 2000 1,000 dollars 61,021 221,299 5,604 250,794 633,904 16,115 326,198 367,193 401,176 248,712 341,391 480,706 218,405 48,787 28,922 154,971 96,181 1,208,306 348,571 314,633 736,369 527,452 177,585 1,159,590 241,101 36,217 25,943 51,641 26,795 9,650 97,209 83,293 45,143 210,287 25,442 142,502 6,925 9,862 36,458 231,600 164,956 131,701 16,579 649,066 2001 1 1,000 dollars 58,211 230,182 5,861 273,173 504,198 14,471 364,943 420,226 543,526 216,287 276,506 542,578 212,481 49,652 25,870 152,766 98,113 1,273,104 320,924 313,055 702,926 420,672 168,947 1,116,982 276,871 36,121 23,148 29,434 19,758 8,339 88,419 70,985 51,370 183,220 30,710 112,692 7,317 8,499 33,610 229,204 169,355 102,376 16,967 547,624 Value of production

1 Preliminary. 2 Includes area seeded in preceding fall. 3 Bearing acreage for citrus and noncitrus fruits and 4 Yield per bearing acreage for citrus and noncitrus fruits and nuts. 5 Year of bloom. 6 Crop year begins with nuts. bloom in one year and ends with completion of harvest the following year. Citrus production is for the year of har7 Yield derived from the in-shell basis. 8 Bearing acreage and yield not calculated. 9 Utilized producvest. 10 Equivalent packinghouse–door returns. 11 For breakdown between fresh market and processing, see individual tion. crop tables. NASS, Crops Branch, (202) 720–2127.

IX–24

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-24.—Total farm input: Index numbers of farm input, by major subgroups, United States, 1987–96
[1992=100] Year 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ Total input 101 100 100 101 102 100 101 102 101 100 Farm labor 101 103 104 102 106 100 96 96 92 100 Farm real estate 100 100 102 101 100 100 98 99 98 99 Durable equipment 120 113 108 105 103 100 97 94 92 89 Energy 102 102 101 100 101 100 100 103 109 104 Agricultural chemicals 1 100 90 95 95 100 100 105 106 90 97 Feed, seed, and livestock purchases 2 97 96 91 99 99 100 101 102 109 95 Other purchased inputs 3 95 99 103 103 104 100 110 117 121 117

1 Includes fertilizer, lime, and pesticides. 2 Includes broiler- and egg-type chicks and turkey poults and imports of live3 Includes purchased services and miscellaneous inputs. stock for purposes other than immediate slaughter. ERS, Environmental Indicators and Resource Accounting Branch (202) 694–5601.

Table 9-25.—Livestock and livestock products: Production and value, United States, 1998–2000
Production 1 Product 1998 1,000 pounds 41,620,414 554,918 25,714,706 38,553,600 934,568 7,050,944 157,348,000 49,255 5,054 ....................... ....................... 220,316 Millions 79,754 1999 1,000 pounds 42,468,398 533,610 25,790,623 40,829,800 1,034,072 6,886,406 162,716,000 46,592 2,896 ....................... ....................... 205,250 Millions 82,715 2000 2 1,000 pounds 42,915,140 505,995 25,716,992 41,516,260 1,116,569 6,988,379 167,559,000 46,446 2,628 ....................... ....................... 220,339 Millions 84,412 1998 1,000 dollars 24,153,116 354,437 8,673,713 15,144,551 75,542 2,679,301 24,331,981 29,415 12,562 475,309 73,978 147,254 4,439,446 1999 1,000 dollars 26,051,477 348,742 7,766,241 15,128,840 73,150 2,809,874 23,400,050 17,860 10,016 489,291 76,506 126,075 4,287,164 2000 2 1,000 dollars 28,388,431 357,142 10,791,404 13,953,196 64,655 2,843,242 20,786,195 15,377 10,609 501,400 75,780 132,742 4,347,190 Value of production

Cattle and calves .......... Sheep and lambs .......... Hogs .............................. Broilers 3 ........................ Mature chickens ............ Turkeys .......................... Milk ................................ Wool (shorn) .................. Mohair 4 ......................... Catfish 5 ......................... Trout 6 ............................ Honey ............................ Eggs ..............................
1 For

cattle, sheep, and hogs, the quantity of net production is the live weight actually produced during the year, adjustments having been made for animals shipped in and changes in inventory. Estimates for broilers and eggs cover the 122 Preliminary, except for wool shorn and mohair. 3 Young chickmonth period Dec. 1, previous year through Nov. 30. 4 AZ, NM, and TX. 5 Value of fish sold. 6 Value of fish and ens of meat–type strains raised for meat production. eggs sold. NASS, Livestock Branch, (202) 720–3570.

Table 9-26.—Agricultural productivity: Index numbers (1992=100) of farm output per unit of input, United States, 1987–96
Year 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... Productivity
1

87 83 90 93 92 100 94 105 100 106

1 Productivity is the output-input ratio. The ratio is obtained by dividing the index of farm output in table 9–25 by the index of total input in table 9–26. ERS, Environmental Indicators and Resource Accounting Branch (202) 694–5601.

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–25

Table 9-27.—U.S. farm foods: Marketing bill, farm value, and consumer expenditures, 1991–2000 1
Year Total marketing bill Billion dollars 363.5 369.4 379.6 402.6 415.7 424.5 444.6 465.4 503.1 537.8 Farm value Billion dollars 101.6 105.1 109.6 109.6 113.8 122.2 121.9 119.6 122.2 123.3 Expenditures for farm foods Billion dollars 465.1 474.5 489.2 512.2 529.5 546.7 566.5 585.0 625.3 661.1

1991 ............................................................................................... 1992 ............................................................................................... 1993 ............................................................................................... 1994 ............................................................................................... 1995 ............................................................................................... 1996 ............................................................................................... 1997 ............................................................................................... 1998 ............................................................................................... 1999 ............................................................................................... 2000 2 .............................................................................................

1 The total marketing bill is the difference between total expenditures for domestic farm-originated food products and the farm value or payment farmers received for the equivalent farm products. It relates only to food purchased by consumers 2 Preliminary. that is not imported or exported. ERS, Food Markets Branch, (202) 694–5375.

Table 9-28.—Farm food products: Marketing costs, United States, 1991–2000
Year Labor 1 Packaging materials Billion dollars 38.1 40.1 40.9 43.3 48.2 47.7 48.7 50.4 50.9 53.5 Intercity transportation, rail and truck Billion dollars 20.4 20.6 21.2 21.8 22.3 22.9 23.6 24.4 25.2 26.4 Fuels and electricity Billion dollars 16.3 16.7 17.2 17.9 18.6 19.6 20.2 20.7 22.0 23.1 Corporate profits before taxes Billion dollars 15.2 15.7 18.1 20.9 19.5 20.7 22.3 25.5 29.2 31.1 Other 2 Total marketing bill 3 Billion dollars 363.5 369.4 379.6 402.6 415.7 424.5 444.6 465.4 503.1 537.8

1991 ..................... 1992 ..................... 1993 ..................... 1994 ..................... 1995 ..................... 1996 ..................... 1997 ..................... 1998 ..................... 1999 ..................... 2000 4 ..................

Billion dollars 160.9 168.4 178.0 186.1 196.6 204.6 216.9 229.9 241.5 252.9

Billion dollars 112.6 107.9 104.2 112.6 110.5 109.0 112.9 114.5 134.3 150.8

1 Includes employee wages or salaries, and their health and welfare benefits. Also includes imputed earnings of propri2 Includes depreciation, rent, advertising and proetors, partners, and family workers not receiving stated remuneration. motion, interest, taxes, licenses, insurance, professional services, local for-hire transportation, food service in schools, col3 The marketing bill is the difference between the farm leges, hospitals, and other institutions, and miscellaneous items. value or payments to farmers for foodstuffs and consumer expenditures for these foods both at foodstores and away from 4 Preliminary. home eating places. Thus, it covers processing, wholesaling, transportation, and retailing costs and profits. ERS, Food Markets Branch, (202) 694–5375.

IX–26

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-29.—Price components: Market basket of farm-originated food products by food group, United States, 1991–2000 1
Market basket of food products Year Retail cost 2 Index 1982– 84=100 137 138 142 145 149 156 160 163 167 171 Farm value 3 Index 1982– 84=100 106 103 105 101 103 111 106 103 98 97 Farm to retail spread 4 Index 1982– 84=100 154 157 162 169 175 180 189 195 205 210 Farm value share of retail cost Percent 27 26 26 24 24 25 23 22 21 20 Retail cost Index 1982– 84=100 146 152 157 164 168 174 178 181 185 188 Bakery and cereal products Farm value Index 1982– 84=100 85 94 92 103 110 126 108 94 83 75 Farm to retail spread Index 1982– 84=100 154 160 166 171 176 181 187 193 199 204 Farm value share of retail cost Percent 7 8 7 8 8 9 7 6 6 5

1991 .............. 1992 .............. 1993 .............. 1994 .............. 1995 .............. 1996 .............. 1997 .............. 1998 .............. 1999 .............. 2000 5 ............

Meat products Index 1982– 84=100 1991 .............. 1992 .............. 1993 .............. 1994 .............. 1995 .............. 1996 .............. 1997 .............. 1998 .............. 1999 .............. 2000 5 ............ 133 131 135 135 136 140 144 142 142 150 Index 1982– 84=100 110 105 107 96 94 100 101 85 82 88 Dairy products Index 1982– 84=100 1991 .............. 1992 .............. 1993 .............. 1994 .............. 1995 .............. 1996 .............. 1997 .............. 1998 .............. 1999 .............. 2000 5 ............ 125 129 129 132 133 142 146 151 160 161 Index 1982– 84=100 90 96 93 94 92 107 98 113 108 99 Poultry Index 1982– 84=100 1991 .............. 1992 .............. 1993 .............. 1994 .............. 1995 .............. 1996 .............. 1997 .............. 1998 .............. 1999 .............. 2000 5 ............ 132 131 137 142 144 152 157 157 158 160 Index 1982– 84=100 103 104 112 115 114 126 121 126 119 117 Index 1982– 84=100 165 163 166 173 178 183 198 193 203 209 Percent 42 42 44 43 42 44 41 43 40 39 Index 1982– 84=100 157 159 163 166 170 174 189 186 207 218 Percent 35 36 35 34 33 36 32 36 32 30 Index 1982– 84=100 132 130 130 134 137 141 142 147 148 147 Index 1982– 84=100 156 158 163 176 178 181 189 200 205 214 Percent 42 41 40 36 35 36 36 30 29 30 Index 1982– 84=100 177 174 182 191 210 216 220 237 252 252

Fruits and vegetables, fresh Index 1982– 84=100 142 122 131 119 133 133 128 133 136 131 Fats and oils Index 1982– 84=100 98 93 108 126 121 112 109 119 89 81 Index 1982– 84=100 144 143 138 137 143 151 154 157 170 172 Percent 20 19 22 25 24 22 21 22 16 15 Index 1982– 84=100 195 199 207 225 248 257 265 288 308 310 Percent 26 23 24 21 21 20 20 19 18 18

Fruits and vegetables, processed Index 1982– 84=100 130 134 132 135 138 144 148 151 155 154 Index 1982– 84=100 122 129 107 113 121 122 116 115 114 106 Index 1982– 84=100 133 135 139 141 143 152 158 162 168 168 Percent 22 23 19 20 21 20 19 18 17 17

1 The market basket consists of foods that mainly originate on U.S. farms bought in foodstores in a base period, currently 2 Indexes of retail cost are components of the Consumer Price Index published by the Bureau of Labor Statis1982–84. 3 Gross return or payment to farmers for the farm products equivalent to foods in the market basket. 4 The spread tics. between the retail cost and farm value is an estimate of the gross margin received by marketing firms for assembling, proc5 Preliminary. essing, transporting, and distributing the products. ERS, Food Markets Branch (202) 694–5375.

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–27

Table 9-30.—Farm product prices: Marketing year average prices received by farmers; Parity prices for January, United States, 1999 and 2000
Commodity and unit Marketing year average price 1 1999 2 Dollars Basic commodities: Cotton: American Upland .............................................................. Extra long staple ............................................................... Wheat ................................................................................... Rice ...................................................................................... Corn ...................................................................................... Peanuts ................................................................................ Tobacco: Flue-cured, types 11–14 ................................................... Va., fire-cured, type 21 ..................................................... Ky.-Tenn., fire-cured, types 22–23 ................................... Burley, type 31 ................................................................. Maryland, type 32 4 ........................................................... Dark air-cured, types 35–36 ............................................. Sun-cured, type 37 ........................................................... Pa., seedleaf, type 41 ...................................................... Cigar binder type 51 ......................................................... Puerto Rican filler, type 46 ............................................... Cigar filler types 54–55 .................................................... Designated nonbasic commodities: All milk, sold to plants .......................................................... Fluid market ...................................................................... Manufacturing grade ......................................................... Honey, all ............................................................................. Wool and mohair: Wool 5 ................................................................................ Mohair 6 ............................................................................. Other nonbasic commodities: Field crops and miscellaneous: Barley ................................................................................ Beans, dry edible .............................................................. Cottonseed ....................................................................... Crude pine gum ................................................................ Flaxseed ........................................................................... Hay, all, baled ................................................................... Hops ................................................................................. Oats .................................................................................. Peas, dry edible ................................................................ Peppermint oil ................................................................... Popcorn, shelled basis ..................................................... Potatoes ............................................................................ Rye ................................................................................... Sorghum grain .................................................................. Soybeans .......................................................................... Spearmint oil ..................................................................... Sweetpotatoes .................................................................. Tobacco: Cigar wrapper, type 61 ................................................. Fruits: Citrus (equiv. on-tree): 7 Grapefruit .......................................................................... Lemons ............................................................................. Limes, Florida ................................................................... Oranges ............................................................................ Tangelos, Florida .............................................................. Tangerines ........................................................................ Temples, Florida ............................................................... Deciduous and other: Apples: For all sales ...................................................................... For fresh consumption 8 .................................................... For processing 9 ................................................................ Apricots: For all sales ...................................................................... For fresh consumption 10 .................................................. Dried, California (dried basis) 9 ......................................... For processing (except dried) 9 ........................................ Avocados 10 .......................................................................... See footnotes at end of table. pound pound bushel cwt bushel pound pound pound pound pound pound pound pound pound pound pound pound cwt cwt cwt pound pound pound bushel cwt ton barrel bushel ton pound bushel cwt pounds cwt cwt bushel cwt bushel pound cwt pound box box box box box box box pound pound ton ton ton ton ton ton 0.516 0.852 2.48 7.59 1.89 0.254 1.737 1.819 2.298 1.899 1.345 2.039 1.590 1.300 4.737 ................ 1.490 14.38 14.42 12.84 0.601 0.380 3.460 2.13 16.40 89.00 ................ 3.79 76.90 1.69 1.12 5.60 10.70 ................ 5.77 2.27 2.80 4.63 9.70 17.60 ................ 3.17 8.85 12.83 5.47 4.53 12.55 5.12 ................ 0.213 128.00 ................ 638.00 ................ 295.00 2,070.00 2000 2 Dollars 0.499 0.952 2.62 5.75 1.86 0.257 1.793 1.835 2.305 1.960 1.387 1.955 1.585 ................ 5.500 ................ 1.500 12.40 12.44 10.54 0.594 0.330 4.040 2.11 15.30 105.00 ................ 3.30 85.00 1.87 1.10 4.90 10.50 ................ 5.08 2.57 3.15 4.75 8.90 15.30 ................ 3.89 9.49 11.21 3.58 2.52 7.15 2.55 ................ 0.179 103.00 ................ 544.00 1,860.00 283.00 1,370.00 Parity price 3 1999 Dollars 1.72 2.21 9.53 27.10 6.52 0.647 3.84 3.79 4.77 4.05 3.52 4.05 3.44 2.94 ................ 2.63 3.30 30.00 ................ ................ 1.34 1.90 3.52 5.83 49.60 242.00 212.00 11.90 190.00 3.64 3.41 28.80 29.50 27.60 13.10 4.96 10.30 13.80 28.20 31.10 42.30 7.98 18.30 17.80 11.40 ................ 27.30 9.67 ................ 0.442 302.00 ................ 1,860.00 4,460.00 623.00 2,920.00 2000 Dollars 1.76 2.25 9.59 28.30 6.61 0.671 3.98 4.00 5.01 4.25 3.60 4.28 3.64 3.02 ................ 2.72 3.34 31.30 ................ ................ 1.42 1.79 3.78 5.90 49.00 246.00 219.00 11.60 195.00 3.86 3.35 29.70 30.10 28.50 13.40 5.16 10.40 13.80 28.30 32.60 43.10 8.14 19.20 20.50 11.50 ................ 28.30 9.99 ................ 0.461 305.00 ................ 1,840.00 4,580.00 648.00 3,260.00

IX–28

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-30.—Farm product prices: Marketing year average prices received by farmers; Parity prices for January, United States, 1999 and 2000—Continued
Commodity and unit Marketing year average price 1 1999 2 Dollars Deciduous and other—Con. Berries for processing: Blackberries (Oregon) ...................................................... Boysenberries (California & Oregon) ............................... Gooseberries .................................................................... Loganberries (Oregon) ..................................................... Raspberries, black (Oregon) ............................................ Raspberries, red (Oregon & Washington) ........................ Cherries: Sweet ................................................................................ Tart ................................................................................... Cranberries 11 ....................................................................... Dates, California 10 ............................................................... Figs, California ..................................................................... Grapes: For all sales ...................................................................... Raisin varieties dried, California (dried basis) 9 ............... Nectarines (California): For all sales ...................................................................... For fresh consumption 19 .................................................. For processing 19 .............................................................. Olives (California): 12 For all sales ...................................................................... Crushed for oil .................................................................. For all sales (except crushed) .......................................... For canning ....................................................................... Peaches: For all sales ...................................................................... For fresh consumption 8 .................................................... Dried, California (dried basis) 9 ......................................... For processing California (except dried): Clingstone 12 ..................................................................... Freestone 9 ........................................................................ Pears: For all sales ...................................................................... For fresh consumption 8 .................................................... Dried, California (dried basis) 9 ......................................... For processing (except dried) 9 ........................................ Plums (California): For all sales 10 .................................................................. For fresh consumption 19 .................................................. For processing 19 .............................................................. Prunes, dried (California) 9 ............................................... Prunes and plums (excl. California): For fresh consumption 13 .................................................. For processing (except dried) 9 ........................................ Strawberries: For fresh consumption 14 .................................................. For processing 9 ................................................................ Sugar crops: Maple sirup ....................................................................... Sugarbeets ....................................................................... Sugarcane for sugar ......................................................... Tree nuts: 15 Almonds ............................................................................ Hazelnuts .......................................................................... Pecans, all ........................................................................ Improved ....................................................................... Seedling ........................................................................ Walnuts ............................................................................. See footnotes at end of table. pound pound pound pound pound pound ton.... pound.... barrel.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... pound.... pound.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... pound.... pound.... gallon.... ton.... ton.... pound.... ton.... pound.... pound.... pound.... ton.... 0.689 0.706 ................ 1.030 1.890 0.698 1,100.00 0.218 17.60 1,240.00 273.00 469.00 1,220.00 411.00 ................ ................ 380.00 11.00 ................ 513.00 0.190 0.290 619.50 255.00 185.00 294.00 393.00 1,040.00 184.00 419.00 ................ ................ 861.00 232.00 182.00 0.735 0.329 27.60 37.20 25.60 0.86 890.00 0.814 1.010 0.577 886.00 2000 2 Dollars 0.477 0.581 ................ 0.643 1.480 0.392 1,340.00 0.187 19.60 1,230.00 263.00 405.00 583.00 398.00 ................ ................ 610.00 11.00 ................ 734.00 0.195 0.281 740.00 250.00 187.00 264.00 318.00 909.00 190.00 442.00 ................ ................ 840.00 321.00 151.00 0.651 0.245 27.10 32.90 26.30 1.01 891.00 1.140 1.260 0.754 1,210.00 Parity price 3 1999 Dollars 0.944 1.340 0.568 0.918 1.61 1.29 2,390.00 0.404 115.00 2,120.00 ................ ................ 2,160.00 ................ 959.00 65.80 ................ 24.20 1,220.00 1,420.00 ................ 0.585 1,810.00 481.00 413.00 ................ 787.00 2,250.00 457.00 ................ 818.00 29.10 2,060.00 842.00 341.00 1.32 0.599 ................ 90.00 64.30 3.46 1,780.00 4,290.00 ................ ................ 2,730.00 2000 Dollars 0.976 1.380 0.587 0.949 1.67 1.33 2,570.00 0.406 117.00 2,250.00 ................ ................ 2,380.00 ................ 1,000.00 64.40 ................ 25.00 1,260.00 1,450.00 ................ 0.611 1,810.00 501.00 431.00 ................ 829.00 2,390.00 466.00 ................ 844.00 33.40 2,140.00 839.00 371.00 1.41 0.639 ................ 92.10 66.00 3.46 1,860.00 4,500.00 ................ ................ 2,860.00

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–29

Table 9-30.—Farm product prices: Marketing year average prices received by farmers; Parity prices for January, United States, 1999 and 2000—Continued
Commodity and unit Marketing year average price 1 1999 2 Dollars Vegetables for fresh market: 14 Artichokes, California ........................................................ Asparagus ......................................................................... Broccoli ............................................................................. Cabbage ........................................................................... Cantaloups ........................................................................ Carrots 16 .......................................................................... Cauliflower 16 .................................................................... Celery 16 ............................................................................ Cucumbers ....................................................................... Eggplant ............................................................................ Escarole/Endive ................................................................ Garlic, California ............................................................... Green peppers 16 .............................................................. Honeydew melons ............................................................ Lettuce .............................................................................. Onions 16 ........................................................................... Snap beans ...................................................................... Spinach ............................................................................. Sweet corn ........................................................................ Tomatoes .......................................................................... Watermelons ..................................................................... Vegetables for processing: 9 Asparagus ......................................................................... Beets ................................................................................. Cabbage ........................................................................... Cucumbers ....................................................................... Green peas ....................................................................... Lima beans ....................................................................... Snap beans ...................................................................... Spinach ............................................................................. Sweet corn ........................................................................ Tomatoes .......................................................................... Livestock and livestock products: All beef cattle ....................................................................... Cows ................................................................................. Steers and heifers ............................................................ Calves .................................................................................. Beeswax ............................................................................... Chickens: Excluding broilers, live ...................................................... Broilers, live 20 .................................................................. All Eggs ................................................................................ Hogs ..................................................................................... Lambs ................................................................................... Milk cows 17 .......................................................................... Milk, retail 18 ......................................................................... Sheep ................................................................................... Turkeys, live ......................................................................... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... ton.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... cwt.... pound... pound... pound... dozen... cwt.... cwt.... head.... quart... cwt.... pound... 67.00 131.00 24.10 11.30 17.20 16.80 30.00 12.00 18.20 30.20 26.90 29.60 31.10 21.60 13.30 9.78 46.50 32.10 17.20 25.80 6.47 1,180.00 59.50 43.70 238.00 275.00 468.00 173.00 133.00 71.10 71.10 63.40 35.10 66.90 87.70 ................ 0.071 0.371 0.622 30.30 74.50 1,280.00 ................ 31.10 0.408 2000 2 Dollars 65.10 117.00 31.20 12.80 17.70 13.50 35.00 18.40 20.40 28.60 31.10 26.20 31.50 19.10 17.50 11.40 42.70 33.30 18.30 31.40 6.36 1,180.00 61.20 47.40 269.00 248.00 432.00 171.00 119.00 73.40 61.10 68.60 37.90 72.30 104.00 ................ 0.058 0.336 0.618 42.30 79.40 1,340.00 ................ 34.20 0.407 Parity price 3 1999 Dollars 69.30 210.00 57.40 21.00 32.40 27.10 65.60 28.20 34.70 36.70 47.20 44.60 54.80 38.40 32.70 25.90 68.70 60.20 37.50 68.10 12.90 2,360.00 119.00 91.50 ................ 579.00 1,020.00 388.00 221.00 160.00 142.00 149.00 ................ ................ 190.00 4.43 ................ ................ 1.47 100.00 154.00 ................ ................ 64.10 0.877 2000 Dollars 71.60 231.00 59.50 21.70 33.50 29.40 68.00 29.00 35.90 37.90 48.80 46.10 56.70 42.00 34.50 27.10 71.00 62.20 38.60 68.90 13.30 2,500.00 123.00 94.60 ................ 609.00 1,050.00 401.00 228.00 165.00 149.00 153.00 ................ ................ 197.00 4.58 ................ ................ 1.50 101.00 162.00 ................ ................ 67.10 0.913

1 Marketing year average prices for crops; weighted calendar year average for livestock and livestock products, except chickens, eggs, and hogs, which are on a Nov.-Dec. marketing year basis. Unless otherwise noted, these are averages for marketing season or calendar year computed by weighing State prices by quantities sold, or by production for those com2 Preliminary. 3 Parity prices are for January of the year shown as modities for which virtually all the production is sold. 4 Previous year. 5 Average local market price for wool sold expublished in the January issue of Agricultural Prices. 6 Average local market price for mohair sold excluding incentive payment. Texas only prior to cluding incentive payment. 7 Crop year begins with bloom in one year and ends with completion of harvest the following year. Prices refer to 1988. the year harvest begins. Thus the prices shown for 1996 relate to the citrus crop designated as 1996–97 in the production 8 Equivalent packinghouse-door returns for California, Oregon (pears only), Washington, and New York (apples reports. 9 Equivalent returns at processing plant-door. 10 Equivalent returns at packonly), and prices as sold for other States. 11 Weighted average of co-op and independent sales. Co-op prices represent pool proceeds excluding reinghouse-door. 12 Equivalent per unit returns turns from non-cranberry products and before deductions for capital stock and other retains. 13 Average price as sold. 14 FOB shipping point when available. Weighted average for bulk fruit at first delivery point. 15 Prices are in-shell basis except almonds of prices at points of first sale when FOB shipping point price not available. 16 Includes some processing. 17 Simple average of States weighted by estimated Jan. 1 head which are shelled basis. 18 Sold by farmers directly to consumers. 19 Prices for fresh and processing breakdown no longer for U.S. average. 20 Live weight equivalent price. published to avoid disclosure of individual operations. NASS, Livestock and Economic Branch, (202) 720–3570.

IX–30

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-31.—Producer prices: Index numbers, by groups of commodities, United States, 1992–2001
[1982=100] Year 1992 ......................................................... 1993 ......................................................... 1994 ......................................................... 1995 ......................................................... 1996 ......................................................... 1997 ......................................................... 1998 ......................................................... 1999 ......................................................... 2000 ......................................................... 2001 1 ...................................................... Total finished goods 123.2 124.7 125.5 127.9 131.3 131.8 130.7 133.0 138.0 140.7 Consumer foods 123.3 125.7 126.8 129.0 133.6 134.5 134.3 135.1 137.2 141.3 Total consumer goods 121.7 123.0 123.3 125.6 129.5 130.2 128.9 132.0 138.2 141.5 Total intermediate materials 114.7 116.2 118.5 124.9 125.7 125.6 123.0 123.2 129.2 129.7 Total crude materials 100.4 102.4 101.8 102.7 113.8 111.1 96.8 98.2 120.6 121.3

1 Preliminary. ERS, Food Marketing Branch, (202) 694–5389. Compiled from reports of the U.S. Department of Labor.

Table 9-32.—Prices received by farmers: Index numbers by groups of commodities and parity ratio, United States, 1992–2001 1
[1910–14=100] Year 1992 ......... 1993 ......... 1994 ......... 1995 ......... 1996 ......... 1997 ......... 1998 ......... 1999 ......... 2000 ......... 2001 4 ...... Food grains 358 332 377 426 497 406 328 287 272 290 Feed grains and hay 352 354 381 400 521 418 356 307 308 325 Cotton 450 455 559 653 626 573 546 436 421 348 Tobacco 1,526 1,521 1,538 1,559 1,592 1,570 1,572 1,536 1,614 1,589 Oilbearing crops 544 590 600 568 700 715 588 452 466 439 Fruit & nuts 2 689 646 632 680 824 770 787 776 679 737 Livestock and livestock products 743 768 727 707 761 755 740 731 744 828 Commercial vegetables 745 785 731 806 740 792 818 737 821 875 Other crops 502 510 517 525 532 532 532 532 532 532

Year

Potatoes, and dry edible beans 444 539 556 541 576 457 500 507 472 507

All crops

Meat animals 971 1,011 910 868 882 933 804 840 955 1,015

Dairy products 805 787 797 783 914 820 953 882 757 933

Poultry and eggs 272 295 298 300 337 319 328 310 299 328

All farm products 626 643 634 646 712 678 645 606 611 657

Parity ratio 3 47 47 45 44 47 43 42 40 38 40

1992 ......... 1993 ......... 1994 ......... 1995 ......... 1996 ......... 1997 ......... 1998 ......... 1999 ......... 2000 ......... 2001 4 ......

498 505 520 553 624 568 527 474 472 489

1 These indexes are computed using the price estimates of averages for all classes and grades for individual commodities being sold in local farm markets. In computing the group indexes, prices of individual commodities have been compared with 1990–92 weighted average prices. The resulting ratios are seasonally weighted by average quantities sold for the most recent previous 5–year period. For example, 1994 indexes use quantities sold for the period 1988-92. Then, the 1990–92 in2 Fresh market for noncitrus, and fresh market and processing for citdexes are adjusted to a 1910–14 reference. 3 Ratio of Index of Prices Received to the Index of Prices Paid by Farmers for Commodities and Services, Interest, rus. 4 Preliminary. Taxes, and Farm Wage Rates. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–3570.

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–31

Table 9-33.—Prices received by farmers: Index numbers by groups of commodities and ratio, United States, 1992–2001 1
(1990–92=100) Year 1992 ......... 1993 ......... 1994 ......... 1995 ......... 1996 ......... 1997 ......... 1998 ......... 1999 ......... 2000 ......... 2001 4 ...... Food grains 113 105 119 134 157 128 103 90 86 91 Potatoes and dry edible beans 88 107 110 107 114 90 99 100 93 100 Feed grains and hay 98 99 106 112 146 117 100 86 86 91 Cotton 88 89 109 127 122 112 107 85 82 68 Tobacco 101 101 102 103 105 104 104 102 107 105 Oil-bearing crops 100 108 110 104 128 131 107 83 85 80 Livestock and livestock products 97 100 95 92 99 98 97 95 97 108 Fruit & Nuts 2 99 93 90 97 118 110 113 111 97 106 Commercial vegetables 111 117 109 121 111 118 123 110 123 131 Other Crops 102 103 105 106 108 108 108 108 108 108

Year

All crops

Meat animals 96 100 90 85 87 92 79 83 94 100

Dairy products 100 98 99 98 114 102 119 110 94 116

Poultry and eggs 97 105 106 107 120 113 117 110 107 117

All farm products 98 101 100 102 112 107 102 95 96 103

Ratio 3

1992 ......... 1993 ......... 1994 ......... 1995 ......... 1996 ......... 1997 ......... 1998 ......... 1999 ......... 2000 ......... 2001 4 ......

101 102 105 112 127 115 107 96 96 99

97 97 94 93 98 90 89 83 80 84

1 These indexes are computed using the price estimates of averages for all classes and grades for individual commodities being sold in local farm markets. In computing the group indexes, prices of individual commodities have been compared with 1990–92 weighted average prices. The resulting ratios are seasonally weighted by average quantities sold for the most re2 Fresh market for cent previous 5–year period. For example, 1994 indexes use quantities sold for the period 1988–92. 3 Ratio of Index of Prices Received (1990–92=100) to Index of noncitrus, and fresh market and processing for citrus. 4 Preliminary. Prices Paid by Farmers for Commodities & Services, Interest, Taxes, and Wage Rates (1990–92=100). NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

Table 9-34.—Prices paid by farmers: Index numbers, by groups of commodities, United States, 1992–2001
(1990–92=100) Production indexes Production (all commodities) 101 104 106 108 115 119 113 111 116 120 Livestock & Poultry 96 104 94 82 75 94 88 95 110 111 Agricultural chemicals 103 109 112 116 119 121 122 121 120 121 Supplies and Repairs 104 107 109 112 115 118 119 121 124 128 Autos and trucks 102 107 111 115 118 119 119 119 119 118 Commodities, interest, taxes, and wage rates 3 101 104 106 109 115 118 115 115 120 124

Year

Feed

Seeds

Fertilizer

Fuels

1992 ......... 1993 ......... 1994 ......... 1995 ......... 1996 ......... 1997 ......... 1998 ......... 1999 ......... 2000 ......... 2001 4 ......

99 102 106 103 129 125 110 100 102 108

99 101 108 110 115 119 122 121 124 132

100 96 105 121 125 121 112 105 110 122

96 93 89 89 102 106 84 93 134 118 Production, interest, taxes, and wage rates 101 103 106 108 115 118 114 113 118 122

Production indexes - continued Farm machinery 104 107 113 120 125 128 132 135 139 142 Farm services 1 103 110 110 115 116 116 115 116 119 121 Interest Rent Taxes Wage rates 2

Year

Building Materials

Family living

1992 ......... 1993 ......... 1994 ......... 1995 ......... 1996 ......... 1997 ......... 1998 ......... 1999 ......... 2000 ......... 2001 4 ......

101 106 109 114 115 118 118 120 121 121

104 100 108 117 128 136 120 113 110 117

93 87 94 102 106 105 104 106 112 114

104 108 106 109 112 115 119 120 123 124

105 108 111 114 117 123 129 135 140 146

104 107 110 113 116 119 121 124 128 131

1 The Farm Service and Rent indexes were combined prior to 1992. 2 Simple average of seasonally adjusted quarterly 3 Family Living component included. 4 Preliminary. indexes. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

IX–32

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-35.—Prices paid by farmers: Index numbers, by groups of commodities, United States, 1992–2001
[1910–14=100] Production indexes Year Family living Production (all commodities) 979 1,006 1,030 1,051 1,118 1,151 1,093 1,078 1,125 1,163 Livestock and poultry 1,223 1,327 1,207 1,047 962 1,200 1,123 1,217 1,403 1,424 Fertilizer 366 352 387 444 458 443 412 385 404 461 Agricultural chemicals 638 672 695 717 736 745 756 746 741 749 Supplies and repairs 736 757 776 798 816 835 846 861 881 903

Feed

Seed

Fuels

1992 ............... 1993 ............... 1994 ............... 1995 ............... 1996 ............... 1997 ............... 1998 ............... 1999 ............... 2000 ............... 2001 3 ............

1,327 1,369 1,404 1,447 1,490 1,525 1,548 1,582 1,636 1,682

485 497 518 502 631 612 539 486 496 528

976 1,002 1,071 1,088 1,142 1,179 1,208 1,201 1,227 1,302

740 717 689 690 789 816 651 720 1,033 975

Production indexes—Continued Year Autos and trucks 2,724 2,833 2,958 3,053 3,126 3,161 3,152 3,166 3,160 3,134 Farm machinery 2,599 2,689 2,843 3,009 3,128 3,216 3,313 3,393 3,490 3,543 Building materials 1,377 1,436 1,488 1,553 1,569 1,602 1,605 1,628 1,647 1,647 Farm services and rent 1,237 1,262 1,304 1,384 1,442 1,477 1,394 1,364 1,379 1,415 Interest Taxes Wage rates

Production, interest, taxes, and wage rates 1,353 1,384 1,419 1,456 1,540 1,585 1,528 1,520 1,585 1,638

Commodities, interest, taxes, and wage rates 2 1,348 1,381 1,416 1,454 1,531 1,574 1,532 1,531 1,594 1,646

1992 ......... 1993 ......... 1994 ......... 1995 ......... 1996 ......... 1997 ......... 1998 ......... 1999 ......... 2000 ......... 2001 3 ......

2,321 2,191 2,367 2,548 2,652 2,621 2,617 2,665 2,798 2,901

2,789 2,886 2,828 2,915 3,001 3,093 3,185 3,214 3,281 3,281

3,930 4,055 4,140 4,278 4,389 4,591 4,838 5,037 5,235 5,432

1 Based on Consumer Price Index-Urban of Bureau of Labor Statistics. 2 The index known as the Parity Index is the Index of Prices Paid by Farmers for Commodities and Services, Interest, Taxes, and Wage Rates expressed on the 1910– 3 Preliminary. 14=100 base. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

Table 9-36.—Prices paid by farmers: April prices, by commodities, United States, 1999–2001 1
Commodity Unit 1999 Dollars Fuels and energy: Diesel fuel 2 3 ..................................................................... Gasoline, service station, unleaded 4 ................................. Gasoline, service station, bulk delivery 4 ........................... L. P. gas, bulk delivery 2 .................................................... Feeds: Alfalfa Meal ........................................................................ Alfalfa Pellets ..................................................................... Bran .................................................................................... Beef Cattle Concentrate. 32-36% Protein .............................................................. Corn Meal ........................................................................... Cottonseed Meal, 41% ....................................................... Dairy Feed 14% Protein ................................................................... 16% Protein ................................................................... 18% Protein ................................................................... 20% Protein ................................................................... 32% Protein Conc. ........................................................ Hog Feed 14-18% Protein .............................................................. 38-42% Protein Conc. ................................................... Molasses, Liquid ................................................................ Poultry Feed:. Broiler Grower ................................................................ Chick Starter ................................................................... Laying Feed .................................................................... Turkey Grower ................................................................ Soybean Meal, 44% ........................................................... Stock Salt ........................................................................... Trace Mineral Blocks ......................................................... See footnotes at end of table. Gal Gal Gal Gal Cwt Cwt Cwt Ton Cwt Cwt Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Cwt Ton Ton Ton Ton Cwt 50 Lb 50 Lb 0.728 1.10 1.13 0.699 12.80 12.80 13.40 258 7.54 14.60 167 180 181 186 272 200 280 12.00 242 242 208 261 12.20 3.99 4.98 2000 Dollars 1.080 1.47 1.48 0.963 12.50 12.40 13.20 261 7.67 14.90 170 175 179 183 287 203 297 12.00 226 249 206 255 13.00 4.01 5.02 2001 Dollars 1.080 1.43 1.47 1.160 13.40 13.40 13.40 279 7.59 15.70 176 184 185 184 291 215 302 12.40 232 239 212 259 13.40 4.05 5.14

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–33

Table 9-36.—Prices paid by farmers: April prices, by commodities, United States, 1999–2001 1—Continued
Commodity Fertilizer: 5 0-15-40 .............................................................................. 0-18-36 .............................................................................. 0-20-20 .............................................................................. 3-10-30 .............................................................................. 5-10-10 .............................................................................. 5-10-15 .............................................................................. 5-10-30 .............................................................................. 5-20-20 .............................................................................. 6- 6- 6 ............................................................................... 6- 6-18 ............................................................................... 6-12-12 .............................................................................. 6-24-24 .............................................................................. 8- 8- 8 ............................................................................... 8-20- 5 ............................................................................... 8-32-16 .............................................................................. 9-23-30 .............................................................................. 10- 6- 4 ............................................................................... 10-10-10 ............................................................................. 10-20-10 ............................................................................. 10-20-20 ............................................................................. 10-34- 0 .............................................................................. 11-52- 0 .............................................................................. 13-13-13 ............................................................................. 15-15-15 ............................................................................. 16- 0-13 .............................................................................. 16- 4- 8 ............................................................................... 16- 6-12 .............................................................................. 16-16-16 ............................................................................. 16-20- 0 .............................................................................. 17-17-17 ............................................................................. 18-46- 0 (DAP) ................................................................... 19-19-19 ............................................................................. 24- 8- 0 ............................................................................... Ammonium Nitrate ............................................................. Anhydrous Ammonia .......................................................... Aqua Ammonia ................................................................... Limestone, Spread on field ................................................ Muriate of Potash, 60–62% K2O ....................................... Nitrate of Soda ................................................................... Nitrogen Solutions. 28% N ............................................................................ 30% N ............................................................................ 32% N ............................................................................ Sulfate of Ammonia ............................................................ Superphosphate, 44-46% P2O5 ........................................ Urea, 44-46% Nitrogen ...................................................... Farm Machinery: Baler, Pick-Up, Automatic Tie, P.T.O. Square Conventional, Under 200 Lb Bales ................... Round, 1200-1500 Lb Bale ............................................ Round, 1900-2200 Lb Bale ............................................ Chisel Plow, Maxiumum 1 Foot Depth of Tillage, Chisel or Sweep Type, Drawn or. Mounted, 16-20 Foot ...................................................... Combine, Self Propelled with Grain head Extra-large capacity ........................................................ Large capacity ................................................................ Corn Head for Combine 6 Row ............................................................................. 8 Row ............................................................................. Cotton Picker, Self Propelled, with sprindle, 4-Row ............................................................................ Cultivator, Row Crop 6-Row ............................................................................ 12-Row, Flexible ............................................................ Disk Harrow, Tandem, Drawn 7 15-17 Foot ..................................................................... 18-20 foot ...................................................................... See footnotes at end of table. Unit 1999 Dollars Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Ton Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each 195 192 200 178 151 170 184 193 197 209 164 231 159 248 235 215 151 171 200 213 252 277 193 215 131 228 163 264 244 212 264 216 156 181 211 97.30 18.10 168 265 122 128 133 171 255 176 15,400 17,700 22,800 12,300 163,000 142,000 22,600 29,500 207,000 5,670 13,300 12,700 17,300 2000 Dollars 183 182 189 168 149 164 177 182 195 214 159 221 160 237 225 202 160 171 191 207 243 259 194 216 176 216 173 268 240 212 240 213 176 194 227 98.30 18.90 165 260 125 131 137 167 233 200 16,100 17,300 23,800 13,400 176,000 146,000 23,400 30,400 206,000 5,860 13,400 13,500 17,400 2001 Dollars 189 184 192 173 150 170 184 188 215 213 173 221 173 232 228 208 157 179 199 217 260 260 210 230 185 237 203 284 246 230 244 234 205 260 399 119 19.10 170 274 204 189 221 192 236 280 16,300 17,600 23,000 13,000 181,000 152,000 24,500 32,100 222,000 6,040 13,800 13,700 18,000

IX–34

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-36.—Prices paid by farmers: April prices, by commodities, United States, 1999–2001 1—Continued
Commodity Unit 1999 Dollars Elevator, Portable, Without Power Unit, Auger Type, 8 Inch Diameter, 60 Foot .......................... Feed Grinder-Mixer, Trailer Mtd., P.T.O. ........................... Field Cultivator, Mounted or Drawn 17-19 Foot ...................................................................... 20-25 Foot, Flexible ........................................................ Forage Harvester, P.T.O., Shear Bar, With Pick-Up Attachment ............................................... With Row Crop Unit, 2-Row ........................................... Forage Harvester, Self-propelled, Shear Bar, With 4–6 row .................................................................. Front-End Loader, Hydraulic, Tractor Mounted 1800-2500 Lb. Capacity, 60 Inch Bucket ....................... Grain Drill, Most Common Spacing Plain, 15-17 Openers ..................................................... Press, 23-25 Openers .................................................... With Fertilizer Attachment, 20-24 Openers .................... Min/No-Till W/Fert. Attach., 15 Foot ............................... Hayrake, Side-Delivery, or Wheel Rake, Traction Drive, 8-12 Foot Working Width ....................... Hay Tedder, 15-18 Foot Manure Spreader, Conveyor Type, P.T.O., 2-Wheel, with Tires. 141-190 Bushel Capacity ............................................... 225-300 Bushel Capacity ............................................... Mower-Conditioner, P.T.O., Pull Type, with 8-10 Foot, Sickle (Cutter) Bar or Disc ............................ 14-16 Foot, Sickle (Cutter) Bar or Disc .......................... Mower, Mounted or Drawn, 7-8 ft Sickle (Cutter) Bar ................................................ 13-14 Foot, Sickle (Cutter) Bar or Disc .......................... Planter, Row Crop With Fertilizer Attachment, 4-Row .................................. With Fertilizer Attachment, 8-Row .................................. With Fertilizer Attachment, 24-Row ................................ 12-Row Conservation (No-Till Cond), w/Fert ................. Rotary Hoe, 20-25 Foot Rotary Cutter, 7-8 Foot Sprayer, Field Crop, Power, Boom Type (Excl. Self-Propelled and Orchard). Tractor Mounted, w/ 300 Gal. Spray Tank ..................... Trailer Type, w/ 500-700 Gal. Spray Tank ..................... Tractor, 2-Wheel Drive 30-39 P.T.O. horsepower ............................................... 50-59 P.T.O. horsepower ............................................... 70-89 P.T.O. horsepower ............................................... 110 - 129 P.T.O. horsepower ......................................... 140 - 159 P.T.O. horsepower ......................................... 190 - 220 P.T.O. horsepower ......................................... Tractor, 4-Wheel Drive 200 - 280 P.T.O. horsepower ......................................... Wagon, Gravity Unload, W/Box and Running Gear, and Tires, 200-400 Bushel Capacity Without Side Extensions ............................................. Wagon, Running Gear, W/O Box 8-10 Ton Capacity .......................................................... Windrower, Self-Propelled, 14-16 Foot ...................................................................... Agricultural Chemicals: 8 Fungicides: Basic Copper Sulfate, 53% WP ..................................... Benomyl (Benlate), 50% WP .......................................... Calcium Polysulfide (Lime Sulfur) Liq.Conc ................... Captan 50% WP ............................................................. Chlorothalonil (Bravo), 6#/Gal EC .................................. Copper Hydroxide (Kocide), 77% WP ............................ Dodine (Cyprex Syllit), 65% WP .................................... Fenarimol (Rubigan), 1#/Gal EC .................................... Ferbam (Carbamate), 76% WP ...................................... Fosethyl-AL (Aliette), 80% WP ....................................... Iprodione (Rovral), 50% WP .......................................... Mancozeb (Dithane 80% WP,Manzate 75% DF) ........... Maneb, 80% WP, 75% DF ............................................. Metalaxyl (Ridomil), 2#/Gal EC ...................................... Oxytetraycline (Mycoshield), 17% WP ........................... Sulfur, 95% WP .............................................................. Triforine (Funginex), 1.6#/Gal EC .................................. Triadimefon (Bayleton), 50% WP ................................... Ziram, 76% WP .............................................................. See footnotes at end of table. Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each Each 3,870 12,900 9,920 13,800 25,500 27,900 200,000 5,060 10,500 15,600 13,400 26,000 4,250 4,230 6,300 9,010 12,700 19,400 4,370 13,500 14,500 26,000 90,400 46,600 6,320 2,980 4,940 10,600 15,400 21,900 32,300 60,100 79,000 109,000 116,000 2000 Dollars 3,820 13,600 10,300 14,400 28,200 30,400 216,000 4,880 11,200 17,500 15,200 26,300 4,670 4,480 6,720 9,640 13,200 21,000 4,360 13,700 15,300 26,900 92,600 46,400 6,280 2,970 5,260 11,100 16,400 21,800 33,700 62,400 81,700 113,000 120,000 2001 Dollars 3,820 14,600 10,700 14,300 28,900 31,400 228,000 4,910 12,100 18,500 15,700 27,100 4,980 4,560 6,630 9,980 13,700 21,500 4,730 14,200 15,500 28,800 95,000 47,400 6,920 3,100 5,500 11,300 16,600 22,000 34,200 63,000 82,300 114,000 127,000

Each Each Each Lb Lb Gal Lb Gal Lb Lb Gal Lb Lb Lb Lb Lb Gal Lb Lb Gal Lb Lb

3,960 1,650 56,400 1.21 18.60 6.91 3.43 58.50 2.53 11.00 321 4.03 13.10 23.10 3.10 3.12 187 20.50 0.312 96.30 67.50 2.92

4,040 1,660 61,600 1.17 18.60 8.32 3.45 56.20 2.58 11.50 310 4.29 12.00 23.40 3.05 3.19 178 20.90 0.313 93.30 67.30 2.72

4,160 1,800 63,200 1.15 18.40 8.42 3.61 56.10 2.60 11.50 321 4.17 12.30 23.70 3.03 3.16 190 22.00 0.320 93.30 69.20 2.82

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–35

Table 9-36.—Prices paid by farmers: April prices, by commodities, United States, 1999–2001 1—Continued
Commodity Unit 1999 Dollars Fumigants: Methyl Bromide (Terr-o-gas 98) ..................................... Herbicides: 2,4-D, 4#/Gal EC ..................................................... Acetochlor (Harness, Surpass), ..................................... 6.4–7#/Gal EC ................................................................ Alachlor (Lasso), 4#/Gal EC ........................................... Atrazine( AAtrex), 4#/Gal L ............................................ Bentazon (Basagran), 4#/Gal EC ................................... Butylate (Sutan), 6.7#/Gal EC ........................................ Chlorimuron-ethyl (Classic), 25% DF ............................. Chlorsulfuron (Glean), 75% ............................................ Cyanazine (Bladex), 4#/Gal EC ..................................... DCPA (Dacthal), 75% WP .............................................. Dicamba (Banvel), 4#/Gal EC ........................................ Diuron (Karmex, Diurex), 80% WP ................................ EPTC (Eptan), 7E-(Eradicane),6.7#/Gal EC .................. Glyphosate (Roundup), 4#/Gal EC ................................ Linuron (Lorox, Linex), 50% DF ..................................... MCPA, 4#/Gal, EC ......................................................... Metolachlor (Dual), 8#/Gal EC ....................................... Metribuzin (Lexone or Sencor), 75% DF ....................... Paraquat (Gramoxone Extra), 2.5#/Gal EC ................... MSMA (Super Arsonade), 4-6# Gal EC ......................... Napropamide (Devrinol), 50% WP ................................. Pendimethalin (Prowl),3.3#/Gal EC ................................ Sethoxydim (Poast), 1.5#/Gal EC .................................. Simazine (Princep), 4#/Gal EC ...................................... Terbacil (Sinbar), 80% WP ............................................. Trifluralin (Treflan), 4#/Gal EC ....................................... Insecticides: Acephate (Orthene), 75% SP ......................................... Aldicarb (Temik), 15% G ................................................ Azinphos-methyl (Guthion), 50% WP ............................. Bt (Dipel 2X), WP ........................................................... Carbaryl, (Sevin), 80% S, SP or WP ............................. Carbofuran (Furadan), 15% G ....................................... Carbofuran (Furadan), 4F .............................................. Chlorpyrifos (Lorsban), 4#/Gal EC ................................. Cyfluthrin (Baythroid) 2#/Gal EC .................................... Cypermethrin,(Ammo 2.5-Cymbush 3#G)EC ................. Diazinon, 4#/Gal EC ....................................................... Dicofol (Kelthane), 35% WP ........................................... Dicrotophos (Bidrin), 8#/Gal EC ..................................... Dimethoate (Cygon), 2.67#/Gal EC ............................... Disulfoton (Di-Syston), 8#/Gal EC .................................. Endosulfon (Thiodan, Phaser), 3#/Gal EC ..................... Esfenvalerate (Asana XL),0.66#/Gal EC ........................ Ethion 4#/Gal EC ............................................................ Fonofos (Dyfonate II), 20% G ........................................ Imidacloprid (Admire, Provado),. 1.6–2#/Gal EC ......................................................... Malathion, 5#/Gal EC ..................................................... Methidathion (Supracide), 2#/Gal EC ............................ Methidathion (Supracide), 25% WP ............................... Methomyl (Lannate) L), 1.81 #/Gal Liq. ......................... Methyl Parathion, 4#/Gal EC .......................................... Oil, Superior Oil, Supreme, Volck .................................. Oxamyl (Vydate-L), 2# L ................................................ Oxydemeton-Methyl (Metasystox-R). 2#/Gal EC ................................................................... Oxythioquinox (Morestan), 25% WP .............................. Phorate (Thimet), 20% G ............................................... Phosmet (Imidan, Prolate), 50% WP ............................. Propargite (Comite, Omite), 30% WP ............................ Synthetic Pyrethroids,. (Pounce 2.0, Ambush 3.2 #/Gal) EC ...................... Terbufos (Counter), 15% G ............................................ Zeta–Cyermethrin (Fury), 1.5#/Gal EC .......................... Other: Gibberellic Acid,(Ry3Up,Pro-Gibb)4.0% L ..................... Nad Napthalene Acetamide, 8.4 WP ............................. Lb Gal Gal Gal Gal Gal Gal Oz Oz Gal Lb Gal Lb Gal Gal Lb Gal Gal Lb Gal Gal Lb Gal Gal Gal Lb Gal Lb Lb Lb Lb Lb Lb Gal Gal Gal Gal Gal Lb Gal Gal Gal Gal Gal Gal Lb Gal Gal Gal Lb Gal Gal Gal Gal Gal Lb Lb Lb Lb Gal Lb Gal Gal Lb 3.09 14.90 68.00 24.90 13.70 78.70 21.50 11.60 18.20 32.30 12.60 94.80 5.11 32.40 45.50 12.10 16.50 77.70 21.20 34.80 21.00 9.26 28.70 84.30 18.20 28.00 29.20 12.60 3.77 9.20 12.10 5.14 (2) 9 ...................... 51.00 515 258 35.70 10.40 88.80 35.10 82.00 37.30 136 36.10 2.13 567 25.10 57.80 ...................... 48.30 29.80 5.15 64.60 72.20 18.50 2.40 6.25 6.81 148 2.65 311 182 61.20 2000 Dollars 3.51 14.70 68.40 24.50 13.60 79.40 21.20 11.90 19.00 33.10 13.20 95.10 5.21 33.30 43.30 11.90 16.60 82.60 20.90 34.30 23.50 9.61 23.60 78.70 18.20 30.10 25.50 12.70 3.73 9.68 12.40 5.44 6 73.50 43.60 511 262 36.20 11.90 88.50 36.40 82.10 35.90 125 38.50 2.16 565 26.20 6 6.97 49.30 31.10 5.22 65.50 72.10 17.60 2.49 6.59 6.86 141 2.71 301 183 59.50 2001 Dollars 4.87 14.90 68.90 24.80 12.50 83.00 22.50 12.40 20.20 33.10 13.50 94.20 4.98 33.40 44.50 11.60 16.90 94.50 20.60 35.20 21.80 9.85 23.10 77.90 18.00 30.90 25.30 12.80 3.76 9.87 12.60 5.75 ...................... 74.80 42.40 493 255 35.90 12.20 89.70 35.50 84.80 35.90 123 35.10 2.15 565 27.40 ...................... 7.51 49.50 33.40 5.38 67.90 77.90 18.60 2.41 6.98 6.05 137 2.67 282 170 63.50

1 Prices paid by famers are collected, for the most part, from retail establishments located in smaller cities and towns in rural areas. Prior to 1995, recorded prices reflected a modified annual average based on frequency item was surveyed dur2 Excludes Federal, State, and local per ing the year. Recorded item values, 1995-99, are the U.S. April average price. 3 Excludes Federal excise tax. 4 Includes Federal, State, and local per gallon gallon taxes where applicable. 5 Excludes cost of application, except for limestone. 6 Discontinued in 2000. 7 With hydraulic lift, transport taxes. 8 Formulation abbreviations: EC–Emulsifiable Concentrate, DF–Dry Flowable, DG–Dry Granular, G– wheels, and tires. Granular, L–Liquid, S–Solution, SP–Soluble Powder, and WP–Wettable Powder. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.

IX–36

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-37.—Agricultural commodities: Support prices per unit, United States, 1992–2001 1 2
Commodity and unit 1992 Dollars Basic commodities: Corn: Target price ............................................ Loan rate ................................................ Cotton: American upland: 3 Target price ........................................ Loan rate ............................................ Extra-long staple: Target price ........................................ Loan rate ............................................ Peanuts: 4 Rice: Target price ............................................ Loan rate ................................................ Wheat: Target price ............................................ Loan rate ................................................ Tobacco: Flue-cured, types 11-14 ......................... Fire-cured, type 21 ................................ Fire-cured, types 22-23 ......................... Burley, type 31 ....................................... Dark air-cured, types 35-36 ................... Virginia sun-cured, type 37 .................... Cigar filler, Puerto Rican, type 46 ......... Ohio filler and Wisconsin binder,. types 42-44 and 53-55 .......................... Barley: 6 Target price ............................................ Loan rate ................................................ Sorghum grain: 6 Target price ............................................ Loan rate ................................................ Oats: 6 Target price ............................................ Loan rate ................................................ Rye: 6 Nonbasic commodities: Beans, dry edible Cottonseed ............................................. Minor oilseeds 7 ..................................... Soybeans ............................................... Sugar, raw ............................................. Milk for manufacturing ........................... Honey, extracted .................................... Mohair .................................................... Wool ....................................................... See footnotes at end of table. 1993 Dollars 1994 Dollars 1995 Dollars 1996 Dollars

Bushel ... do .......... Pound .... do .......... do .......... do .......... do .......... Cwt. ....... do .......... Bushel ... do .......... Pound .... do .......... do .......... do .......... do .......... do .......... do .......... do .......... Bushel ... do .......... Cwt. ....... do .......... Bushel ... do .......... do .......... Cwt. ....... Ton ........ Pound .... Bushel ... Pound .... Cwt. ....... Pound .... do .......... Pound ....

2.75 1.72 0.7290 0.5235 1.0580 0.8815 0.3375 10.71 6.50 4.00 2.21 1.560 1.367 1.421 1.649 1.217 1.208 (5) 1.054 2.36 1.40 4.66 2.91 1.45 0.88 1.46 (5) (5) 0.089 5.02 0.1800 10.10 0.538 4.613 1.97

2.75 1.72 0.7290 0.5235 1.0570 0.8812 0.3375 10.71 6.50 4.00 2.45 1.577 1.395 1.464 1.683 1.255 1.233 0.834 1.074 2.36 1.40 4.66 2.91 1.45 0.88 1.46 (5) (5) 0.089 5.02 0.1800 10.10 0.538 4.738 2.04

2.75 1.89 0.7290 0.5000 1.0200 0.8503 0.3392 10.71 6.50 4.00 2.58 1.583 1.407 1.483 1.714 1.273 1.245 0.844 1.084 2.36 1.54 4.66 3.21 1.45 0.97 1.61 (5) (5) 0.087 4.92 0.1800 10.10 0.500 4.739 2.09

2.75 1.89 0.7290 0.5192 0.9560 0.7965 0.3392 10.71 6.50 4.00 2.58 1.597 1.430 1.518 1.725 1.304 1.265 0.861 1.101 2.36 1.54 4.66 3.21 1.45 0.97 1.61 (5) (5) 0.087 4.92 0.1800 10.10 0.500 4.657 2.12

(8) 1.89 (8) 0.5192 (8) 0.7965 0.3050 (8) 6.50 (8) 2.58 1.601 1.455 1.557 1.737 1.339 1.288 (5) 1.120 (8) 1.55 (8) 3.23 (8) 1.03 (9) (5) (5) 0.0891 4.99 0.1800 (10)10.35 (11) (12) (12)

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–37

Table 9-37.—Agricultural commodities: Support prices per unit, United States, 1992–2001 1 2 —Continued
Commodity and unit 1997 Dollars Basic commodities: Corn: Target price ................................. Loan rate ..................................... Cotton: American upland: 3 Target price .......................... Loan rate .............................. Extra-long staple: Target price .......................... Loan rate .............................. Peanuts: 4 Rice: Target price ................................. Loan rate ..................................... Wheat: Target price ................................. Loan rate ..................................... Tobacco: Flue-cured, types 11-14 .............. Fire-cured, type 21 ...................... Fire-cured, types 22-23 ............... Burley, type 31 ............................ Dark air-cured, types 35-36 ........ Virginia sun-cured, type 37 ......... Cigar filler, Puerto Rican, type 46 Ohio filler and Wisconsin binder,. types 42-44 and 53-55 ................ Barley: 6 Target price ................................. Loan rate ..................................... Sorghum grain: 6 Target price ................................. Loan rate ..................................... Oats: 6 Target price ................................. Loan rate ..................................... Rye: 6 Nonbasic commodities: Beans, dry edible Cottonseed .................................. Minor oilseeds 7 .......................... Soybeans .................................... Sugar, raw ................................... Milk for manufacturing ................. Honey, extracted ......................... Mohair ......................................... Wool ............................................ 1998 Dollars 1999 Dollars 2000 Dollars 2001 Dollars

Bushel do Pound do do do do Cwt. do Bushel do Pound do do do do do do do Bushel do Cwt. do Bushel do do Cwt. Ton Pound Bushel Pound Cwt. Pound do Pound

(8) 1.89 (8) 0.5192 (8) 0.7965 0.3050 (8) 6.50 (8) 2.58 1.621 1.498 1.623 1.760 1.398 1.326 (5) 1.169 (8) 1.57 (8) 3.14 (8) 1.11 (9) (5) (5) 0.0930 5.26 0.1800 (13)10.20 (11) (12) (12)

(8) 1.89 (8) 0.5192 (8) 0.7965 0.3050 (8) 6.50 (8) 2.58 1.628 1.536 1.681 1.778 1.450 1.360 (5) 1.212 (8) 1.56 (8) 3.11 (8) 1.11 (9) (5) (5) 0.0930 5.26 0.1800 (14)10.05 (11) (12) (12)

(8) 1.89 (8) 0.5192 (8) 0.7965 0.3050 (8) 6.50 (8) 2.58 1.632 1.559 1.716 1.789 1.481 1.380 (5) 1.238 (8) 1.59 (8) 3.11 (8) 1.13 (9) (5) (5) 0.0930 5.26 0.1800 (15) 9.90 0.59 2.00 (12)

(8) 1.89 (8) 0.5192 (8) 0.7965 0.3050 (8) 6.50 (8) 2.58 1.640 1.559 1.716 1.805 1.481 1.380 (5) 1.238 (8) 1.62 (8) 3.05 (8) 1.16 (9) (5) (5) 0.0930 5.26 0.1800 (15) 9.90 0.59 2.00 (12)

(8) 1.89 (8) 0.5192 (8) 0.7965 0.3050 (8) 6.50 (8) 2.58 1.660 1.572 1.736 1.826 1.499 1.392 (5) 1.252 (8) 1.65 (8) 3.05 (8) 1.21 (9) (5) (5) 0.0930 5.26 0.1800 (15) 9.90 0.65 .................. (12)

1 National averages during the marketing years for the individual crops, beginning in the years shown. 2 The target price 3 11⁄16 strict low middling, micronaire 3.5 through 4.9. 4 For quota is known in the statute as the ‘‘established price‘‘. 5 No support program. 6 Grade No. 2 or better except for oats which is Grade No. 3. 7 Includes portion of crop. 8 The Federal Agriflaxseed, sunflower seed (oil and other), safflower, rapeseed (industrial), canola and mustard seed. culture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 replaced the deficiency payment/production adjustment programs for the program crops with a Production Flexibility Contract program, making target prices no longer applicable beginning with the 9 The rye price support program was terminated by the Federal Agriculture Improvement and 1996/97 marketing year. 10 As of January 1, 1996. 11 The honey price support program was terminated by the Federal AgReform Act of 1996. 12 The wool and mohair support programs terminated as of December 31, riculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996. 13 As of January 1, 1997. 14 As of January 1, 1998. 15 As of January 1, 1995, as required by Public Law 103-130. 1999. FSA, Economic Policy and Analysis Staff, (202) 720–3451.

IX–38

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-38.—Farm income: Cash receipts by commodity groups and selected commodities, United States, 1993–2000 1
Commodity 1993 1,000 dollars 178,217,974 90,544,545 39,486,978 10,948,470 533,276 19,261,516 10,415,826 96,435 3,779,430 2,509,672 3,504,449 1994 1,000 dollars 181,273,883 88,293,071 36,252,219 9,898,434 510,536 19,983,347 11,371,723 73,071 3,789,877 2,643,057 3,761,933 1995 1,000 dollars 188,048,906 87,217,115 34,044,036 10,254,866 566,100 19,879,611 11,762,222 60,218 3,892,912 2,769,397 3,978,241 1996 1,000 dollars 199,296,420 92,948,988 30,976,868 12,565,187 612,170 22,785,017 13,904,023 59,043 4,776,255 3,045,718 4,214,093

All commodities .................................................................. Livestock and products ...................................................... Cattle and calves ............................................................... Hogs ................................................................................... Sheep and lambs ............................................................... Dairy products .................................................................... Broilers ............................................................................... Farm chickens .................................................................... Chicken eggs ..................................................................... Turkeys .............................................................................. Miscellaneous livestock .....................................................

Commodity All commodities .................................................................. Livestock and products ...................................................... Cattle and calves ............................................................... Hogs ................................................................................... Sheep and lambs ............................................................... Dairy products .................................................................... Broilers ............................................................................... Farm chickens .................................................................... Chicken eggs ..................................................................... Turkeys .............................................................................. Miscellaneous livestock .....................................................

1997 207,634,392 96,475,258 35,999,622 13,053,680 625,495 20,940,261 14,158,926 71,219 4,539,929 2,814,997 4,259,433

1998 195,816,237 94,121,049 33,415,407 9,444,082 479,760 24,114,036 15,144,551 75,262 4,439,446 2,616,280 4,379,667

1999 188,131,608 95,547,103 36,529,976 8,621,759 462,579 23,207,093 15,128,840 72,712 4,287,164 2,754,114 4,470,722

2000 193,585,849 99,472,503 40,760,546 11,771,798 461,518 20,621,983 13,953,196 64,371 4,347,190 2,785,681 4,692,501

Commodity Crops .................................................................................. Food grains ........................................................................ Feed crops ......................................................................... Cotton ................................................................................. Tobacco ............................................................................. Oil crops ............................................................................. Vegetables ......................................................................... Fruits/nuts .......................................................................... All other crops ....................................................................

1993 87,673,429 8,306,161 20,198,980 5,281,684 2,948,542 13,218,618 13,667,397 10,307,956 13,734,091

1994 92,980,812 9,548,491 20,310,488 6,738,770 2,656,352 14,652,170 14,058,378 10,325,680 14,690,483

1995 100,831,791 10,356,077 24,516,001 6,852,715 2,548,399 15,492,956 14,984,318 11,075,008 15,006,308

1996 106,347,432 10,795,279 27,250,921 6,983,125 2,794,668 16,344,700 14,457,168 11,903,599 15,817,972

Commodity Crops .................................................................................. Food grains ........................................................................ Feed crops ......................................................................... Cotton ................................................................................. Tobacco ............................................................................. Oil crops ............................................................................. Vegetables ......................................................................... Fruits/nuts .......................................................................... All other crops ....................................................................

1997 111,159,134 10,410,552 27,103,413 6,345,803 2,873,917 19,742,457 14,668,531 13,144,091 16,870,370

1998 101,695,188 8,822,407 22,655,376 6,072,960 2,802,755 17,376,877 15,160,059 11,648,969 17,155,785

1999 92,584,505 6,965,280 19,622,069 4,698,423 2,272,785 13,608,244 15,236,395 12,287,014 17,894,295

2000 94,113,346 6,639,158 19,959,901 4,554,630 2,314,528 13,857,399 15,889,310 12,692,394 18,206,026

1 USDA estimates and publishes individual cash receipt values only for major commodities and major producing States. The U.S. receipts for individual commodities, computed as the sum of the reported States, may understate the value of sales for some commodities, with the balance included in the appropriate category labeled ‘‘other‘‘ or ‘‘miscellaneous.‘‘ The degree of underestimation in some of the minor commodities can be substantial. ERS, Farm Structure, Performance, and Well being Branch, (202) 694–5592. E-mail contact is rogers@ERS.USDA.gov.

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002 Table 9-39.—Farm income, United States, 1993–2000 1
Item 1993 Thousand dollars 205,048,156 191,646,141 82,558,679 92,059,251 17,028,211 13,402,015 160,360,064 44,688,093 200,577,493 141,187,393 59,390,100 1994 Thousand dollars 216,047,272 208,168,143 100,296,974 89,809,757 18,061,412 7,879,129 167,190,751 48,865,521 198,189,523 147,462,128 50,727,395 1995 Thousand dollars 210,763,773 203.484,322 95,711,901 87,822,434 19,949,987 7,279,451 173,818,816 36,944,956 205,868,805 153,318,917 52,549,889

IX–39

1996 Thousand dollars 235,764,002 228,424,433 115,505,509 92,135,530 20,783,394 7,339,570 180,970,473 54,793,530 217,653,504 159,934,677 57,718,826

Total gross farm income .................................................... Value of Production 2 ........................................... Crops ..................................................... Livestock and products ......................... Services and forestry ............................ Direct government payments .............................. Total production expenses ................................................. Net farm income ................................................................ Gross cash income ............................................................ Cash expenses .................................................................. Net cash income ................................................................

Item Total gross farm income .................................................... Value of production 2 ........................................... Crops ..................................................... Livestock and product ........................... Services and forestry ............................ Direct government payments .............................. Total production expenses ................................................. Net farm income ................................................................ Gross cash income ............................................................ Cash expenses .................................................................. Net cash income ................................................................

1997 238,508,145 231,012,851 112,295,921 96,482,856 22,234,074 7,495,294 190,026,707 48,481,438 227,253,111 168,714,523 58,538,587

1998 231,834,588 219,454,572 101,537,876 94,202,084 23,714,612 12,380,016 188,977,224 42,857,364 222,145,011 167,378,777 54,766,234

1999 235.300,528 213,787,409 93,161,355 95,206,083 25,365,971 21,523,119 190,986,379 44,314,149 224,604,431 168,913,641 55,690,790

2000 241,532,892 218,636,459 95,305,882 99,285,836 24,044,741 22,896,433 195,089,247 46,443,645 230,115,523 172,618,807 57,496,716

1 Component values and additional details may be found in the value-added and cash income tables on the internet at http://www.ers.usda.gov/data/farmincome/finfidmu.htm. 2 Includes cash receipts, value of change in inventories, and home consumption in the value-added table. Value of production is synonymous with final output. ERS, Farm Structure, Performance, and Well being Branch, (202) 694–5592. E-mail contact is rogers@ERS.USDA.gov

Table 9-40.—Expenses: Farm production expenses, United States, 1993–2000
Item 1993 Thousand dollars 160,360,064 21,434,339 14,741,954 5,163,032 8,396,281 6,719,652 5,350,631 2,676,771 34,815,759 10,663,620 15,008,840 10,929,765 18,291,105 6,168,315 1994 Thousand dollars 167,190,751 22,635,018 13,304,604 5,372,789 9,177,120 7,219,623 5,312,504 2,682,739 37,773,985 11,555,708 15,310,370 11,765,291 18,605,561 6,475,439 1995 Thousand dollars 173,818,816 23,831,792 12,505,851 5,462,110 10,029,109 7,718,667 5,426,405 2,969,776 40,213,495 12,576,470 16,293,790 10,914,217 19,165,709 6,711,426 1996 Thousand dollars 180,970,473 25,236,518 11,293,747 6,211,914 10,928,918 8,518,367 5,978,952 3,163,860 40,171,057 12,961,117 17,331,338 12,971,368 19,387,396 6,815,921

Total production expenses ................................................. Feed purchased .......................................................... Livestock and poultry purchased ................................ Seed purchased .......................................................... Fertilizer and lime ....................................................... Pesticides .................................................................... Fuel and oil ................................................................. Electricity ..................................................................... Other 1 ......................................................................... Interest ........................................................................ Contract and hired labor expenses ............................ Net rent to nonoperator landlords 2 ............................ Capital consumption ................................................... Property taxes .............................................................

Item Total production expenses ................................................. Feed purchased .......................................................... Livestock and poultry purchased ................................ Seed purchased .......................................................... Fertilizer and lime ....................................................... Pesticides .................................................................... Fuel and oil ................................................................. Electricity ..................................................................... Other 1 ........................................................................ Interest ........................................................................ Contract and hired labor expenses ............................ Net rent to nonoperator landlords 2 ............................ Capital consumption ................................................... Property taxes .............................................................

1997 190,026,707 26,334,299 13,820,317 6,711,329 10,927,288 9,017,509 6,242,613 3,043,921 42,815,440 13,132,569 18,552,450 12,854,924 19,600,192 6,973,856

1998 188,977,224 25,031,177 12,576,095 7,211,706 10,624,242 9,017,812 5,600,046 2,908,384 43,712,156 13,365,025 19,271,601 12,654,861 19,956,895 7,047,223

1999 190,986,379 24,525,989 13,849,887 7,211,978 9,921,381 8,618,167 5,589,019 2,986,750 44,873,558 13,584,609 19,962,143 12,757,072 20,263,656 6,842,169

2000 195,089,247 24,525,179 15,826,297 7,312,237 10,021,093 8,518,183 7,186,684 2,999,827 43,796,251 14,132,307 20,023,514 13,236,483 20,568,452 6,942,739

1 Includes repair and maintenance, machine hire and customwork, marketing, storage and transportation, and miscella2 Includes landlord capital consumption. neous expenses. ERS, Farm Structure, Performance, and Well being Branch, (202) 694–5592. E-mail contact is rogers@ERS.USDA.gov

IX–40

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-41.—Farm marketings: Cash receipts, government payments, and principal commodities, by States, 2000
Cash receipts State Total 1,000 dollars 51,933 3,272,295 4,887,463 2,289,754 25,509,829 4,561,322 502,521 741,179 6,951,096 5,049,552 530,183 10,774,252 3,389,246 7,022,330 4,580,756 7,905,407 3,605,477 1,819,807 391,875 1,472,742 503,594 3,474,924 7,522,018 4,566,967 2,922,459 1,806,371 7,409,676 2,689,343 8,951,881 154,371 812,247 2,086,411 386,462 3,122,868 4,404,604 4,219,858 3,049,277 4,033,373 47,976 1,544,226 3,790,061 2,019,679 13,343,556 1,010,202 2,281,203 507,903 5,049,735 5,220,527 390,704 954,360 193,585,849 Crops 1,000 dollars 20,226 588,446 1,639,079 1,226,432 19,240,740 1,228,871 337,056 183,801 5,573,093 1,944,550 443,543 5,027,118 1,761,120 5,312,484 2,886,234 2,417,203 1,270,606 1,166,533 300,964 624,878 241,811 2,139,628 3,647,249 1,890,453 885,835 704,315 3,134,768 2,049,942 3,029,152 94,216 619,146 473,304 149,250 1,188,575 2,653,890 779,193 2,222,981 1,252,000 40,296 752,342 1,755,116 1,029,880 4,181,401 240,004 732,331 66,759 3,339,415 1,416,149 51,321 159,649 94,113,346 Livestock and roducts 1,000 dollars 31,707 2,683,849 3,248,384 1,063,322 6,269,089 3,332,451 165,465 557,378 1,378,003 3,105,002 86,640 5,747,134 1,628,126 1,709,846 1,694,522 5,488,204 2,334,871 653,274 90,911 847,864 261,783 1,335,296 3,874,769 2,676,514 2,036,624 1,102,056 4,274,908 639,401 5,922,729 60,155 193,101 1,613,107 237,212 1,934,293 1,750,714 3,440,665 826,296 2,781,373 7,680 791,884 2,034,945 989,799 9,162,155 770,198 1,548,872 441,144 1,710,320 3,804,378 339,383 794,711 99,472,503 Government payments Rank

AK ...... AL ...... AR ...... AZ ...... CA ...... CO ..... CT ...... DE ...... FL ....... GA ...... HI ....... IA ....... ID ....... IL ........ IN ....... KS ...... KY ...... LA ...... MA ..... MD ..... ME ..... MI ....... MN ..... MO ..... MS ..... MT ...... NC ...... ND ...... NE ...... NH ...... NJ ...... NM ..... NV ...... NY ...... OH ..... OK ...... OR ..... PA ...... RI ....... SC ...... SD ...... TN ...... TX UT VA VT ...... ...... ...... ......

1,000 dollars 1,672 170,852 900,648 107,066 667,466 351,116 18,143 25,028 56,741 380,057 11,927 2,302,094 261,297 1,943,916 938,464 1,231,923 448,473 451,831 10,973 88,470 13,851 381,056 1,502,230 869,390 463,901 490,002 447,096 1,170,234 1,406,971 4,768 22,481 79,495 3,918 159,876 678,104 439,851 137,401 147,848 1,218 144,499 789,895 298,873 1,647,066 36,181 152,452 26,093 352,503 603,213 23,509 34,302 22,896,433

WA ..... WI ...... WV ..... WY ..... US ......

49-Greenhouse, dairy, hay, potatoes(39%). 24-Broilers, cattle/calves, chicken eggs, greenhouse(83%). 13-Broilers, rice, cattle /calves, soybeans(68%). 29-Cattle/calves, dairy, cotton, hay (55%). 1-Dairy, grapes, greenhouse, lettuce (42%). 16-Cattle/calves, corn, hogs, dairy (74%). 44-Greenhouse, dairy, chicken eggs, aquaculture (60%). 40-Broilers, soybeans, corn, greenhouse(81%). 9-Greenhouse, oranges, tomatoes, sugar cane, (56%). 12-Broilers, cotton, chicken eggs, peanuts (63%). 41-Pineapples, greenhouse, sugar cane, macadamia nuts(56%). 3-Hogs, corn, soybeans, cattle/calves(90%). 23-Dairy, cattle/calves, potatoes, wheat(70%). 8-Corn, soybeans, hogs, cattle/calves(87%). 14-Corn, soybeans, hogs, dairy(73%). 5-Cattle/calves, wheat, corn, sorghum grain(87%). 21-Horses/mules, tobacco, cattle/calves, broilers(72%). 33-Sugar cane, cotton, cattle/calves, rice(51%). 45-Greenhouse, dairy, cranberries, apples(62%). 36-Broilers, greenhouse, dairy, soybeans (68%). 43-Potatoes, dairy, aquaculture, chicken eggs (66%). 22-Dairy, greenhouse, soybeans, corn(55%). 6-Soybeans, hogs, corn, dairy (64%). 15-Cattle/calves, soybeans, hogs, corn (64%). 27-Broilers, cotton, aquaculture, cattle/calves(73%). 34-Cattle/calves, wheat, barley, hay(85%). 7-Hogs, broilers, greenhouse, tobacco (66%). 28-Wheat, cattle/calves, soybeans, sugar beets (61%). 4-Cattle/calves, corn, soybeans, hogs(91%). 48-Greenhouse, dairy, cattle/calves, apples(76%). 39-Greenhouse, horses/mules, blueberries, dairy (60%). 31-Cattle/calves, dairy, hay, greenhouse (85%). 47-Cattle/calves, hay, dairy, onions (82%). 25-Dairy, greenhouse, cattle/calves, apples (69%). 17-Soybeans, corn, dairy, greenhouse(61%). 18-Cattle/calves, hogs, broilers, wheat(82%). 26-Greenhouse, cattle/calves, dairy, hay (49%). 19-Dairy, cattle/calves, greenhouse, chicken eggs(62%). 50-Greenhouse, dairy, sweet corn, potatoes(78%). 35-Broilers, greenhouse, tobacco, turkeys(58%). 20-Cattle/calves, soybeans, corn, wheat(77%). 32-Cattle/calves, broilers, greenhouse, tobacco(52%). 2-Cattle/calves, greenhouse, cotton, broilers(74%). 37-Cattle/calves, dairy, hogs, hay(72%). 30-Broilers, cattle/calves, dairy, turkeys (56%). 42-Dairy, cattle/calves, greenhouse, maple products(91%). 11-Apples, cattle/calves, dairy, potatoes (54%). 10-Dairy, cattle/calves, corn, soybeans (79%). 46-Broilers, cattle/calves, turkeys, dairy (75%). 38-Cattle/calves, sugar beets, hay, hogs (87%). Cattle/calves, dairy, corn, broilers (47%).

ERS, Farm Sector, Performance, and Well-being Branch, (202) 694–5592. E-mail contact is rogers@ERS.USDA.gov

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 2002

IX–41

Table 9-42.—Average Income to Farm Operator Households, United States, 1997–2000 1
Item 1997 1998 1999 2000 2

Dollars per farm Net cash farm business income 3 .................................................. Less depreciation 4 ......................................................................... Less wages paid to operator 5 ....................................................... Less farmland rental income 6 ....................................................... Less adjusted farm business income due to other household(s) 7 12,676 6,578 513 568 *1,505 14,357 7,409 637 543 1,332 13,194 7,027 499 802 1,262 11,175 7,357 608 757 801

Dollars per farm operator household Equals adjusted farm business income ......................................... Plus wages paid to operator .......................................................... Plus net income from farmland rental 8 ......................................... Equals farm self-employment income ............................................ Plus other farm-related earnings 9 ................................................. Equals earnings of the operator household from farming activities .............................................................................................. Plus earnings of the operator household from off-farm sources 10 Equals average farm operator household income comparable to U.S. average household income, as measured by the CPS ..... 3,513 513 945 4,971 1,234 6205 46,358 52,562 4,436 637 868 5,941 1,165 7,106 52,628 59,734 3,603 499 1,312 5,415 944 6,359 57,988 64,347 *1,652 608 NA *2,260 339 2,598 58,709 61,307

Dollars per U.S. household U.S. average household income 11 ................................................ 49,692 51,855 Percent Average farm operator household income as percent of U.S. average household income ............................................................ Average operator household earnings from farming activities as percent of average operator household income ........................ NA NA

105.8 11.8

115.2 11.9

NA 10

NA 4.2

1 Farm operator household income is de* The relative standard exceeds 25 percent, but is no more than 50 percent. fined to be consistent with definitions used in the Current Population Survey (CPS). The CPS, conducted by the Census Bureau, is the source of official U.S. household income statistics. The CPS defines income to include any income received as cash. In-kind receipts are excluded. The CPS definition departs from a strictly cash concept by including depreciation in the list of operating expenses that farm operators and other self-employed people subtract from gross receipts when they report 2 Resulting from a change in the survey design, net cash income from operating another farm or net money income. ranch and net income from farmland rental are not available for all versions of Agricultural Resource Management Study in 2000. Further, net cash income from operating another farm or ranch and net farm income from farmland rental are not separate from total off-farm income. Therefore, farm self-employment income, other farm related earnings, earnings of the operator household from farming activities, and earnings of the operator household from off-farm sources are not strictly com3 A component of farm sector income. Excludes income of contractors and landparable to those from previous years. lords as well as the income of farms organized as non-family corporations or cooperatives and farms run by a hired manager. Includes the income of farms organized as proprietorships, partnerships, and family corporations, which are all closely 4 Consistent with the CPS definition of self-employment income, reported depreciation expenses are held by households. 5 Wages subtracted from net cash farm income. The ARMS collects farm business depreciation used for tax purposes. paid to the operator are subtracted here because they are not shared among other households that have claims on farm business income. These wages are added to the operator household‘s adjusted farm business income to obtain farm self6 Gross rental income is subtracted here because net rental income from the farm operation is employment income. 7 More than one household per farm may have a claim on the income added below to income received by the household. 8 Includes of a farm business. The national average is 1.1 households per farm sharing the income of a farm business. net rental income from the farm business. Also includes net rental income from farmland held by household members that is 9 Includes wages not part of the farm business. In 2000, net rental income was collected as a part of off-farm income. paid to other operator household members by the farm business and net cash income from a farm business other than the one being surveyed. In 2000, net cash income from operating another farm or ranch was collected as a part of off-farm in10 Income from wages, salaries, nonfarm businesses, interest, dividends, transfer payments, net rental income come. from nonfarm properties, etc. In 2000, also includes net cash income from a farm business other than the one being sur11 From the Current Population Survey. NA-not available. veyed and net rental income from farmland. ERS, Farm Structure and Performance Branch, (202) 694-5568. Sources: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1997-2000 Agricultural Resource Management Study (ARMS) for farm operator household data. U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Current Population Survey (CPS), for U.S. average household income.

IX–42

FARM RESOURCES, INCOME, AND EXPENSES

Table 9-43.—Grazing fees: Rates for cattle by selected States and regions, 1999–2001
Monthly lease rates for private non-irrigated grazing land 1 State 1999 Dollars per month 7.40 12.10 12.00 11.10 11.50 13.20 19.00 9.00 8.80 10.30 8.00 11.10 14.70 8.00 10.00 10.00 11.70 11.10 12.30 11.40 11.00 Animal unit 2 2000 Dollars per month 7.20 12.30 11.80 10.90 12.00 14.10 20.00 9.50 9.00 10.90 7.00 10.70 15.50 8.50 10.80 8.90 12.20 11.50 12.60 11.60 11.40 2001 Dollars per month 7.00 13.00 11.90 11.50 12.50 14.90 20.60 10.00 10.20 10.30 8.00 12.10 15.70 8.50 11.00 9.10 12.90 11.90 13.10 12.30 11.70 1999 Dollars per month 9.75 15.00 14.20 13.00 13.00 15.00 23.00 11.50 10.10 11.10 9.00 12.30 17.20 8.75 12.10 11.30 13.50 12.80 14.30 13.30 12.60 Cow-calf 2000 Dollars per month 10.00 15.50 14.40 13.00 14.00 15.60 24.00 11.50 11.50 12.50 8.50 12.90 17.60 10.50 13.10 11.20 14.10 13.70 14.90 13.80 13.60 2001 Dollars per month 9.75 16.00 14.20 13.40 15.50 16.70 24.60 13.00 12.50 12.20 9.00 12.80 18.30 9.50 14.00 11.80 15.00 13.90 15.50 14.50 13.70 1999 Dollars per month 8.00 12.50 10.90 11.80 11.50 14.00 19.70 10.00 10.00 10.70 7.50 11.60 14.90 8.50 11.10 11.20 12.00 11.50 12.60 11.90 11.20 Per head 2000 Dollars per month 7.40 12.70 12.20 11.50 12.00 14.70 21.00 10.50 9.40 12.50 7.00 10.00 16.40 8.50 11.30 9.90 12.60 11.90 13.10 12.00 11.80 2001 Dollars per month 7.20 13.50 12.30 12.00 12.50 16.00 21.50 10.70 10.50 12.50 7.50 9.50 17.20 9.00 11.50 10.20 13.10 12.40 13.70 12.60 12.30

AZ ............ CA ............ CO ........... ID ............. KS ............ MT ........... NE ............ NV ............ NM ........... ND ........... OK ........... OR ........... SD ............ TX ............ UT ............ WA ........... WY ........... 17-State 3 16-State 4 11-State 5 9-State 6 ..

1 The average rates are estimates (rates over $10.00 are rounded to the nearest dime) based on survey indications of 2 Includes animal unit monthly lease rates for private, non-irrigated grazing land from the January Agricultural Survey. 3 Seventeen Western plus cow-calf rates. Cow-calf rate converted to animal unit (AUM) using (1 aum=cow-calf *0.833). 4 Sixteen Western States: All States, except Texas. 5 Eleven Western States: AZ, CA, CO, States: All States listed. 6 Nine Great Plains States: CO, KS, NE, NM, ND, OK, SD, TX, WY. ID, MT, NV, NM, OR, UT, WA, WY. NASS, Environmental, Economics, and Demographics Branch, (202) 720–6146.


				
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