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					      Biology Department
Missouri Western State University

         Annual Report
           2007-2008


 Year One of the Five Year Plan
          2007-2012


     Submitted July 1, 2008
                            Academic Year 2007-2008
              ENGLISH, FOREIGN LANGUAGES & JOURNALISM
                                 DEPARTMENT
             Number of Faculty, Majors, Intended Majors, & Graduates
Discipline       FTE Faculty FT/PT         # of Majors       # of Intended/     # of Graduates
                                                                Premajors
Biology          11/0.5                    177               116                26
PTA              2/0                       38                N/A                19


                          # of Students Involved in Applied Learning

  Independent Projects       Internships      Performances/       Conference Presentations
                                                Exhibitions
  30                         14               N/A                 36

                                      Community Service

Discipline         # of Faculty     Mean # of Fac.       # of Groups    # Student        # Hours
                      Doing           Volunteer             Served         Service          Student
                      Service         Hrs. Per                             Projects         Service
                                      Month
Biology            Data not
                     available
PTA
           2007 BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT STRATEGIC PLAN
  Aligned with the 2007-2012 Strategic Plan for Missouri Western State University

BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Missouri Western State University Biology Department is to provide a
collaborative learning environment in which students and faculty can apply their
biological exploration and discovery experiences as professionals and informed citizens.

INTRODUCTION

The Biology Department at Missouri Western State University is committed to the
preparation of tomorrow‟s biologists and science literate citizens. We are a vibrant
community of scholars engaged in the discovery and dissemination of knowledge with
increasing relevance to our modern society. We plan to continue to educate biology
majors as broadly trained scientists, with a curriculum that includes molecular, cellular,
organismal, and ecological courses, as well as physics, mathematics, and chemistry
through biochemistry. Nonmajors taking biology will learn its relevance to their own lives
and to society through interactive lectures and laboratories that encourage them to explore
how biology contributes to scientific discovery. We will continue to offer laboratory
sections with most of our majors and general studies courses and staff them with full time
faculty whenever possible. We have a well-considered and deliberate focus on
undergraduate education that has resulted in tangible outcomes in terms of the success of
our students, faculty, and alumni. Our Department is composed of faculty who are
prepared to excel in undergraduate teaching and research and who believe that graduate
programs, at least at this time, would detract from their ability to maintain and improve
excellent undergraduate programs. The exception to this may be a graduate program that
would provide area high school biology teachers with opportunities for advancement. Our
Department has a strong history of undergraduate students conducting research that they
have presented at state, regional, national, and international forums, and published in peer-
reviewed journals. It also has a strong record of providing students with valuable
internship opportunities. We plan to build upon this success by improving access to
undergraduate research and internships. We believe in the teacher-scholar model of
professorship, and are committed to the pursuit of peer-reviewed scholarly achievement
such as publications and external grants that are associated with teaching, undergraduate
research, and service. We are proud of our ongoing contributions to the important role that
Missouri Western State University plays on behalf of its students and the broader
community.

STRATEGIC PLAN OPPORTUNITY 1: BUILDING GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Strategic Plan Goal 1.0: Develop and promote excellent graduate programs aligned with
the University mission of applied learning, applied research, and professional service in the
community and region.
Strategic Plan Objective 1.2: Establish graduate programs that meet regional and
economic needs for advanced education and fit within the mission of the University.

Biology Objective: Continue to explore the possibility of a BS/MS in Science Education
degree program that emphasizes applied learning and is distinctive from other state
programs.

Biology Action: Engage in discussion within the Department about the new program.

Biology Action: Collect data regarding the need for the new program and about similar
existing programs.


STRATEGIC PLAN OPPORTUNITY 2: ENHANCING ACADEMIC QUALITY

Strategic Plan Goal 1.0: Become a national center of excellence in applied learning and a
national model for the new American regional university.

Strategic Plan Objective 1.3: Conduct nationally-recognized faculty and student applied
research and creative activity.

Biology Objective: Provide Biology students with increased opportunities for quality
undergraduate research.

Biology Action: Support existing faculty and hire new faculty who have a commitment to
undergraduate research.

Biology Action: Continue to participate in the Summer Research Institute and support its
development.

Biology Action: Discuss ways to incorporate undergraduate research as a course in either
summer or the AY so that students can earn credit and faculty can be given workload.

Biology Action: Explore and promote ways to institutionalize undergraduate research in
the Biology Department and campus-wide (for eg. the Program of Research, Teaching and
Applied Learning, or PORTAL).

Strategic Plan Goal 2.0: Provide a learning environment that encourages substantial
academic achievement, connects knowledge and practice, and promotes regional service.

Strategic Plan Objective 2.1: Develop and implement teaching and learning strategies
that emphasize critical thinking skills, including questioning, interpreting, analyzing,
synthesizing, and creative problem solving.

Biology Objective: Improve the quality of experience for students taking nonmajors
Biology.
Biology Action: Incorporate a Learning Cycle approach and investigative experimentation
into BIO101 laboratories.

Biology Action: Discuss the possibility of teaching biology to nonmajors with additional
or alternative approaches to the BIO 101 offering (make certain sections geared for a
particular interest group or look into offering web based courses)

Biology Objective: Find ways to formalize Critical Thinking education in the Biology
curriculum.

Biology Action: Discuss the use of COL151 and Learning Communities or linked courses
as ways to incorporate Critical Thinking into the curriculum.

Strategic Plan Objective 2.5: Provide opportunities for participation in integrated applied
learning experiences, including internships, practica, faculty and student research, service
learning, and study away.

Biology Objective: Support students that wish to engage in internships as part of their
curriculum or in addition to it.

Biology Action: Expand internship opportunities with local businesses and agencies.

Biology Action: Maintain relationships with agencies that provide internships for Wildlife
and Conservation Management majors.

Strategic Plan Goal 4.0: Support and recognize faculty excellence in teaching and
learning; scholarship, applied research, and creative activity; and service to the region.

Strategic Plan Objective 4.1: Strengthen support for faculty research and creative
activities.

Biology Objective: Increase the number of faculty that present their teaching, research,
and service projects at state, regional and national meetings.

Biology Action: Establish a Biology Department Faculty Speakers bureau that faculty can
use to cover classes while they present at meetings.

Biology Action: Discuss the importance of faculty presentations in Department meetings.

Biology Action: Encourage student organizations to invite Department faculty to give
presentations.

Biology Objective: Increase the number of faculty members that publish their research,
service and teaching projects in peer reviewed journals.
Biology Action: Encourage faculty to find ways to publish work in all three areas of
professional development.

Biology Action: Compile a list of the journals that faculty members in the Department
have published in as well as those that represent new opportunities and share with the
Department.

Biology Objective: Host professional development opportunities by inviting speakers and
demonstrations for both faculty and students.

Biology Action: Work with student organizations and use faculty contacts to bring
speakers to campus.

Biology Action: Discuss the establishment of a seminar course for student, faculty, and
outside speaker research presentations.

Biology Objective: Find more time for faculty to engage in professional development.

Biology Action: Develop and promote programs that provide faculty with time during
summers to engage in scholarly pursuits (eg. PORTAL).

Biology Action: Develop an undergraduate research course that will provide faculty with
time to pursue research with students.

Strategic Plan Objective 4.2: Promote faculty professional and voluntary service in the
region beyond the campus.

Biology Objective: Encourage faculty to take sabbaticals that will allow professional
development and growth.

Biology Action: Engage in planning discussions about how sabbaticals can be paired so
that a single replacement could be used.

Biology Action: Dialogue about ideas for sabbaticals within the Department and with
others who have experience with sabbaticals.


STRATEGIC PLAN OPPORTUNITY 3: SUSTAINING INSTITUTIONAL
ACCREDITATION

Strategic Plan Goal 1.0: Market Western as a prototype of the new American regional
university, characterized by applied learning and applied research and service.

Strategic Plan Objective 1.1: Increase awareness of Western‟s status as a university that
is building graduate programs and is emphasizing a statewide mission in applied learning
and applied research to external and internal audiences.
Biology Objective: Improve awareness of the research activities of Biology Department
faculty and students among prospective students and Biology majors.

Biology Action: Hang student and faculty research posters in hallways in the existing and
the new building.

Biology Action: Establish a faculty research seminar series, with the help of student
organizations.

Strategic Plan Objective 1.5: Increase the awareness of student outcomes, faculty, and
staff achievements, and programs both on campus and beyond campus.

Biology Objective: Establish a Biology Department newsletter.

Biology Action: Appoint a faculty newsletter editor and solicit broad contributions from
Department faculty.

Biology Action: Publish the inaugural newsletter issue in Spring 2007 and distribute to the
University community, alumni, and prospective students.

Biology Action: Publish one issue of the newsletter per year.

Biology Objective: Augment the Department website with a system that will allow
collection of Biology “points of pride.”

Biology Action: Enlist students in courses taught by Deborah Becker and Connie Hecker
to develop Gold Points, an online database that will collect data on activities and
accomplishments by faculty, students, and alumni and serve up the data on the web.

Biology Action: By spring 2008, implement the new Gold Points system developed as an
applied learning project.

Biology Action: Promote the use of the Gold Points system to other departments.

Biology Objective: Improve communication with alumni of the Department.

Biology Action: Continue the Biology Open House on homecoming Saturday and
encourage broader faculty involvement.

Biology Action: Bring alumni back as speakers.

Biology Action: Send the Biology newsletter to alumni.

Biology Action: Invite alumni to use the Gold Points system.
Strategic Plan Goal 2.0: Strengthen the University-wide initiative to attract, engage, and
graduate a diverse student body.

Strategic Plan Objective 2.2: Increase the enrollment, retention, and graduation outcomes
of targeted groups of students.

Biology Objective: Recruit qualified students to Biology Department programs.

Biology Action: Work with Admissions to recruit students.

Biology Action: Establish a targeted recruitment program in which students are invited to
the Department for a discussion and tour with specific faculty members.

Biology Objective: Provide lecture and laboratory courses for Biology majors that
prepare them for work or further study.

Biology Action: Address the structure of the sophomore core curriculum for Biology
majors.
Meet early and often during AY 07/08 as a Department to discuss the current sophomore
core for Biology and develop alternatives.

Biology Action: Incorporate ideas for curriculum changes into curriculum proposals.

Strategic Plan Goal 3.0: Provide all graduates with an experience in applied learning.

Strategic Plan Objective 3.2: Assess and continuously improve the effectiveness and
quality of applied learning experiences.

Biology Objective: Develop quantitative skills in Biology majors.

Biology Action: Continue the quantitative skills interventions in freshman majors courses.

Biology Action: Continue the quantitative skills assessment survey.

Biology Objective: Expand the number of applied learning opportunities for Biology
majors.

Biology Action: Discuss how capacity for independent research can be expanded.

Biology Action: Discuss the development of a lower division Introduction to Biological
Research course.

Biology Action: Discuss the development of an upper division Biological Research
course.
STRATEGIC PLAN OPPORTUNITY 4: BUILDING CONNECTIONS

Strategic Plan Goal 1.0: Engage Western actively in the educational development of the
region.

Strategic Plan Objective 1.2: Increase applied learning, applied research and service
opportunities by partnering with business, industry, education, healthcare, and community
leaders.

Biology Objective: Understand better the ways the department can keep up with
educational needs that fit with area life science industry needs.

Biology Action: Have periodic meetings with area industry personnel to discuss their
needs.

Biology Action: Dialog with alumni who work in area industry about how their education
prepared them for work.

Strategic Plan Goal 3.0: Engage Western extensively in the cultural development of the
region.

Strategic Plan Objective 3.4: Work with regional cultural groups to create jobs,
internships, and volunteer opportunities.

Biology Objective: Support Biology Department student organizations.

Biology Action: Explore opportunities for student organizations to gain access to SGA
funding for travel to conferences.

Biology Action: Encourage student groups to work together to sponsor programs that
serve regional needs.


STRATEGIC PLAN OPPORTUNITY 5: USING MEASUREMENT AND
ASSESSMENT

Strategic Plan Goal 2.0: Create and implement a comprehensive University assessment
plan focused on student learning and mission effectiveness.

Strategic Plan 2.2: Show evidence of data-informed decision-making and assessment
effectiveness

Biology Objective: Develop assessment criteria that students graduating with a Biology
degree should meet.

Biology Action: Examine the ETS exit exam data, looking for trends and opportunities for
improvement.

Biology Action: Investigate alternative or additional graduating student assessment tools.

Biology Action: Discuss and implement a plan to increase student motivation to do well
on assessments of graduating student learning outcomes.


STRATEGIC PLAN OPPORTUNITY 6: VALUING PEOPLE

Strategic Plan Goal 1.0: Recruit, hire, support, and retain a diverse group of employees
with the specific credentials, skills, and values required of excellent faculty, staff,
administrators, and student employees.

Strategic Plan Objective 1.3: Improve the processes the University uses to support and
retain employees.

Biology Objective: Improve the amount and quality of peer-education among faculty in
the Department with regard to teaching.

Biology Action: Establish a process of peer visits to classrooms that provides a
mechanism for feedback and encourages discussion.

Biology Action: Incorporate peer evaluation of teaching in faculty annual evaluations and
promotion/tenure applications.


STRATEGIC PLAN OPPORTUNITY 7: BUILDING AND MANAGING
RESOURCES

Strategic Plan Goal 1.0: Leverage resources to meet students‟ needs and the long-term
strategic development of the University.

Strategic Plan Objective 1.1: Improve the teaching, learning and living environment, and
the functionality of existing facilities and equipment.

Biology Objective: Engage in the planning and design of the new building.

Biology Action: Actively participate in meetings with the architects during Fall 2007.

Biology Action: Conduct phasing into the new building in such a way that negative impact
on course delivery is minimized.

Biology Objective: Explore ways to use the Kit Bond Science and Technology Incubator
to the benefit of Biology Department.
Biology Action: Investigate student opportunities for internships in the new incubator.

Biology Action: Respond to faculty consulting opportunities.

Biology Objective: Continue use of the conservation building and study area to the
benefit of students and faculty.

Biology Action: Explore the possibility of establishing field station-type housing for
hosting meetings.

Biology Objective: Increase the availability of equipment and instrumentation for cell and
whole animal imaging techniques.

Biology Action: Use resources associated with the new building to purchase an updated
Kodak Imaging system that includes chemiluminescence and fluorescence capabilities and
increased microscope imaging capabilities.

Biology Action: Use resources associated with the new building to purchase a
fluorescence microscope.

Biology Action: Use resources associated with the new building to purchase a research
grade dissecting microscope.

Strategic Plan Goal 3.0: Promote a collaborative culture that encourages private financial
support.

Strategic Plan 3.2: Increase applications for federal, state, and private grant support.

Biology Objective: Seek external support for accomplishing Department objectives.

Biology Action: Identify objectives that could be addressed by external funding.

Biology Action: Work with the director of Grants and Sponsored Programs to identify
funding sources for potential proposals.

Biology Action: Find time and support for faculty to develop grant proposals during
summers.
PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM STRATEGIC PLAN

STRATEGIC PLAN OPPORTUNITY 2: ENHANCING ACADEMIC QUALITY

Strategic Plan Goal 2.0: Provide a learning environment that encourages substantial
academic achievement, connects knowledge and practice, and promotes regional service.

Strategic Plan Objective 2.1: Develop and implement teaching and learning strategies
that emphasize critical thinking skills, including questioning, interpreting, analyzing,
synthesizing, and creative problem solving.

PTA Objective: Provide students an opportunity to blend academic knowledge and
applications in and beyond the classroom.

PTA Action: Ensure that 100% of PTA students will participate in a wellness event during
their two years in the PTA program.

PTA Action: Ensure that 100% of PTA students have successfully completed 15 weeks of
clinical internship.

Strategic Plan Objective 2.5: Provide opportunities for participation in integrated applied
learning experiences, including internships, practica, faculty and student research, service
learning, and study away.

PTA Objective: Provide students with co-curricular opportunities to grow and develop to
be productive community members.

PTA Action: Ensure that 100% of PTA students will complete a professional development
portfolio which includes community service.

PTA Action: Explore the possibility of PTA students to participate in legislator‟s day in
Jefferson City.


STRATEGIC PLAN OPPORTUNITY 3: SUSTAINING INSTITUTIONAL
ACCREDITATION

Strategic Plan Goal 2.0: Strengthen the University-wide initiative to attract, engage, and
graduate a diverse student body.

Strategic Plan Objective 2.2: Increase the enrollment, retention, and graduation outcomes
of targeted groups of students.

PTA Objective: Maintain the accreditation status of the PTA program.

PTA Action: Comply with all accreditation requirements.
PTA Objective: Graduate students from the PTA program who are prepared for
professional success.

PTA Action: Maintain a three year average overall pass rate on licensure examination of 
85%.

PTA Objective: Develop a mix of students with academic potential for completing the
PTA program.

PTA Action: Ensure that at least 85% of accepted students will have  18 ACT.

PTA Objective: Strengthen retention and graduation of students enrolled in the PTA
program.

PTA Action: Ensure that all PTA courses have tutors available through Counseling and
Testing upon request.

PTA Action: Counseling and Testing will be recommended as a resource to students who
are at risk.

PTA Objective: Provide students opportunities to participate in international and/or
multicultural experiences.

PTA Action: Explore the possibility of students to perform a clinical internship in a study
away format beginning with the possibility of a three week summer clinical in India in
Summer 2008.
BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT FACULTY AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS

Publications

Dr. Baker and Paula Overfelt published a paper entitled, “Health Professions Advisors and
AHECs: A Partnership That Benefits All‟ in The Advisor in 2007. The paper is an
important example of the scholarship of service.

Dr. Daggett published a peer-review article of SRI results from summer 2005 in Bioscene.

Along with three MWSU student coauthors, Dr. Eckdahl published a manuscript in January
2008 in BioMed Central Genomics, a prestigious peer-reviewed journal.

Dr. Eckdahl submitted a manuscript to the Institution for Engineering Technology Synthetic
Biology Journal describing the work of his 2006 iGEM research team. The manuscript, entitled
“Computing with living hardware,” underwent peer review and was published in August 2007.
The paper has two faculty and seven student coauthors from Missouri Western and three faculty
and four student coauthors from Davidson College. It describes their 2007 iGEM project and
experience.

Along with GCAT collaborators, Dr. Eckdahl published a peer-reviewed manuscript
entitled “Genome Consortium for Active Teaching (GCAT): Meeting the Goals of
BIO2010” in the Summer 2007 issue of CBE: Life Science Education.

Dr. Eckdahl, Dr. Poet, and seven Missouri Western students, along with three faculty
members and five students from Davidson College published Engineering Bacteria to
Solve the Burnt Pancake Problem in BioMed Central (BMC) Journal of Biological
Engineering. It was among 15 articles chosen by BMC from over 1000 articles published
during the month for a worldwide press release, resulting in online news stories about the
research by Scientific American, The Discovery Channel, the London Telegraph, MSNBC,
Science News, Science Daily, and many others from countries around the world. Each of
at least 100 news stories about the research to build a bacterial computer mentioned
Missouri Western State University. One of the Davidson authors was interviewed on
NPR‟s Science Friday on May 23. The publication is an outcome of the 2006 Western
Summer Research Institute research team that went on to receive awards at the November
2006 iGEM competition.

Presentations

Ashley, D. 2007. The use of miniprojects as a service learning component of
BIO355 (Cave Ecology) at Missouri Western State University. Presented at the
annual meeting of the Missouri Academy of Science, St. Joseph, MO, April 21.

Ashley, D., and T. Rachow. 2007. Introducing BIO220: a field natural history
approach to study abroad. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Missouri
Academy of Science, St. Joseph, MO, April 21.
Bugbee, S., and D. Ashley. 2007. BIO355 miniprojects: Water chemistry of karst
habitats. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Missouri Academy of
Science, St. Joseph, MO, April 21.

Elliott, W. R., K. Echols, D. C. Ashley, and T. Aley. 2007. Waterborne
contaminants in Tumbling Creek Cave, Missouri. Paper presented at the annual
meeting of the Missouri Academy of Science, St. Joseph, MO, April 21.

Evans, R., D. Ashley, C. Chevalier, and T. Nagel. 2007. Characterizing prairie
fauna: mound-building ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) at Pawnee Prairie
(Harrison Co., Missouri). Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Missouri
Academy of Science, St. Joseph, MO, April 21.

Helstrom, S. R., and D. C. Ashley. 2007. BIO355 miniprojects: Preliminary
observations on bat roost temperatures in four Missouri caves. Poster presented
at the annual meeting of the Missouri Academy of Science, St. Joseph, MO,
April 21.

Knadler, J., D. Ashley, and J. Baker. 2007. 2007 status report on microbes
identified from Missouri cave waters. Poster presented at the annual meeting of
the Missouri Academy of Science, St. Joseph, MO, April 21.

Ward, V., and D. Ashley. 2007. BIO355 miniprojects: Continued monitoring of
the cavesnail population in Cathedral Cave. Poster presented at the annual
meeting of the Missouri Academy of Science, St. Joseph, MO, April 21.

Wiegman, A., and D. Ashley. 2007. BIO355 miniprojects: Continued monitoring
of cricket populations in Skaggs Cave. Poster presented at the annual meeting of
the Missouri Academy of Science, St. Joseph, MO, April 21.

Winfrey, J., and D. Ashley. 2007. BIO355 miniprojects: Tumbling Creek Cave
crayfish morphometrics. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Missouri
Academy of Science, St. Joseph, MO, April 21.

Evans, R., D. Ashley, C. Chevalier, and T. Nagel. 2007. Preliminary observations
on mound-building ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) at Pawnee Prairie (Harrison
Co., Missouri). Poster presented at the Missouri Natural Resource Conference,
Osage Beach, Missouri on January 31.

Okapal, J., and D. C. Ashley. 2007. Materials used for „Ethical Interventions‟ in
introductory biology courses. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the
Association for Practical and Professional Ethics, Cincinnati, Ohio on Feb. 22.

Elliott, W., J. Kaufmann, R. Hoskins, J. Kennedy, G. Veni, T. Aley, D. C.
Ashley, and J. Thompson. 2007. Speaker Panel: Managing Caves & Karst in the
21st Century. Panel discussion presented at the Powder Valley Conservation
Center during the National Cave and Karst Management Symposium, St. Louis,
MO, Oct. 9.

Elliott, W. R., K. Echols, D. C. Ashley, and T. Aley. 2007. Waterborne
contaminants in Tumbling Creek Cave, Missouri. Paper presented at the National
Cave and Karst Management Symposium, St. Louis, MO, Oct. 11.

Chevalier, C.D. 2007. Department of Biology, Missouri Western State University.
RACCOONS AS GOOD MODELS FOR UNDERGRADUATE APPLIED LEARNING
AND COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH IN WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND
MANAGEMENT IN THE FIELD AND LAB. 43rd Annual Meeting, Missouri Academy of
Sciences. Missouri Western State University, St. Joseph, MO. 20 – 21 April, 2007.

Chevalier, C. D. 2007. Department of Biology, Missouri Western State University.
MEASURING TIME-COURSE PARAMETERS, PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE,
BLOOD CHEMISTRY AND HEMATOLOGY PROFILES OF RACCOONS UNDER
CHEMICAL RESTRAINT: AN EXAMPLE OF NON-TRADITIONAL
UNDERGRADUATE APPLIED LEARNING. 2nd Annual Conference on Applied
Learning. Missouri Western State University 10-11 February 2007

Chevalier, C. D. 2007. Department of Biology, Missouri Western State University.
ASPECTS OF THE NATURAL HISTORY AND MANAGEMENT OF RACCOONS IN
NW MISSOURI: PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF A DEN SITE SELECTION STUDY.
Keynote Speaker. 13th Annual Meeting of MO Trappers Association. October.

Chevalier, C. D., J. W. Rushin, and C. K. Darrough. 2007. Department of Biology,
Missouri Western State University. USING GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGY TO
DOCUMENT AND MANAGE POTENTIAL HAZARDOUS WASTE DUMPING ON
MWSU CAMPUS: A FACULTY, STUDENT, AND STAFF PARTNERSHIP IN
UNDERGRADUATE APPLIED LEARNING. 2nd Annual Conference on Applied
Learning. Missouri Western State University 10-11 February 2007

Chevalier, C.D., J.W. Rushin and C.K. Darrough. 2007. Missouri Western State
University. USING GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGY TO MANAGE BIODIVERSITY
CONSERVATION AND HEALTH ON MWSU CAMPUS: MAPPING POTENTIAL
HAZARDOUS WASTE DUMPING THROUGH A FACULTY, STUDENT, AND
STAFF PARTNERSHIP IN UNDERGRADUATE APPLIED LEARNING. 43rd Annual
Meeting, Missouri Academy of Sciences. Missouri Western State University, St. Joseph,
MO. 20 – 21 April, 2007.

Evans, R.1, D.C. Ashley*1, C.D. Chevalier1 and T. Nagel2. 2007. 1Department of Biology,
Missouri Western State University. 2Missouri Department of Conservation, St. Joseph,
MO. PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS ON MOUND-BUILDING ANTS
(HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) AT PAWNEE PRAIRIE CONSERVATION AREA
(HARRISON COUNTY, MISSOURI). Missouri Natural Resource Conference, 31
January – 2 February 2007. Lake-of-the-Ozarks, MO.

Evans, R.1, D.C. Ashley*1, C.D. Chevalier1 and T. Nagel2. 2007. 1Department of Biology,
Missouri Western State University. 2Missouri Department of Conservation, St. Joseph,
MO. CHARACTERIZING PRAIRIE FAUNA: MOUND-BUILDING ANTS
(HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) AT PAWNEE PRAIRIE (HARRISON CO.,
MISSOURI). 43rd Annual Meeting, Missouri Academy of Sciences. Missouri Western
State University, St. Joseph, MO. 20 – 21 April, 2007.

Hellstrom, S. R., L. G. Kukuc, S. J. Longe, H. M. Slawson, and C. D. Chevalier.
Department of Biology, Missouri Western State University. St. Joseph, MO. 2007.
WORKING WITH RACCOONS IN THE FIELD AND LABORATORY SETTINGS.
Summer Research Institute Public Seminar. June.ST. JOSEPH, MO. 64507 USA.

Hellstrom, S. R., L. G. Kukuc, S. J. Longe, H. M. Slawson, and C. D. Chevalier.
Department of Biology, Missouri Western State University. St. Joseph, MO. 2007. DEN
SITE SELECTION BY MALE RACCOONS (Procyon lotor). Summer Research Institute
Public Seminar. June.

HELLSTROM, S. and C. D. CHEVALIER. 2007. BLOOD SERUM CHEMISTRY AND
HEMATOLOGY IN FIELD-FRESH OPOSSUMS (DIDELPHIS VIRGINIANA) IN
NORTHWEST MISSOURI. 56th Annual International meeting of The Wildlife Desease
Association. Estes Park, CO. August.
Hellstrom, S. and C. D. Chevalier. Department of Biology, Missouri Western State
University. St. Joseph, MO. 2007. SEASONAL DEN SITE SELECTION BY URBAN
MALE RACCOONS (Procyon lotor) IN NORTHWESTERN MISSOURI. Undergraduate
Reasearch Summer Institute Seminar. December.

Dr. Baker presented “Functional and Molecular Characterization of a New Bacteriocin”
presented at Missouri Academy of Science, April 2007

Baker, J, Caldwell, B., Daggett, M., Eckdahl, T. "Faculty working together to conduct
undergraduate research" presented at the Conference on Applied Learning in Higher
Education, MWSU, 2006

Knadler, J., D. Ashley, J. Baker. 2006 Status Report on Microbes Identified From
Missouri Cave Waters.

Dr. Eckdahl presented his iGEM research project in April at the Institute for Biological
Engineering annual meeting in St. Louis.

At the NABT Professional Development Conference in Atlanta Dr. Rushin organized,
presided over and presented (co-authored by several teaching colleagues) a talk titled
“Using Two-Week Learning Cycle Blocks (LCB‟s) as a Way for Non-major General
Biology Students to Do Science.” At this meeting I also presented a poster titled “Inquiry
Teaching in the Middle Schools Through a University-School District Partnership.”
At the Missouri Natural Resource Conference (MNRC) in Tan Tara, Mo., and at the
Missouri Academy of Science annual meeting in St. Joseph, Mo., Dr. Rushin co-authored a
poster titled “Vegetational Patterns in a Successional Flood Plain Before and After the
Construction of a Chute.”

Dr. Walton presented two posters at Experimental Biology in Washington, DC in April
2007. Experimental Biology is a national meeting of six major scientific societies,
including the American Physiological Society. Both posters described teaching-related
research activities, one from work she primarily did at a prior institution and one poster
based on a pilot study that she conducted in BIO 251 (Medical and Public Health
Microbiology) at MWSU in Fall 2006. She was awarded the American Physiological
Society 2007 Teaching of Physiology Section Research Recognition Award for one of
these posters. This competitive award provided funds applied to meeting registration and
travel costs.

Dr. Walton presented a poster and one oral presentation at the Missouri Academy of
Science meeting at MWSU.

At the Missouri Natural Resource Conference (MNRC) in Tan Tara, Mo., and at the
Missouri Academy of Science annual meeting in St. Joseph, Mo., Dr. Rushin co-authored a
poster titled “A Comparison of Bird Diversity in Several Successional Habitat Types in
Northwest Missouri.”

At the Applied Learning in Higher Education Symposium held at MWSU in St. Joseph,
Mo., Dr. Rushin co-authored a poster titled “Using Geospatial Technology to Document
and Manage Potential Hazardous Waste Dumping on the MWSU Campus: A faculty, A
Student and Staff Partnership in Undergraduate Applied learning.”

Student Presentations

Bugbee, S., and D. Ashley. 2007. BIO355 miniprojects: Water chemistry of karst
habitats. Poster presented at the Spring Multidisciplinary Research Day (MRD)
Poster Symposium, St. Joseph, MO, on April 30. (David Ashley - Faculty
Sponsor).

Helstrom, S. R., and D. C. Ashley. 2007. BIO355 miniprojects: Preliminary
observations on bat roost temperatures in four Missouri caves. Poster presented at
the Spring Multidisciplinary Research Day (MRD) Poster Symposium, St. Joseph,
MO, on April 30. (David Ashley - Faculty Sponsor).

Porter, H., and D. C. Ashley. 2007. BIO355 miniprojects: Amphibian population
data from six Missouri caves. Poster presented at the Spring Multidisciplinary
Research Day (MRD) Poster Symposium, St. Joseph, MO, on April 30. (David
Ashley - Faculty Sponsor).
Ward, V., and D. Ashley. 2007. BIO355 miniprojects: Continued monitoring of the
cavesnail population in Cathedral Cave. Poster presented at the Spring
Multidisciplinary Research Day (MRD) Poster Symposium, St. Joseph, MO, on
April 30. (David Ashley - Faculty Sponsor).

Wiegman, A., and D. Ashley. 2007. BIO355 miniprojects: Continued monitoring
of cricket populations in Skaggs Cave. Poster presented at the Spring
Multidisciplinary Research Day (MRD) Poster Symposium, St. Joseph, MO, on
April 30. (David Ashley - Faculty Sponsor).

Winfrey, J., and D. Ashley. 2007. BIO355 miniprojects: Tumbling Creek Cave
crayfish morphometrics. Poster presented at the Spring Multidisciplinary Research
Day (MRD) Poster Symposium, St. Joseph, MO, on April 30. (David Ashley -
Faculty Sponsor).

Ward, V., B. Tallman, P. Jointer, and D. Ashley. 2007. Micro-invertebrate
Diversity in Roy‟s Branch, Buchanan County, Missouri. Poster presented at the
Fall Multidisciplinary Research Day (MRD) Poster Symposium, St. Joseph, MO,
on Dec. 5. (David Ashley - Faculty Sponsor).

Wiegman, A., J. Riley, and D. Ashley. 2007. BIO455 Miniprojects: Pollination by
insects in Buchanan County. Poster presented at the Fall Multidisciplinary
Research Day (MRD) Poster Symposium, St. Joseph, MO, on Dec. 5. (David
Ashley - Faculty Sponsor).

Susan Brock, Judith Knadler, Meredith Triplet, Jason Baker. “Functional and molecular
characterization of a new bacteriocin” presented at Summer Research Institute symposium,
MWSU, July 2007

Judith W. Knadler and Jason C. Baker, Ph.D “Characterization of a Newly Discovered
Bacteriocin” presented at the URSI symposium, MWSU, Oct. 2006

Knadler, J., Ashley, D., Baker, J. “2006 Status Report on Microbes Identified from
Missouri Cave Waters” presented at Missouri Academy of Sciences, Truman State
University, April 2006

Willie Gilbert and Jason C. Baker. “The effectiveness of newly developed hand soaps at
killing common bacteria” presented at Tri-Beta District Convention, Lyons, KS, April
2006

Benefield, Amanda, Baker, Jason C. “Antimicrobial Effectiveness of Laundry Detergents.”
presented at Multidisciplinary Research Day, May 2005, Missouri Western State College
and Tri-Beta District Convention, Reis Biological Field Station, Steelville, MO, April 2005

Todd Eckdahl Jeff Poet led a 2007 Summer Research Institute team of eight students that
collaborated with students and faculty from Davidson College to participate in the
international Genetically Engineered Machines competition. They attended the iGEM
Jamboree at MIT in November to present the team‟s synthetic biology project to use DNA
flipping in the creation of a bacterial computer. For their contribution of genetic parts and
their website, poster, and oral presentations, the team was recognized with gold medal
status, the highest level of participation.

Grants

Dr. Eckdahl continued work in 2007 as Co-PI on a $307,000 grant award from the
National Science Foundation in 2006, serving as laboratory coordinator for a microarray
workshop held at Morehouse College in summer 2007. The July workshop trained 40
faculty from throughout the country to engage their undergraduate students in microarray
technology. He also joined two colleagues from Davidson College to deliver a workshop
in May for 20 faculty at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Eckdahl and Dr. Poet submitted a NSF grant proposal to the Undergraduate Biology and
Mathematics program to support their synthetic biology work for a three year period beginning
in 2008. The proposal, entitled “Synthetic Biology Research for Undergraduates (SyBR-U),”
was funded by the NSF Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological and
Mathematical Sciences (UBM) program for $170,000 for three years.

Dr. Chevalier received a grant from Racal Landstar Satellite Service for subscription for
Differential GPS ($800), one from Omnistar Satellite service subscription for Differential
GPS ($800), one from the Western Institute Professional Development program for Re-
Certification as Mapping GPS systems Certified Trainer. ($350)

Institutional Service

Dr. Rushin served on the following MWSU committees: Bachelor of Interdisciplinary
Studies, Environmental Impact Committee and the Educational Leadership Team
(Planning for the NCATE/DESE evaluation of our elementary and secondary education
programs.)

Mr. Evinger was an invited presenter at the Galileo‟s Legacy Conference on Global
Warming and Climate Change and was the only MWSU science presenter on the agenda.
His presentation set the stage for the Panel Discussion and was summarized by Dr. Claire
Parkinson of NASA as professional and informative and was so appreciated by Dr. Willie
Soon of Harvard University that he suggested to Dr. Sandie Seeger that he should bring the
presentation to Harvard.

Dr. Hardwick served on the institutional committee for strategic planning in the area of
using measurement and assessment.

Dr. Hardwick served as the co-coordinator of a committee and project that is using a
$10,000 AHEC grant to develop a high school curriculum that will promote health care
careers to freshmen and sophomores in high school.
Dr. Daggett served on the Faculty Evaluation Committee, the Institutional Animal Care
Committee, and the Pre-Health Scholarship committee.

Dr. Walton joined the MWSU Critical Thinking Steering Committee. She also attended
and actively participated in CTSC meetings as the representative of the Biology
Department.

Dr. Walton was invited to serve on an ad hoc task force formed to discuss the mission and
goals of the Center for the Advancement of Learning, Teaching, and Scholarship. This
committee met in October and November 2007 to discuss the mission of the Center and the
job description of the position of Director of the Center.

Dr. Hardwick coordinated the PTA student participation in the Wellness Fair. This year all
second year students participated (16). They provided massages to employees at the
Relaxation Station and worked with psychology students in the same station on stress
reduction. The PTA students assisted a staff member from Community Arthritis services
on the administration of osteoporosis screening. The students also assisted a PT from
Heartland Health Systems who conducted golf posture screening and education.

Dr. Hardwick served on the Professional Leave committee and the Wellness committee.

Dr. Rachow worked with the Gold Points development team and helped with the
implementation and utilization of the database.

Dr. Rachow became the faculty sponsor for the new BIO 220 Club and helped in their
efforts to develop fund raising activity to help financially support students in this Study
Away program. He also produced a 45 minute BIO 220 DVD chronicling the March 2007
trip to Belize and distributing it to all members of the class as well as Dr. Fulton of the
Study Away program, Dr. Johnson, Dean of LAS, Dr. Bragin and President Scanlon.

Dr. Baker serves on the Strategic Planning Steering Committee and as co-chair of the
Opportunity 1 area of Building Graduate Programs. This requires development and
progress updates of action items to support the Goals and Objectives in this area.

Dr. Chevalier served on the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Member, as
chair of the GPS-GIS User Group, and s Chair of the Local Arrangements Committee for
hosting MAS Annual meeting. 2007.

Dr. Eckdahl served on the Presidential Screening committee in 2007.

Professional Service

Dr. Rushin served as Editor –in-Chief of the Transactions of the Missouri Academy of
Science. As part of his responsibilities he reorganized and expanded the Editorial Board
and improved the copy editing and printing of the journal.
Dr. Ashley was a session chair for the Speleology Session. Annual meeting
of the Missouri Academy of Science, and for the Cave Life Studies session of
presentations at the National Cave and Karst Management Symposium

Dr. Chevalier maintains daily contact with area “industry” personnel relative to natural
resources conservation and management, including Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest
Service, National park Service, US Department of Interior, Bureau of Indian affairs, Sac
and Fox Nation Environmental Protection Agency Department of Agriculture APHIS, MO
Department of Natural Resources, MO Department of Conservation. I routinely discuss
their needs for entry-level hirings, as well as any needs they have relative to research,
management, or monitoring activities our programs can facilitate or arrange opportunities
for students to participate in.

Dr. Walton served as an ad hoc reviewer for two journals in 2007. She reviewed one paper
for Bioscene, the journal of the Association of College and University Biology Educators.
I also reviewed a manuscript for the American Journal of Physiology. In addition, she was
an invited reviewer for three chapters of a nonmajors biology textbook, Essentials of
Biology with Physiology, 2nd Ed. by Campbell, Reece, & Simon, published by Pearson
Benjamin Cummings.

Dr. Hardwick served as the president of the Central Consortium of Clinical Education.

Dr. Daggett served ACUBE on its Steering committee, on the Bioscene Editorial Board, on
its web site committee.

Dr. Chevalier works with the Western Institute‟s Division of Professional Training to
identify areas where interface between traditional education and professional development
training can be offered that benefits professional communities, alumni, and our students.
This provides both a training opportunity as well as feedback from members of the
professional community as to how relevant or irrelevant what we offer in our curricula is.

Dr. Eckdahl participated in the Genomics Education Partnership along with Dr. Poet and
ten students in Bioinformatics. Dr. Poet and I also traveled to Washington University in
June to present our experience to other member of the Partnership.

Dr. Baker reviewed and edited a paper entitled “Antimicrobial Activity of Mono- and Di-
Methyl Substituted Benzhydrols and Benzophenones In Vitro” for the Transactions of the
Missouri Academy of Science.

Dr. Eckdahl served as a paid external reviewer for the Biology Department at Culver
Stockton College in March.

Missouri Western hosted the Missouri Academy of Science in April 2007. Dr. Baker was
an integral part of the local arrangements committee specifically dealing with parking,
housing, day-of-event poster displays, and technology in presentation rooms.
Community Service

Dr. Rushin helped to organize and I presented in the Super Science Saturday program
sponsored by the St. Joseph Museums. He also served as a judge for the Spring Garden M.
S., West Platte M.S./H.S., River Bend Treatment Center and the MARSEF (H.S.) science
fairs.

Dr. Rushin led one Midland Empire Audubon Society Field trip and served as a volunteer
at the Squaw Creek natural Wildlife area reception center/nature center.

Dr. Hardwick served as a judge for MARSEF and as the United Way Building
Coordinator.

Dr. Walton volunteered at Super Science Saturday in February 2007, demonstrating
biology-related activities and displays for the attendees (several hundred children and their
parents). She also served as a volunteer workshop facilitator during the Girl Scout
workshop sponsored by Tri Beta and acted as a consultant for an area high school student
as she planned a science project involving cell culture.

Dr. Rushin served as Co-Director of the District Missouri Junior (H. S.) Academy of
Science. He is also a member of the METS (Math, Engineering, Technology and Science)
committee for the St. Joseph School District and MWSU.

Dr. Hardwick served on the board of the Community Arthritis Services and helped to
organize and conducted a silent auction for fund raising at the annual bowl-a-thon.
She is also president of the Gower Sorority, a service oriented women‟s group whose focus
I raising money for a scholarship given to a graduating senior at East Buchanan High
School.

Dr. Raffensperger served as chair of the NW District of the Missouri Physical Therapy
Association and as the chair of the Arthritis Advisory Board. She also recently became
active on the NW Missouri Tobacco Use Prevention Coalition.

Dr. Rushin served on the Arrangements Committee for the MAS Annual Meeting at
MWSU. I also served as the Judging Coordinator for the State Missouri Academy of
Science which was held during the annual meeting.

Dr. Rushin served on the Boards of Directors of the St. Joseph Museums (member of
Educations and Collections committees), Midland Empire Audubon Society (Chp. of
Program committee)and the Missouri Prairie Foundation.

Dr. Daggett established a Stream team – attended two Water Quality Workshops offered
by Department of Natural Resources

Dr. Daggett coordinated Girl Scout workshops during Spring and Fall semesters, served as
a judge for MARSEF, and hosted students for the “So you want to be a doctor program.”

Dr. Chevalier routinely provide consulting services to various entities, from K – 12
teachers on statistics and experimental and study design, to various agencies on mapping
GPS technology. Including FBI Crime scene spatial data analysis, to Buchanan County
Sheriff‟s office, St. Joseph Police department on crime scene GPS, MO Dept. of
Conservation, Dept. of Nat. Resources, SEMA (state emergency management agency),
Several regional universities faculty (park U., Rockhurst U., UMKC, St. Louis U.,
Oklahoma State U., U. of S. Dakota) various Indian Nations, various community colleges,
other NGO‟s (non-government organizations like utility cooperatives, MO Dept. of
Transportation, St. Joseph Chamber of Commerce.

Dr. Chevalier was the Chair of the Local Arrangements Committee for hosting the April
2007 Annual Meeting of the Missouri Academy of Sciences here at MWSU. I developed
partnerships in Chemistry, Computer science, Math, and Physics; Biology; and
Engineering departments, and the Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society to plan, host,
and manage the Annual Meeting. I arranged for a professional web developer (Artistic
Design) to volunteer her time to develop the meeting website which was widely considered
the best ever fielded by the Academy, resulting in a living guide that helped the local
arrangements committee effectively manage what members have widely acknowledged to
be the smoothest Academy Meeting they have attended in many years.

Dr. Chevalier supervised Student TWS at weekend invasive plant species removal work
days at Squaw Creek NWR. He was an invited instructor for the Hunter Education
Program, organized and supervised student staffing of managed deer hunt check station,
and helped the Missouri Western Student Chapter of TWS staff their deer aging
demonstration booth at MDC‟s Annual Quality Deer Management and Antler Measuring
Day at East Hills Mall, St. Joseph.

Dr. Chevalier taught 4 Professional Mapping Certified User GPS workshops for
professional organizations including, MDC, DNR UMKC, Univ. of OK MO-Kan; MO
Nat. Guard.

Dr. Chevalier is a member of Missouri Adaptive Enterprise Architecture Committee, a
state-level committee to establish standardizations for GPS collected geospatial data in
Missouri.

Dr. Eckdahl hosted two groups of middle school students for a workshop on DNA, genes,
and heredity. He also hosted a middle school student interested in genetics for a job
shadowing program. He hosted a group of grade school kids for a workshop on DNA
technology.

Dr. Rushin supervised three Conservation/Wildlife Internship students. He was also
involved in two pre-service biology teaching students as teaching assistants (paid by a
local grant from the St. Joseph Chamber of Commerce) in the graduate science education
workshops for local middle school science teachers. They helped the middle school
science teachers during the piloting of newly developed science lessons.

Dr. Eckdahl gave a presentation along with Dr. Jeff Poet on their iGEM experience to the
Downtown Rotary Club. He also gave a presentation on our iGEM experience and
Missouri Western undergraduate research in general to the Kiwanis Club.

Dr. Baker judged science fair projects for both the Missouri Junior Academy of Science
(MJAS) and Mid-America Regional Science and Engineering Fair (MARSEF) held each
spring on our campus, including each year of the time frame for this narrative, 2005-2007.
Additionally, in the 2007-2008 academic year I am the Biology consultant for the
MARSEF organizing committee.

Dr. Baker provided technical consultation and lab/safety training for the science projects of
seven regional high school students since 2005. These projects have led to presentations at
MJAS and MARSEF, including two MARSEF winners who then presented at the
International Science and Engineering Fair.

Dr. Baker serves on the Board of the Ensworth Medical Trust, a medical loan program
administer through the St. Joseph branch of U.S. Bank.


PROMOTION, TENURE AND AWARDS

Dr. Daggett underwent a successful midterm review in Fall 2007.

Dr. Daggett became a Distinguished Professor at the Assistant Professor level in 2008.

Dr. Eckdahl was presented the James V. Mehl awarded for faculty scholarly achievement
in 2008.


FACULTY HIRING

Dr. Kurt Hartman was hired to replace Mr. Richard Boutwell. Dr. Hartman is a
community ecologist.

Dr. Mark Mills was hired to replace Dr. Sandie Seeger. Dr. Mills is an organismal
biologist.

Dr. Karen Koy was hired to replace Mr. Lee Evinger. Dr. Koy is a paleontologist.


CONCLUDING REMARKS

The Biology Department is poised to build upon the solid foundation of its past as it builds
its future. Four areas in which the Department is known for its excellence are 1) providing
applied learning opportunities for undergraduate students, 2) delivering quality instruction
for majors and nonmajors alike, 3) outreach to the community, and 4) scholarly
achievement by faculty members and students. There are several reasons that suggest it is
reasonable to expect that the Department will improve upon its excellent record of
achievement in each of these areas. One is improved facilities in the form of the new
building project. Another is the addition of three new faculty members, hired for their
potential to support Departmental goals. Another is the ongoing attraction of biological
disciplines and career opportunities to talented young people. Yet another is the ongoing
interest in life sciences industry in the community. These and other factors indicate that
the Biology Department is on the move toward even higher levels of excellence in
supporting undergraduate education in its classrooms and beyond.

				
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