AN ALEXANDER FAMILY

					                                 An Alexander Family
                         of Florence and Darlington counties, and old
                               Sumter District in South Carolina
                                         Compiled and written by
                                            Val McGinness

                                           BIOGRAPHIES
             Based on the descendants of John Alexander (1) and Mary Woodham “Polly”
            through their grandson John Wesley Alexander, and his surname descendants

                          Last revised, updated, and/or edited December 11, 2011

ABNER ALEXANDER
A son of Rev. John William Reese Alexander "William" and Delila Alexandra Kea, "Delila" and "Liley"
Born: About 1840 Darlington District, South Carolina
Died: December 4, 1863 at about age 24 from wounds sustained around a month earlier in the War
Between the States at the Battle of Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Tennessee, also called the Battle of
Lookout Mountain
Marriage: None
Burial: Unknown by this research. Several years ago, I wrote the Veterans Administration and asked
about Abner’s burial. They wrote back, explaining that they don't have a record of his grave, and
suggested that he may have been buried as an “unknown”. Abner was captured by Union troops, and
likely died in one of their prison camps, where he may be anonymously buried.

   Abner was likely named after his uncle, Rev. Abner M. Alexander of old Sumter District, the
Bishopville, South Carolina area, his father's oldest brother. During the War Between the States, the
Civil War, he was a Private in Company F, 8th Regiment, South Carolina Volunteers, Confederate
States of America, and fought in, among other battles, the "Battle of Chickamauga, also known as the
"Battle of Lookout Mountain". He was wounded and captured during that fight on November 8,
1863. The battles that took place around that time are memorialized by the very large Chickamauga
and Chattanooga National Military Park. In those battles, 43,000 Confederate troops took on 60,000
Union troops to save Chattanooga. In the end, Chattanooga fell. The fighting there was some of the
hardest of that war.
   Younger brother John Wesley Alexander and Abner had a chance meeting during the Civil War.
Here is what John wrote as part of his 1932 “Reminiscence”: At the beginning of the war, my only
brother, Abner Alexander, enlisted for service for six months. He fought in the first Battle of Bull Run,
Virginia. (In) Six months he came home and found that I had entered the army. He regretted, very
much, that I had taken this step. I went away while he was at home. My brother re-enlisted and
went back to the same company. Just a few days before they went to Tennessee, I heard that my
brother's command was about a mile from me. I got permission to go to him, and this was the last
time I ever saw him. He came a part of the way back with me. We sat on a chestnut log and he told
me that he felt like that we would never see each other again, and told me, also, where I would find
his trunk and other belongings. He was killed at Lookout Mountain, Tennessee. I found his things, as
he told me, his trunk and picture, but his girlfriend refused to part with his jewelry.
   Abner died, as his muster roll stated “in the hands of the enemy”. He was taken prisoner after
being wounded at Lookout Mountain, and was likely taken away from the area, possibly to a Union
prison camp, maybe as far away as Camp Morton in Indiana. He lasted About a month after being
wounded. The Veterans Administration has no record of his burial, suggesting that he may have been
buried as an unknown.
   His father's older brother, Rev. Abner M. Alexander is probably this Abner's namesake.
   Not much is known about this Abner, with the exception of his serving the South, and being the
brother of John Wesley Alexander.
   Abner’s parents seemingly moved into Henry County during the early 1840s, after being surveyed
in the United States Census back in South Carolina in 1840, then appearing back in South Carolina
again by 1850.
   Younger brother, John Wesley Alexander was born in Henry County, Alabama in August of 1846.
He, too, was born in the Cureton’s Bridge Post Office community. His parents were from South
Carolina, and he later moved back there with them, and later served the Confederacy in the Civil
War. John remained in the Darlington County and Florence County area for the rest of his 87-year-
long life.
   There's a historical sign that tells a brief-version history of the post office at the intersection of the
old crossroads on Alabama Highway 27 which runs between Abbeville and Ozark, Alabama, and you
cross Cureton's Bridge itself when on Highway 27, not far from the post office sign. The site is
located closer to Abbeville than to Ozark.
   James Irvin Alexander, Sr., Abner and John Wesley’s uncle, had moved to that area of Henry
County, Alabama around 1836 from the now defunct Sumter District, South Carolina, now Lee County,
in the vicinity of Bishopville. He settled into what is now known as the old "Center Community",
represented by Old Center United Methodist Church. Some say James may have purchased land for
About $1.25 per acre, due to the removal of the Creek Native Americans, and there was a surplus of
land after that in portions of Alabama, and the surrounding region. James remained there the rest of
his days, and some of his descendants now live on the same general farm land that he once
inhabited.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1850 - This survey was taken in old Sumter District, South Carolina. A couple of facts that deserve
attention are: (1) This census proves that Delila was still alive after the family moved back to South
Carolina, and did not die in Henry County, Alabama. Since she died in 1851, she didn't live a long
time after their return. (2) For whatever reason, Abner was not listed in this survey, even though he
was alive. The household included:

       William Alexander, age 30 (Rev. John William Reese Alexander "William" and "Uncle William")
       Delila Alexander, age 29 (Delila Alexandra Kea Alexander "Delila" and "Liley")
       Mary Alexander, age 12
       Elizabeth C Alexander, age 7 ("Lizzie")
       John W Alexander, age 4 (John Wesley Alexander "John")

REV. ABNER M. ALEXANDER
A son of John Alexander and Mary Woodham “Polly”. Abner is not a direct descendant in this line. He
was patriarch John Alexander's son, and Rev. John William Reese Alexander's brother.
Born: January 25, 1796 Sumter District, South Carolina
Died: June 13, 1871 Sumter County, South Carolina at age 74
Marriage: 1819 Massey Ella Belk "Massey"
Born: April 4, 1804 South Carolina
Died: September 19, 1870 Sumter County, South Carolina

Massey was a daughter of:

       Jeremiah Belk b. About 1778 in South Carolina m. About 1803
       Anna Mixon

Massey paternal grandfather was:

       William Belk of Kershaw District, South Carolina, within the larger Camden District b. About
        1756
       Hannah Darling b. About 1770 in South Carolina
   Rev. Alexander was once Pastor of the now-defunct New Hope Church (Methodist) near what is
now called Carter’s Crossing in Darlington County, not to be confused with Carter’s Crossroads in not
too far away Cartersville.
   For the most part, Abner was a Methodist and earlier on a Methodist-Episcopal "preacher" and
pastor in old Sumter District, Sumter County, and Darlington County in South Carolina. He was known
as Rev. Abner Alexander, an active member of the area Methodist clergy. He was one of two sons of
John Alexander and Mary "Polly" Woodham who would enter the clergy. The other was Rev. John
William Alexander "William", who many churchgoers called "Uncle William".
   The value of Abner's real estate was valued at $4,000, in that same census.
   Years ago there was an actual "Stokes Bridge" that people crossed, for which the Bishopville
community near (now) Lynches River is named. St. Matthews Methodist Church was on one side of
Lynches Creek at Stokes Bridge, and on the other side of the bridge, just a short distance away, was
Hebron Methodist Church, basically on what used to be the same road. These are two churches that
our Alexander relatives regularly attended. Some are buried at Hebron, and some are buried at St.
Matthew.
   There is no longer a bridge where Stokes Bridge once stood, and those who want to cross the
(now) Lynches River have to cross on United States Highway 15 at the DesChamps Bridge, the
location where Abner's father once lived, across the river from near neighbor and family friend Capt.
Peter DuBose.
   Abner’s name is found as a witness on the will of Captain Peter Dubose, dated Monday, August 3,
1846 (Will Book D-2 Page 199 Bundle 120 Package 8). It is known that Capt. Dubose and Abner’s
father. Peter Dubose’s son, Middleton Dubose, was the executor of John Alexander’s will.

John Alexander’s will was witnessed by:
     Captain Peter DuBose
     A.C.L.D. Belk
     Harriet DuBose Stokes (Peter DuBose's daughter)

   Massey’s father, Jeremiah Belk, was born sometime previous to 1767 in the old Camden District,
South Carolina, and died around 1848 in Darlington County, South Carolina. He married his wife, the
former Anna Mixon, previous to 1795. Anna was born during 1769 in that part of old Camden District
that became Darlington County, and later Lee County. Jeremiah Belk was brother to Rigdon Belk,
who was born previous to 1760, and died in 1825. He was one of the original five trustees of Cypress
Church in (then) Darlington County. He and four other men put up a total of five dollars (a legally-
needed token amount) to pay for the land on which the church was already situated. The papers
were dated December 1827.
   Mr. Belk owned several Negro slaves who were mentioned and distributed in his will (Darlington
County Will Book 10, page 145), dated Saturday, July 6, 1844. The document, read on Friday, July
14, 1848, listed slave names Dinah, Easter, America, Jim, Rachel (there were possibly two females
named Rachel), Aggy, Hannah, Leak, Griff, Tilda, Nelly, Ira, Tinah, Sabry, Peter, Lewis, Stephen,
Mourning, Juda, and Manson.
   Abner was co-executor of father-in-law Jeremiah Belk's estate. Mr. Belk's probate papers, dated
Friday, July 14, 1848, left Abner's family two Negro boys, Jonas and George, and two Negro men,
Manson and Herod, in trust for relatives. Other slaves mentioned in his will were: Charles (a man);
Dice (a woman); Andire (a boy); Tener (a girl); Pat (a girl); and Peter (a boy).
   Massey Alexander's grandfather, William Belk, a Kershaw County, South Carolina farmer, was born
around 1742 and died in Kershaw County. He married the former Hannah Darling in 1760 in Kershaw
District. In the 1790 United States Census for Kershaw District, South Carolina, Mr. Belk had 2 males
over 16 years of age, 2 males under 16, and 5 females in his household. His will is recorded in
Camden, Kershaw County, South Carolina, dated Thursday, December 15, 1814 with the final
settlement Tuesday, January 12, 1819 by son Joseph Belk.
   Abner is known to have been a local preacher, but nothing I've found on him indicates that he was
ever ordained.
   Massey's name has been seen in records as “Mary” and “Maisy”.
   An aunt of Massey's, Jeremiah Belk's sister, was Pherriby Belk b. About 1781 in South Carolina.
   Abner and Massey's daughter, Harriette M. Alexander first married Henry A. Tiller, and after his
death married to W.J. Martin.
   The burial location of Abner and Massey is not known by this research, but it's guessed to be near
son Abijah Elijah Alexander "Ebijah" in bricked-over graves with no markings at St. Matthew United
Methodist Church in rural Bishopville, Lee County, South Carolina. Although Ebijah and wife Lydia
Mixon Fields are buried there, their marker was placed there years later. Other unmarked bricked-
over graves that seem identical to theirs are close to them.

The children of William and Hannah Belk, according to Mr. Belk’s will were:

       Rigdon Belk
       Nice Skinner
       Ann Skinner
       Gatce Mixon
       Susannah Belk was also mentioned, but no relationship was mentioned.

Massey’s siblings were:

       William Alexander Belk
       Elizabeth Belk

Obituary - Written by Rev. Samuel A. Weber, a longtime minister in the South Carolina Conference of
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Rev. Weber was an 1859 graduate of Wofford College,
Spartanburg, South Carolina. The obituary was published in the Wednesday, September 6, 1871 issue
of the Southern Christian Advocate (Page 144, Column 4):

    Rev. Abner Alexander was born in Darlington County, S.C., January 25th, 1796, and died in Sumter
County, S.C., June 13th, 1871.
    Seventy-five years of human experience have been rarely devoted with such uniformity of purpose
and with such success to the best interests of humanity and of the Church, as those of my lately
deceased friend and brother in Christ. His life has been a good illustration of the words of the author
of ‘Festus’: ‘He lives most, who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best."
    He commenced the service to God early in life, and first as class leader and then as a local
preacher, he served his generation long and faithfully and well. With ordinary intellectual capacity,
and with poor chances for its cultivation, he was yet instilled, by diligence and prayer, to become a
very acceptable and useful preacher. He was a man of one book - that Book he prized highly and
studied with a sanctified curiosity and with the meekness of a teachable child, as he sat humbly at the
feet of Jesus. He hence became ‘mighty in the Scriptures’ and his preaching was largely of what
might be called the scriptural kink, i.e., the presentation and proof of scriptural doctrines, by means of
texts and illustrations from the Bible. His ministry, while not popular nor brilliant, was yet sound and
safe, and effective to the accomplishment of good to those who went to the house of God to pray and
hear, and went away to pray and do. It was edifying. It was a means of building up the believer in
faith and hope and love and holiness. He brought a strong reinforcement to his public ministry, in the
beautiful consistency of his daily life.
    He preached in what he did, as well as what he said. His life was a sermon - is a sermon, for
‘being dead he yet speaketh’. His words and his works went hand-in-hand -go hand-in-hand in their
mission of truth and righteousness. venerable steward - his neighbor once remarked, ‘If I had to put
my hand on the head of the best man in the neighborhood, Abner Alexander would be that man.’
This verdict finds a ready echo in the entire community. A good man has gone to his reward. To
cherish his memory - to emulate his example - to follow him, as he followed Jesus through life to
heaven, be this our privilege and pleasure. It was his sad misfortune to lose his wife about nine
months before hid death. His heath, having been on the decline for some time before, he was never
able to rally after his bereavement. He suffered greatly from depression of spirits - underrated his
character and failed to realize, as he might and should have done, the comforts and consolation of our
holy religion. Nevertheless his hold on Christ was firm and unshaken.
    The following resolutions were unanimously adopted by his Quarterly Conference:
    Whereas, it has pleased God in the wisdom of His Providence, to remove from our midst our
brother in Christ - Rev. Abner Alexander, and whereas the deceased was for a long time identified
with this body;
   Resolved:
       1. That we deplore his death as a loss to the community and a calamity to the Church.
       2. That we join in hearty condolence with family at his death and unite with them in the hope
of reunion with him in the mansions of the blessed.
       3. That a page of our Journal be inscribed to the memory of our deceased brother.
       4. That a copy of these resolutions be furnished the family and that a copy be sent to the
Southern Christian Advocate for publication.

Obituary - The following excerpt is taken from an article in what seems to be the Southern Christian
Advocate, circa 1852. Entitled Sumter Circuit in Olden Time, it was written by Rev. W.W. Mood. In
the obituary article, previous to this excerpt, Rev. Mood was describing Bethlehem Church, which was
located, at what is now Bethlehem Cemetery, just north of Bishopville:

   …Rev. Abner Alexander, local Deacon, belonged here. He was universally respected and beloved.
In conversation he spoke very deliberately and quietly. In public prayer he was very fervent. He was
always in accord with the traveling ministry. There never was the slightest jar, and this satisfactory
and pleasant. If I remember correctly, he had appointment every Sabbath, sometimes going far from
home. God made him a blessing to all in that country. I have reason in after years to know his worth
and to be satisfied as to his correct judgment in a matter which threatened the peace, and, I was
going to say, the existence, of Methodism in that country.
   He had a heavy bereavement this year in the death of his son John.

Obituary: Daughter Harriett's obituary from a February 24th issue (year not known) of the Columbia,
South Carolina newspaper, The State, under DEATHS IN SOUTH CAROLINA.

                                            Mrs. H.M. Martin
                                          Special to The State.

    Lugoff, Feb. 24.- Mrs. H.M. Martin died at the home of her son, W.H. Tiller February 17, after an
illness of several weeks. She was 82 years of age. Mrs. Martin was a native of Sumter County and a
daughter of the Methodist preacher, the Rev. Abner Alexander. She first married Henry Tiller and
they made their home in Kershaw. After the death of Mr. Tiller she was married to W.J. Martin. Mrs.
Martin was a member of Sandy Grove Church. Her life was one of a true Christian and she died
steadfast in her faith. She is survived by the following children: Mrs. S.H. Campbell of Cassitt, W.H.
Tiller of Lugoff and H.K. Martin of Bethune.

  In the obituary, Cassatt, located within Kershaw County, South Carolina was misspelled as
"Cassitt".

Obituary: From from the Southern Christian Advocate - Wednesday, July 5, 1871 (page 106, column
5):

                                  DEATH OF REV. ABNER ALEXANDER

   We regret to learn of the death, near Bishopville, S.C. on the 13th of June of this faithful preacher
of the gospel. He belonged to the local ministry, and did effective work. Having served his allotted
time, he has been called to receive his reward. - Christian Neighbor
Obituary: This combination obituary and article for Mrs. Alexander was published in what appears to
be the Southern Christian Advocate. It was written by L. Wood, and included others who had died in
the Bishopville region at that time.

  You'll notice that the writer refers to Massey as “Mary”.
    “…and, now, Mrs. Mary Alexander, wife of Rev. Abner Alexander, is numbered among the
triumphant dead. What a history is hers! She was born April 4th, 1804, joined the church in 1818,
married in 1819, converted in 1820, afflicted with rheumatism in its most violent chronic form since
1840, from which she has been unable to get out of the house since 1860, and yet all the while by her
vigorous intellect maintaining a wise control of her domestic affairs, as well as preserving a bright
religious faith and general knowledge of current events. She was smitten with paralysis about half
past 5 o'clock, p.m., Sunday the 18th Sept. 1870, while Rev. S.H. Browne, was leading the devotions
of the family, in connection with a few old friends, collected from a distance by our third quarterly
conference. From this scene of prayer she was carried in eight short hours, to one of rejoicing and
praise.”

United States Federal Census Reference:

1850 - In this survey, taken in Sumter District, South Carolina, Abner's real estate was valued at
$4,000. His household, surveyed on the September 13th included:

       Abner Alexander, age 54 (Rev. Abner M. Alexander)
       Massey Alexander, age 46 (Massey Ella Belk Alexander "Massey")
       John S Alexander, age 21 (John Singleton Alexander "John")
       Israel J Alexander, age 18 (Israel Jefferson Alexander "Jefferson")
       Martha S Alexander, age 16
       Harriet Alexander, age 14 (Harriett Alexander)
       Benj M Alexander, age 12 (Benjamin M. Alexander)
       Heartwell Alexander, age 10 (Hartwell C. Alexander)
       Jas W Alexander, age 7 (James Wesley Alexander "Wesley")
       Frances S Alexander, age 5

1860 - The survey was taken on June 12th in Bishopville township, Sumter District, South Carolina.
Living either on the same land or next door was son Israel Jefferson Alexander "Jefferson", age 28.
Living just a short distance away was Abner and Massey's son Abijah Elijah "Ebijah" Alexander, age
40, and wife Lydia Mixon Fields Alexander, age 39. According to the census, Abner had slaves then.
Israel Jefferson Alexander "Jefferson" is not listed in the 1860 census, and would have been about
two years old at that time. In the census, Abner's real estate holdings were valued at approximately
$6,000, his personal estate at $17, 375, quite large for that day and time. These were the inhabitants
in the surveyed household:

       Abner Alexander, age 64 (Rev. Abner M. Alexander)
       Massey Alexander, age 56 (Massey Ella Belk Alexander "Massey")
       Harriette M Alexander, age 24
       Hartwell C Alexander, age 20 (Hartwell C. Alexander)
       James W Alexander, age 17 (James Wesley Alexander "Wesley")
       Francis J Alexander (A female whose named was incorrectly spelled due to gender, and
        should be "Frances"), age 16
       Henriette D Alexander, age 9

1870 - The census for Bishopville Township, Sumter County, South Carolina, taken on the 27th of
August was the last one for Massey, who died twenty-four days later. Her name was misspelled in the
survey, and apparently her age was not correct either. Again, Massey was still alive when the survey
was taken. The enumerator found these inhabitants in Abner's household:

       Abner Alexander, at age 75 ("Clergyman") (Rev. Abner M. Alexander)
       Nicey Alexander, age 65 ("Keeping House") (Massey Ella Belk Alexander "Massey")
       James W Alexander, age 27 ("At Home") (James Wesley Alexander "Wesley")
       T J Alexander, age 20 ("Without Occupation")
       H Alexander, age 12 ("At Home")
       John A McLellan, age 16 ("At Home")

ADDIE OLIVIA ALEXANDER
"Addie"
A daughter of John Wesley Alexander "John" and Sarah Ann M. Stewart "Sallie"
Born: August 31, 1883 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: February 8, 1911 at age 27
Marriage: John Lemuel Hill "Lemuel"
Born: September 8, 1874 in Florence County, South Carolina
Died: August 4, 1910
Burial: Addie, Lemuel, and Sallie Mae Hill are buried at Byrd Cemetery, the city cemetery of
Timmonsville, Florence County, South Carolina, one block off of United States Highway 76 on the
western end of town.

Addie and Lemuel’s children include:

       Luther Carlisle Hill "Carlisle" b. April 7, 1906 Florence County, South Carolina d. October 26,
        1935 in the High Hill community of Darlington County, South Carolina at 29 years 6 months
        and 19 days of age - burial: October 27, 1935 at Byrd Cemetery, Timmonsville, Florence
        County, South Carolina
       Martin Gary Hill "Gary" b. August 3, 1908 d. May 30, 1977 m. before 1929 to Rosa Lee (nee?)
        (It's possible that "Lee" was Rosa's surname) - burial: Rose Hill Cemetery, Ardmore, Carter
        County, Oklahoma. The Hills had at least one child: Ruth Hill b. about 1929.
       Sallie May Hill b. January 22, 1911 d. March 30, 1916 at age 5 years 2 months and 8 days in
        the Ebenezer community, Florence County, South Carolina

   Daughter Sallie May Hill died as the result of (death certificate) "Extensive burns, 2nd and 3rd
degree." She was buried March 30, 1916 at Byrd Cemetery, Timmonsville, Florence County, South
Carolina.
   The children's aunt, Maggie Louise "Maggie" Alexander, raised the three orphans following their
parent's death. Maggie was engaged at the time, yet took in the children. She gave up the idea of
her future marriage, and never married.
   Addie and Limuel are said to have died during an elongated flu epidemic. He died About six
months after Addie.
   J.H. Kistler Funeral Home of Darlington, South Carolina handled Carlisle's arrangements. John
Luther Alexander, Sr. (1) "Luther" was the informant on Luther Carlisle's death, which was the result
of a cerebral hemorrhage, a "stroke", rendering him paralyzed previous to his death.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1880 - This June 7th census survey shows John L. Hill at age six. His family was living in
Timmonsville Township, Darlington County, South Carolina. The entire listing of household members,
and their parents were born in South Carolina, including the Parnells. The large household included:

       Calvin Hill, age 49 ("Farmer")
       Sophronia Hill, age 36 ("Wife") ("Keeping House")
       Murry B Hill, age 19 ("Son") ("Working on farm")
       Harriett E Hill, age 16 ("daughter") ("Working on farm")
       Henry C Hill, age 11 ("Son") ("at home")
       Sarah M Hill, age 9 ("daughter")
       John L Hill, age 6 ("Son")
       Clem H Hill, age 3 ("Son")
       Raymon Hill, age 11 months ("Son")
       Harriett Parnell, age 30 ("Servant")
       Henrietta Parnell, age 1
1900 - This enumeration was conducted on June 8th in Timmonville, Florence County, South
Carolina. Even though Lemuel married Addie O. Alexander, he evidently had a sister named Addie, as
well. Future wife Addie Alexander was still living in her father's family as a 17-year-old. The
household included:

       John L Hill, age 25 ("Head") (listed as "single")
       Raymond Hill, age 29 ("Brother")
       Addie Hill, age 14 ("Sister") (listed as "single")

1900 - This survey was taken on the 20th of June in the High Hill Township, Darlington County, South
Carolina. Addie was still living in her parents' household with these inhabitants:

       John W Alexander, age 53 ("Head") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Sarah A Alexander, age 60 ("Wife") (Sarah Ann M. Stewart Alexander "Sallie")
       Henry L Alexander, age 26 ("Son") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Maggie L Alexander, age 20 ("Daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")
       Addie O Alexander, age 17 ("Daughter") (Addie Olivia Alexander "Addie")
       Joseph K Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe")

1920 - This botched-up survey was taken in what was then called Ebenezer Township of Florence
County, South Carolina. It was the location of John's "Lone Tree Farm" on Sallie Hill Road near
Timmonsville in Florence County. Now, people think of Ebenezer as part of the west end of Florence
near the shopping mall on Business I-20. The survey listed John as married, although he was a
widower, and daughter Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie" was listed as his wife. Also, the Hill boys
were John's grandchildren, not nephews. They were, however, Maggie's nephews, sons of Addie
Olivia Alexander Hill. Real wife Sallie Stewart Alexander died in 1917. The survey for John's area was
taken on both the fifth and sixth of January. The household included:

       John W Alexander, age 73 ("Head") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Maggie Alexander, age 38 ("Wife") (incorrect, was daughter) (Maggie Louise Alexander
        "Maggie")
       Carlisle Hill, age 13 ("Nephew") (Luther Carlisle Hill "Carlisle")
       Gary Hill, age 11 ("Nephew") (Martin Gary Hill "Gary")

1930 - Luther Carlisle Hill, a farmer, was listed as one of three people living in his grandfather's home
during the census for Timmonsville Township, Florence County, South Carolina. He was probably
doing the farming at his grandfather's farm, where he lived. Another of the three was his aunt,
Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie", and grandfather John Wesley Alexander was 83 at the survey
time. Luther was 24, and Maggie was 45. The survey was enumerated April 4th. Included were:

       John W Alexander, age 83 ("Head") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Maggie Alexander, age 45 ("Daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")
       Luther C Hill, age 24 ("G. Son") (grandson) (Luther Carlisle Hill "Carlisle")

ALBERT DEWEY ALEXANDER
"Dewey"
A son of Wilton Kenneth Alexander "Kenneth" and Beatrice Lloyd "Bea"
Born: July 17, 1932
Died: August 30, 2005

ALMA JEAN ALEXANDER
"Alma Jean"
A daughter of Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton" and Mavie Edna Jolly "Mavie"
Born: October 1929

ANN ALEXANDER
A daughter of John Alexander and Mary Woodham "Polly"
Born: About 1806
Died: 1870
Ann is not a direct descendant in this line. She was Rev. John William Reese Alexander's sister.
Born: About 1806 Sumter District, South Carolina
Died: 1870 Washington County, Florida
Marriage 1: Before 1846 to William Tiller, Jr.
Born: 1799 Sumter District, South Carolina
Died: April 3, 1840 in Newville, Henry County, Alabama
Marriage 2: February 26, 1853 to Needham Riley

  Ann moved on to Washington County, Florida after William’s passing, and her marriage to
Needham.

ANN ALEXANDER
A daughter of William Frank Alexander, Sr. "Frank" and Grace Andrews

ANTHONY DALE ALEXANDER
 "Tony"
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Jr. "Joe" and Josie Rebecca Timmons "Rebecca"
Born: January 29, 1961

ARIS ALEXANDER of Neshoba and Winston counties, Mississippi
A son of John Alexander and Mary Woodham "Polly"
Born: About 1801
Died: After the 1860 United States Federal Census
Aris is not a direct descendant in this line. He was Rev. John William Reese Alexander's brother.
Born: About 1815 Sumter District, South Carolina
Died: Between June 18, 1870 and June 24, 1880 (census surveys), likely Mississippi
Marriage: About 1840 to Nicy Skinner
Born: About 1822 old Sumter District, South Carolina
Burial: Not known by this research

    Aris and Nicy have many decendants in Mississippi, and although they are seemingly scattered into
different areas, many still live there.
    Many researchers have listed Nicy’s name as “Nicy Jane Skinner”, but I’ve never seen proof that
her middle name was Jane, although the 1870 census lists her as "Nicy J." Her mother, Nicy Jane
(nee?) Skinner.
    Joseph P. Alexander, age 4, is listed in the 1870 U.S. Census survey of Aris' home. According to
descendants of his in Mississippi, he was known as "Joe Pete". The story goes that his grave was
unmarked except for a large rock on top of it. Evidently, when somebody cleaned the cemetery, they
removed the rock, and nobody alive seems to know exactly where his grave is.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1850 - Aris was still living in South Carolina, and was a farmer during this survey for Second Division
Township, Darlington District on September 9th. The census record shows they lived in Darlington
County, but it was not a county until after the War Between the States. His household included:

       Aris Alexander, age 35 ("Farmer")
       Nicey Alexander, age 28
       James S Alexander, age 10
        Leonard Alexander, age 7
        Nancy Alexander, age 5

1860 - The census finds him in Louisville Post Office, the seat of Winston County, Mississippi on the
25th of September. Residents of his household were:

        Aris Alexander, age 45 ("Farmer") (male)
        Nicy Alexander, age 38 (female)
        Jas Alexander, age 20 (male)
        Leonard Alexander, age 17 (male)
        Nancy Alexander, age 15 (female)
        Jno Alexander, age 9 (male)
        Wm Alexander, age 7 (male)
        V W Alexander, age 4 (male)

1870 - This survey was taken in Philadelphia Post Office, Beat 2, Neshoba County, Mississippi on June
18th. Aris' occupation has changed from "Farmer" to "Boardinghouse". The inhabitants of Aris'
household were:

        Aris Alexander, age 69 ("Boardinghouse")
        Nicy J Alexander, age 48 ("Keeping house")
        Nancy J Alexander, age 22 (b. South Carolina)
        John H Alexander, age 19 (b. Mississippi)
        Francis B Alexander, age 9 (male) (b. Mississippi)
        Margaret M Alexander, age 6 (b. Mississippi)
        Joseph P Alexander, age 4 ("Joseph Peter Alexander "Joe Pete")

1880 - Aris had died since the last survey for his family, and now widow Nicy J. Alexander was the
"Head of Household" as this survey was taken on the 24th and 25th of June in Beat #2, Attalla
County, Mississippi. Her household included:

        Nicy J Alexander, age 59 ("Head" and "Keeping house")
        Francis B Alexander, age 19 ("Son" and "Laborer")
        Margaret M Alexander, age 16 ("Daughter" and "At home"
        Joseph P Alexander, age 13 ("Son" and "Laborer") ("Joseph Peter Alexander "Joe Pete")

ARNOLD CEIL ALEXANDER, JR.
A son of Arnold Ceil Alexander, Sr. "Arnold" and Maggie Mae Rogers "Maggie"
Born: November 4, 1947

ARNOLD CEIL ALEXANDER, SR.
"Arnold"
A son of John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" (1) and Nettie Hatchell
Born: February 14, 1912
Died: December 28, 1983 at age 71 Florence, Florence County, South Carolina
Marriage: June 20, 1932 to Maggie Mae Rogers
Born: May 22, 1917
Died: February 15, 2002
Burial: Arnold and Maggie are buried at Pine Grove United Methodist Church, Darlington County,
South Carolina near Timmonsville.

Arnold   and Maggie’s children include:
         Arnold Ceil Alexander, Jr.
         Eldridge Lee Alexander
         Grace Elizabeth Alexander "Grace"
       John Luther Alexander, Sr. (2) " Luther" b. June 20, 1944 d. July 14, 2009 at age 65

Maggie’s parents were:

       William Everett Rogers b. November 23, 1885 d. September 15, 1929
       Eunice Vista Folsom b. December 31, 1882 d. March 11, 1960

Burial: The Rogers are buried at Newman Swamp United Methodist Church, Lamar, Darlington County,
South Carolina

   Arnold lived at “Alexander’s Crossroads” all of his life, just yards away from the present-day Pine
Grove United Methodist on South Carolina Highway 340. The crossroads got the name because
Arnold and his parents lived and worked at the crossroads in earlier years. His father, Luther owned
and operated a country store there. On a related note, I once saw a map of the Timmonsville area on
the wall in the downtown Timmonsville Post Office, and it denoted Alexander Crossroads.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1920 - Arnold's mother, Nettie Hatchell Alexander had died in 1916. Father Luther had remarried, and
Arnold's family was living in Indian Branch, School District 23, Darlington County, South Carolina. The
enumeration took place in their vicinity on the 23rd and 27th of January, probably right before and
after a weekend. Inhabitants of the household were:

       J Luther Alexander, age 41 ("Head") (John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" [1])
       Bertha R Alexander, age 42 ("Wife") (Bertha Rosalie Lechner Alexander "Bertha")
       Marie Alexander, age 16 ("Daughter")
       Julia Alexander, age14 ("Daughter")
       Mary Alexander, age 12 ("Daughter") (Mary Berta Alexander "Mary")
       Arnold Alexander, age 7 ("Son") (Arnold Ceil Alexander, Sr. "Arnold")

1930 - Anderson School District, Darlington County, South Carolina was the household's location
during this survey, taken by Luther's nephew, Roy Dudley Hatchell on April 2nd. Those in the
household were:

       John L Alexander, age 52 ("Head") (John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" [1])
       Bertha M Alexander, age 52 ("Wife") (Bertha Rosalie Lechner Alexander "Bertha")
       Arnold Alexander, age 19 ("Son") (Arnold Ceil Alexander, Sr. "Arnold")
       Helen Alexander, age 9 ("Daughter") (Helen Flora Alexander "Helen")

1930 - Anderson School District, Darlington County, South Carolina was the household's location
during this survey, taken by Arnold's first cousin, Roy Dudley Hatchell on April 2nd. Those in the
household were:

       John L Alexander, age 52 ("Head") (John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" [1])
       Bertha M Alexander, age 52 ("Wife") (Bertha Rosalie Lechner Alexander "Bertha")
       Arnold Alexander, age 19 ("Son") (Arnold Ceil Alexander, Sr. "Arnold")
       Helen Alexander, age 9 "Daughter" (Helen Flora Alexander "Helen")

ASA JUNIOUS ALEXANDER
"Junious"
A son of Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie" and Frances Olivia Jernigan "Olivia"
Born: December 1898 South Carolina
Died: South Carolina
Burial: Junious is buried in the old family cemetery located on the former "Lone Tree Farm", John
Wesley Alexander's property in rural Timmonsville, Florence County, South Carolina at the Darlington
County line.

  Asa was a teenager at his death.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1900 - On June 20th the survey was taken at Junious' parents' home in the High Hill Township of
Darlington County. Counties were about to change, and Florence County would be taking over the
area of "Lone Tree Farm", father John Wesley Alexander's property. John Wesley Alexander's
property didn't change, only borders. Charlie's household included:

       Charles E Alexander, age 28 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Frances O Alexander, age 19 ("Wife") (Frances Olivia Jernigan Alexander "Olivia")
       Asa J Alexander, age 1 ("Son") (Asa Junious Alexander "Junious")

BARBARA LYNN ALEXANDER
"Barbara" and "Bobbie"
A daughter of Belvin Ryan Alexander "Belvin" and "Bill", and Jennie Lee Caddell "Jennie"
Born: January 23, 1947

BARNEY KIRBY ALEXANDER
"Barney" and "B.K."
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe" and Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: May 12, 1925 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: April 9, 1945 in Belgium during World War II’s infamous “Battle of the Bulge” at age 19
Burial: Lorraine American Cemetery, Plot E Row 34 Grave 35, St. Avold, France.

    I’m guessing that B.K.’s uncle, Barney Ward could have been this Barney's namesake. Mr. Ward
was married to B.K.'s mother's sister, Laura Hancock Ward.
    During World War II, he was a Private First Class in the United States Army, 255th Regiment, 63rd
Infantry Division. His serial number was 34966578.
    His World War II enlistment in the the Army took place at Fort Bragg, North Carolina on March 29,
1944. The registration says that he was from Darlington, South Carolina. It also said that he weighed
"100", but it also had his height as "00".
    B.K. fought and died in “The Battle of the Bulge”, in which 19,000 were killed, and 60,000 injured.
It was the largest land battle of World War II, and extremely rough on the men, mostly due to the
intense cold, lack of non-frozen water, and a shortage of supplies. In scope and number of
participants, no American engagement in history was more costly or massive. Winston Churchill called
it “the greatest American battle of the war”, and it is considered to be the breaking point in the war
against Hitler for good reason. Germany surrendered a few weeks later in May. The battle was also
known as the "Ardennes Offensive" and the "Von Rundstedt Offensive", taking place December 16,
1944 through January 25, 1945. It was a major German offensive through the densely forested
Ardennes Mountains region of Wallonia in Belgium.
    Pvt. Alexander posthumously earned the Purple Heart, is on the World War II Honor Roll, and his
name, along with three other local soldiers who died in World War II is engraved on a monument
gatepost at Philadelphia United Methodist Church, Darlington County, South Carolina. Another of the
three is Olin Clyde Folsom "Olin", who B.K.'s sister, Gladys Myrtis Alexander (Gladys), married during
the war.

Letter - From B.K.’s Commander, Lt. Col. James E. Hatcher:

Mrs. Fannie H. Alexander
Route 2
Timmonsville, South Carolina
My dear Mrs. Alexander:

   Please accept my deepest and heartfelt sympathies in the loss of your son, Barney K. Alexander,
34966578, Company B, 255th Infantry, who gave his life in battle on 9 April 1945 for his country. He
was buried in the United States Military Cemetery in Western Germany and services were conducted
by the Protestant Chaplain, who officiated.
   There is little one can do or say at such time to help ease the burden that is yours. While I did not
know your son personally, I do know that he enjoyed the high respect and admiration of the officers
and men with whom he was associated. The sacrifice he has made, his devotion to duty, and his
courage will not be forgotten, and will serve to inspire us to better efforts.

Sincerely yours,
James E. Hatcher
Lt. Col., Infantry
Commanding

Letter - From one of his teachers, Theron Anderson:

Dear Mr. and Mrs. Alexander:

    I am writing to let you know that I feel very deeply for you in the loss of your son, ‘B.K.’ As you
know he was in my classroom in Lamar for a number of months. In fact I had known him as a little
boy but had not been with him for a number of years. I don't know that I have every told you just
what I thought of B.K. I have remarked to my parents at home something of my appreciation for
him. I can say to you now that B.K. was one of the finest boys I have ever had the privilege of
teaching. He was courteous, quiet and orderly. He never did one thing in the classroom that made it
necessary for me to have to ask for his attention. He did a fair grade of work but you always had the
feeling that he knew more than his paper showed because he was always attentive. I know that such
comments about him will not bring him to you but I know it will mean something to you to know that
one who knew him admired him. I know nothing of his record as a soldier but I believe he was every
inch a true American soldier who did well what he was asked to do.
    I wish to express my sincere sympathy for you and the other members of the family. You know
that I can feel for you in that I lost a very dear brother in the same horrible conflict. I wonder if there
is anything we can do to atone for what those boys have done for us. If in anyway I can be of service
to you please don't hesitate to call on me.

Your sincere friend
Theron J. Anderson

Letter - From B.K. to older brother Lee Alexander, postmarked “Camp Van Dorn, Mississippi,
September 2, 1944, 1 p.m.” It was return addressed “Company B, 255 Infantry, A.P.O. 410, Camp
Van Dorn, Mississippi":

Sept. 1, 1944
Camp Van Dorn

Dear Lee,

   Received your letter today and sure was glad to hear from you. I hope this finds you all well. As it
leaves me just fine. Or at least I think I'm O.K.
   I sure would like to see you and the family now. It seems like ages. I'm figuring on being home
very shortly. This pen I got won't hardly write. It's one I borrowed. Someone borrowed one out of
my locker p.m. So now I haven't any. I hope the tobacco continues to sell good. As it has in the
past. It sure does rain a lot out here. For the last few days I have got soaking wet every afternoon.
Tell Edith and Mary “hello” for me. I'll close now will write more next time.
Love,
B.K.
P.S. Got a letter from Belvin a few days ago.

Letter - To brother Joseph Lee Alexander "Lee" was written by B.K. just a little over two months
before his death.

France
March 2, 1945

Dear Lee,

This leaves me fine and hope you are the same. How is Mary and Edith? Tell them hello for me. I
haven't time but to write a line or two but will try to pick a time to write more next time. I guess you
have your crop well under way by this time.
I'll close for now. Answer soon.

Love,
B.K.”

Article - The newspaper that published this news clip on B.K. is not known by this research:

                                             Killed in Action

  Darlington. May 4 - Mr. and Mrs. J.K. Alexander, of the Philadelphia section of Darlington County,
have been notified by the War Department that their son, Private B.K. Alexander, of the U.S. Army,
had been killed in action somewhere in Germany.
  Private Alexander had been overseas for the past several months. He entered the armed forces
sometime ago. He had served in France, Holland, Belgium and in Germany recently.

Newspaper article - A poem written by a niece to honor her Uncle B.K.: The late Ruth Alexander,
daughter of B.K.'s brother, Clifton Alexander, got her poem published in the May 19, 1945 edition
of Florence Morning News. At the end of the poem was the credit, Written by Ruth Alexander of
Center School (Timmonsville), 5th grade.

A Hero Who Went Away
In honor of Barney K. Alexander
Special to Morning News:
Timmonsville, May 19, 1945
He was a hero of this war
A hero so brave and true,
We needed him here on earth
But God needed him too.
I wish this war would have ended
Before he was called away
The news reached our shore on Saturday.
And oh, what a price to pay.
There were many tears shed
On that sad, sad, day
I prayed that we would meet him
After he had passed away.
I'm sure he has been fighting
And doing what he could
So this cruel war would end
In peace like it should.
He fought in lots of countries, states
And also towns.
I guess he tried to kill every enemy
He saw who was around.
We know there's a vacant chair ready,
For a soldier who we all knew
He was fighting for a country of freedom
And for the red, white and blue.
I'm sure his name was written
On the roll book God has above,
A name of a brave hero,
A hero we all loved.
I'm sure he said a prayer to God
To guide and save us all.
And I guess he was proud to go
When God had called.”

BELVIN RYAN ALEXANDER
"Belvin" and "Bill"
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe" and Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: April 15, 1913 Florence County, South Carolina
Died: February 3, 1989 at age 75 at home in Florence, Florence County, South Carolina
Marriage: March 17, 1946 to Jennie Lee Caddell "Jennie"
Born: April 11, 1915 Berkley County, South Carolina near Moncks Corner
Died: May 18, 2010 Florence, Florence County, South Carolina
Burial: Jennie and Belvin are entombed within the indoor sectiion of the mausoleum at Florence
Memorial Gardens, Old Timmonsville Highway, Cashua Drive, Florence, Florence County, South
Carolina.

Belvin and Jennie’s children are:

       Barbara Lynn Alexander "Barbara" and "Bobbie"
       Patricia Kay Alexander "Patricia" and "Pat"

Jennie was a daughter of:

       Sam Caddell
       Nettie (nee?)

    Rev. John L. Jernigan performed the wedding vows for the Jennie and Belvin union.
    Belvin was manager of railroad-related Fruit Growers Express in Florence for many years, and
following the close of the Florence branch of Fruit Growers Express, a company that iced trains, he
worked for a relatively short period of time in Fort Myers, Florida with the same corporation.
Refrigeration train cars eventually phased out the need for ice. Belvin was getting around retirement
age by that time, and returned to Florence to spend the rest of his days.
    He was a member of the Breakfast Optimist Club and the Amity Masonic Lodge #340 in Florence,
Brotherhood of Retired Railroad Men, and a member and Steward of Saint Paul United Methodist
Church on West Palmetto Street in Florence.
    Belvin's name is inscribed in his parents’ family bible as Belvin “Rhyne” Alexander, yet he always
spelled it “Ryan”.
    From United States World War II Army Enlistment Records: Belvin R. Alexander; b. 1913; White;
Citizen; Native of South Carolina; Resident of South Carolina; (County or city) Florence; Enlisted June
26, 1941; Enlisted in South Carolina; Enlisted at Fort Jackson, Columbia; Private; four years of high
school; Single, without dependants; 69 inches in height; and 215 pounds.
Tribute - Daughter Patricia remembers...

    Belvin Ryan Alexander was a special man. His family, his church, and his friends were the most
important things in his life.
     He loved his family. He and Jennie were married for 43 years before his death. He was the kind
of father every child should have. He had an abundance of patience and a great sense of humor.
Even though he worked long, hard hours at the ice plant, he always had time for his children and their
friends. He spent hours in the yard surrounded by neighborhood children. He had the Alexander
knack for telling an outrageous tale with such a straight face you weren't sure if he was teasing you or
not. He drank ‘tea’ from dainty china teacups, had his fortune told by 5-year-old gypsies, bought
gallons of Kool-Aid from card-table stands, and drove carpools with a gentle, steady humor. He didn't
endure these activities, but enjoyed them.
     Belvin and his brother Lee were especially close. Belvin lived with Lee and his wife, Edith, some
before he got married. Over the years they shared many family activities and celebrations. They
planted a garden together on Lee's farm each summer. Others enjoyed being around Belvin and Lee
because they enjoyed each other's company so much.
    Belvin had two daughters and two granddaughters. He passed his love of growing things on to his
older grandchild, Susie. She frequently stayed with her grandparents on weekends and during
summer vacations. Emily, his younger grandchild, was especially lucky because she lived in the same
town as "Granddaddy". He had retired before she was born so they were playmates. Granddaddy
would be hanging out of the door waiting when he knew his “buddy” was coming. They spent hours
swinging in the backyard and playing “I Spy”.
    Belvin loved to watch ball games on television and to fish - winter or summer. He was very active
at his church, St. Paul United Methodist Church He visited shut-ins weekly and delivered “Meals on
Wheels” to the elderly when he was in his seventies. He didn't seem to realize the “old people” he
was helping were often younger than him!
     Belvin died on Friday, February 3, 1989 while working in his yard. It was a quick, peaceful death
like his father before him. Hundreds of people filled the church at his funeral. It was a tribute to a
loving, funny, precious man who liked just about everyone he met and accepted each person for the
good he found in them. I don't believe he realized he always saw the good in people because he
brought out the best in them.
     Belvin Ryan Alexander was a special man.

BERTHA MARIE ALEXANDER
"Marie"
A daughter of John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" (1) and Nettie Hatchell
Born: August 27, 1903
Died: February 1, 1967 at age 64
Marriage: David Woodruff Fields "David"
Born: March 6, 1897 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: April 4, 1968 Hartsville, Darlington County, South Carolina
Burial: Marie and David are buried at Westview Cemetery in Hartsville, Darlington County, South
Carolina.

Marie and David's children include:

       Dorothy Fields
       Marian Fields

David's parents were:

       Paron Fields b. October 15, 1868 d. April 2, 1930 at age 61 in Darlington, Darlington County,
        South Carolina
       Rosa Mae Barnes b. 1879 d. At age 70. Paron was buried April 3, 1930 at Wesley Chapel
        United Methodist Church, Lydia, Darlington County, South Carolina. He was a farmer, and
        according to his death certificate, his father was P.G. Fields, and his mother was ? Havrle
        (difficult to read the census information). Both of Paron's parents were born in South
        Carolina. Rosa Mae Barnes' father was Thomas Nathaniel Barnes.

BETTY EVELYN ALEXANDER
"Evelyn"
A daughter of Wilton Kenneth Alexander "Kenneth" and Beatrice Lloyd "Bea"
Born: January 10, 1946

CARL H. ALEXANDER
A son of Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry", and Laura M. Raines
Born: May 27, 1919 South Carolina
Died: December 10, 1994
Marriage: Dorothy Shealy "Dot"
Born: January 12, 1926 Greenwood County, South Carolina
Died: May 13, 2011 Greenwood County, South Carolina at age 85
Burial: Dot is buried at Elmwood Cemetery in Greenwood. I don’t know if Carl is buried there, too.
The cemetery is located in Ninety-Six, Greenwood County, South Carolina.

   Carl was a six foot one, one hundred and ninety pound professional baseball player in the minor
leagues from 1939 to 1946, possibly longer, with a batting average ranging from .211 to .325 during
his pro career. He started professionally in 1939, and played for: (1939) Ashland Colonels of the
Mountain State League; (1939) Orlando Senators, Florida State League (parent team was
"Washington"); (1940) Ashland Colonels of the Mountain State League; (1941) Columbia Reds of the
South Atlantic League (parent team was "Cincinnati"); and (1946) Knoxville Smokies of the Tri-State
League. I don't know how long he remained with that particular team. All records found on Carl, so
far, have indicated that he may have been untruthful about his age when he joined professional
baseball. Most of the stats I've seen on him have him listed at about 2 years older than he actually
was.
   According to enlistment records, Carl joined the United States Army on May 23, 1941 at Ft.
Jackson, South Carolina near Columbia. That stopped his baseball career until after the war, in 1946.
   According to the Social Security Death Index, his final residence was in Greenville, Greenville
County, South Carolina.

Obituary - Dot Alexander's after-the-funeral version of her obituary:

   Dorothy Shealy "Dot" Alexander, 85, widow of Carl H. Alexander, died May 13, 2011 at Wesley
Commons in Greenwood. Born in Greenwood, she was a daughter of the late DeWitt T. and Annette
Summer Shealy.
   Mrs. Alexander was retired from Greenwood Mills, Ninety Six Plant, and was an Avon representative
for more than 42 years. She was a member of the St. Paul United Methodist Church.
   Survivors include her daughter, Ann (Randy) Stephenson, Ninety Six, five grandchildren, Amanda
Brock and John Stephenson, both of Ninety Six, Carla Dean, Rutherfordton, North Carolina, Deidre
Alexander, Charleston, and Drew Wilson, Ninety Six; five great-grandchildren.
   In addition to her husband and parents, she was predeceasedf by a brother, Earl Shealy.
   Funeral services were conducted at the St. Paul United Methodist Church; Revs. Philip Chandler and
Thomas Cartledge officiated. Burial followed in Elmwood Cemetery. The Blyth Funeral Home and
Cematory Services of Greenwood assisted the family with the arrangement.
   Pallbearers were Irby Shealy, Ronnie Shealy, Richard Shealy, Paul Johnson, Ned Johnson, Jimmy
Norris, Stanley Bell, and Colin Gunnells.
   Honorary escorts were the staff of Wesley Commons and Hospice Care of the Piedmont, Friends of
96 Depot along witrh Suzy Farrar, Leonard Bryan, Helen Belue, Frances Pratt, Ruby Turner, and Jamie
Brown.
   Memorials may be made to St. Paul United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 66, Ninety Six, South
Carolina 29666, or to Hospice Care of the Piedmont;, 408 W. Alexander Avenue, Greenwood, South
Carolina, 29646.

Obituary - This is Dot's alternative version of her obituary, made available from Blythe Funeral Home:

                                          DOT ALEXANDER

   Dorothy Shealy "Dot" Alexander, 85, former resident of Wilson Bridge Road, widow of Carl H.
Alexander, died May 13, 2011 at Wesley Commons in Greenwood.
   Born in Greenwood, January 12, 1926, she was a daughter of the late DeWitt T. and Annette
Summer Shealy. Mrs. Alexander was retired from Greenwood Mills, Ninety Six Plant, and was a Avon
Represented for over 42 years. She was a member of St. Paul United Methodist Church.
   Surviving are a daughter, Ann Stephenson and husband Randy of Ninety Six and a son, Doug
Alexander and fiancé Darla of Ninety Six; five grandchildren, Amanda Brock and Jon Stephenson, both
of Ninety Six, Carla Dean of Rutherfordton, NC, Deidre Alexander of Charleston and Drew Wilson of
Ninety Six; five great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by a brother, Earl Shealy.
   Funeral services will be conducted at 3:00 PM Monday at St. Paul United Methodist Church with
Rev. Philip Chandler and Rev. Thomas Cartledge officiating.
   Burial will be in Elmwood Cemetery.
   Pallbearers will be Irby Shealy, Ronnie Shealy, Richard Shealy, Paul Johnson, Ned Johnson, Jimmy
Norris, Stanley Bell and Colin Gunnells.
   Honorary escort will be the staff of Wesley Commons and Hospice Care of the Piedmont, Friends of
96 Depot along with Suzy Farrar, Leonard Bryan, Helen Belue, Frances Pratt, Ruby Turner and Jamie
Brown.
   The body is at Blyth Funeral Home and will be placed in the church at 2:00 PM Monday.
   The family is at the home of her daughter and son-in-law, Ann and Randy Stephenson, 1706 Island
Ford Road in Ninety Six and will receive friends at the church from 2:00 to 3:00 Monday afternoon.
   Memorials may be made to St. Paul United Methodist Church, PO Box 66, Ninety Six, SC 29666 or
to Hospice Care of the Piedmont, 408 W. Alexander Avenue, Greenwood, SC 29646.

1920 - Although Carl's father Henry was shown as being single in the census for Greenville Township,
Greenville County, South Carolina, taken on January 10th, wife Laura was listed as a "Wife". In the
household on that survey were:

       Henry L Alexander, age 48 ("Head") (Henry Lee Alexander)
       Laura Alexander, age 36 ("Wife") (Laura M. Raines Alexander)
       Eugean Alexander, age 11 ("Son")
       Edna Alexander, age 7 ("Daughter")
       William Alexander, age 4 years 9 months ("Son") (William A Alexander)
       Carl Alexander, age 1 year 8 months ("Son") (Carl H. Alexander)

1930 - Henry and the family were living in Greenville Township, Greenville County, South Carolina in
this survey, taken on April 14th. Henry's "Industry" was listed as "Barber shop", and Laura's was
"Sewing fac." (factory). She was a seamstress. The household included:

       Henry L Alexander, age 57 ("Head") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Laura M Alexander, age 47 ("Wife") (Laura M. Raines Alexander)
       Willliam A Alexander, age 15 ("Son")
       Carl H Alexander, age 12 ("Son")
       Leland S Alexander, age 9 ("Son")
       James H Alexander, age 6 ("Son")

CAROL ALEXANDER
(Infant) A daughter of Joseph Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" and Bertha Rosalie Lechner "Bertha"
Born: November 19, 1918
Died: September 21, 1919 at almost ten months of age
Burial: Pine Grove United Methodist Church, Darlington County, South Carolina near Timmonsville

CAROLYN BEATRICE ALEXANDER
"Carolyn"
A daughter of Wilton Kenneth Alexander "Kenneth" and Beatrice Lloyd "Bea"
Born: October 29, 1939

CHARLES ENGRAM ALEXANDER
"Charlie"
A son of John Wesley Alexander "John" and Sarah Ann M. Stewart "Sallie"
Born: September 29, 1871 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: January 9, 1949 at home at age 67
Marriage 1: About 1898 to Frances Olivia Jernigan "Olivia
Born: May 1881
Died: August 1907
Marriage 2: Ida Eula Jeffords "Ida"
Born: December 5, 1881
Died: July 15, 1949 of heart problems (according to her death certificate)
Burial: Olivia and a few of her children are buried at the old family cemetery on "Lone Tree Farm"
next to the waters of Lake Swamp, Timmonsville, Florence County, South Carolina at the Darlington
County line on Sallie Hill Road. Charlie and Ida were buried at Pine Grove United Methodist Church,
South Carolina Highway 340, Darlington County, South Carolina. Ida was buried on July 17, 1949.
Daniel Madison Jeffords is also buried at Pine Grove United Methodist Church.

Charlie and Olivia’s children include:

       Asa Junious Alexander "Junious"
       William Frank Alexander, Sr. "Frank"
       Mildred Olivia Alexander "Mildred"

Children from Charlie and Ida’s union include:

       Charles Ira Alexander "Ira"
       Daniel Allen Alexander "Allen"
       Eula Myrtle Alexander "Myrtle"
       Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl"
       James Ervin Alexander "James"
       John Wesley Alexander (2) "Johnny"
       Margaret Leola Alexander "Leola"
       Sally Louise Alexander "Sally"
       Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow"

Ida's parents were:

       Daniel Madison Jeffords b. August 5, 1842 d. November 16, 1909 in Darlington County, South
        Carolina
       Margaret Hatchell b. Darlington County, South Carolina
       Two brothers of Ida, listed in her obituary, were:
       Morgan Jeffords
       Bunyan Jeffords

   Bunyan Jeffords was living in Dovesville, Darlington County, South Carolina at the time of her
obituary, and brother Morgan was living the in the Pine Grove community of Darlington County, South
Carolina.
    Ida was listed on her death certificate as being a "domestic", and that she had lived there all of her
life.

Obituary - Publication not known to this research, dated January 12, 1949, yet datelined January
11th:

   DARLINGTON, January 11 – Charles E. Alexander, 77, planter died last night (his grave marker
says he died on January 9th) at his residence at Oates. He had been in declining health for some
time.
   Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock at the Pine Grove Methodist
Church, conducted by the pastor, J.P. Raquemore, pastor of the Southern Methodist of Philadelphia.
Nephews of the deceased will serve as pallbearers, and grand-nieces will be in charge of the flowers.
   Mr. Alexander was born in Darlington County. He was a member of the Methodist Church, and
farmed extensively.
   He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Ida Jeffords Alexander; five sons, Frank Alexander, Earl
Alexander, Woodrow Alexander, Ira Alexander, all of Oates; and James Alexander of Hartsville; two
daughters, Mrs. Howard Watford of Lamar and Mrs. Harley Newsome of Hartsville; two brothers,
Luther Alexander and Joe Alexander, both of Timmonsville; two sisters, Miss Maggie Alexander and
Mrs. George Hatchell, both of Timmonsville. Six grandchildren survive also.

Obituary - Charlie's second wife, Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida" in a publication not known to this
research.

   DARLINGTON – Mrs. Charlie E. Alexander, 67, of the Oates section of Darlington County, died
Friday night at 9:30 o’clock.
   Funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at 5 o’clock at the Pine Grove Methodist Church
conducted by the Reverend F.L. Frazier, assisted by the Reverend L.A. Houneycutt and the Reverend
J.P. Raquemore. Interment will take place in the Thornell Cemetery (Thornal is correct).
   Mrs. Alexander was born in Darlington County and she had lived here all of her life. She made
home with a son, Woodrow Alexander.
   Her husband died in January of this year.
   Surviving are five sons, Frank Alexander, Earl Alexander, Woodrow Alexander, Ira Alexander all of
Oates, James Alexander of Hartsville; two daughters, Mrs. Howard Watford of Lamar, Mrs. H. Newson
(Newsome is correct) of Hartsville; two brothers, Bunyan Jeffords of Dovesville, Morgan Jeffords of
the Pine Grove community.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1900 - Charlie and his family were surveyed in the High Hill Township of Darlington County next to, or
on the same property with brother Luther’s family and father John Wesley Alexander’s (1) family. In
that survey Charlie was 28, had been married to Olivia for two years (she was 19 at the time of the
survey), and they had one son, Asa Junious, who was a year old.

1900 - On June 20th the survey was taken in the High Hill Township of Darlington. Counties were
about to change, and Florence County would be taking over the area of "Lone Tree Farm", father John
Wesley Alexander's property. John Wesley's didn't change, only borders. Charlie's household
included:

       Charles E Alexander, age 28 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Frances O Alexander, age 19 ("Wife") (Frances Olivia Jernigan "Frances")
       Asa J Alexander, age 1 ("Son") (Asa Junious Alexander "Junious")

1920 - Charlie, Ida, and their family were living on "Lone Tree Farm" in the area then known as
Ebenezer Township, Florence County, now considered farther east on the edge of the City of Florence
in Florence County, South Carolina. The survey was taken on both January 5th and 6th.
       Charlie Alexander, age 49 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Ida Alexander, age 38 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
       Frank Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (William Frank Alexander "Frank")
       Earl Alexander, age 10 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl")
       James Alexander, age 8 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "James")
       Woodrow Alexander, age 5 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
       Allen Alexander, age 1 and a half years ("Son") (Daniel Allen Alexander "Allen")

1930 - Charlie was living on his father's land "Lone Tree Farm" in Timmonsville Township, Florence
County, South Carolina during this survey. In his household were:

       Charlie E Alexander, age 60 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Ida Alexander, age 48 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
       Earl Alexander, age 20 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander ("Earl")
       James I Alexander, age 19 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "James")
       Woodrow W Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
       Ira Alexander, age 9 ("Son") (Charles Ira Alexander "Ira")
       Leola Alexander, age 6 ("Daughter") (Margaret Leola Alexander "Leola")
       Sallie L Alexander, age 1 year 10 months ("Daughter") (Sally Louise Alexander "Sallie")

CHARLES IRA ALEXANDER
"Ira"
A son of Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie" and Ida Eula Jeffords "Ida"
Born: December 20, 1920 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: September 9, 1979 at age 58
Marriage: April 28, 1957 Darlington County, South Carolina to Allien U. Odom
Born: March 1, 1922
Died: At her home on Indian Branch Road near Darlington, Darlington County, South Carolina June 5,
2003 following an illness. She was 81.
Burial: Darlington Memory Gardens, Hartsville, Darlington County, South Carolina. Allien was buried
there on June 8, 2003.

    United States Army Corporal Ira Alexander served during World War II.
    Mrs. Alexander was a daughter of William Jacob and Mildred Iseman, and actively involved as a
lifelong member of Indian Branch United Methodist Church. She was the historian, a member of the
Ladies Aid Society, a long-standing choir member, and teacher of the Lottie McSwain Sunday School
class for many years. She had a sister alive at the time of her death, Mae Belle Odom Hamilton of
Baltimore, Maryland.

Obituary - Morning News June 7, 2003

   DARLINGTON -- Allien U. Odom Alexander, 81, of Darlington died Thursday, June 5, 2003, at her
home on Indian Branch Road after an illness.
   Funeral services will be held on Sunday, June 8, 2003 at 3 PM in the Indian Branch United
Methodist Church conducted by Reverend Steve Zimmerman. Burial will follow in Darlington Memory
Gardens directed by Kistler-Hardee Funeral Home.
   Mrs. Alexander was born in Darlington County on March 1, 1922. She was the daughter of the late
William Jacob Odom and Mildred Iseman Odom. Mrs. Alexander was the widow of the late Charles Ira
Alexander. She was a life member of the Indian Branch United Methodist Church, where she was
actively involved. Mrs. Alexander served as the church historian, a member of the Ladies Aid Society,
a long-standing choir member and teacher of the Lottie McSwain Sunday School class for many years.
   Mrs. Alexander is survived by her sister, Mae Belle Odom Hamilton of Baltimore, MD and by many
nieces, nephews and friends.
   The family will receive friends at Kistler-Hardee Funeral Home on Saturday, June 7, 2003 from 6-8
PM.
  Memorials may be made to McLeod Hospice, 555 Cheves Street, Florence, SC, 29501.

1930 - Ira's parents were living on John Wesley Alexander's "Lone Tree Farm" in Timmonsville
Township, Florence County, South Carolina during this survey. In his household were:
    Charlie E Alexander, age 60 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
    Ida Alexander, age 48 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
    Earl Alexander, age 20 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl")
    James I Alexander, age 19 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "James")
    Woodrow W Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
    Ira Alexander, age 9 ("Son") (Charles Ira Alexander "Ira")
    Leola Alexander, age 6 ("Daughter") (Margaret Leola Alexander "Leola")
    Sallie L Alexander, age 1 year 10 months ("Daughter") (Sally Louise Alexander "Sally")

CORNELIA CAROLINE ALEXANDER
"Caroline"
A daughter of John Alexander and Mary Woodham "Polly"
Born: About 1825
Died: After June 7, 1880
Marriage: William James Hall "Jim"
Born: About 1822 South Carolina
Died: After June 7, 1880
Caroline is not a direct descendant in this line. She was Rev. John William Reese Alexander's sister.
Burial: The Hall’s place of burial is not known by this research.

Jim Hall was a son of:

       William Hall b. About 1790 North Carolina
       Judy Hall b. About 1792 South Carolina

United States Federal Census Reference:

1860 - In the census, taken within Tiller's Ferry Post Office, Second Division, Kershaw County, South
Carolina on June 26th. The entire family was born in South Carolina. Inhabitants of the household
were:

       W J Hall, age 38 ("Planter") (male) (William James Hall "Jim")
       C C Hall, age 35 (female) (Cornelia Caroline Alexander Hall "Caroline")
       M Hall, age 14 (female)
       W D Hall, age 12 (female) (census error: W.D. was a male)
       Ervin Hall, age 8 (male) (Ervin E. Hall)
       M S Hall, age 6 (male) (Shelton M. Hall)
       P C Hall, age 1 (female) (Piety C. Hall)

1870 - This survey, taken on August 26th, was taken at, Tiller's Ferry Post Office, Buffalo Township,
Kershaw County, South Carolina. The entry with the Erwin E. Hall was probably a mistake. It is listed
as Ervin in the 1860, and Carolina had a brother named Irvin, for whom he may have been named.
This time the household included:

       William J Hall, age 48 ("Farmer") (William James Hall "Jim")
       Caroline C Hall, age 45 ("keeping house") (Cornelia Carolina Alexander Hall "Caroline")
       Judith A Hall, age 23 ("at home")
       Erwin E Hall, age 16 ("Labors on farm")
       Shelton M Hall, age 15 ("Labors on farm")
       Piety C Hall, age 12 ("at home")
       Lydda L Hall, age 9 ("at home")
       Abraham L Hall, age 5 ("at home")

1880 - In this June 7th survey the Halls were in Buffalo Township, Kershaw County, South Carolina.
Noticable differences to the last survey wer the switching of the names of Jim and Caroline. He was
now J.W. instead of William J., and Caroline C. was changed to C. Caroline. "C.P. Hall" and "Piety C.
Hall" (1870 survey) were Piety Caroline Hall b. March 9, 1859, Darlington District (now Lee County),
South Carolina d. April 15, 1940 at age 81 m. Ben Stephens. Thanks to Sue Gill for the information on
Piety Hall Stephens. Inhabitants of the household were:

       J W Hall, age 58 ("Farmer") (William James Hall "Jim")
       C Carolina Hall, age 55 ("Wife") (Cornelia Caroline Alexander Hall "Caroline")
       D D W Hall, age 32 ("Son")
       C P Hall, age 21 ("Daughter) (Piety C. Hall)
       D L V Hall, age 18 ("Daughter")
       L A Hall, age 15 ("Daughter")

DANIEL ALLEN ALEXANDER
"Allen" (A teenager at his death)
A son of Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie" and Ida Eula Jeffords "Ida"
Born: September 4, 1927
Died: In the Ebenezer township, Florence County, South Carolina
Burial: Pine Grove United Methodist Church, Darlington County, South Carolina in an unmarked grave
near his parents

United States Federal Census Reference:

1920 - Allen's parents were living on "Lone Tree Farm", John Wesley Alexander's land in the area then
known as Ebenezer Township, Florence County, now the name of an area considered farther east on
the edge of the City of Florence in Florence County, South Carolina. The survey was taken in their
area on both January 5th and 6th.

       Charlie Alexander, age 49 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Ida Alexander, age 38 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
       Frank Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (William Frank Alexander "Frank")
       Earl Alexander, age 10 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl")
       James Alexander, age 8 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "James")
       Woodrow Alexander, age 5 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
       Allen Alexander, age 1 and a half years ("Son") (Daniel Allen Alexander "Allen")

DAPHNE ELIZABETH ALEXANDER
"Daphne"
A daughter of Willard Terry Alexander, Sr. "Willard" and Nobia Elizabeth Stricklen "Nobia"
Born: May 6, 1946
Marriage: Spencer Jones

DONNA LYNN POWERS
"Donna"
A daughter of Frances Mildred Alexander "Mildred" and Edgar Ray Powers, "Edgar" and "Sonny"
Born: July 13, 1947 at home in Timmonsville, South Carolina
Marriage 1: Harbert Wingfield Corley, Jr. "Butch"
Born: Florence, Florence County, South Carolina
Marriage 2: John Gardner
Born: Connecticut
Marriage 3: William Jerman “Bill Jerman”
Born: Charleston, Charleston County, South Carolina

Donna and Butch's son:

       Harbert Wingfield Corley, III "Wynn" b. April 20, 1968 Florence County, South Carolina m.
        Dana Darnell Sheppard "Dana".

Wynn and Dana have two children:

       Justin Dean Corley "Justin"
       Jacob Ray Corley "Jake"

Donna and John's son:

       Jonathan Gardner b. Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina

EDNA D. ALEXANDER
A daughter of Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry", and Laura M. Raines
Born: July 14, 1912
Died: September 1983 Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina at age 71
Marriage: John H. Padgett
Born: August 17, 1908
Died: April 1, 1993 South Carolina at age 84

1920 - Although Edna's father was shown as being single in the census for Greenville Township,
Greenville County, South Carolina, taken on January 10th, wife Laura was listed as a "Wife". Edna
was 7 years of age during this survey. In the household on that survey were:

       Henry L Alexander, age 48 ("Head") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Laura Alexander, age 36 ("Wife") (Laura M Raines Alexander)
       Eugean Alexander, age 11 ("Son")
       Edna Alexander, age 7 ("Daughter")
       William Alexander, age 4 years 9 months ("Son") (William A Alexander)
       Carl Alexander, age 1 year 8 months ("Son") (Carl H. Alexander)

EDNA RUTH ALEXANDER
"Ruth"
A daughter of Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton" and Mavie Edna Jolly "Mavie"
Born: December 28, 1932
Died: February 19, 1996 at age 63 South Carolina
Marriage: Yancy Duewell Spring "Duewell" of Florence, Florence County, South Carolina

Ruth and Duewell's children include:

       Dennie Ravenel Spring b. ? d 1988
       Darlene Spring b. ? d. ? m. Jim Winborne

Obituary - Morning News for April 30, 2005:

    FLORENCE - Yancy Duewell Spring, 75, died Thursday, April 28, 2005, at his residence after an
illness.
    Funeral services will be at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 1, in Waters-Powell Funeral Home Chapel. Burial will
follow in Florence Memorial Gardens. The family will receive friends from 6 to 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
    He was born in Florence County, a son of the late George Dewey and Lizzie Springs Spring. He
was the owner of Spring Used Parts in Florence.
    Mr. Spring was predeceased by his wife, Ruth Alexander Spring; a son, Dennis Ravenel Spring; and
a brother, Arnette Spring.
    Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. Darlene (Jim) Winborne of Florence; eight sisters, Burnette
McKenzie and Annette (Butch) Cusaac, both of Florence, Adlevia (Jerry) Strawn of Effingham,
Suedean (Bobby) Hanna of Sumter, Julia (Timmons) Floyd and Margie (Alva) Lee, both of Lake City,
Lib (Neal) Yonas of Coward and Jannette (Lynn) Coward of Belmont, N.C.; two brothers, Donald
(Donna) Spring of Florence and George (Mitzi) Spring of Lake City; and two grandchildren, Lauren
Elizabeth Spring and Charles Joseph Joey Williamson.

   With high honors, and an outstanding grade average, Ruth and Dewell's daughter Darlene
graduated Grand Magna Cum Laude from Francis Marion University in 2000.

ELDREDGE LEE ALEXANDER
A son of Arnold Ceil Alexander, Sr. "Arnold" and Maggie Mae Rogers "Maggie"
Born: April 18, 1940
Marriage: Jeanette (nee?)

ELIZABETH C. ALEXANDER
"Lizzie"
A daughter of Rev. John William Reese Alexander "William" and Delila Alexandra Kea, "Delila" and
"Liley"
Born: November 5, 1843 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: November 13, 1904 at age 61
Marriage: Early 1860s (conflicting information) Darlington County, South Carolina Robert Nelson
Parnell "Robert"
Born: January 3, 1841
Died: According to his death certificate April 3, 1917 State Hospital, Columbia, Richland County, South
Carolina. His grave marker states he died on the 2nd of April. He died of heart problems at age 75.
He had been in the hospital for five months
Burial: Lizzie, husband Robert, and son Raymond are interred at Newman Swamp cemetery, Lamar,
Darlington County, South Carolina

Elizabeth and Robert's offspring include:

       Paul Alexander Parnell b. September 20, 1873 Darlington County, South Carolina d. August
        21, 1924 m1. Annie P. Turner b. June 2, 1870 d. December 21, 1908 m2. Alice Knotts b.
        March 23, 1875 d. November 6, 1926 - burial: Paul and both spouses are buried at Newman
        Swamp United Methodist Church, Lamar, Darlington County, South Carolina
       Cora Dale Parnell b. June 22, 1886 Darlington County, South Carolina d. February 13 or 14,
        1967 m. William Norwood Bell "Norwood" b. February 1, 1879 d. July 28, 1926 - burial at
        Newman Swamp United Methodist Church, Lamar, Darlington County, South Carolina
       Alonzo Homer Parnell b. February 21, 1878 Darlington County, South Carolina d. December
        20, 1947 - burial: Newman Swamp United Methodist Church, Lamar, Darlington County, South
        Carolina. His marker states: "At Rest"
       Raymond Parnell b. October 1, 1880 d. February 23, 1904 at age 23, prior to his mother dying
        later in that same year - burial: Newman Swamp United Methodist Church, Lamar, Darlington
        County, South Carolina, next to his parents, who share the same marker

Robert Nelson Parnell's parents were:

       Israel C. Parnell b. December 28, 1805 d. August 24, 1874
       Frances Scot Saverance

Robert's maternal grandparents were:
       Paul Saverance
       Hannah Huggins

Robert's maternal great grandparents were:

       Thomas Saverance
       Susannah Murrell

Robert's other maternal great grandparents were:

       John Huggins
       Elizabeth White Simmons

   Robert was previously married to Mary McLendon b. about 1842 d. by 1865.
   Since Elizabeth C. Alexander Parnell's father was Rev. William Alexander, and with her marrying
Robert Nelson Parnell, brother of Martha Anne E. Parnell Alexander, it made her real father also her
father-in-law after he married Anne.

  Robert, Lizzie, and most of their sons and daughters are buried at Newman Swamp United
Methodist Church, Lamar, Darlington County, South Carolina.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1860 - Only Lizzie and Robert were in the household in this survey, taken on a non-listed day of June.
The survey was conducted for Darlington Post Office, Darlington County, South Carolina. Robert was
listed as an "Overseer", probably for his father's slaves.

       Robert Parnell, age 20 (Robert Nelson Parnell "Robert")
       Eliz Parnell, age 15 (Elizabeth C. Alexander Parnell "Lizzie")

1880 - Lizzie and Robert were living in Lisbon Township, Darlington County, South Carolina during this
survey in June. Elizabeth was "Keepinghouse". The household included:

       Robt N Parnell, age 37 ("Farmer") (Robert Nelson Parnell "Robert")
       Elizabeth C Parnell, age 31 ("wife") (Elizabeth C. Alexander Parnell "Lizzie")
       John A Parnell, age 14 ("son")
       Joshua Parnell, age 12 ("son")
       Paul Parnell, age 6 ("son")
       Alonzo Parnell, age 2 ("son") (Homer Alonzo Parnell)

1900 - Elizabeth's grave marker states that she died in 1904, yet she was not listed on this survey.
The enumeration on June 29th was taken in Lamar Township, Darlington County, South Carolina.
Robert was listed as a "Farmer", and son Raymond was listed as a "Farm Laborer". In the household
were:

       Robert N. Parnell, age 59 ("Head") (Robert Nelson Parnell "Robert")
       Raymond Parnell, age 19 ("Son")
       Cora Parnell, age 13 ("Daughter")

ELIZABETH J. ALEXANDER
A daughter of John Alexander and Mary Woodham "Polly"
Died: January 1855
Marriage: Believed to have never married
Mary is not a direct descendant in this line. She was Rev. John William Reese Alexander's sister.
ELLA L. ALEXANDER
A daughter of John Wesley Alexander "John" and Sarah Ann M. Stewart "Sallie"
Born: March 18, 1870 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: July 6, 1902 at age 32 Darlington County, South Carolina
Marriage: June 28, 1896 in Darlington County to John J. Hatchell
Born: May 1847 in South Carolina

John J. Hatchell had at least three children by an earlier wife, and they became Ella's step-children:

       Trapler Hatchell b. April 1885
       Leila Hatchell b. April 1883
       Ila Hatchell b. May 1892

    Old Cypress Methodist Episcopal Church, South records indicate Ella was baptized August 22, 1875
at the church in (then) Darlington County (now Lee County). A cemetery is there, but no longer the
church.
    Family lore has it that Ella was somewhat of a hypochondriac. She actually was ill for several
years, and died fairly young, just six years after her marriage. The story goes that Ella would feel too
sick during the week when it was time to do chores, but when Sunday, church day, came around, she
was feeling well and ready to go.
    I believe her to be the writer of a dramatic grieving obituary for her grandfather, Rev. John William
Reese Alexander, who died in 1899.
    From what I’ve been told by family members, over the last couple of decades Lone Tree Farm’s
cemetery has been vandalized more than once, with grave digging, and involving county law
enforcement. The cemetery is fairly difficult to enter, located very near Lake Swamp itself, and the
back of properties in the subdivision which replaced Lone Tree Farm.
    This is only a guess, but I have come to the conclusion that Ella was probably buried in her father's
private cemetery on "Lone Tree Farm" just inside the Florence County line from Darlington County,
South Carolina on Sally Hill Road in rural Timmonsville, South Carolina, once known as part of the
Ebenezer township. Dying at age 32, her husband still had plenty of years to live, and her father was
living on the land where she was possibly buried. The cemetery is now difficult to locate and enter,
somewhat closed off due to a surrounding residential subdivision. Also, I have not seen that cemetery
on any of the local cemetery surveys, probably because it's so hidden.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1900 - The survey, taken in the Philadelphia Township, Darlington County, South Carolina on June
27th bearing the name John J. Hatchell shows that Ella had been married to him for 4 years. That
would make the younger Hatchells in this survey, Ella's step-children. The survey was taken in the
Philadelphia Township, Darlington County, South Carolina.

       John J Hatchell, age 53 ("Head")
       Elle L Hatchell, age 30 ("Wife") (Ella L. Alexander Hatchell)
       Leila Hatchell, age 17 ("Daughter")
       Trapler Hatchell, age 15 ("Son")
       Ila Hatchell, age 8 ("Daughter")

ERVIN M. ALEXANDER
A son of John Alexander (1) and Mary Woodham "Polly"
Born: About 1822 Sumter District, South Carolina
Died: After 1855 sometime after his father's death in 1846
Ervin is not a direct descendant in this line. He was Rev. John William Reese Alexander's brother.
United States Federal Census Reference:

1850 - September 21st was survey day for the Sumter District, South Carolina home of John
Alexander, who died about 4 years earlier. In charge now was widow Mary Woodham Alexander
"Polly" is found living with son Ervin was listed as a "Planter" on his mother's farm. The term
"planter" is mostly described as the head person of the farm or plantation. Mary's real estate was
valued at $1,800. The survey stated that Mary and Ervin were born in South Carolina.
Mary Alexander, age 73 (Mary Woodham Alexander "Polly)
Ervin M Alexander, age 28 ("Planter")

EUGENE E. ALEXANDER
A son of Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry", and Laura M. Raines
Born: About 1909
Died: 1973
Burial: Reportedly, New Jersey

United States Federal Census Reference:

1910 - April 15th was the date of this survey in Greenville Township, Greenville County, South
Carolina. Henry is absent from the household in this survey, with his wife as "head". World War I did
not commence until 1914, so Henry may have been serving in the military during this time. Laura's
mother and a boarder were present in this household:

       Mrs. L M Alexander, age 28 ("head")
       John Alexander, age 7 ("son")
       Lewis Alexander, age 3 ("son")
       Eugene Alexander, age 1 ("son")
       Mrs. S A Raines, age 70 ("mother")
       Mrs. Nannie Ray, age 25 ("boarder")

1920 - Although Henry was shown as being single in the census for Greenville Township, Greenville
County, South Carolina, taken on January 10th, wife Laura was listed as a "Wife". Although Laura
didn't have a job during this survey, Henry was a "Barber", and his "Industry" was "Barber shop".
Also in the household on that survey were:

       Henry L Alexander, age 48 ("Head") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Laura Alexander, age 36 ("Wife") (Laura M Raines Alexander)
       Eugean Alexander, age 11 ("Son")
       Edna Alexander, age 7 ("Daughter")
       William Alexander, age 4 years 9 months ("Son") (William A Alexander)
       Carl Alexander, age 1 year 8 months ("Son") (Carl H Alexander)

EULA MYRTLE ALEXANDER
"Myrtle" (A child at her death)
A daughter of Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie" and Ida Eula Jeffords "Ida"
Born: September 1, 1912 Ebenezer community, Florence County, South Carolina
Died: January 29, 1916 at 3 years, 4 months, and 28 days of age, in the Ebenezer community of
Florence County, South Carolina. Reportedly, her clothes caught fire.
Burial: January 29, 1916 in an unmarked grave near her parents at Pine Grove United Methodist
Church, Darlington County, South Carolina near Timmonsville

  According to her death certificate, Myrtle died from "extensive burns", second and third degree.

EVELYN GAYLE ALEXANDER
A daughter of Vivian Loren Alexander "Loren" and Eunice Lee
Born: January 15, 1938
Died: February 5, 1936
Burial: Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church, Timmonsville, Florence County, South Carolina

(MRS.) FRANCES (NEE?) ALEXANDER
Parents: Unknown to this research
Born: About 1753 in either North Carolina or Virginia
Died: 1820 Sumter District, South Carolina
Marriage: ? Alexander
Burial: It’s believed that Frances’ grave, along with her son John and wife Mary Woodham
Alexander's, and likely more in the family, are now beneath land that is used for farming outside of
present-day Bishopville, Lee County in the Stokes Bridge community. The cemetery, know as the
“Woodham Family Cemetery" has disappeared from sight. The last I heard, after a drive-by siting by
my aunt, Mildred Alexander Powers, and my first cousin, Mary Alexander Jensen, the cemetery
appeared to be nothing more than a cornfield.

    Frances is the earliest known member of this lineage, a widow whose parents and husband are not
known by this research. She was the mother of John Alexander, husband of Mary Woodham "Polly".
    Her known children were: Mary Margaret "Polly" Alexander, b. About 1774 North Carolina, d.
Reportedly during the first two-thirds of the 1800s in the Choctaw Nation portion of eastern-central
Mississippi, m. Paris Hickman, a son of William Hickman; and John Alexander, b. About 1775, d. 1846
old Darlington District, South Carolina, m. Mary "Polly" Woodham.
     Mrs. Alexander, reportedly a widow, with no evidence that I've seen to the contrary, is the earlier
Alexander in this research lineage with somewhat of a paper trail. Mr. Alexander is a mystery to this
research, yet her husband very well may have been a casualty of the Revolutionary War, a
supposition based on dates of events.
     The late Robert Earl Woodham of Columbus, Georgia had spearheaded a small organization that
helped revitalize a Woodham Family Cemetery in Newton, Dale County, Alabama that was in pretty
bad shape, and restored it with some success. Mr. Woodham never got to fulfill his dream of
revitalizing the one in the Stokes Bridge community of Lee County, South Carolina. Suspected to be
buried there are Mrs. Frances (nee?) Alexander, John and Mary Alexander, Edward Woodham Sr. and
Jr. and their wives, and who knows who else. Keep in mind that the history of events on the
cemetery's demise is hearsay, although the cemetery certainly seems to have been plowed and
farmed. Paraphrased, South Carolina's law on cemeteries is that a cemetery that has had no one
buried in it, and has not been continually maintained over a period of seventy years, may be plowed.
The graveyard's location is About two miles south of Hebron United Methodist Church. Many
genealogists do not like the law.
     While living in the Newbern District (as it was spelled in the first United States Census survey for
the United States and North Carolina in 1790), the old Dobbs County, Frances had already received
some sort of land grant in the old Sumter District of South Carolina in a portion that is now
Bishopville, and it appears that son John received one, as well, with around three and a half more
acreage than Frances. This leads to believe that it may have been some sort of grants given to
Frances and John, due to the death of a possible Revolutionary War soldier.
    The survey of Frances' proposed land in old Sumter District, South Carolina was made on
December 5, 1786. The plat survey for the land was accompanied by the following: “I have caused to
be (writing illegible) and laid out unto Frances Alexander, a tract of land containing one hundred and
thirty acres situate in the District of Camden in Spring Branch waters of Lynches Creek and both such
marks, buttings, and boundings as above plot represents. Certified for the 5th of December, 1786. -
Ephraim Mitchell”
     I don't know exactly how, but it's possible that Frances was, in some way tied in to the Woodhams
from back in old Dobbs County, North Carolina. When she made the journey into South Carolina from
North Carolina, she traveled with Mary Woodham Wiggins, a sister of Edward Woodham Jr., father of
her son John's wife Mary Woodham.
    Frances might have been born in Virginia, possibly Surry County, yet that is based on scant
evidence. In this research, the lineage of this Alexander clan can currently be traced back only to her,
except for one possibility. Although Frances’ father’s name is not known, a family baby book, in the
possession of a descendant of Rev. Abner M. Alexander's (eldest son of John Alexander)’ had some
handwritten names on a page that included Frances Alexander’s name. A “William”, and a “Samuel
Welch of Virginia” were written in no particular order, and did not seem to explain much of anything,
so they are actually only names on a page, with nothing more to back them up. The page named a
“William” beside Frances’ name, listing him as born in 1726 and died in 1783. Samuel Welch of
Virginia might have been Frances’ father. Who knows? There was a Samuel Welch who was born
around 1730 in Surry County, Virginia. He reportedly served in the American Revolution. The dates
are in the right position to be a possible parent of Frances. A cousin, Mary Alexander Jensen of South
Carolina made the baby book contact, and passed the information to me a few years ago. The page
was reportedly in a baby book of Kathryn Alexander "Kay" Wagener, a descendant of Frances’ through
her son John, through his son Edward, through his daughter Katie, and on. According to the same
evidence, whatever John’s name was listed on that page had the name “Dewitt” close to it. In an
earlier writing, I related the same information About the Dewitt name, and several amateur
genealogists took that information and started reporting that his middle name was indeed. There is
nothing that proves that. Again, the name was just on a page, and not in any order, nor
accompanied by any explanation of who it actually referred to.
    In addition to the name Welch, as a maiden name for Frances Alexander, the name Wiggins was
suggested to me by another source, suggesting that Frances might have been a Wiggins, related to
Daniel H. Wiggins or his mother.
     Frances, before entering into South Carolina with son John and daughter Polly, Daniel A. Wiggins,
a first cousin of John’s wife’s, Mary Woodham Alexander, and Daniel's mother Mary Woodham
Wiggins, sister of Mary Woodham Alexander’s father Edward Woodham Jr., was accompanied during
the journey from Dobbs County, North Carolina into old Sumter District.
     Mrs. Wiggins, reportedly a widow at the time of the migration into South Carolina, died in 1822 in
the (now) Bishopville area. That was approximately two years after Frances' death in 1820. After
that, Daniel H. Wiggins moved on to old Henry County in Alabama where he was a prominent citizen
in the original Henry County's first county seat, the now-defunct Richmond, located at what is now
Grimes, Dale County, Alabama adjacent to Napier Field, Dothan's main airport. There is a historical
sign marking the location.
    Frances Alexander's 1786 land survey was taken in what is now Bishopville, Lee County, South
Carolina. Back then it was in the old Sumter District with the larger Camden District. Her land was
located at the town limit of modern-day northwest of Bishopville, South Carolina, and still appears to
be farming land at the edge of town. The 130-acre tract was located near the southeastern corner of
the intersection of today’s West Church Street and Denny’s Pond Road, just a few blocks from
downtown Bishopville. Son John Alexander and Frances' son-in-law Paris Hickman sold her land
following her death. Some of the properties surrounding Frances' land during the 1786 survey were
owned by Jacob Chambers, Dennis McLendon, William Mixon, Samuel Ratliff, Ann Dixon, and Samuel
Chandler.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1800 - Frances is found in Salem Township, Sumter District, South Carolina. Back then, the census
bureau only wanted a head count, and numbers were used instead of names. Only the "Head of
Household" was identified. Here's the way the count went at Frances' home:

       1   -   Free white male 16-25 years old
       1   -   Free white male female 26-44 years old
       1   -   Household member over 25 years old
       2   -   Members in the household

FRANCES GAMEWELL ALEXANDER
"Gamewell"
A daughter of Rev. John William Reese Alexander "William" and Martha Anne E. Parnell "Anne"
Born: February 17, 1864 South Carolina
Died: March 5, 1926 at age 62 in the Mount Pleasant community of Lee County, South Carolina
Marriage: Alexander Selkirk Fields "Sandy" (also seen as Sylkirk)
Born: September 20, 1856 in South Carolina
Died: March 20,1914 at age 58
Burial: Gamewell and Sandy are buried at Newman Swamp United Methodist Church, Lamar,
Darlington County, South Carolina. The couple's “Woodmen of the World” grave marker is inscribed
“Forever with the Lord."

Gamewell and Sandy's children include:

       Annie Fields b. December 12, 1881 South Carolina d. March 19, 1943 m. Emery Rhett Huggins
       Mary Elizabeth Fields "Mamie" b. April 28, 1883 South Carolina d. November 1931 m. George
        Franklin Sutton
       Ida Gertrude Fields "Ida" b. November 12, 1885 South Carolina d. November 9, 1949 m.
        Columbus Arthur Parnell b. July 15, 1877 d. September 20, 1943 - burial: Newman Swamp
        United Methodist Church, Lamar, Darlington County, South Carolina. Ida Gertrude and
        Columbus Arthur's inscription reads: "THE FAITHFUL ARE CERTAIN OF THEIR REWARD"
       William Henry Fields b. November 9, 1887 South Carolina d. September 1, 1965 m. Meta
        Virginia Jeffords
       Ephraim Duncan Fields b. December 9, 1889 South Carolina d. March 28, 1974 m. Susan
        Margaret Hay
       Sidney Webber Fields b. March 28, 1892 South Carolina d. March 28, 1968 m1. October 7,
        1915 Catherine Sarah Griggs "Kate", a daughter of George W. Griggs and Victoria Byrd b.
        September 17, 1891 d. July 15, 1944 (also seen as “Sara Katherine Griggs”) m2. December
        1955 to Katherine Hurley
       Lewis Hamer Fields "Lewis" b. May 23, 1894 South Carolina d. October 31, 1959 m. Bertha
        Bell b. October 4, 1906 d. February 10, 1998
       John Newton Fields b. August 18, 1895 South Carolina d. May 12, 1959 m. Mildred Mary
        Jones
       Roxie Fields (infant) b. September 27, 1897 d. June 30, 1898
       Samuel Carlisle Fields "Carl" b. March 7, 1902 South Carolina d. December 7, 1968 - burial:
        Newman Swamp United Methodist Church, Lamar, Darlington County, South Carolina
       Clifton Wallace Fields b. November 12, 1903 in Lamar, Darlington County, South Carolina d.
        July 23, 1973 in Lamar, Darlington County, South Carolina m. March 18, 1924 to Bessie Pearl
        Edwards b. October 9, 1900 d. February 10, 1976
       Mae Kathleen Fields b. February 22, 1907 Lamar, Darlington County, South Carolina d.
        February 24, 1982 m. William Melvin Riley
       Theron Howard Fields b. August 27, 1909 d. October 28, 1980 m. Annie Laura Parnell, a
        daughter of Hamer Parnell b. 1913 d. October 25, 1980

   Sandy Fields was a farmer, and a son of Ira Bright Fields and Nan Maria Parnell.
   One of Gamewell's half-sisters, Elizabeth C. Alexander married Gamewell's uncle, Robert Nelson
Parnell.
   Ephraim Duncan Fields' North Carolina death certificate states the following: b. December 9, 1889
in South Carolina; d. March 28, 1974 in Wadesboro, Anson County, North Carolina at age 84 in
Wadesboro Nursing Home; widowed; his usual residence was in Society Hill, Darlington County, South
Carolina; he was a retail merchant of hardware; burial was handled by Belk-King Funeral Home of
Darlington at Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Society Hill, Darlington County, South Carolina on
March 31, 1974; and cause of death was "Bronchopneumonia" brought on by "Cerebral Sclerosis with
sever chronic brain syndrom and bed confined".

Obituary - Written in newspaper style, but some of the content leaves one to believe the writer was
close to the family. Judging by the heading on the obituary, it’s also possible that the writer may
have been an acquaintance of son Carl Fields. It probably comes from a Bishopville newspaper,
where Carl was a resident. If not, maybe Darlington County.
                                            Mrs. A.S. Fields
                    Mother of Carl Fields Passed Away in Mt. Pleasant Community

    Mrs. Gamewell Fields, wife of the late Alexander S. Fields, died at her home in the Mt. Pleasant
community of Lee County, Friday morning, March 6 (incorrect). Her death was not unexpected as she
had been in bad health for several years, but was only confined to her bed about three weeks.
    Mrs. Fields was the daughter of Rev. William and Mrs. Anne Alexander, and had lived all her life in
the same community. She was a woman of Christian character and endeared herself to many friends.
She had been since early childhood a member of Newman Swamp Methodist Church and was always a
faithful helper in God's work.
    She was 68 (incorrect) years old in February, having been born in 1863 (incorrect). The funeral
was held at Newman Swamp Methodist Church Saturday morning at 11 o'clock, conducted by her
pastor, Rev. Mr. Peeler. Interment was in the church cemetery. Her sons acted as pallbearers.
    She is survived by one half-brother, John Alexander of Timmonsville, two step-children, Mrs.
Newman Brown and Esca Fields of Lee County, and four daughters and eight sons, as follows: Mrs.
E.R. Huggins, Lynchburg; Mrs. G.F. Sutton, Winnsboro; Mrs. C.O. Parnell, Lamar; Mrs. Melvin Riley,
Lynchburg; Henry, Lamar, Sidney and Duncan, Society Hill; J. Newton, Hollidaysburg, Pa.; Carl,
Bishopville; Clifton, Mullins; Louis and Howard, who lived with her at the family home, and a number
of grandchildren. All of her children were at her bedside during her last illness. Many friends
sympathize with her family in her death. The grave was completely covered with beautiful floral
designs, which bespoke of the esteem in which she was held.”

United States Federal Census Reference:

1860 - Sandy Fields was four years old during this survey in his parents' home in Darlington Court
House Post Office, Darlington District, South Carolina on August 2nd. Everyone in the household had
been born in South Carolina. The household included:

       Ira B. Fields, age 43 ("Farmer")
       Mary Fields, age 30
       Alexr Fields, age 4 (male)
       Frans E. Fields, age 3 (female)
       W S Fields, age 1 (male)

1880 - Sandy is found in this June 12th survey as a "widower" in Cypress Township, (then) Darlington
County, South Carolina in his mother's household. The household included he and his mother, and
apparently his two children from that marriage. Judging by the age of baby Harmon E.B. Fields, the
mother had died within the last nine months. Everyone in the survey was born in South Carolina, and
their parents, as well. The names of those in the household were:

       Alexander S. Fields, age 23 (Alexander Sylkirk Fields "Sandy")
       Mary M A Fields, age 49 ("Mother"/"Keeping House")
       Lusinda N Fields, age 3 ("Daughter")
       Harmon E B Fields, age 9 months (born in September) ("Son")
       Simon Capers, an African-American 12-year-old ("Hired Labor"/"Farm Laborer")

1900 - Gamewell and Sandy were surveyed in Cypress Township, Darlington County (now Lee
County), South Carolina on June 13th. The couple was in their 24th year of marriage. Everyone in
the survey was born in South Carolina, and so were their parents. Their household included:
 Alexander Fields, age 43 ("Head")
 Francis Fields (erroneous male gender spelling), age 36 ("Wife")
 Annie Fields, age 18 ("Daughter")
 Mary Fields, age 16 ("Daughter")
 Ida Fields, age 14 ("Daughter")
 Henry Fields, age 12 ("Son")
   Duncan Fields, age 10 ("Son") (Ephraim Duncan Fields "Duncan") b. December 9, 1989 South
    Carolina d. March 28, 1974 Wadesboro, Anson County, North Carolina at age 84. Listed as a
    widower at the time of his death. Previously, he had been confined to bed for the "many
    months", and died after a week-long bout with bronchopneumonia. Duncan was a retail hardware
    merchant. He lived in Society Hill, Darlington County, South Carolina. Burial: March 31, 1974
    Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Society Hill. Belk-King Funeral Home of Darlington handled the
    funeral. According to his death certificate, Mrs. R.G. Donald of Society Hill was the "Informant" of
    his passing.
   Sidney Fields, age 8 ("Son")
   Louis Fields, age 6 ("Son")
   Morton Fields (possibly "Newton", hard to read), age 4 ("Son")
   Corlide Fields, age 1 month ("Son")
   Eslen Fields, age 21 ("Son")

1910:

       J S Fields, age 53 ("Head")
       Gamewell Fields, age 42 ("Wife")
       Duncan E Fields, age 23 (Ephraim Duncan Fields "Duncan") b. December 9, 1989 South
        Carolina d. March 28, 1974 Wadesboro, Anson County, North Carolina at age 84. Listed as a
        widower at the time of his death. Previously, he had been confined to bed for the "many
        months", and died after a week-long bout with bronchopneumonia. Duncan was a retail
        hardware merchant. He lived in Society Hill, Darlington County, South Carolina. Burial: March
        31, 1974 Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Society Hill. Belk-King Funeral Home of Darlington
        handled the funeral. According to his death certificate, Mrs. R.G. Donald of Society Hill was
        the "Informant" of his passing.
       Carl Fields, age 16
       Clifton Fields, age 13
       Mary Fields, age 10
       Crow Fields, age 6
       Newton Fields
       Cathaline Fields, age 4
       Howart Fields, age 8 months

FRANCES LAURA ALEXANDER
"Frances" and "Fran"
A daughter of Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton" and Mavie Edna Jolly "Mavie"
Born: March 27, 1939

FRANCES MILDRED ALEXANDER
"Mildred"
A daughter of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe" and Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: October 31, 1927 Florence County, South Carolina
Marriage: 1946 Edgar Ray Powers "Edgar" and "Sonny"
Born: February 28, 1922 Florence County
Died: December 30, 1986 in a Florence hospital, Florence County, South Carolina at age 64
Burial: Edgar Powers is buried in the same plat as his parents at Byrd Cemetery, Timmonsville,
Florence County, South Carolina. Artie and Camilla Powers are also buried at Byrd Cemetery,
Timmonsville, Florence County, South Carolina, next to Sonny.

Mildred and Edgar’s children:

       Donna Lynn Powers "Donna" b. July 13, 1947
       Sandra Gayle Powers "Sandy" b. August 2, 1949
Sonny's parents were:

       Willie Artie Powers "Artie" b. November 4, 1876 d. April 23, 1952
       Camilla Galloway Powers b. August 20, 1884 d. November 9, 1980

   Mildred started school at Lake Swamp School in Darlington County near Timmonsville, and
graduated from Lamar High School in Lamar, Darlington County in 1944 as “Class Poet”. She’s was an
active member of Timmonsville United Methodist Church where she taught Sunday School classes
from beginners to young adults, a Methodist Youth Fellowship counselor, a circle leader, and has been
a District Secretary of the United Methodist Women. Mrs. Powers, who used to paint when given the
notion, even furnished the artwork for a cookbook that her circle published, once played in the hand
bell choir, and has been recognized by her fellow parishioners in 2008 for singing in the church choir
for 50 years.
   After retirement, Mildred spent years as a counselor for Palmetto Center in Florence, a drug and
alcohol rehabilitation unit operated by the State of South Carolina.

FRANKLIN LEE ALEXANDER
"Frank"
A son of Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton" and Mavie Edna Jolly "Mavie"
Born: May 24, 1951
Died: April 8, 1978 at age 26 Florence County, South Carolina
Burial: Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church, rural Timmonsville, Florence County, South Carolina

GERALD WESLEY ALEXANDER
"Jerry"
A son of Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton" and Mavie Edna Jolly "Mavie"
Born: December 21, 1943

GLORIA DIANE ALEXANDER
"Diane"
A daughter of Willard Terry Alexander, Sr. "Willard" and Nobia Elizabeth Stricklen "Nobia"
Born: May 23, 1953
Marriage: Johnny Lynch

  Diane is a nurse.

GRACE ELIZABETH ALEXANDER
"Grace"
A daughter of Arnold Ceil Alexander, Sr. "Arnold" and Maggie Mae Rogers "Maggie"
Born: September 20, 1933
Marriage: James Brown

HAMILTON EARL ALEXANDER
"Earl"
A son of Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie" and Ida Eula Jeffords "Ida"
Born: May 9, 1909
Died: April 5, 1983 at age 73
Marriage: December 30, 1936 to Inez Sansbury
Born: November 1, 1914
Died: November 27, 1998

Inez was a daughter of:

       Eugene Sansbury
       Elizabeth (nee?)
   Earl and Inez Alexander resided in the Oates community of Darlington County, South Carolina.
  The couple is buried at Elim United Methodist Church's cemetery in the Oates community of
Darlington County, South Carolina.

United State Federal Census Reference:

1920 - Earl's parents were living on his grandfather's property "Lone Tree Farm", in the area then
known as Ebenezer Township, Florence County, now the name of an area considered farther east on
the edge of the City of Florence in Florence County, South Carolina. The survey was taken in their
area on both January 5th and 6th.

       Charlie Alexander, age 49 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Ida Alexander, age 38 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
       Frank Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (William Frank Alexander "Frank")
       Earl Alexander, age 10 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl")
       James Alexander, age 8 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "James")
       Woodrow Alexander, age 5 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
       Allen Alexander, age 1 and a half years ("Son") (Daniel Allen Alexander "Allen")

1930 - Earl's parents were still living on John Wesley Alexander's "Lone Tree Farm" in Timmonsville
Township, Florence County, South Carolina during this survey. In his household were:

       Charlie E Alexander, age 60 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Ida Alexander, age 48 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
       Earl Alexander, age 20 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl")
       James I Alexander, age 19 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "James")
       Woodrow W Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
       Ira Alexander, age 9 ("Son") (Charles Ira Alexander "Ira")
       Leola Alexander, age 6 ("Daughter") (Margaret Leola Alexander "Leola")
       Sallie L Alexander, age 1 year 10 months ("Daughter") (Sally Louise Alexander "Sally")

HELEN FLORA ALEXANDER
"Helen"
A daughter of John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" (1) and Bertha Rosalie Lechner "Bertha"
Born: February 4, 1921
Died: October 10, 1986 at age 65
Marriage: Robert White, Jr.
Born: August 3, 1915
Died: February 23, 2008
Burial: Helen, Robert, and their infant, Marilyn are buried at Pine Grove United Methodist Church,
Darlington County, South Carolina. Although Robert remarried after Helen's death, he and Helen are
buried side by side. Their inscription states: “OUR FATHER WHO ART IN HEAVEN”.

Helen and Robert’s children include:

       Bertha Ann White "Bert" b. 1939
       Carol Jeanette White "Jeanette" b. November 30, 1941
       John Alexander White "Johnny" b. January 26, 1955
       Marilyn White b. June 21, 1949 d. March 27, 1952
       Robert Randall White b. 1947

1930 - Anderson School District, Darlington County, South Carolina was the household's location
during this survey, taken by Helen's first cousin, Roy Dudley Hatchell on April 2nd. Those in the
household were:
       John L Alexander, age 52 ("Head") (John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" [1])
       Bertha M. Alexander, age 52 ("Wife") (Bertha Rosalie Lechner Alexander "Bertha")
       Arnold Alexander, age 19 ("Son") (Arnold Ceil Alexander "Arnold")
       Helen Alexander, age 9 ("Daughter") (Helen Flora Alexander "Helen")

HENRY LEE ALEXANDER
"Henry" and "Harry"
A son of John Wesley Alexander "John" and Sarah Ann M. Stewart "Sallie"
Born: July 25, 1872 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: March 7, 1948 at home at age 75 Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina at 2:45 am
Marriage 1: June 23, 1900 to Laura M. Raines of High Hill Township, Darlington County, South
Carolina. The Henry Alexanders were listed in the 1900 Darlington County, South Carolina United
States Census as living in the High Hill community.
Born: 1882
Died: February 16, 1957 at age 74 in Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina
Burial: Not sure about the burial of wives Laura or Susan, but Henry was buried at Woodlawn
Memorial Park, Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina on March 8, 1948. The funeral director
was Thomas F. McAfee of Greenville.

Henry and Laura's children include:

       Carl H. Alexander
       Edna D. Alexander
       Eugene E. Alexander
       James H. Alexander
       John Lee Alexander
       Leland S. Alexander
       Lewis R. Alexander
       William Alexander
       Willis Alexander

   Laura Raines Alexander was a daughter of Edward L. Raines and Sallie A. (nee?).
   The Henry Alexanders moved out of Darlington County, South Carolina when Henry was About 34,
and into Greenville, where they remained. Laura worked in what was known as a “sewing room”
there. In their day, Greenville was a giant in the textile industry. It’s probable that Henry and Laura
moved to Greenville specifically for work in the textile industry, but that’s just a supposition. Henry is
said to have operated a barbershop in the Poe Community of Greenville. He was a barber when he
died.
   For whatever reason, Henry was listed as “Harry” on a couple of early United States Census
surveys for Darlington County while he was still living in his father's household. I once asked Henry’s
daughter-in-law, Carl Alexander’s wife, Dorothy S. Douglas Alexander (Dot) About Henry being called
Harry, and she told me in 1997 that she never knew of him being called that. It may have been that
the census taker was one of those who would take a person’s name and enter the popular nickname
for that name on the survey instead of the actual name, and Harry is a nickname for Henry.
   Henry died at his residence, 15 Woodside Circle, Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina.
Laura was alive at the time of his passing, and was the informant of his death. The family lived in
Greenville for 41 years.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1880 - Henry is found in his father's household in this survey as "Harry". The census was taken in the
Lisbon Township, Darlington County, South Carolina on June 25th. The household included:

       John Alexander, age 32 ("Farmer") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Sarah M Alexander, age 36 ("wife") (Sarah Ann M Stewart Alexander "Sallie")
       Mary Alexander, age 13 ("Daughter") (Mary Berta Alexander "Mary")
       Ella Alexander, age 10 ("Daughter") (Ella L Alexander)
       Charles Alexander, age 9 ("Son") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Harry Alexander, age 8 ("Son") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Mollie Alexander, age 5 ("Daughter") (Mattie Viola Alexander)
       Luther Alexander, age 3 ("Son") (John Luther Alexander, Sr.)
       Maggie Alexander, age 1 ("Daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander)

1900 - This survey was taken on the 20th of June in the High Hill Township, Darlington County, South
Carolina. Henry was still living in his parents' household with these inhabitants:

       John W Alexander, age 53 ("Head") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Sarah A Alexander, age 60 ("Wife") (Sarah Ann M Stewart Alexander "Sallie")
       Hary L Alexander, age 26 ("Son") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Maggie L Alexander, age 20 ("Daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")
       Addie O Alexander, age 17 ("Daughter") (Addie Olivia Alexander "Addie")
       Joseph K Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe")

1910 - April 15th was the date of this survey in Greenville Township, Greenville County, South
Carolina. Henry is absent from the household in this survey, with his wife as "head". World War I did
not commence until 1914, so Henry may have been serving in the military during this time. Laura's
mother and a boarder were present in this household:

       Mrs. L M Alexander, age 28 ("head") (Laura M. Raines Alexander)
       John Alexander, age 7 ("son")
       Lewis Alexander, age 3 ("son")
       Eugene Alexander, age 1 ("son")
       Mrs. S A Raines, age 70 ("mother") (Susan M. (nee?) Raines)
       Mrs. Nannie Ray, age 25 ("boarder")

1920 - Although Henry was shown as being single in the census for Greenville Township, Greenville
County, South Carolina, taken on January 10th, wife Laura was listed as a "Wife". Although Laura
didn't have a job during this survey, Henry was a "Barber", and his "Industry" was "Barber shop".
Also in the household on that survey were:

       Henry L Alexander, age 48 ("Head") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Laura Alexander, age 36 ("Wife") (Laura M Raines Alexander)
       Eugean Alexander, age 11 ("Son")
       Edna Alexander, age 7 ("Daughter")
       William Alexander, age 4 years 9 months ("Son") (William A Alexander)
       Carl Alexander, age 1 year 8 months ("Son") (Carl H Alexander)

1930 - Henry and the family were living in Greenville Township, Greenville County, South Carolina in
this survey, taken on April 14th. Henry's "Industry" was listed as "Barber shop", and Laura's was
"Sewing fac." (factory). She was a seamstress. The household included:

       Henry L Alexander, age 57 ("Head") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Laura M Alexander, age 47 ("Wife") (Laura M. Raines Alexander)
       Willliam A Alexander, age 15 ("Son")
       Carl H Alexander, age 12 ("Son")
       Leland S Alexander, age 9 ("Son")
       James H Alexander, age 6 ("Son")
HOYT ALLEN ALEXANDER
"Hoyt"
A son of Wilton Kenneth Alexander "Kenneth" and Beatrice Lloyd "Bea"
Born: December 27, 1935

JACK STANLEY ALEXANDER
"Jack"
A son of Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton" and Mavie Edna Jolly "Mavie"
Born: July 15, 1946

JAMES IRVIN ALEXANDER, SR. of Henry County, Alabama
"James"
A son of John Alexander and Mary Woodham "Polly"
Born: June 17, 1812 Sumter District, South Carolina
Died: August 22, 1892 Henry County, Alabama
Marriage: January 10, 1833 Elizabeth Jane Stokes "Jane"
Born: March 7, 1817 Kershaw County, South Carolina
Died: November 21, 1899 in Alabama
James is not a direct descendant in this line. Rev. John William Reese Alexander was James’ brother.
Burial: James and Jane are buried at Center United Methodist Church, Newville, Henry County,
Alabama in the Center community, near the Dale County line. The church's cemetery is listed as a
historical cemetery in Alabama, and has a historical sign beside the road indicating it as such. The
church is often referred to as "Old Center Church".

   By seven years, James was an older brother of this line's direct decendant, Rev. John William
Reese Alexander, and was one of many people in his area of old Sumter District, South Carolina who
sold his land, and migrated into old Henry County, Alabama in 1836, following the removal of the
Creek Indians from that area. Most of the Indians were relocated to reservations in Oklahoma. Land
in that portion of Alabama is said to have sold as low as about $1.25 per acre. James bought a
sizeable farm, and to this day has descendants living on the old land, as well as in Dale and Houston
counties of southeastern Alabama, and Washington County, Florida.
   Records show that James purchased land on September 20, 1939 of 39.875 acres at Section 35,
Township 7-N, Range 27-E, St. Stephens Meridian, Henry County. On July 15, 1854 he purchased
39.99 acres in Section 23, Township 6-N, Range 26-E, St. Stephens Meridian, Henry County. On the
1st of November, 1858, James bought 200 acres of land. The latter transaction was located in four
parts: Section 23, Section 23, Section 23, and Section 26. All of them were described as Township 6-
N, Range 26-E, St. Stephens Meridian, Henry County.
   James and Jane raised a sizeable family, and even a couple of Grimes children, orphans of a
schoolteacher mother. James was a seemingly educated and "knowing" man himself, a
schoolteacher, a Justice of the Peace, an administrator of wills, and a Master Mason, probably
attending the now defunct Lodge in nearby Echo, Dale County, Alabama.

James and Jane's children include:

       James Irvin Alexander b. ? d. ? m. December 11, 1866 Marilda Wiggins (Licensed December
        3, 1866)

United States Federal Census Reference:

1850 - James and his family were living in Southern District, Henry County, Alabama during this
survey on November 2nd. The entire family was surveyed under the erroneous surname of
"Alexandria". Household members included:

       Jas Alexandria, age 37 ("Farmer") (b. South Carolina) (James Irvin Alexander, Sr. "James")
       Jane Alexandria, age 32 (b. South Carolina) (Elizabeth Jane Stokes Alexander "Jane")
        Wm C Alexandria, age 16 ("Farmer") (b. South Carolina) (William C Alexander)
        Mary Alexandria, age 14 (b. Alabama)
        John H Alexandria, age 12 (b. Alabama)
        James J Alexandria, age 11 (b. Alabama) (James Irvin Alexander, Jr. "Jim")
        Wesley Alexandria, age 3 (b. Alabama) (Wesley Greensburg Alexander)
        Malissa Alexandria, age 1 (b. Alabama) (Malissa Ann Alexander)

1860 - James listed his parents in this survey for Henry County, Alabama, Cureton Bridge Post Office,
Freemans Beat 9, as both having been born in North Carolina. The survey was taken June 11th. In
the household were:

        James Alexander, age 47 (b. South Carolina) (James Irvin Alexander, Sr. "James")
        Elizabeth J Alexander, age 43 (b. South Carolina) (Elizabeth Jane Stokes Alexander "Jane")
        William C Alexander, age 23, (b. South Carolina)
        John H Alexander, age 21 (b. Alabama)
        James I Alexander, age 17 (b. Alabama) (James Irvin Alexander, Jr. "Jim")
        Malissa Ann Alexander, age 10 (b. Alabama)
        Calvin Alexander, age 8 (b. Alabama)
        Abner A Alexander, age 5 (b. Alabama) (Abner Asbury Alexander "Asbury")
        Margaret S Alexander, age 3 ( b. Alabama)

1870 - The James Alexanders were found this go-round in Abbeville Post Office, Precinct 9, Henry
County, Alabama. James and Jane were listed as born in South Carolina, and the others were born in
Alabama.

        James Alexander, age 58 ("Farmer") (James Irvin Alexander, Sr. "James")
        Elizabeth Alexander, age 53 ("Keeping House")
        Mary Alexander, age 34 ("At Home")
        Ebner Alexander, age 16 ("Farm Laborer")
        Margaret Alexander, age 12 ("At Home")

1880 - James Alexander and his family were living in Cureton Bridge Post Office, Beat 7 Henry County,
Alabama at the time of this survey, June 17th. His parents were listed as having been born in North
Carolina, and both of Jane's parents were born in South Carolina. The two daughters listed had a
notation on their census line that stated James was born in North Carolina, and their mother was born
in South Carolina. It seems unlikely that James, born in 1812 would have been born in North
Carolina, since his mother, Mrs. Frances Alexander moved into South Carolina previous to 1800, and
his brother Abner was born in Sumter District, South Carolina in 1796. In that household were:

        James Alexander, age 68 ("Farmer") (James Irvin Alexander, Sr. "James")
        Elizabeth Alexander, age 63 ("keeping house") (Elizabeth Jane Stokes Alexander "Jane")
        Margret Alexander, age 22 ("work in house") ("Daughter")
        Lizar J Alexander, age 13 ("work in house") ("Daughter")

State of Alabama Census Reference for Henry County (not a federal census):

1850 -   State of Alabama Census, Henry County, Alabama (not a federal census)
         James Alexander, age 37, ("Farmer") (b. South Carolina) (James Irvin Alexander, Sr. "James")
         Jane (Stokes) Alexander, age 32 (b. South Carolina) (Elizabeth Jane Stokes Alexander "Jane")
         William C Alexander, age 16, ("Farmer") (b. South Carolina)
         Mary Alexander, age 14 (b. Alabama)
         John H Alexander, age 12 (b. Alabama)
         James J Alexander, age 11 (b. Alabama) (James Irvin Alexander, Jr. "Jim")
         Wesley Alexander, age 3 (b. Alabama) (Wesley Greenburg Alexander)
         Malissa Alexander, age 1 (b. Alabama (Malissa Ann Alexander)
1866 - James' State of Alabama Census, Henry County, Alabama "White Population" for Township 6,
Range 26 enumeration (not a federal census). In the household were:
     Males under 10 years of age: 0
     Males 10 to 20 years of age: 3
     Males over 20 years of age: 1
Total of males: 4
     Females under 10 years of age: 1
     Females 10 to 20 years of age: 2
     Females over 20 years of age: 1
Total of females: 4

1870 - This survey, taken on June 12th in "The 9th Precinct" of Henry County, Alabama, Abbeville
Post Office finds son James Irvin Alexander, Jr. "Jim" and his family living on his parents' property.
James Sr.'s household was recorded with these inhabitants:

       James Alexander, age 58 ("Farmer") (James Irvin Alexander, Sr. "James")
       Elizabeth Alexander, age 53 ("Keeping House") (Elizabeth Jane Stokes Alexander "Jane")
       Mary Alexander, age 34 ("At Home")
       Ebner Alexander, age 16 ("Farm Laborer") (Abner Asbury Alexander "Asbury")
       Margaret Alexander, age 12 ("At Home")

1880 - Beat #7 (Curetons' Bridge Post Office), Henry County, Alabama was the location of this survey,
yet likely the same house and property that was surveyed in the 1870 enumeration. The household
that decade included:

       James Alexander, age 68 ("Farmer") (James Irvin Alexander, Sr. "James")
       Elizabeth Alexander, age 63 ("wife" "keeping house") (Elizabeth Jane Stokes Alexander
        "Jane")
       Margret Alexander, age 22 ("daughter" "work in house")
       Lizar J. Alexander, age 13 ("daughter" "work in house")

JAMES CARL ALEXANDER
"James", "Jim", and "Jimmy"
A son of Wilton Kenneth Alexander "Kenneth" and Beatrice Lloyd "Bea"
Born: November 14, 1948

JAMES DAVID ALEXANDER
"David"
A son of Viviian Loren Alexander "Loren" and Eunice Lee
Born: August 6, 1939 Pee Dee area of South Carolina in either Florence or Darlington county
Died: September 28, 2008 Ridgeway, Fairfield County, South Carolina
Over the years, David has lived in: Darlington County, South Carolina; Florence County, South
Carolina; Columbus, Mississippi; Colorado Springs, Colorado; and Macon, Bibb County, Georgia.

JAMES ERVIN ALEXANDER
"James"
A son of Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie" and Ida Eula Jeffords "Ida"
Born: November 24, 1910 Florence County, South Carolina
Died: November 5, 1996 at age 85
Marriage: January 10, 1937 to Virginia Louise Mixon "Virginia"
Born: January 1, 1920 in Florence County, South Carolina
Died: January 25, 2000

James and Virginia’s children include:
       Ervin Alexander
       Louise Alexander

Virginia's parents were:

       Edward Leon Mixon "Eddie" b. 1881 d. 1951
       Docia Corrine Windham "Docie" b. 1894 d. 1981

  According to the Social Security Death Index, James’ Social Security card was issued in North
Carolina, indicating that he had once worked there.
  These Alexanders were longtime residents of Hartsville, Darlington County, South Carolina.
Burial: James was buried November 7, 1996, and Virginia was buried January 27, 2000. Both graves
can be found at Westview Memorial Cemetery, Hartsville, Darlington County, South Carolina.

Obituary - Florence Morning News, Florence, South Carolina, dated November 7, 1996:

   Hartsville - Funeral services for James Ervin Alexander, Sr., 85, who died Tuesday, November 5,
1996, will be today, November 7, at 4 p. m. from the Lakeview Baptist Church. The Rev. Don Purvis
will officiate. Burial will be in the Westview Memorial Cemetery, directed by Norton Funeral Home.
   Mr. Alexander was born in Florence County, a son of the late Charlie I. (the letter “I” is incorrect)
and Ida Jeffords Alexander. He was retired from Hartsville Coffee County and was a member of
Lakeview Baptist Church.
   Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Virginia Mixon Alexander of Hartsville; one son, Ervin Alexander of
Hartsville; one daughter, Mrs. Louise Stephens of Prosperity; two sisters, Mrs. Sally Newsome of
Hartsville and Mrs. Leola Watford of Lamar; five grandchildren, six great-grandchildren, and one 2-
great-grandchild.

Obituary - Florence Morning News, Florence, South Carolina, dated January 26, 2000:

   Hartsville - Funeral services for Virginia Mixon Alexander, 80, who died Tuesday, January 25, 2000
will be at 3 p.m. Thursday from the Lakeview Baptist Church. Dr. Don Purvis will officiate. Burial will
be in Westview Memorial Cemetery directed by Norton Funeral Home.
   Visitation will be from 7 to 9 p.m. today at the funeral home.
   Mrs. Alexander was born in Florence County, a daughter of the late Eddie and Docie Windham
Mixon. She was a member of the Lakeview Baptist Church and retired from the Hartsville Mill.
   Surviving are a son, Ervin Alexander of Hartsville; a daughter, Mrs. Louise Stephens of Prosperity; a
sister, Mrs. Connie Rogers of Timmonsville; a brother, E.L. Mixon of Timmonsville; five grandchildren,
seven great-grandchildren, and a 2-great-grandchild.
   She was preceded in death by her husband, James Ervin Alexander.

United State Federal Census Reference:

1920 - James' parents were living on "Lone Tree Farm" in the area then known as Ebenezer
Township, Florence County, now the name of an area considered farther east on the edge of the City
of Florence in Florence County, South Carolina. The survey was taken in their area on both January
5th and 6th.

       Charlie Alexander, age 49 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Ida Alexander, age 38 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
       Frank Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (William Frank Alexander "Frank")
       Earl Alexander, age 10 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl")
       James Alexander, age 8 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "James")
       Woodrow Alexander, age 5 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
       Allen Alexander, age 1 and a half years ("Son") (Daniel Allen Alexander)
1930 - James' parents were still living on "Lone Tree Farm" in Timmonsville Township, Florence
County, South Carolina during this survey. In his household were:

       Charlie E Alexander, age 60 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Ida Alexander, age 48 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
       Earl Alexander, age 20 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl")
       James I Alexander, age 19 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "James")
       Woodrow W Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
       Ira Alexander, age 9 ("Son")
       Leola Alexander, age 6 ("Daughter") (Margaret Leola Alexander "Leola")
       Sallie L Alexander, age 1 year 10 months ("Daughter") (Sally Louise Alexander "Sally")

JAMES H. ALEXANDER
A son of Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry", and Laura M. Raines
Born: About 1924
Burial: James is reportedly buried in the Greenville, South Carolina area.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1930 - James' father's household was surveyed in Greenville Township, Greenville County, South
Carolina on April 14th. The household included:

       Henry L Alexander, age 57 ("Head") (Henry Lee Alexander)
       Laura M Alexander, age 47 ("Wife") (Laura M Raines Alexander "Laura")
       Willliam A Alexander, age 15 ("Son")
       Carl H Alexander, age 12 ("Son")
       Leland S Alexander, age 9 ("Son")
       James H Alexander, age 6 ("Son")

JANE ALEXANDER
A daughter of John Alexander and Mary Woodham “Polly”
Died: After 1854
Jane is not a direct descendant in this line. She was Rev. John William Reese Alexander's sister.
Marriage: Before 1846 to Samuel Davis

JESSIE CLIFTON ALEXANDER, JR.
"Jessie" and "Junior" (to family)
A son of Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton" and Mavie Edna Jolly "Mavie"
Born: November 19, 1934

JESSIE CLIFTON ALEXANDER, SR.
"Clifton" and "Cliff" Born: May 26, 1906 - Died: May 12, 1973
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe" and Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: Darlington County in South Carolina
Died: At age 66 in Florence County, South Carolina
Marriage: Mavie Edna Jolly "Mavie"
Born: October 12, 1911
Died: April 30, 1981
Burial: Clifton and Mavie are buried at Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church, Timmonsville, Florence
County, South Carolina

Children of Clifton and Mavie include:

       Alma Jean Alexander "Alma Jean"
       Edna Ruth Alexander "Ruth"
       Frances Laura Alexander "Frances" and "Fran"
       Franklin Lee Alexander "Frank"
       Gerald Wesley Alexander "Jerry"
       Jessie Clifton Alexander, Jr. "Jessie"
       Laurie Silas Alexander "Laurie"
       Jack Stanley Alexander "Jack"
       John Gee Alexander "John"
       Russell Dale Alexander "Russell"

Mavie's parents were:

       Silas Jolly b. June 1886 d. August 4, 1942 Effingham community, Florence County, South
        Carolina
       Queen E. Thompson "Queenie" b. 1892 d. March 6, 1956. They're buried at Pine Grove
        United Methodist Church, Darlington County near Timmonsville. Their double marker is
        inscribed: “THE FAITHFUL ARE CERTAIN OF THEIR REWARD”.

Mavie's paternal grandparents were:

       Robert Jolly
       Serena Nunnery

Her maternal grandparents were:

       Louie E. Jolly
       Katie Thompson

Mavie had at least one brother:

       King David Jolly

  The eldest of his siblings, Clifton last resided in the town Timmonsville, Florence County, South
Carolina.

Tribute - Daughter Fran remembers...

    It is only human nature for children to think that they know more than their parents when they are
young. It takes becoming a parent yourself to really understand and appreciate your parents. It is
only then that you can realize the hopes, dreams, fears and sorrows that your parents experienced.
    We know that Clifton had many dreams that were never fulfilled. Because of having very little
money, there was no need to worry about it. It was difficult for him to take care of his ten children
but he always managed somehow. Perhaps most of them remember the hard times and can
somehow love him even more for trying.
    He tried hard to do his best by us. He fed and clothed us and disciplined and loved us. Times
were hard but he always tried to spend the last dollar or fifty cents to make one of us happy - a candy
bar, or soda or something that he knew we wanted.
    In his younger years he worked on the W.P.A., and had to give it up because of a crippling spinal
disease that eventually made him totally disabled. He was always a farmer, and even though he
wasn't physically able to do a lot of work himself, he made sure his children did it. Oh! How we hated
it when he would get us started in the field to work and then he would take off and not come back
until it was nearly dark. Little did we know the pain he suffered but by now most of his children have
been afflicted with the disease he had, some more severe than others and now we know a little of his
suffering.
    Whenever someone would come along and pay a compliment on the garden or a tobacco or cotton
field, he would strut like a peacock! We suppose he was proud of what his children had done to
receive such compliments.
   Clifton was a great fisherman. It seems as though he always felt like fishing when he could not do
anything else. As children we never knew how many BC Headache Powders or Anacin he had to take
just to feel like fishing. He would always get us started digging bait, and as soon as we had enough
to start he would take one of us to carry his tackle box, and he would go to the river bank leaving the
rest of us behind to dig enough worms to fill the remaining cans. We always got to fish later though.
   Another of his great loves was sports of any kind, but some form of ball was his favorite because
he loved to watch his sons (all seven) play. This brought him much pleasure. He was proud of his
children. He also loved a radio because he would stay up late at night to hear a fight or wrestling or
some sports show. We believe it was in his blood.
   Clifton was a very generous man. He would have given away everything we had if our mama
would have let him. Her concern was for her children. There were times when he would have us load
the back of our old car with turnips, collards, sweet potatoes or whatever was in season and go to
town, park the car and go in the stores and tell people to go get whatever they wanted. He loved
‘hog killing’ days when he could have relatives, neighbors and friends come and help and when we
were finished he always seemed to have given away more than we kept. We didn't know at the time
but that was the Lord's way of returning our blessings - the more you give, the more you receive.
   He loved to laugh. He would laugh so hard he would shake all over. Hopefully laughing covered
some of his pain. Laughter comes from a merry heart and worketh like a good medicine. There were
many occasions where he would laugh until tears would run down his face. One of these times came
about on a hot summer day when Clifton was sitting under a Chinaberry tree and kept complaining
about the heat and one of his sons-in-law decided to try to help him by cutting his pants leg off and
making him some Bermudas. As he cut the pants off up above the knees, the material began to rip
and before he knew it, the entire crotch had ripped out leaving him in quite a predicament. His son-
in-law just walked away and left in laughing tears. There were many moments such as this.
   Clifton sharecropped many years for G.K. Young, one of the finest and most honest men in the
community. He always treated Clifton and his family as if we were part of his own family. We were
blessed to have G.K. and his wife Mildred be such a vital part of our lives.

Obituary - Possibly Florence Morning News, Florence, South Carolina:

    TIMMONSVILLE - Funeral services for Jessie Clifton Alexander will be conducted Tuesday at 4 p.m.
at Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church by the Rev. Freddie Yound and the Rev. Thomas Terry. Burial will
be in the church cemetery, directed by Layton-Perry Funeral Home.
   Mr. Alexander, 66, died Saturday in a Florence hospital after a short illness.
   He was born in Darlington County, a son of the lateJoseph and Fannie Hancock Alexander.
   Mr. Alexander was a retired farmer, and a member of the Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church and the
Woodmen of the World.
   Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Mavie Jolly Alexander of the home; seven sons, Jerry Alexander, Laurie
Alexander, and Russell Alexander, all of Timmonsville, Frank and Jack Alexander, both of Rochester,
New York, John Alexander of Cassett, and Jessie C. Alexander, Jr.of U.S. Air Force, Alaska; three
daughters, Mrs. James William Brown of North Augusta,Mrs. Duewell Spring of Florence, and Mrs. Bill
Lovelace of Fayetteville, N.C.; five brothers, Lee Alexander,Willard Alexander, and Joe Alexander, all of
Timmonsville, Belvin Alexander of Florence and Kenneth Alexander of Effingham; a sister, Mrs. Edgar
Powers of Timmonsville; 20 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

JOHN ALEXANDER
The oldest known patriarch of this line
A son of Mrs. Frances (nee?) Alexander and an unknown father (to this research)
Born: About 1775 North Carolina, possibly Dobbs County
Died: 1846 Darlington District, South Carolina
Marriage: Darlington District to Mary Woodham "Polly"
Born: About 1777 South Carolina
Died: Darlington District, South Carolina About 1846

John and Mary's children include:
      Abner M. Alexander
      Ann Alexander
      Aris Alexander
      Cornelia Caroline Alexander "Caroline"
      Elizabeth J. Alexander
      Ervin M. Alexander
      James Alexander
      Jane Alexander
      John William Reese Alexander "William"
      Mary Alexander
      Susannah Alexander "Susan"

Mary Woodham Alexander's parents were:

      Edward Woodham, Jr. b. 1746 Surry County, Virginia d. Sumter District, South Carolina in a
       part that is now Lee County, South Carolina d. ? m. About 1763 in North Carolina
      Mary Aires "Polly" b. About 1755 d. Darlington County, South Carolina. The couple is possibly
       buried in the now desecrated Woodham Cemetery, Stokes Bridge, Bishopville, Lee County,
       South Carolina
      Mary Woodham Alexander's paternal grandparents were:
      Edward Woodham, Sr. b. Between 1700 and 1720 Charles City County, Virginia d. 1785 Dobbs
       County, North Carolina in a part that is now Lenoir County, North Carolina
      Eleanor Dupree "Ellen" b. About 1720, possibly in Virginia d. Early 1800s, Darlington District,
       South Carolina m. About 1739 in Virginia - burial: Lenoir County, North Carolina

Edward Woodham,Jr. and the former Mary Woodham's children include:

      Louisa Woodham b. May 2, 1741, Surry County, Virginia d. Early 1800s
      Aris Woodham b. July 3, 1771, Darlington District, South Carolina d. Alabama - burial:
       Woodham Cemetery, Dale County, Alabama
      Mary Woodham b. About 1748 in North Carolina m. ? Wiggins
      (Child) Woodham b. About 1779 in North Carolina
      George Windham Woodham b. About 1784 in North Carolina
      Edward Harley Woodham b. June 26, 1785, Darlington District, South Carolina
      Mary Woodham Alexander's paternal great grandfather:
      Thomas Woodham b. About 1666, Charles City County, Virginia

   As a note, back in those days, the nickname "Polly" was used for almost every woman who's name
was Mary. There were several names that were treated the same way, i.e. Sarahs became "Sallie" or
"Sally".
   Mary Woodham Wiggins was a widow when she moved into Sumter District, South Carolina, and
was the mother of Daniel H. Wiggins. Some think Mary's deceased husband may have been a Jesse
Wiggins. When she migrated into South Carolina with Daniel, along for the journey was also John
Alexander's widowed mother, Mrs. Frances (nee?) Alexander, John, and Mary Margaret Alexander
"Polly", Frances' daughter. They ended their trip to old Sumter District in the area of modern-day
Bishopville, Lee County, South Carolina. Daniel moved on into Henry County, Alabama in About 1828,
after the death of his mother. Being Edward Woodham's sister, she's likely buried in the old
Woodham Family Cemetery, now just a field for crops. Daniel's son Joshua Wiggins was born in Una,
once in old Sumter District, now in Lee County, South Carolina.
   As previous stated, Mary Woodham Wiggins was the mother of Daniel Wiggins, who later moved
into Washington County, Georgia, but after his daughter married, he moved into Henry, where he was
prominent. He reportedly purchased the local jail, and lived there until he died. He resided in the
town of Richmond, which was then old Henry County's county seat, before the seat was moved to
Abbeville. It was probably on the same land where the church and cemetery now stand. The jail was
next to the opposite side of the cemetery from the present-day Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church. Mt.
Pleasant Baptist is located in Grimes, Dale County, Alabama, next to Dothan, Alabama's Napier Field
airport. They have a fairly new church building. The first church on his property became "The
Wiggins Church", and Daniel was buried in the church's cemetery. Nobody seems to be sure About
the exact location of he and his wife, Susanna Truitt's grave. Years ago, a group of folks put up grave
markers up to mark the spot, right in front of one of his son's grave, just to memorialize his being
buried in that cemetery. He and Susanna were married About 1798 back in old Darlington District,
South Carolina.
   John Alexander was a well-respected member of his community, one of the “who’s who”, and one
of the founding fathers of what is now the still-active Bethlehem United Methodist Church, Lee
County, South Carolina. According to United States Census records, John was termed a “planter”.
Historians say that the word “planter” was used in place of “farmer” when the person owned a certain
number of acres of land and slaves. A person who owned a plantation was known as a planter, as he
or she was the supervisor of the planting, but had many people such as slaves, and sometimes his
own children to do most of the work.
   All that is really known About our John Alexander’s residence is that he lived near the crossing at
Lynches River, formerly Lynches Creek and United States Highway 15, now called the DesChamps
Bridge, reportedly on the Darlington District side, across the creek from Capt. Peter DuBose, who lived
on the Sumter District side. A pre-bridge ferry was known McCallum’s Ferry, and before that it was
DuBose’s Ferry, owned and operated by the Captain’s family. It is believed that John Alexander's
family first lived on the Sumter District side, where his children were born. Later he lived on the
Darlington District side. That information was passed along to me by the late Historian of the
Darlington County Historical Commission, Horace Fraser Rudisill.
   John and his brother-in-law, Paris Hickman sold Frances Alexander's property following her death.
The transaction took place on January 5, 1821 (Sumter District Deed Book FF, page 74).
   When John attended an estate sale for neighbor Micah Mixon and bought: pine chest, $7.05; safe,
$9.05; iron chain, $1.00; sitting chair, 52 cents; and 3 barrels, $3.00.
   In the March 10, 1949 edition of the “Lee County Messenger”, the late Bishopville historian, Joseph
Freeman Stuckey (Joe) wrote an article called “Early History of Bishopville and Vicinity”. In it, he told
of what he knew of John and his family. Copies of some of Mr. Stuckey's manuscripts are available in
the Manuscript Room of the Caroliniana Library at the “Horseshoe” of the University of South Carolina
in Columbia. It is listed under the heading “Lee County Families”.
   Prices were sure lower back then. John's coffin cost $9. It seems he died at home.
   John’s Last Will and Testament was signed April 22, 1845 and was filed September 5, 1846 in
Sumter County (bundle 128, package 4). He stipulated in his will that in the event of his death,
“Rainey”, one of his slaves, was to be rented to pay any debts owed. According to some of the
records I’ve seen, son William Alexander ended up with Rainey.
   Slaves and their “increase” were willed by John to be divided between his six daughters after his
and his wife's deaths.

Six other slaves listed in the will are:

       Jacob
       Solomon
       Chloe
       George (a youth)
       Dick
       Charlotte

When his will was drawn, John Alexander owned:

       12 horses
       1 colt
       17 stock hogs
       10 meat hogs
       12 head of cattle
       crops

Some of the friends, neighbors, and contemporaries named in John's probate papers were the “Who's
Who” of that area and time:

       John Mixon
       Jeremiah Belk (Rev. Abner M. Alexander's father-in-law)
       Middleton DuBose (friend of John Alexander and son of Capt. Peter DuBose)
       M. Filing
       M. Belk
       ? Beasley
       J. Fields
       James Heron

Witnesses to John Alexander's will were:

       Captain Peter DuBose (a neighbor and friend of John Alexander)
       A.C.L.D. Belk
       Harriet Stokes

In 1854, probate accounting records stated that money was paid to these related people:

       Abner Alexander (Rev. Abner M. Alexander)
       James Alexander (a son of John Alexander who lived in Henry County, Alabama)
       William Alexander (Rev. John William Reese Alexander)
       Jane Alexander Davis (a daughter of John Alexander)
       Caroline Alexander Hall (Cornelia Caroline Alexander)
       Susan Alexander (Susannah Alexander - her widower, Captain John Wesley Stuckey was
        administrator for their children)
       Mary Alexander (a daughter of John Alexander)
       Anna Alexander Riley (a daughter of John Alexander)

In an 1855 accounting, each of the following sons received $71.75:
     Abner Alexander (Rev. Abner M. Alexander)
     James Alexander
     William Alexander
     Aris Alexander
     Ervin M. Alexander

   Many of the buyers at John's estate sale on August 16, 1852 in Sumter District, South Carolina
(Bundle 133, package 17) are mentioned in historical documents that chronicle the development of
that entire area. They were:

       Abijah Alexander (A son of Rev. Abner M. Alexander)
       Abner Alexander (Rev. Abner M. Alexander)
       William Alexander (Rev. John William Reese Alexander "William")
       John Denacy
       John C. Dennis
       Abel Dixon
       D.A. Dixon
       Ezekiel Dixon
       John H. Dixon
       E. DuBose
       M. DuBose (Possibly Middleton DuBose, John's executor)
       Dorcas Elmore
       John Folsom
       T.J. Green
       James Hall (Likely Cornelia Caroline Alexander "Caroline"’s husband, William James Hall "Jim")
       William Hall (Likely Jim Hall's father)
       William H. Holleyman
       Thomas Kelley
       J.A. McGee
       John McGee
       T.M. Muldrow
       B.A.J. Scarborough
       J.W. Stuckey (likely John Wesley Stuckey, widower of Susannah Alexander Stuckey, also an
        Assistant Marshal)

    Dick, one of the family’s slaves, was sold at that estate sale, and monies were disposed of to the
following people:

       Jeremiah Belk (Rev. Abner M. Alexander's father-in-law)
       Willis Josey
       J.W. Stuckey (Likely John Wesley Stuckey)
       William Rogers
       George Kelley
       J.A. (Last name illegible – possibly McGee)
       Richard Jenkins
       Stephen Woodham
       John H. Dixon
       James Rembert
       Ezekiel Dixon

   Don’t be confused with all of the “Pollys” connected with John. Polly was once a standard
nickname for just About anyone named Mary. John’s sister, wife, and mother-in-law were all
nicknamed Polly, as well as others who were related.
   Over thirty years after John's death, his former neighborhood was the site of one of the more
famous duels in the old South, the “Cash-Shannon Duel”. A historical marker which is erected on
United States Highway 15 near Lynches River states: “This was the site of the last fatal duel fought in
South Carolina, in which Colonel E.B.C. Cash of Cash's Depot killed a William M. Shannon of Camden
on July 5, 1880. This tragedy influenced the South Carolina Legislature to enact a law in December
1880, making dueling a crime and requiring public officials, until 1854, to swear that they had not
been in a duel.”
   Son-in-law John Alexander was the administrator of Edward Woodham, Jr.'s will and estate.
   John and Mary are likely buried in the now-defunct Woodham Family Cemetery in the Stokes Bridge
community, Bishopville, Lee County, South Carolina. Alternatively, they may be buried in the old, yet
partial cemetery of the Capt. Peter DuBose family's graveyard, not far away on the Bishopville side of
Lynches River (formerly Lynches Creek). The John Alexander family, and the Captain's family were
near neighbors, as well as close in friendship.

Last Will and Testament - Capitalization, spelling, punctuation are all as written in either the original
document or by an earlier, unknown transcriber:

                        Estate of John Alexander decd. Last Will and Testament
                  JUDGE OF PROBATE'S OFFICE, SUMTER County, SOUTH CAROLINA
                                        State of South Carolina
                                            Sumter District
In the name of God amen. I John Alexander of the State and district aforesaid planter being old and
infirm but of perfect mind and memory Thanks be to God for his mercies call into mind the mortality
of my body do make and ordain this instrument to be my last will and testament in manner and form
as follows (Viz.) Principally and first of all I recommend my soul into the hands of God who gave it
and my body to be buried in a decent Christian like manner and as touching such worldly estate as it
hath pleased God to bless me with I give and dispose of in the following (Viz.) First I desire all my
lawful debts to be paid I desire if lawful for one or more of my slaves to be hired out until my debts
are paid if this cannot be approved of according to law I wish my Executors to sell one Negro and pay
the debts. Secondly I lend to my beloved wife Mary Alexander, all my slaves (Viz.) Raner Jacob,
Solomon, Cloe, George, Dick, and Charlotte and their increase during her natural life and after her
death to be equally divided between my six daughters to wit Ann Tiller, Mary Magee, Susanna
Stuckey, Elizabeth Alexander, Cornelia Carolina Alexander, and Jane Davis in trust of my indubitable
friends Asa Woodham and Middleton DuBose for their use and benefit and their children prohibiting at
same their husbands or any other person or persons of any power to sell or dispose of said Negro
slaves in any manner shape or form but for their sole use and benefit I also give my daughters
Elizabeth and Cornelia C. Alexander each one horse bridle and saddle each one cow and calf each one
feather bed and furniture I further lend my wife Mary Alexander the lands and tenements thereon I
now live with one other tract called the Barnes or mill tract to have and to hold all and singular the
above lands during her natural life together with all my stock hogs cattle the crop that may be
growing on the premises or gathered and also all the horses that I have not otherwise disposed of
and my house hold and kitchen furniture and plantation tools declare the above land and stock and
other things named to be sold and equally divided between my five sons (Viz.) Abner Alexander James
Alexander Aris Alexander John W. Alexander Ervin M. Alexander I now give one other tract or parcel
of land adjoining Peter DuBose land formerly a part of the land formerly a tract of the ++ to be
equally divided between my two sons Aris Alexander and Ervin M. Alexander Aris Alexander part to go
to the use and benefit of his children I do hereby constitute make and ordain my trusty friends Asa
Woodham and Middleton DuBose my sole executors of this my last will and testament. I hereby
utterly disallow revoke and disannul every other former will and testament by me made. Ratifying this
and no other to be my last will and testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto put my hand and
seal this twenty second April one thousand eight hundred and forty five. And in the sixty ninth year of
the Independence of the United States of America. John Alexander - Signed sealed and
acknowledged John Alexander (seal) in the presence of day and above written Peter DuBose, A.C.L.D.
Belk, Harriet Stokes

JOHN GEE ALEXANDER
"John"
A son of Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton" and Mavie Edna Jolly "Mavie"
Born: February 6, 1942

JOHN LEE ALEXANDER
A son of Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry", and Laura M. Raines
Born: About 1903
Burial: John's reportedly buried in the Greenville, South Carolina area.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1910 - April 15th was the date of this survey in Greenville Township, Greenville County, South
Carolina. John's father, Henry, is noticeably absent from the household in this survey, with wife Laura
as "head". World War I did not commence until 1914, so Henry may have been serving in the military
during this time. Laura's mother and a boarder were present in this household, and John was age 7.
John was not listed in the 1920 census when he would have been around 17 years old.

       Mrs. L M Alexander, age 28 ("head")
       John Alexander, age 7 ("son")
       Lewis Alexander, age 3 ("son")
       Eugene Alexander, age 1 ("son")
       Mrs. S A Raines, age 70 ("mother")
       Mrs. Nannie Ray, age 25 ("boarder")
JOHN LUTHER ALEXANDER, JR. (1)
(Infant)
A son of John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" (1) and Nettie Hatchell
Born: August 26, 1915 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: November 6, 1915 High Hill community, Darlington County, South Carolina at 2 months and 11
days
Burial: November 7, 1915 at Lake Swamp Baptist Church near his mother and sister, Ruth. According
to his death certificate, the infant's death was due to Cholera.

JOHN LUTHER ALEXANDER, SR. (1)
"Luther"
A son of John Wesley Alexander "John" and Sarah Ann M. Stewart "Sallie"
Born: January 23, 1878 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: January 25, 1955 at age 77 Darlington County, South Carolina
Marriage 1: January 1, 1899 to Nettie Hatchell
Born: April 1, 1880 South Carolina
Died: June 25, 1916 South Carolina
Marriage 2: Bertha Rosalie Lechner "Bertha"
Born: October 17, 1876 in Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: April 6, 1969
Burial: Luther and Bertha are buried at Pine Grove United Methodist Church, Darlington County, South
Carolina, and Nettie is buried at Lake Swamp Baptist Church, a short distance from Pine Grove United
Methodist Church, where Luther, Sr. (1) is buried. Near Nettie are her infant daughter, Ruth
Alexander, and infant son John Luther Alexander, Jr. (1)

Luther and Nettie’s children were:

       Arnold Ceil Alexander, Sr. "Arnold"
       Bertha Marie Alexander "Marie"
       John Luther Alexander, Jr. (1) (infant)
       Julia Louise Alexander "Julia"
       Lena Marian Alexander "Lena"
       Mary Berta Alexander "Mary"
       Ruth Alexander (infant)
       Sadie Alexander

Luther and Bertha's children include:

       Carol Alexander (Infant)
       Helen Flora Alexander "Helen"

Nettie's parents were:

       James Larry Hatchell "James" b. 1847 d. 1912 Darlington County, South Carolina
       Julia Olivia Anderson "Julia" b. 1858 d. 1893 Darlington County, South Carolina

Nettie's paternal grandparents were:

       Elias W. Hatchell
       Margaret (nee?)

Nettie had at least 3 siblings:

       Lula Hatchell b. 1878
       Elliott L. Hatchell b. 1876 Darlington County, South Carolina m. Letha Booth
       Isla Olivia Hatchell b. May 25, 1891 d. on May 23, 1920 from complications of influenza
        contracted during February of 1920 m. H.J. Jolly
       Josephine Hatchell b. 1875

Bertha was a daughter of:

       Frank C. Lechner b. 1844 Scotland, and spoke English as his "Mother tongue"
       Martha E. Thornal b. June 1838 South Carolina d. 1918 - burial: Pine Grove United Methodist
        Church, Darllington County, South Carolina near Timmonsville

Bertha had two known sisters:

       Mable E. Lechner b. June 5, 1874 in South Carolina d. January 1, 1881 burial: Pine Grove
        United Methodist Church, Darlington County, South Carolina
       Fannie Lechner

    Nettie died of “Bright’s Disease”, as did her father. Luther’s second wife, Bertha was a friend of the
family, who helped care for Nettie during her fatal illness.
Netties parents were farmers, and are listed in the 1880 United States Census for Timmonsville in
(old) Darlington County, South Carolina. In that census Hatchell was spelled "Hatchel".
    According to an article About Bertha, and sister-in-law Maggie Louise Alexander, Bertha's maternal
great great grandfather was Amos Thornal, who lived in a log cabin, and owned the property on
which it was located in Darlington County, South Carolina near Timmonsville. That property has been
the burying ground for years for the Thornal family and use to be known as the "Thornal Cemetery",
sometimes incorrectly referred to as the "Thornwell Cemetery". Pine Grove Methodist Church, even
when it was in it's old location near (now) Interstate 20 buried their dead at Thornal. The newer Pine
Grove Methodist, built around 1951, now known as Pine Grove United Methodist Church, is built in
front of the graveyard on South Carolina Highway 341.
    Daughter Sadie Alexander was living her father's home during the 1900 United States Census for
High Hill community in Darlington County, South Carolina. Many references to Sadie have her middle
initial as "C". Her tombstone inscription says "E".
    Luther registered for the World War I draft on September 12, 1918. He was described as having
blue eyes, brown hair, and being tall. He was living on Route 2, Darlington, South Carolina. His
"Present Occupation" was "Farming", and his nearest relative was listed as Mrs. J.L. Alexander (Mrs.
John Luther Alexander), also of Route 2. His signature is on the draft card.

Newspaper Article - Includes Bertha Rosalie Lechner Alexander and Maggie Louise Alexander. From
the Florence Morning News, dated February 6, 1958:

                       MRS. ALEXANDER, SENIOR CITIZEN, RECALLS HER LIFE
                                        by Bess Truman

    Mrs. Bertha Lockner Alexander, 81, lives with her sister-in-law, Miss Maggie Alexander in the Lake
Swamp community of Darlington County, just across the Florence County line.
    Her father was a Yankee and fought against her mother's first husband, who, through the irony of
fate, was killed in jumping from a train in his hurry to get home quickly after the close of the
Confederate War. Her Yankee father liked the South so much that he drove a pack of horses down
South after the war to sell, met Bertha's mother and married her.
    Her great-great grandfather, Amos Thornhill (Thornal is correct), helped organize the Lake Swamp
Church, the first in Lake Swamp. He lived in a one-room log house, one of the oldest in Darlington
County, was buried in the yard under a big oak tree, to which his son added another log room and
hallway and moved it closer to the road. Their former home site was later converted into a cemetery,
with Bertha's 2-great-grandfather's grave remaining in it. Bertha says the big oak sheltering it only
fell from age a few years ago.
    Bertha, her mother, and her grandmother were born in this log house, though Bertha says the
outside had been all weather boarded when she first remembers it. On his death, an uncle, who
inherited it, deeded it to Pine Grove Baptist (Methodist is correct) Church, which still stands and can
be seen from Bertha's home.
   “Well, I taught school for 13 years, ten before my marriage and three afterward.’ said Bertha. ‘Yes,
she is considered on of the best educated Senior Citizens in the Lake Swamp community.’ interrupted
Maggie, her sister-in-law.
   ‘Well, I did go to college about five years,’ agreed Bertha, ‘though not all to the same college. I
started to Converse College first with my older sister; but entered the academic department,
corresponding to high school the first year, as I had not yet finished night school before going with
her sister. In the middle of the second year, my sister died and the school burned, so I transferred to
Columbia College (later changed to Queen's College and moved to Charlotte). Then while visiting
relatives in Georgia, they persuaded my mother to send me to National Park Seminary in Washington,
where I received my B.S. degree.’
   ‘I was a county demonstrator agent for three years, conducting a course in this work with Miss
Edith Parrott at Coker College, the first, I believe that was ever held.’
   ‘I married John Luther and had he lived until January 24 of this year, we would have been married
41 years. He was a widower with six children, the youngest, Arnold, being only 4 ½ years old. He
now manages my farm for me. The oldest, Sadie now deceased, married two weeks after I did; Julia
married Herbert Jordan, who is now county manager of Darlington County. Mary lives in Darlington
and Lena married a Mr. Nivens of Charlotte. In two weeks after my husband died, 20 years ago,
Sadie married, and in two more weeks, Maggie, my husband's sister, who has devoted the best years
of her life caring for her sister's children, then came to live with me and we have lived together ever
since.’
   ‘Maggie has her own living quarters in the front of the house and we both spend every night at my
own daughter's, Mrs. White whose home you can see at the cross roads, just a step away, across the
street from the store. We do our chores before leaving in the short winter days. I live mostly on the
young sprouts of corn and navy beans started in pure sand before their roots have hardly started. I
contribute my good health to this died, eating about 30 tiny young plants at a time, though I do use
and infra...” (Remainder of the article not available.)

  The niece mentioned in the article, “Mrs. White”, was Helen Flora Alexander White.
  Although I made the effort to locate Nettie’s obituary in the Florence Morning News and The State
(Columbia, South Carolina), she doesn’t seem to have had one published.

Obituary - Florence Morning News, January 27, 1955:

   Darlington, January 26 - J. Luther Alexander, 77, of the Pine Grove Community died last night at
home after an illness lasting several months.
Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday from the Pine Grove Methodist church. The pastor,
the Rev. B.S. Hughes will officiate, assisted by the Rev. Luther Shealy. Burial will follow in the church
cemetery.
   Mr. Alexander was born in Darlington County, son of the late John Wesley Alexander and Sally
Stewart. He was for 15 years a member of the Darlington County Board, and for 30 years he had
been superintendent of the Sunday School at the Piney Grove Church. He was chairman of the board
of stewards at the church and was treasurer of the church building fund. He was one of the most
outstanding leaders of his community.
   Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Bertha L. Alexander; one son, Arnold C. Alexander of Darlington
County; five daughters, Mrs. E.T. Nivens of Charlotte, of Darlington County; one brother, Mrs. David
Fields of Hartsville, Mrs. Herbert l. Jordan and Mrs. Archie McKay, both of Timmonsville, and Mrs.
Robert White Jr.; Joe K. Alexander of Timmonsville; one sister, Miss Maggie Alexander of Darlington;
24 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren.

Obituary - Florence Morning News, April 7, 1969:

  Darlington - Mrs. Bertha Lechner Alexander, 92, of the Pine Grove Community of Darlington
County, died early Sunday morning in a Darlington hospital after a brief illness.
    Funeral services will be Monday at 4 p.m. in the Pine Grove United Methodist Church with Rev. R.N.
Wells officiating. Burial will be in the church cemetery, directed by Kistler Funeral Home.
    Mrs. Alexander was born in Darlington County, a daughter of the late Frank C. and Martha Thornell
Lechner. She was a lifelong resident of Darlington County and the widow of the late J. Luther
Alexander who died in 1955. She was a member of the Pine Grove United Methodist Church where
she was a teacher of the Bertha Alexander Sunday School Class. She was a member of the Pine
Grove WSCS.
    Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Robert (Helen) White Jr. of Darlington; a stepdaughter, Mrs. Herbert
I. (Julia) Jordan of Darlington; 25 grandchildren and 49 great-grandchildren.
    Pallbearers will be Otto Davis, Olin DuBose, Henry Wallace, Charley Ham, Alvin DeWitt, and Earl
Wallace. Honorary pallbearers will be the Men's Bible Class of the Pine Grove United Methodist
Church.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1900 - Luther, first wife Nettie Hatchell, and infant Sadie C. Alexander are found in Darlington County,
South Carolina, living in the High Hill Township, not far from Timmonsville, living on the same
property with both his father and brother Charlie’s family. Luther was 23 at the time, and had been
married to Nettie for only a year. On that twentieth day of June the household included:

       John L Alexander, age 23 ("Head")
       Nettie Alexander, age 20 ("Wife")
       Sadie C Alexander, age 2 months ("Daughter")

1910 - Luther and family were located in Timmonsville Township, Florence County, South Carolina on
the 25th of April. This would be Nettie's last federal census survey. In the household were:

       Luther J Alexander, age 33 ("Head")
       Nettie Alexander, age 30 ("Wife")
       Sadie C Alexander, age 10 ("Daughter")
       Lena M Alexander, age 8 ("Daughter")
       Marie Alexander, age 7 ("Daughter")
       Julia Alexander, age 5 ("Daughter")
       Mary Alexander, age 2 ("Daughter")

1920 - Nettie Hatchell Alexander had died, Luther had remarried, and Luther's family was living in
Indian Branch, School District 23, Darlington County, South Carolina. The enumeration took place in
their vicinity on the 23rd and 27th of January, probably right before and after a weekend. Luther and
Bertha owned their home. In that home were:

       J Luther Alexander, age 41 ("Head")
       Bertha R Alexander, age 42 ("Wife")
       Marie Alexander, age 16 ("Daughter")
       Julia Alexander, age14 ("Daughter")
       Mary Alexander, age 12 ("Daughter")
       Arnold Alexander, age 7 ("Son")

1930 - Anderson School District, Darlington County, South Carolina was the household's location
during this survey, taken by Luther's nephew, Roy Dudley Hatchell on April 2nd. Those in the
household were:

       John L Alexander, age 52 ("Head") ("Farmer")
       Bertha M Alexander, age 52 ("Wife")
       Arnold Alexander, age 19 ("Son")
       Helen Alexander, age 9 ("Daughter")
JOHN LUTHER ALEXANDER, JR. (2)
(Infant)
A son of John Luther Alexander "Luther" and Judy Freeman

JOHN LUTHER ALEXANDER, SR. (2)
"Luther"
A son of Arnold Ceil Alexander, Sr. "Ceil" and Maggie Mae Rogers "Maggie"
Born: June 20, 1944
Died: July 14, 2009 following an illness at age 65
Marriage: Judy Freeman
Burial: Luther Alexander, Sr. (2) is buried at Pine Grove United Methodist Church, Darlington County,
South Carolina near Timmonsville, and very near his home. He was buried July 17, 2009.

Luther and Judy had one child:

       John Luther Alexander, Jr. (2)

   Luther's name has a "2" next to it because his grandfather was John Luther Alexander, Sr., also
called "Luther". His grandfather also had a son named John Luther Alexander, Jr., and this Luther's
son, John Luther Alexander, Jr. has a "2" after his name, as well.

Obituary - From the July 16, 2009 Morning News (formerly Florence Morning News), Florence,
Florence County, South Carolina:

   DARLINGTON - John Luther Alexander, Sr., 65, died Tuesday, July 14, 2009 after an illness.
   Funeral services will be Friday, July 17, 2009 at 3:00 p.m. at Pine Grove United Methodist Church,
Timmonsville. Interment will follow in the church cemetery.
   Mr. Alexander was born in Darlington County, the son of the late Arnold C. and Maggie Rogers
Alexander. He was a member of Pine Grove United Methodist Church, Timmonsville, SC.
   Survivors are his wife of Darlington, Judy Freeman Alexander, a son, John Luther Alexander, Jr.,
Darlington; two brothers, Eldredge Lee (Jeannette) Alexander, Florence, Arnold Ceil Alexander,
Jacksonville, Florida; a sister, Grace (James) Brown, Sumter, SC.
   Memorials may be made to Pine Grove United Methodist Church, 3544 Timmonsville Hwy.,
Timmonsville, SC 29161.
   Visitation will be at Friday, July 17, 2009 at 2:00 at Pine Grove United Methodist Church prior to the
service and other times at the home of Eldredge Lee and Jeannette Alexander.
   Layton-Anderson Funeral Home 4210 W. Palmetto Street, Florence is assisting the family with
arrangements.

JOHN WESLEY ALEXANDER (1)
"John"
A son of John William Reese Alexander "William" and Delila Alexandra Kea "Delia" and "Liley"
Born: August 26, 1846 Cureton’s Bridge community, Henry County, Alabama
Died: February 13, 1934 at his home in the Ebenezer community of Florence County, South Carolina
at age 87
Marriage: February 1, 1866 Sarah Ann M. Stewart "Sallie"
Born: February 16, 1840
Died: December 15, 1917
Burial: John and Sallie are buried at Pine Grove United Methodist Church, Darllington County, South
Carolina near Timmonsville. John was buried on February 15, 1934 at what was then called Thornal
Cemetery. Mr. Alexander's funeral arrangements were handled by J.H. Kistler of Darlington,
Darlington County, South Carolina.

Their children include:
       Addie Olivia Alexander "Addie"
       Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie"
       Ella L Alexander
       Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry"
       John Luther Alexander, Sr. (1) "Luther"
       Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe"
       Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie"
       Mary A Elizabeth Alexander "Mary"
       Mattie Viola Alexander "Mattie" and "Mollie"

   Sallie was a daughter of Abel S. Stewart and Lydia Kirkley of the Philadelphia community,
Darlington County. According to everyone who knew him, and his legacy on paper, John W.
Alexander was a extremely well-liked, as well as influential, citizen in his community. One of his
grandsons, the late Willard Alexander, told me a family story About John Wesley went to the aid of a
student who was About to be expelled by extremely disgruntled school officials. Despite the low odds
of that boy being vindicated, John's “good word” evidently caused the boy to stay in school.
   Some in the family have said that John Wesley Alexander wrote at least one article for “Florence
Morning News”.
   John's “Lone Tree Farm” was converted into a golf course, and a relatively short time later it went
out of business. The land has since been developed into a respectable subdivision, an auto repair
business, and a horse stable. A cemetery used in John Wesley Alexander’s day, located at the edge of
his property, is not far from the road, North Sallie Hill Road, and the creek crossing the road into
Darlington County, South Carolina. The subdivision now makes that graveyard somewhat
inaccessible. Those buried there include Charlie Alexander’s first wife, Olivia, some of Charlie's
children, and possibly John's daughter Ella.
   Several of my elder Alexander aunts and uncles have told me that a holly bush, a landmark
indicating where to turn to go to John's house, was once located at the corner of North Sallie Hill
Road and Holly Bush Road. It was in a straight line with John’s house across the road. The bush
itself was removed in the last few years, probably by county workers who had no idea of its purpose
or significance to the older family members and others of that area.
   In a list of baptisms on the Lynches Creek Circuit of the South Carolina Methodist Conference,
John’s father, William Alexander, and stepmother, Anne Parnell Alexander had four of John’s children
baptized. The location was probably Cypress Church. On the list were: Ella, Charlie, Henry, and
Mattie Alexander.
   Listed as living in John’s High Hill Township home in the 1900 United States Census survey for
Darlington County were (transcribed by an anonymous person from the census taker’s handwritten
survey): Sarah A. Alexander, 60 (wife); Hary L. Alexander, 26 (son); Maggie L. Alexander, 20
(daughter); Addie O. Alexander, 17 (daughter); and Joseph K. Alexander, 15 (son).
   A couple of notes on the aforementioned survey of family members: “Harry” is a nickname for
Henry, as he was formally named Henry Lee Alexander; and Addie was listed in the census as Addie
G. in the transcription, but after I checked the handwritten census survey, it was the census taker’s
rendition of an “O” that was mistaken by the transcriber. “Head of Household” John was 53 years old
at the time of the 1900 survey, and he was listed as having been married for 34 years, a farmer, and
as the renter of the farm he was working at the time. All his listed children were apparently single
back then. Also in that census, John’s family, and two of his son’s families lived next to each other in
the High Hill community. The two sons listed in that survey were: John Luther Alexander, who was
married to the former Nettie Hatchell then; and Charles Engram Alexander (Charlie), who was then
married to the former Frances Olivia Jernigan (Olivia), who died About 7 years later. Each son had a
child in his home that year, Luther's daughter, Sadie Alexander was two months old at the time, and
Charlie had Asa Junious Alexander (Junious) in the household, a 1-year-old.
   In the 1910 and 1920 census, John was found in the Ebenezer Township of Florence County,
toward Florence from Timmonsville. John was 66 in the 1910 survey, and his wife, on the list as Sallie
M. was also 66. That was to be her last census survey. Living close by was son Charlie Alexander in
both the 1910 and 1920 surveys. In 1900, John and Sallie’s youngest son, Joseph Kirkland "Joe"
Alexander was still at his parents’ home, but he was not in the 1910 survey.
    By 1920, Sallie Stewart Alexander had died, and daughter Maggie Alexander was erroneously listed
as John’s wife. That’s easy to understand, because Maggie was an intelligent, take-charge sort of
person, and the census taker probably thought she was John’s wife due to her assertiveness.
However, Maggie was only 38 years old at the time John was 73. In the survey, daughter Addie’s
sons, Luther Carlisle Hill and Gary Hill were living in the home at the time listed as nephews. Carlisle
was 13, and Gary was 11. They were Maggie’s nephews, but not “Head of Household” at John’s
household. It’s apparent that the census taker didn’t quite grasp the correct relationships within that
household, and more evidence that census takers made plenty of mistakes. I’ve seen mistakes in
almost every census survey I’ve dealt with over the years. Some census takers were more “on top of
it” than others. They seemed to have been more interested in numbers of people rather than
correctness of details.
    In the 1930 survey, John was only living with daughter Maggie, and grandson Luther Carlisle Hill on
Lone Tree Farm in the Lake Swamp Community of Florence County, South Carolina just inside the
Florence County line. Darlington County, South Carolina was right across the creek. That would be
John’s last United States Census, as he died there just a few years later at the farm. Carlisle Hill, who
was 24 at the time of the survey, died About five years later himself at age 29. Since the boy’s
parents died earlier in his life, Maggie was their guardian. The boys’ birth parents were John Limuel
Hill and Addie Olivia Alexander. Limuel died in 1910, and Addie died in 1911. Family members have
said that they think the couple died from complications of a flu epidemic.
    John Alexander death certificate states that he died of heart problems, and was a retired farmer
who farmed for 70 years. It also stated that he died at 10:30 in the evening, and that Timmonsville's
J.F. Davenport was his Doctor.

Newspaper Article - A summation of John’s final birthday party, possibly written by his
daughter, Maggie Alexander:

                          FAMILY REUNION HELD - HONOR 87TH BIRTHDAY

    On Saturday, August 26, J.W. Alexander reached the ripe age of eighty-seven, and members of his
family gathered at his home, Lone Tree Farm, about four miles from Timmonsville for a pleasant
reunion in honor of the occasion.
    Mr. Alexander is one of Florence County's honored Confederate Veterans. He has six children
living, and of these the following were present on this happy occasion: C.E. Alexander, J.L. Alexander,
J.K. Alexander, Mrs. G.C. Hatchell (Mattie); and Miss Maggie Alexander.
    Forty-nine grand children and great grandchildren were in attendance, with other members of his
family, totaling sixty-five, with about 25 other guests and relatives, making ninety in all. Among them
were two preachers, the Rev. L.W. Shealy of the Marlboro Circuit, and the Rev. J.F. Campbell, now
pastor of Epworth.
    About one o'clock a bountiful picnic dinner was served in the shade of the trees about the home.
The aged honoree was feeling his best and thoroughly enjoyed the occasion, the good fellowship and
the good wishes of his many relatives and friends. It was a happy day for all, and when leaving they
expressed the hope that Mr. Alexander would see many more happy birthdays.

Tribute - Handwritten and dated February 27, 1934 by John Wigfall Ivy of Timmonsville, South
Carolina. Mr. Ivey is buried at Byrd Cemetery, Timmonsville, Florence County, South Carolina.

                                             Deceased
                                      JOHN WESLEY ALEXANDER
                                          An Appreciation
                                           By John W. lvy

   Having known Mr.John Wesley Alexander, intimately, for almost half a century, I am pleased to
write the following lines in appreciation of his sterling worth as a man and Christian whose influence
for good among men can scarcely be fully estimated.
J is for Justice, in thought, word, and deed,
O is for Oneness, in purpose and in creed,
H is for Honesty, until life shall end,
N is for Nothing, but truth and honor defend.

W is for Worship of our Father above,
E is for Everyone embraced in His love,
S is for Strength of heart, mind, and soul,
L is for Leader to our heavenly goal,
E is for Earnestness in every effort made,
Y is for Yield nothing until right is staid.

A is for All should walk in love's way,
L is for Loyalty, when justice holds sway,
E is for Energy, to fight for the right,
X is for X-ray, giving more light,
A is for Almighty, in whom we should hide,
N is for Never, desert our guide,
D is for Doing, as The Master taught,
E is for Eternal life, that He brought,
R is for Remember, to live as we ought.”

Obituary - Back years ago, some families wrote obituaries for publication. Maggie Louise Alexander,
John’s schoolteacher daughter is believed to have written this obituary, as well as for others in the
family. It's an from Florence Morning News, Florence, Florence County, South Carolina:

                                     Taps For Brave Soldier Sound
                     Funeral Services for John W. Alexander At Timmonsville Today

Special to Morning News:
   TIMMONSVILLE, February 14 - Funeral services forJohn W. Alexander, 87, gallant Confederate
veteran who died Tuesday night at his home a few miles from Timmonsville, will be held Thursday
morning 11 o'clock from the Pine Grove Methodist church conducted by his pastor, the Rev. J.F.
Campbell. Interment will follow in the Thornwell Cemetery beside the grave of his wife.
   Mr. Alexander enlisted in the Confederate army at the age of fifteen years and served throughout
the war. He was a member of Culpepper Camp, U.C.V. of Timmonsville. For thirty years he had been
superintendent of the Pine Grove Methodist Sunday School being assisted the last few years by his
son Luther Alexander.
   Mr. Alexander was a splendid Christian gentleman and his influence for good has been far
reaching. His death, due to heart trouble from which he had been suffering for some time, brings
sorrow to a host of friends.
   Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. George Hatchell and Miss Maggie Alexander and four
sons; J.L., J.K., C.E. Alexander all of the Timmonsville section, and H.L. Alexander of Greenville. He
also leaves 32 grandchildren, 30 great-grandchildren and four 2-great-grandchildren. The pallbearers
will be six grandsons: Gary Hill, Roy Hatchell,Lee,Arnold,James, and Earl Alexander.

Obituary - From the March 15, 1934 issue of the Methodist periodical Southern Christian Advocate,
page 12, column 2:

   On February 13, 1934, death came into our midst and removed from the home, church and Sunday
school one of the most faithful and beloved members, Bro. John Wesley Alexander, 87 years 5 months
and 17 day of age. He was the son of the late Rev. John William Alexander who died in the year
1903*. His loving wife passed through the gate of death in 1917, leaving him a widower for the past
17 years.
   Brother Alexander gave his heart to God around 45 years ago and had a rich experience until the
day came when he fell asleep. He really did fall asleep. On Friday night preceding his death, realizing
that he was soon to pass out, he called all who were near to his bedside and talked and prayed with
them closing with a benediction. He then went into a state of coma and breathed his last on the
following Tuesday night. He served as steward of Pine Grove Methodist Church for quite a number of
years and was superintendent of the Sunday school until the day of his death. He died in harness for
his Lord.
    He was a member of the league of Confederacy, having served all four years in the war between
the States. During this war his life was saved by a pocket Testament. A bullet, which perhaps would
have pierced his heart, struck the Testament in his pocket and his life was spared.
    He is survived by six children: Charlie Alexander,H.L. Alexander, J. Luther Alexander, Joseph
Alexander, Mrs. G.C. Hatchell, and Miss Maggie Alexander; also 40 grandchildren, 40 great
grandchildren, and 3 great great grandchildren. He is gone but not forgotten. His works do follow
him. - J.F. Campbell**

Footnotes: *On the previous obituary: 1899 is correct. **Reverend J.F. Campbell

Obituary - Believed to have been written by her daughter, Maggie Louise Alexander:

   SARAH A.M. ALEXANDER - Was born February 16, 1840 and died December 15, 1917. She was
married to Mr. J.W. Alexander February 1, 1866. In early life she united with the Methodist Church at
Philadelphia, where she held her membership until after her marriage. She remained a faithful
member of the Methodist Church until after her death.
   In earlier life, she was identified with the Sunday School at Newman Swamp as teacher. In her
later years, she was a member of the Missionary Society at Pine Grove for several years, acting as
treasurer and did what she could to make the work a success. Though she was in failing health
several months, yet she seldom missed a service from church. She leaves a husband and six children.
   One brother, * C.W. Stewart and one sister, ** Mrs. J.P. Mozingo, are still living.
   She realized fully that she was nearing the end of her days. She was seriously ill only a few days.
   She expressed herself as ready to go when the call should come.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1880 - John Alexander and his family were living in the Lisbon Township, Darlington County, South
Carolina on the 25th day of June, when his home was surveyed. Occupants of the home included:

       John Alexander, age 32 ("Farm Laborer") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Sarah M Alexander, age 36 ("Wife") (Sarah Ann M. Stewart Alexander "Sallie")
       Mary Alexander, age 13 ("Daughter") (Mary Berta Alexander "Mary")
       Ella Alexander, age 10 ("Daughter") (Ella L. Alexander)
       Charles Alexander, age 9 ("Son") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Henry Alexander, age 8 ("Son") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Mollie Alexander, age 5 ("Daughter") (Mattie Viola Alexander "Mattie" and "Mollie")
       Luther Alexander, age 3 ("Son") (John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" [1])
       Maggie Alexander, age 1 ("Daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")

1900 - This survey was taken on the 20th of June in the High Hill Township, Darlington County, South
Carolina. The household included:

       John W Alexander, age 53 ("Head") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Sarah A Alexander, age 60 ("Wife") (Sarah Ann M. Stewart Alexander "Sallie")
       Henry L Alexander, age 26 ("Son") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Maggie L Alexander, age 20 ("Daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")
       Addie O Alexander, age 17 ("Daughter") (Addie Olivia Alexander "Addie")
       Joseph K Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe")

1910 - This survey, taken in the Ebenezer Township of Florence County, South Carolina on April 19th,
finds only three inhabitants in the John Alexander household. It was to be the last survey his wife,
Sallie, who died in 1917. Notable is the recorded age of Sallie, who was older than John Wesley, but
showed up as the same age as him in this survey. The household included:

       John W Alexander, age 64 ("head") ("Farmer") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Sallie M Alexander, age 64 ("wife") (Sarah Ann M. Stewart Alexander "Sallie")
       Maggie L Alexander, age 28 ("daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")

1920 - This botched-up survey was taken in what was then called Ebenezer Township of Florence
County, South Carolina. It was the location of John's "Lone Tree Farm" on Sallie Hill Road near
Timmonsville in Florence County. Now, people think of Ebenezer as part of the west end of Florence
near the shopping mall on Business I-20. The survey listed John as married, although he was a
widower, and daughter Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie" was listed as his wife. Also, the Hill boys
were John's grandchildren, not nephews, they were, however, Maggie's nephews, sons of Addie Olivia
Alexander Hill. Real wife Sallie Stewart Alexander died in 1917. The survey for John's area was taken
on both the fifth and sixth of January. The household included:

       John W Alexander, age 73 ("Head") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Maggie Alexander, age 38 ("Wife") (incorrect, was a daughter) (Maggie Louise Alexander
        "Maggie")
       Carlisle Hill, age 13 ("Nephew") (Luther Carlisle Hill "Carlisle")
       Gary Hill, age 11 ("Nephew") (Martin Gary Hill "Gary")

1930 - Dying in 1934, this was John's last census survey. His household in Timmonsville Township,
Florence County, South Carolina had diminished to three people including him. The survey was
enumerated April 4th. Included were:

       John W Alexander, age 83 ("Head") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Maggie Alexander, age 45 ("Daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")
       Luther C Hill, age 24 ("G. Son") (grandson) (Luther Carlisle Hill "Carlisle")

    This autobiographical true story of Confederate infantryman Pvt. John Alexander’s life centers
mostly on the War Between the States, which he entered into by telling the Confederates that he was
older than he really was. The story was told to his schoolteacher daughter, Maggie Alexander, on
December 12, 1932, not too many months before he passed. From all I've learned about Maggie, she
knew that her father’s life, & what he had to say about it, was significant enough to have historical
interest. I'm sure she urged him to help her put on paper what his life was like living through some
the Civil War's most horrific & famous battles, nearly dying several times during that era, but not from
injury. Keep in mind as you read this that John was a fortunate man to have survived the Civil War.
The North & South combined lost an estimated 623,000 of its best men in that war. Also, slightly
different versions of this story have floated around the family over the years. At times, I have
received a written note or phone call where someone in the family would say that the wording seems
a little off, compared to their version.

   I was born August 26, 1846, in Henry County, Alabama. My parents emigrated from Alabama
when I was about three years old. My mother died when I was about four years old, so I have never
known the love of a mother.
   In writing this, I wish to relate some of the most impressive experiences of my life as a soldier
during my four years of service in the War Between the States as best I can remember them now.
   I was too young to realize what I was getting into when I entered the war. I had a pal, John W.
DuBose, who was older than I. He had enlisted for service, and as I loved him dearly, I could not
bear for him to leave me. It was because of his influence that I volunteered to go to the army, as I
was not quite fifteen years of age. My pal and I were in all the conflicts.
   I entered the war in 1861. W.I. Carter of Cartersville was my captain, his company A, 14th South
Carolina Regiment. We were trained for service at a place called Lightwood Knot Springs, near
Columbia, South Carolina. I was in training about three months, served on the coast about Beaufort
Island until the second day of May, 1862.
    The Northern troops were encamped on Beaufort Island. We had several skirmishes around and
near Port Royal and Beaufort Island. In these skirmishes, very few lives were lost. On the twenty-
second day of May, 1862, we got orders to go to the Northern Army at Richmond, Virginia.
    A short while after this we went into hostilities. The comptroller of the Northern Army was General
McClellan. Among those in my company were my pal, John W. DuBose, Sewell W. DuBose, Henry
DuBose, George Scarborough, Marion Large, Charlie and Alexander Stuckey.
    Alexander Stuckey was an orderly sergeant. He was wounded at The Battle of the Wilderness. A
minnie ball struck him on one side of the head going through it and came out on the other side. I
reported him as dead. He was taken to some hospital and recovered. Sewell DuBose was a brave
soldier. After the war, he married Elizabeth Gwynn Jenkins, and reared a large and intelligent family
of children. Marion Large married a daughter of Sewell DuBose.
    At the beginning of the war, my only brother, Abner Alexander, enlisted for service for six months.
He fought in the first Battle of Bull Run, Virginia. Six months he came home and found that I had
entered the army. He regretted, very much, that I had taken this step. I went away while he was at
home. My brother re-enlisted and went back to the same company. Just a few days before they
went to Tennessee, I heard that my brother's command was about a mile from me. I got permission
to go to him, and this was the last time I ever saw him. He came a part of the way back with me.
We sat on a chestnut log and he told me that he felt like that we would never see each other again,
and told me, also, where I would find his trunk and other belongings. He was killed at Lookout
Mountain, Tennessee. I found his things, as he told me, his trunk and picture, but his girlfriend
refused to part with his jewelry.
    The first battle I engaged in was the Battle of Seven Pines. This battle took place along the
Chickahominy River, and was as complete a victory as the Southern Army ever had. We drove
twenty-seven miles down the river until we were under the shelter of their gunboats that lay in the
James River. At this time our brigadier general was Maxcy Gregg of Florence, South Carolina, who
was one of the bravest men I ever knew. Later I saw him, after he was killed, being carried on a
stretcher at The Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia. I do not know how old General Gregg was at the
time of his death, but he looked to be about forty years old. From this time the battles were too
numerous for me to remember the dates.
     I fought in the following divisions: I fought under General A.P. Hill, General Maxcy Gregg, Abner
Perrin. I was never wounded bad enough to leave the battlefield, but was knocked down by a ball at
Vine Run, Virginia. I had a small camp Testament in my pocket which I think saved my life. The ball
hit me in the region of my heart, doubling the Testament in the center. I was knocked down, was
stunned, but soon got up and took my place in the battle.
    At The Battle of Cold Harbor we fought all afternoon until dark. When the battle ceased, I was
detailed to go to the rear and get water for the company. Taking as many canteens as I could carry,
I went to a little ravine to get water. A Union soldier was lying near the ravine. His teeth had been
shot out and his jawbone was broken. He made me understand that he wanted water. I held the
canteen to his lips and he drank all he wanted. After this, he made me understand that he wanted
me to carry him to the rear, as we were still in danger. I carried him about three hundred yards and
left him. When I returned to my company, I was sent to help bring the dead. We worked all night
until up into the next day.
    I was in the Battle of Gettysburg, which lasted four days and nights. This was the most cruel of all
the battles. It was a slaughter pen. I was a drummer boy at this time, and after three or four rounds
of fighting, the bass drummer and I were detailed to care for the wounded. The Battle of the
Wilderness was a thick forest of junipers which were hewn down by balls like a field of grain. It did
not seem that a person could come out the battle alive.
    Twice during the war I was dangerously ill. I had typhoid fever, also typhoid pneumonia. One day
I was sent to Richmond, Virginia, a distance of about twelve miles, to drive cattle for beef for the
army. On my way back to camp, a thundercloud arose, and I lay in a wet blanket that night in mud
and water. When I awoke the next morning I was very sick. Two days later, my commander was
sent to Fredericksburg, Virginia and I was sent to a hospital in Lynchburg, Virginia. I had developed
typhoid fever. One Sunday morning while convalescing, two of us decided to ask permission of the
doctor to let us take a walk. He agreed, on the condition that we would not eat anything on the trip.
We promised. On our trip we saw a garden of beautiful green collards and asked a colored woman to
cook some of them for us. This she did, and we ate all we wanted with no bad results.
   At Malvern Hill I was captured prisoner. From there was sent to Point Lookout, and from there was
sent to Elmira, New York.

  This was a very bitter experience. As it was very cold, the prisoners suffered severely from cold and
hunger. Here, I contracted typhoid pneumonia and again, was dangerously ill. When I had about
recovered, I got an exchange payroll. When I left prison they gave me a piece of pickled pork and
hard tacks to eat. I would have died from hunger, but got up with some officers, who shared what
they had with me.
    I left Elmira, New York the 14th of March 1865, and reached my home on the 27th of March. I
came home by way of Richmond, and came by railroad to Blackstock, South Carolina. The Union
Army had torn up the railroad, and I had to walk the rest of the way, a distance of one hundred and
ten miles. When my partner and I reached the Wateree River, we made an attempt to cross over
without the help of the ferryman, and had a narrow escape from drowning. But the ferryman arrived
and carried us safely over.
    The first night after reaching Camden, I spent the night with a cousin who sent us a part of the
way home the next morning. Sherman's Raid had passed through this country and had destroyed
everything. "Life preserver peas" were about the only thing that could be had, and the people said
that they had the right name.
    On arriving home, I heard that my cousin, Edward Alexander, who served in the Western armies,
who had been reported and lamented as dead for three years, had returned home two weeks
previous. His funeral had been planned, and a preacher engaged to preach his funeral on the Sunday
following his arrival on Friday night. On this Sunday, this soldier went to the service and told the
preacher he need not bother about preaching his funeral.
    I was in a company of one hundred and twelve men, and as far as I know, am the only living one
at the present time. I was never wounded in the war, but soon after I had the misfortune to get my
leg broken twice in the same place. From this accident I have never recovered, but the results have
followed me until the present time.
    I am now in my 87th year. I have six children living, thirty-nine grandchildren, thirty-two great-
grandchildren, and one great-great grandchild. I am also the only one of my family of the older
Alexanders living now. - John Wesley Alexander”
Notes
    Elmira Prison was in Elmira, New York, historically known to many as “The Death Camp of the
North”.
    General Maxcy Gregg, one of the most famous of the Civil War’s South Carolina generals, is
mentioned in the reminiscence for having been carried off the battlefield at the Battle of
Fredericksburg, Virginia. Gregg was shot through the spine on December 11, 1862, and died the next
day. It is said that the general’s deafness may have contributed to his demise.
    Point Lookout is in the state of Maryland.
    Blackstock, South Carolina, mentioned in the reminiscence is located about a hundred miles
northwest of the Darlington County area.
    The site of John Wesley's boot camp, or “camp of instruction”, Camp Johnson, also known as
"Lightwood Knot Springs", is located near Interstate 20 and Interstate 77 off Parklane Road in
Columbia, South Carolina near Two Notch Road, just a hop, skip, and a jump east of the South
Carolina Department of Archives and History location. Part of the location, where the historical sign
is placed is now a community tennis center that has been in operation for a few years.
    John Alexander states in his “Reminiscence”, “I volunteered to go to the army, as I was not quite
fifteen years of age.” He was actually 15 years and 6 months old at the time of his enlistment. His
birth date was August 26, 1846, and his enlistment date was March 12, 1862. According to The War
of the Rebellion, Series 1, Volume 27, Part 2, Report number 556, Abner Perrin was a Colonel during,
at least part of, the Civil War.
    In his “Reminiscence”, John mentioned friends and fellow soldiers of his Confederate unit. Among
them were:

       Sewell Wesley DuBose "Sewell" b. September 7, 1826 d. June 20, 1888 at age 61 m.
        December 10, 1848 to Elizabeth Gwynn Jenkins "Elizabeth" b. May 24, 1833 d. November 9,
        1909. Sewell and Elizabeth are buried at Cypress Cemetery, Lee County, Alabama. Sewell
        was a son of Sinclair DuBose "Sinkler" and Rebeckah Hudson DuBose. Elizabeth was a
        daughter of Samuel Dupre Jenkins and Helen Elizabeth Brockinton. Her great grandfather
        was Rev. James Jenkins, a well-known traveling Methodist church pioneer.
       In addition, John mentioned Francis Marion Large "Marion" b. May 15, 1843 d. December 3,
        1874 m. Martha Dupre, a daughter of Sewell Wesley DuBose and Elizabeth Gwynn Jenkins b.
        September 29, 1849 d. August 21, 1918. Marion and Martha are buried at Cypress
        Cemetery. Marion's tombstone was erected in 1962.
       Also, John mentioned his good friend from back home, John Wesley DuBose "John", a farmer,
        a son of Henry J. DuBose and Jane Kelly b. August 14, 1842 d. June 25, 1901 m. August 6,
        1865 to Catherine H. Clements of Lydia, Darlington District, South Carolina b. April 30, 1845
        d. September 19, 1926.

   Cypress Cemetery is located at Cypress Crossroads in Lee County, South Carolina, not far from
Lydia, and part of an area that was formerly old Darlington District and later Darlington County. The
church is first identified in records as having starting out, as far back as anyone can tell, in 1827 as
the "Cypress Meeting House". Land was donated by people of the church, and so began Cypress
Methodist Church. The Cypress Methodist Church building is no longer there. The original church and
cemetery was just down the road from the current one. Bodies were exhumed and moved into the
new cemetery by a funeral home, as many as could be found and identified. A new church was built
on the new site, but it eventually burned, and the congregation was moved to Newman Swamp
Methodist Church near Lamar, Darlington County, South Carolina, now known as Newman Swamp
United Methodist Church.
   In John’s “Reminiscence”, Port Royal and Beaufort are mentioned. They're located in coastal
southeastern South Carolina, which is also known as “The Low Country”, south of Charleston, South
Carolina, north of Savannah, Georgia, and not far from Hilton Head, South Carolina.

JOHN WESLEY ALEXANDER (2)
"Johnny"
A son of Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie" and Ida Eula Jeffords "Ida"
Born: December 9, 1916
Died: May 28, 1918
Born: Florence County, South Carolina
Died: Ebenezer community, Florence County, South Carolina at age 1 and a half years, of Colitis,
which was onset 30 days previous to his death
Burial: In an unmarked grave at Pine Grove United Methodist Church, Darlington County, South
Carolina near Timmonsville. The informant of the child's death was his uncle, Joseph Kirkland
Alexander, Sr. "Joe".

REV. JOHN WILLIAM REESE ALEXANDER
"William" and, to his parishioners "Uncle William"
A son of John Alexander and Mary Woodham "Polly"
Born: January 24, 1819 Sumter District, South Carolina
Died: February 9, 1899 Darlington County, South Carolina at age 80
Marriage 1: 1837 to the former Delila Alexandra Kea "Delila" and "Liley"
Born: According to a Find A Grave Memorial, December 12, 1821 Darlington District, South Carolina
Died: According to a Find A Grave Memorial, December 20, 1851 at 30 years of age
Marriage 2: December 16, 1852 to the former Martha Anne E. Parnell "Anne"
Born: May 21, 1833
Died: February 28, 1891 at age 57
Burial: William is buried, seemingly by himself at Newman Swamp United Methodist Church, Lamar,
Darlington County, South Carolina where he attended, and preached at times. His barely-readable
grave inscription reads: Rejoice for a brother deceased…our loss is his infinite gain. A soul out of
prison released and freed from his bodily chain. With songs let us follow his flight and mount with his
spirit above. Another inscription on the marker states: Age 80 yrs 15 days. So far in my search, no
survey that I've seen, nor personal search have turned up either Anne or Delila's grave. A Find A
Grave dot com "Memorial" claims that Delila is buried at Cypress Cemetery in Lee County (formerly
Darlington County), but her grave is not visible, and it does not appear on any of the local region
cemetery surveys. What is curious is that the person who stated that her grave is there, features
what appears to be a short epitaph in his Memorial stating that she was the "Beloved Wife of" John
William Reese Alexander. It also has birth and death dates that are somewhat accurate, if not
accurate. I e-mailed the man who entered that information, who simply goes by "Cowboy" on Find A
Grave, and seems to be a Delila descendant. He wrote back by e-mail, saying that he didn't really
know where he obtained that information. He said it might be Ancestry dot com, but I've not found
anything on that site, other than census records concerning her. That doesn't mean that the
information is not there.

William and Anne Alexander's sole offspring was:

       Frances Gamewell Alexander "Gamewell" m. Alexander Sylkirk Fields "Sandy".

Delila Kea Alexander's parents were:

       Thomas Kea b. About 1792 Sampson County, North Carolina d. October 20, 1835
       Lenore "Lanie" (nee?) b. January 14, 1812

Anne Parnell Alexander's parents were:

       Israel C. Parnell
       Frances Saverance "Fannie"

United States Federal Census Reference:

1830 - Darlington District, South Carolina. Thomas Kea's household (no names just numbers) had 11
free whites, and two African-American slaves.

1880 - Anne Parnell Alexander was listed as "Keeps house" in the 1880 United States Census for
Cypress, Darlington County, South Carolina (now Lee County). In addition to William Alexander, age
60, living in the household with Anne, age 47, was daughter Frances Gamewell Alexander (Gamewell),
age 16, and George Harris, age 11.

   Delila died almost 48 years earlier than William and is loosely reported to be buried, supposedly
with a grave marker, in Cypress Cemetery in Lee County, yet although I have searched that cemetery
a few times, no Delila, and cemetery surveys do not list her. A Find A Grave Memorial for Cypress
Methodist Cemetery has the notation of what seems to be an epitaph on a grave marker, "Loving Wife
Of John William Reese Alexander", including the birth and death dates. It is also possible that she
was buried at the now defunct New Hope Methodist Church Cemetery in Darlington County at Carters
Crossroads, where she and William attended right after their return to South Carolina from Alabama,
not long before she died. I've searched that cemetery, as well, but it has burned and been vandalized
over the years. Many of the markers are no longer there. William's brother, Rev. Abner M. Alexander
preached at that church around that time, and that's probably why they attended that church. One of
William's nephews is buried there, a son of (Rev.) Abner M. Alexander, Benjamin M. Alexander.
William died only eight years after Anne, his last wife, but as far as anybody knows, he did not
remarry. The cemetery is now simply known as New Hope Cemetery.
   At some time after November 5, 1843, Elizabeth C. Alexander "Lizzie"'s date of birth in South
Carolina, William and family moved to old Henry County in southeastern Alabama where his older
brother James, and sister Ann had already settled (1836). William and family were back in South
Carolina in time for the 1850 United States Census. The reason may have been Liley's unknown
malady that led to her passing in 1851. The family, including Liley, was listed in the 1850 census.
   I’ve never quite completely understood William’s formal status in the clergy. An article which was
written years ago by the late Darlington County Historical Commission Historian, Horace F. Rudisill,
stated that he was ordained, but research facts have so far been inconclusive. I had a talk with Mr.
Rudisill years later, and got the impression that he was not quite sure About that fact, as time went
on. The Historian at the South Carolina Methodist Archives at the Sandor-Tezler Library at Wofford
College in Spartanburg, Herbert Hucks once told me that he thought William was a “Local Preacher”,
and could find no validation that he was ever ordained.
   Local preachers were ones who filled in for pastors, for whatever reason, and became interim
pastors when churches were without a permanent one. As a preacher, William mostly served
Darlington County, South Carolina. Because of that, many of his descendants live in Darlington
County to this day, and some moved on into the Timmonsville area of Florence County, South
Carolina. William's earlier days had him working on his father's plantation in old Darlington District
near Bishopville as an “overseer” for his family's slaves, and the farm itself. Rev. Alexander is listed as
a Local Preacher in 1875 Cypress Church records along with McKenzie Mozingo, Joseph Hendrix, and
Miles H. Joy. In that year, William W. Williams and Lewis M. Hamer are listed as pastors. In 1876,
William Alexander is again listed as a local preacher along with McKenzie Mozingo and Miles H. Joy.
Lewis M. Hamer was listed as the pastor.
   William Alexander had at least one slave named Rainey who was willed to him by his father as sort
of a “loaner”. He possibly owned more slaves previous to the War Between the States.
   William and Delila Alexander’s daughter, Elizabeth C. Alexander married her step-uncle, Robert
Nelson Parnell (Robert), a brother of William’s wife, Anne Parnell and a son of Israel Parnell b.
December 28, 1805 d. August 24, 1874 and Fannie Severance Parnell. Israel and Fannie are
reportedly buried at Newman Swamp United Methodist Church, Darlington County, South Carolina.
   Delila's father, Thomas Kea was apprenticed to become a sailor, but gave it up to farm. He is
thought to have entered the Darlington District of South Carolina around 1811.

Obituary - Methodist periodical Southern Christian Advocate, March 9, 1899, a month following
William's death, and written by George M. Boyd. The obituary's listing of Rev. Alexander's birthday is
incorrect:

    ALEXANDER - Reverend John William Reese Alexander was born in Darlington County, South
Carolina on January 25, 1819, and died in the same county February 9, 1899. His name will appear
familiar to many of our brethren of the South Carolina Conference. ‘Uncle William’ never forgot the
pastors who served this country. For nearly half a century he served the church as a local preacher.
He was always ready to render aid to his pastors. Loyal, zealous, faithful, was he to the seed of his
life. In his last affliction he seemed to be ‘filled with all the fullness of God’ and rejoiced that
‘deliverance had come.’ As the beautiful snow covered the cemetery the day he was buried, I could
not but think it emblematic of his pure, spotless spirit that had gone to God who gave it. The church
on Lamar Circuit has been made poorer by his death, but heaven richer. We will miss “Uncle William”
much.

Obituary - Publication not known to this research. Officially, the author is unknown, yet unofficially,
I'm personally positive that she William's granddaughter, Ella Alexander Hatchell who wrote it. Ella
was a daughter of John Wesley Alexander, who died in her early 30s due to ill health:

   Rev. J.W.R. Alexander departed this life February 9, 1899, aged 80 years and 15 days.
   He was a consistent member of Newman Swamp Church, and a devoted Christian. Grandfather in
Heaven. On the 11th of Feb, while the beautiful snow was falling, they laid dear grandfather in his
cold grave to sleep the blessed sleep at Newman Swamp Cemetery till Jesus comes to reward His
servants. And as these now came and covered his grave, I thought of his white robe washed in the
blood of Jesus as it fled to its heavenly home where Jesus welcomed him in as he said: ‘Well done
thou good and faithful servant, enter thou into the joys of the Lord.’
   I think of him, how he praised God as he met many loved ones waiting and watching at the
beautiful gate.
   Farewell, dear grandfather. By the grace of God I hope to meet you there to part no more.
Sometimes it seems like it will not be long before I meet you there as I have suffered so long here. I
know I would enjoy that heavenly greeting. As I have not had the pleasure of hearing the blessed
Gospel preached for a long time, it was so much comfort to me for him to come, but I have to
comfort myself the best I can now. I have no grandfather to come and comfort me. How we miss
him in our home!
   Only last June I had lost all hopes of life here, and I thought if I could see him, how it would help
me. I wanted to be propped up, and while sitting there I heard someone come in. I looked up, and to
my surprise it was the dear old soul that I thought I would never see again, for he had been sick for
some time. How he cheered me with loving words of prayer I never shall forget. On last October,
our last meeting, he told me where to meet him, and by the help of my Savior, I hope to meet him in
the sweet by and by.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1850 - The survey for Sumter District, South Carolina, taken on September 16th had these as William
and Delila's household inhabitants:

       Wm Alexander, age 30 ("Head") (Rev. John William Reese Alexander "William" and "Uncle
        William")
       Delila Alexander, age 29 ("Wife") (Delila Alexandra Kea Alexander "Delila" and "Liley")
       Mary Alexander, age 12 ("Daughter")
       Abner Alexander, age 10 ("Son")
       Elis C Alexander, age 7 ("Daughter") (Elizabeth C. Alexander)
       John W Alexander, age 4 ("Son") (John Wesley Alexander "John")

1880 - The survey took place in Cypress Township, Darlington County, South Carolina on the 23rd of
June. In the household were:

       John W R Alexander, age 60 ("Farmer") (Rev. John William Reese Alexander "William" and
        "Uncle William")
       Martha Alexander, age 47 ("Wife") (Martha Anne E. Parnell Alexander "Anne")
       Francis G Alexander, age 16 ("Daughter") (Frances Gamewell Alexander "Gamewell")
       George Harris, age 11 ("Hired Laborer")

JOSEPH KIRKLAND ALEXANDER, III
"Joey"
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Jr. "Joe" and Josie Rebecca Timmons "Rebecca"
Born: January 29, 1952

JOSEPH KIRKLAND ALEXANDER, JR.
"Joe"
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe" and Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: September 17, 1932 Florence County, South Carolina
Died: July 9, 2011 McLeod Hospice, Florence, Florence County, South Carolina at age 78
Marriage: Josie Rebecca Timmons "Rebecca"
Born: February 1, 1932 Florence County, South Carolina
Burial: Sardis Baptist Church, 3129 Sardis Highway, Sardis community, Timmonsville, Florence County,
South Carolina

Their children include:

       Anthony Dale Alexander "Tony"
       Joseph Kirkland Alexander, III "Joey" m. Robin Munn b. ? d. Deceased
       Rebecca Faye Alexander "Becky" m. Dann Lay
       Wanda Leigh Alexander "Wanda" m. Rick Kelly
       Wayne Timmons Alexander "Wayne"

  Joe was a longtime member of Sardis Baptist Church, Sardis community, Timmonsville, South
Carolina, and the church's Baraqcca Sunday School Class. He was also a member of the Woodmen of
the World Lodge #245.
   Joe and Rebecca were married for 61 years. He was known as "Poppy" to their grandchildren.
   Although once primarily a tobacco farmer, Joe later became a clerk with CSX Railroad, and worked
there for 37 years, until retirement.
   As a side note, Joe was a fellow church member with, and knew Cale Yarborough, the famous
NASCAR driver and team owner.

JOSEPH KIRKLAND ALEXANDER, SR.
"Joe"
A son of John Wesley Alexander "John" and Sarah Ann M. Stewart "Sallie"
Born: March 5, 1885 Darlington County, South Carolina, in a part that is now Lee County, South
Carolina
Died: May 4, 1962 at age 77 in Timmonsville, Florence County, South Carolina
Marriage: October 30, 1904 to Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: January 9, 1887 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: November 20, 1961 Florence County, South Carolina at age 74
Burial: Joe and Fannie are buried at Pine Grove United Methodist Church, South Carolina Highway
340, Timmonsville, Darlington County, South Carolina next to their infant, William Elbert Alexander
"Elbert", and next to Joe's father, John Alexander and Sallie Stewart.

Joe and Fannie's children include:

       Belvin Ryan Alexander "Belvin" and "Bill"
       Frances Mildred Alexander "Mildred"
       Myrtie Gladys Alexander "Gladys"
       Jessie Clifton Alexander Sr. "Clifton"
       Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Jr. "Joe"
       Joseph Lee Alexander "Lee"
       Vivian Loren Alexander "Loren"
       Marvin Esker Alexander "Marvin"
       Willard Terry Alexander, Sr. "Willard" (Originally Willard Dewey Alexander)
       William Elbert Alexander "William"
       Wilton Kenneth Alexander "Kenneth"

Fannie Hancock Alexander's parents were:

       William Eli Hancock "Will" b. April 18, 1852 d. March 2, 1917 Effingham, Florence County,
        South Carolina, the community in which he resided
       Olivia Bryant

Fannie's paternal grandparents were:

       Felix Hancock
       Nancy Langston

Fannie's maternal grandparents were:

       William Madison Bryant "Madison"
       Sarah E. Jordan Bryant b. South Carolina

   Fannie Hancock Alexander's paternal great grandfather is thought to have been an earlier Felix
Hancock who has been found living with another family in North Carolina.
   Joe Alexander, his immediate family, and his descendants basically teetered between living in
Florence and Darlington counties over the years, but for the most part lived in Florence County in and
around Timmonsville. Later on most of them lived in the Timmonsville area. They lived in that area,
unlike other earlier Alexanders because father John Wesley Alexander had a large farm know as Lone
Tree Farm just inside of the Florence County line in the Lake Swamp community next to part of the
swamp. The boundary lines changed around the turn of the century when a part of Darlington County
was then taken to make up part of Florence County. Until the change, John Alexander lived in
Darlington County.
   Joe and Fannie last resided in the Sardis Community outside of Timmonsville, and attended Sardis
Baptist Church.
   Earlier in life, Joe attended the original Pine Grove Methodist Church, located less than a mile from
the newer Pine Grove church that was built in the early 1950s at the site of the Thornal Cemetery,
where the church buried its parishioners for years. Joe’s father, John was Superintendent of the
Sunday School.
   One of Joe's nephews, the late William Frank Alexander (Frank), once said that he and others used
to refer to his Uncle Joe as “Josephus” (pronounced jo-'see-fus).
   While raising his own family, Joe and his family started attending a Baptist church in their
community because of its closer proximity to where they lived.
   Fannie Alexander suffered a broken hip, just days before her passing. Joe Alexander was living
with granddaughter Mary Alexander Jensen and husband Dale Jensen's home when he too died just a
few months later.
   One of Joe's obituaries states that he was born in Lee County, South Carolina in 1888, but Lee
County did not officially become a county until around 1901, having been formed from parts of three
other counties, Darlington, Kershaw, and Sumter. He was born in that part of old Darlington County
that became Lee County, although the exact location is not known.

Obituary - Florence Morning News, Florence, Florence County, South Carolina dated Saturday, May 5,
1962:
                                            Joe K. Alexander

   TIMMONSVILLE - Joe K. Alexander, 77, died of a heart attack Friday at the home of his son, Lee
Alexander.
    Surviving are seven sons, Clifton, Lee, Joe Jr. and Willard Alexander all of Timmonsville, Belvin and
Marvin of Florence, and Kenneth Alexander of Effingham; two daughters, Mrs. Edgar Powers of
Timmonsville and Mrs. Jacob Ruther of Columbus, Ohio; and one sister, Miss Maggie Alexander of
Timmonsville.
    Funeral arrangements will be announced by Layton-Perry Funeral Home.

Obituary - Florence Morning News, Florence, Florence County, South Carolina, probably published on
Sunday, May 6, 1962 as a follow-up obituary including the funeral arrangements:

   TIMMONSVILLE - Funeral services for Joe K. Alexander, 77, who died Friday will be conducted at 3
p.m. Sunday at Sardis Baptist Church by Rev. Clyde Fox. Burial will be in Pine Grove Cemetery.
   Pallbearers will be Glenn Hatchell, Frank Alexander, Ira Alexander, James Alexander, Arnold
Alexander, Douglas Ward, Jim Ward, and Otto Ward.
   Honorary pallbearers will be members of Baracca Sunday School Class of Sardis Baptist Church.

Obituary - The State newspaper out of Columbia, South Carolina. In this one, the writer erroneously
names what should be Rev. Clyde Fox as “Rev. Clyde Sparks”:

   TIMMONSVILLE - Funeral services for Joe K. Alexander, Sr., 77, who died of a heart attack Friday,
will be conducted at 3 p.m. Sunday afternoon from Sardis Baptist Church by the Rev. Clyde Sparks.
Burial will be in the Pine Grove Cemetery.
   Mr. Alexander was born in Lee County, March 5, 1885, the son of John Wesley and Sallie Stewart
Alexander. His wife,Fannie Hancock Alexander, died in November, 1961.
   Surviving are seven sons, Clifton, Lee, Joe Jr., and Willard Alexander, all of Timmonsville, Belvin
and Marvin Alexander of Florence, and Kenneth Alexander of Effingham; two daughters, Mrs. Edgar
(Mildred) Powers of Timmonsville, and Mrs. Jacob (Gladys) Ruther of Columbus, Ohio; one sister,
Miss Maggie Alexander of Timmonsville; 34 grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; and a number of
nieces and nephews.

Obituary - The State newspaper, Columbia, South Carolina:

    TIMMONSVILLE - Mrs. Fannie Hancock Alexander, 74, wife of Joseph K. Alexander, Sr., Route 3,
Timmonsville, died Monday night.
    She was born in Darlington County, the daughter of the late William E. and Olivia Bryant Hancock.
She was member of Sardis Baptist Church.
    Surviving are her husband, seven sons, Jesse Clifton Alexander, Joseph Lee, Willard T. and Joe K.,
Jr., of Timmonsville,Belvin R., and Marvin E. of Florence and Kenneth Alexander of Effingham; two
daughters, Mrs. Edgar Powers of Timmonsville and Mrs. Jacob Ruther of Columbus, Ohio; one sister,
Mrs. Laura Ward of Timmonsville; 34 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.
    Funeral services will be held at 3 p.m. Wednesday from Sardis Baptist Church, with burial in the
Pine Grove Cemetery near Timmonsville.

Obituary/Article - From a Sardis Baptist Church-related committee:

   It is with cherished memories and deep appreciation for a devoted Christian life that the members
of Sardis Baptist Church, Florence Association, pay tribute to Mrs. Fannie Hancock Alexander, who
passed away in November at the age of 74.
   Her going has left a sadness in the hearts of those who knew her and a vacancy in her home,
church, and community.
   Her personal faith and trust in God made her an inspiration to her friends and loved ones. She
worked with untiring efforts to help others.
   She always had a warm welcome for those who visited her, giving them inspiration and
encouragement. Her many acts of kindness and love and her friendly spirit will ever be remembered.
   We extend our deepest sympathy to her husband and children and pray they may find the love of
God sufficient for their every need. – Committee

United States Federal Census Reference:

1900 - This survey was taken on the 20th of June in the High Hill Township, Darlington County, South
Carolina. Joe was still living in his parents' household with these inhabitants:

       John W Alexander, age 53 ("Head") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Sarah A Alexander, age 60 ("Wife") (Sarah Ann M. Stewart Alexander "Sallie")
       Henry L Alexander, age 26 ("Son") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Maggie L Alexander, age 20 ("Daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")
       Addie O Alexander, age 17 ("Daughter") (Addie Olivia Alexander "Addie")
       Joseph K Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe")

1910 - The Joseph Kirkland Alexanders were living in Timmonsville Township, Florence County, South
Carolina during this survey on April 28th. In the census, Joe's father is listed as having been born in
South Carolina, yet he was born in Henry County, Alabama. In the Timmonsville home were:

       Joseph C Alexander, age 25 "Head" (Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe")
       Fannie L Alexander, age 23 ("Wife") (Frances Leitha Hancock Alexander "Fannie")
       Jessie C Alexander, age 3 ("Son") (Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton")
       Joseph L Alexander, age 2 ("Son") (Joseph Lee Alexander "Lee")

1920 - Joe, Fannie, and family were living on Joe's father land, called "Lone Tree Farm", as were his
father, sister Maggie Louise Alexander, a couple of Joe's nephews, and his brother Charlie's family. In
that census, the "Dewey" in the survey was Willard Terry Alexander, Sr. The Terry was a mistake
made by the government, and Willard the went with it. He was originally Willard Dewey Alexander.
The household was surveyed on one of the two days that his area was enumerated, January 5th and
6th.

       Joseph K Alexander, age 35 ("Head") (Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe")
       Fannie L Alexander, age 33 ("Wife") (Frances Leitha Hancock Alexander "Fannie")
       Jessie Alexander, age 14 ("Son") (Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton")
       Joseph Alexander, age 11 ("Son") (Joseph Lee Alexander "Lee")
       Kenneth Alexander, age 9 ("Son") (Kenneth Wilton Alexander "Kenneth")
       Ryan Alexander, age 6 ("Son") (Belvin Ryan Alexander "Belvin" and "Bill")
       Vivien L Alexander, age 4 ("Son") (Vivian Loren Alexander "Loren")
       Dewey Alexander, age 1 year 6 months ("Son") (Willard Terry Alexander, Sr. "Willard". His
        original middle name was "Dewey".)

1930 - Joe's family was living in Timmonsville Township, Florence County, South Carolina when the
survey was taken in the neighborhood on April 14th and 15th. In the household were:

       Joseph K Alexander, age 45 ("Head") (Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe")
       Fannie L Alexander, age 43 ("Wife") (Frances Leitha Hancock Alexander "Fannie")
       Joseph L Alexander, age 21 ("Son") (Joseph Lee Alexander "Lee")
       Wilton K Alexander, age 19 ("Son") (Wilton Kenneth Alexander "Kenneth")
       Vivian Alexander, age 16 ("Son") (Vivian Loren Alexander "Loren")
       Willard D Alexander, age 12 ("Son") (Willard Terry Alexander, Sr. "Willard". His original
        middle name was "Dewey".)
       Myrtie G Alexander, age 10 ("Daughter") (Myrtie Gladys Alexander "Gladys")
       Barney K Alexander, age 6 ("Son") (Barney Kirby Alexander "Barney" and "B.K.")
       Fannie M Alexander,age 3 years 5 months ("Daughter") (Frances Mildred Alexander "Mildred")
       Marvin E Alexander, ("Son") age 4 months ("Son") (Marvin Esker Alexander "Marvin")

JOSEPH LEE ALEXANDER
"Lee"
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe" and Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: November 4, 1908 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: February 21, 1987 at age 78 McLeod Regional Medical Center, Florence, Florence County, South
Carolina
Marriage: September 3, 1932 Florence County, South Carolina to Edith Elizabeth Langston "Edith"
Born: May 5, 1905 Florence County, South Carolina
Died: Friday, October 18, 1991 Florence County, South Carolina
Burial: Lee and Edith are buried at Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church

Lee and Edith's only child:

       Mary Frances Alexander "Mary" b. August 11, 1934 m. Dale Jensen of Maryland

Edith's parents were:

       Joseph Ervin Langston
       Mary Adeline Anderson

    Although Edith's birth date is May 5th, according to her tombstone, the Social Security Death Index
lists her birth date as the 7th.
    Lee and Edith grew tobacco, cotton, corn, soybeans, wheat, hot peppers, sweet potatoes, and
peanuts. Late in the 1960s, they began raising chickens for the makers of Campbell’s Soup of
Sumter, South Carolina.
    In 1972, Lee was named “Campbell Soup Broiler Grower of the Year”.
    He was a Master Mason at Benton Lodge #26 and a Woodmen of the World member.
   Edith and Lee were members of Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church and the adult ladies' Sunday
School class. She was a member of the Sunshine Club, the Elim Joy Club, the Home and Garden Club,
and she sang alto in the choir.
   Lee was elected Deacon in 1934, and served as Sunday School Superintendent, Training Union
Director, Sunday School teacher, and on all the church committees at one time or another. He was
honored with the title Lifetime Deacon and Ex-Officio Member by the Congregation, basically meaning
that he could represent the church anytime, anywhere, and attend any meeting. He was a Master
Mason who served as Worshipful Master of Oak Grove Masonic Lodge 378, and was chosen as Mr.
Woodmen at Cedar, Woodmen of the World Camp 245 at Sardis, near Timmonsville.
   Lee and Edith are buried at Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church, located on Hill Road south of
Timmonsville, Florence County, South Carolina.

Tribute - Daughter Mary remembers...

    Lee Alexander and Edith Langston married in 1932 at a time when the farm community was still in
economic depression. They lived with Ellison and Emma Joyner the first few months of marriage, later
moving to a house on John Carraway's farm. There, Lee's brother Belvin and Lilly Bell Washington
lived with them. It also was there that their only child, Mary Frances, was born. In 1937 the family
moved to the Old Charlie Langston Place on Hill Road near Sansbury Crossroads. Lee bought the farm
and they lived there for the rest of their lives. Remember when chickens were turned loose in the yard
and gardens were fenced in? That's the way it was. Farm families were self-sufficient. Corn was
ground for grits and cornmeal; wheat was ground for flour (stored at a Darlington mill); sugar cane
was made into syrup at a cane mill that John Carraway and Lee owned. Going to mill was a fun trip
taken often. Every family had a milk cow. Animals were grown for food and men hunted and families
ate the game. Everyone worked hard on a small farm. During tobacco season, families swapped help
with neighbors. Enough vegetables were canned, potatoes banked, onions dried, and wood cut to
last until the next spring. It was a good life! Time and progress brought about mechanized farming,
chickens in 380-foot enclosed chicken houses, freezers, gas and electric heat, clothes dryers,
television, microwaves and a whole different way of life. The progressive changes were good as well.
Lee and Edith celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary plus four more together.
    Lee was a dedicated and faithful member of Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church. He was elected
Deacon in 1934 and served as Sunday School Superintendent, Training Union Director, Sunday School
teacher, and on all the church committees at one time or another. He was honored with the title
Lifetime Deacon and Ex-officio Member by the Congregation. This meant that he could represent the
church anytime anywhere and attend any meeting. He served as Worshipful Master of Oak Grove
Masonic Lodge 378; was chosen as Mr. Woodmen at Cedar, Woodmen of the World Camp 245 at
Sardis. Lee was a people person and loved to attend meetings. He loved people and people loved
him. He, never in his life, met a stranger. Family and friends were drawn to him for advice,
counseling, encouragement, spiritual guidance, or just to talk.
    Lee died on February 21, 1987 following a long struggle with progressive renal failure. His funeral
was truly a ‘home-going’ under umbrellas in the chilly wind and rain. His pastor, Pat Childress, a
much-loved former pastor, Richard Moyers, family, and scores of caring friends paid tribute to a
dedicated Christian man.

Obituary - Florence Morning News, February 22, 1987:

   TIMMONSVILLE - J. Lee Alexander, 78, died Saturday.
   Born in Darlington County, he was a son of the late Joseph Kirkland and Fannie Hancock
Alexander. He was a retired farmer, was a member of Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church and the adult
men's Sunday school class, and was a deacon. He was past master of the Oak Grove Masonic Lodge,
A.F.M., and a member of Woodmen of the World Camp No. 245.
   Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Edith Langston Alexander; a daughter, Mrs. Dale (Mary) Jensen of
Timmonsville; brothers, Willard and Joe Alexander of Timmonsville and Belvin Alexander of Florence;
a sister, Mrs. Edgar (Mildred) Powers of Timmonsville; and grandchildren.
   Services will be held at 4 p.m. today at Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church.
  Memorials may be made to Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church or the Timmonsville Rescue Squad.
  Layton-Perry Funeral Home is in charge.

Obituary Florence Morning News for October 20, 1991:

   TIMMONSVILLE - Mrs. Edith Langston Alexander, 86, died Friday, Oct 18, 1991 in a Florence
Hospital.
   She was born in Florence County, a daughter of the late Joseph Ervin and Mary Adeline Anderson
Langston. She was the widow of Lee Alexander. She was a member of Sparrow Swamp Baptist
Church and the adult ladies' Sunday School class. She was a member of the Sunshine Club, the Elim
Joy Club and the Home and Garden Club.
   Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Dale (Mary) Jensen of Timmonsville; a brother, Herbert Langston of
Timmonsville; two sisters, Miss Nellie Langston and Mrs. Ellie Mae Wiggins, both of Timmonsville; a
grandson, Michael A. Jensen of Timmonsville; a granddaughter, Mrs. Karen Jensen Kirby of North
Augusta; and three grandchildren.
   Funeral services will be 4 p.m. today, Oct 20, 1991, in Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church. Burial will
be in the church cemetery, directed by Layton-Perry Funeral Home.

1920 - Lee is found with his parents as "Joseph" on "Lone Tree Farm" in Ebenezer Township in
Florence County, South Carolina, where his parents, grandfather, and uncle were living. It's not clear
whether they lived in separate dwellings or all in the grandfather's house, but probably in what are
called "tenant houses". The household was surveyed on one of the two days that his area was
enumerated, January 5th and 6th.

       Joseph K Alexander, age 35 ("Head") (Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe")
       Fannie L Alexander, age 33 ("Wife") (Frances Leitha Hancock Alexander "Fannie")
       Jessie Alexander, age 14 ("Son") (Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton")
       Joseph Alexander, age 11 ("Son") (Joseph Lee Alexander "Lee")
       Kenneth Alexander, age 9 ("Son") (Wilton Kenneth Alexander "Kenneth")
       Ryan Alexander, age 6 ("Son") (Belvin Ryan Alexander "Belvin" and "Bill")
       Vivien L Alexander, age 4 ("Son") (Loren Vivian Alexander "Loren")
       Dewey Alexander, age 1 year 6 months ("Son") (Willard Terry Alexander, Sr. "Willard". His
        original middle name was "Dewey".)

JOYCE VIRGINIA ALEXANDER
"Virginia"
A daughter of Wilton Kenneth Alexander "Kenneth" and Beatrice Lloyd "Bea"
Born: September 23, 1934
Marriage: Harry Lee Dennis "Harry"
Died: February 11, 2008 Florence, Florence County, South Carolina

JUDY ELAINE ALEXANDER
"Judy"
A daughter of Marvin Esker Alexander "Marvin" and Lynette Pigate
Born: June 22, 1955
Marriage: Robert Reid "Bob"

JULIA LOUISE ALEXANDER
"Julia"
A daughter of John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" (1) and Nettie Hatchell
Born: August 5, 1906
Died: June 27, 1973 at age 66
Marriage: Herbert L. Jordan
Born: April 7, 1901
Died: January 19, 1986
Burial: Lake Swamp Baptist Church, Darlington County, South Carolina, near their seemingly unnamed
infants.

Julia and Herbert's children include:

       Infant son b. and d. September 29, 1938
       Infant son b. and d. October 15, 1940

United States Federal Census Reference:

1920 - Julia in the survey for Darlington County, South Carolina. In the household were:

       J Luther Alexander, age 41 (John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" [1])
       Bertha R Alexander, age 42 (Bertha Rosalie Lechner "Bertha")
       Marie Alexander, age 16 (Bertha Marie Alexander "Marie")
       Julia Alexander, age 14 (Julia Louise Alexander "Julia")
       Mary Alexander, age 12 (Mary Berta Alexander "Mary")
       Arnold Alexander, age 7 (Arnold Ceil Alexander, Sr. "Arnold")


LARRY HOYT ALEXANDER
"Larry"
A son of Marvin Esker Alexander "Marvin" and Lynette Pigate
Born: February 19, 1968 Florence, Florence County, South Carolina
Marriage: Shannon (nee?)

Larry and Shannon have at least one child:

       Robert Alexander "Bobby"

LAURIE SILAS ALEXANDER
"Laurie"
A son of Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton" and Mavie Edna Jolly "Mavie"
Born: February 3, 1937

LELAND S. ALEXANDER
A son of Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry", and Laura M. Raines
Born: About 1921
Burial: Reportedly buried in the Greenville, South Carolina area.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1930 - Leland's family was living in Greenville Township, Greenville County, South Carolina in this
survey, taken on April 14th. The household included:

       Henry L Alexander, age 57 ("Head") (Henry Lee Alexander"Henry" and "Harry")
       Laura M Alexander, age 47 ("Wife") (Laura M Raines Alexander)
       Willliam A Alexander, age 15 ("Son")
       Carl H Alexander, age 12 ("Son")
       Leland S Alexander, age 9 ("Son")
       James H Alexander, age 6 ("Son")

LENA MARIAN ALEXANDER
"Lena"
A daughter of John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" (1) and Nettie Hatchell
Born: August 29, 1901 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: November 27, 1967 at age 66 of (death certificate) "Coronary Occlusion" Charlotte Memorial
Hospital, Charlotte, Mecklenburg, North Carolina
Marriage 1: John Quincy Jernigan "John"
Born: April 1893
Died: 1965
Marriage 2: Eldred Thomas Nivens "Eldred"
Born: October 23, 1903, North Carolina
Died: March 1988 Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina at age 84
Burial: Lena Alexander Nivens is buried at Sharon Memorial Park, Charlotte, Mecklenburg County,
North Carolina, being placed there the day after her death, November 28, 1967. Her arrangements
were handled by McEwen Funeral Home of Charlotte. I don't know where Mr. Nivens is entombed.
He may have remarried, although one document I viewed referred to him as a "Widower". John
Quincy Jernigan is reportedly buried at Wesley Chapel United Methodist Church in Darlington County,
South Carolina.

Lena and John Jernigan's children include:

       Mamie Edell Jernigan "Mamie" b. September 21, 1918 m. ? Folsom
       Thomas Frederick Jernigan "Thomas" b. August 3, 1920
       Melvin Jernigan b. July 4, 1922
       Kathleen Jernigan b. February 3, 1923 m. ? Bennett

Lena's union with Eldred Nivens produced:

       Frances Geraldine Nivens b. August 8, 1942 d. June 21, 2000 m. ? Moser - burial: Sharon
        Memorial Park, Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

John Quincy Jernigan's parents were:

       Quincy A. Jernigan b. March 1856
       Ella A. (nee?) b. February 1867

  At the time of Lena's passing, she and Eldred lived in Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, North
Carolina. Her death certificate states that her occupation was as an assistant in a meat market.
  Eldred's name has also been seen as "Eldridge".

United States Federal Census Reference:

1900 - John Quincy Jernigan appears as a seven-year-old in his parents' home during the June 27th
survey in High Hill Township, Darlington County, South Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Jernigan had been
married fourteen years at the time. The household included:

       Quincy A Jernigan, age 44 b. March 1856 ("Head")
       Ella A Jernigan, age 33 b. February 1867 ("Wife")
       Spencer G Jernigan, age 21 b. December 1878 ("Son")
       Leon C Jernigan, age 13 b. February 1887 ("Son")
       Earnest Jernigan, age 11 b. December 1888 ("Son")
       Harley J Jernigan, age 9 b. November 1890 ("Son")
       Not legible , but is John Quincy Jernigan, age 7 b. April 1893 ("Son")
       Andrew W Jernigan, age 7 b. May 1896 ("Son")
       Paul H Jernigan, b. January 1899 ("Son")

1910 - Luther and family were located in Timmonsville Township, Florence County, South Carolina on
the 25th of April. This would be Nettie's last federal census survey. In the household were:
       Luther J Alexander, age 33 ("Head") (Luther Alexander, Sr. [1])
       Nettie Alexander, age 30 ("Wife") (Nettie Hatchell Alexander)
       Sadie C Alexander, age 10 ("Daughter") (Sadie E. Alexander)
       Lena M Alexander, age 8 ("Daughter")
       Marie Alexander, age 7 ("Daughter")
       Julia Alexander, age 5 ("Daughter")
       Mary Alexander, age 2 ("Daughter") (Mary Berta Alexander "Mary")

1920 - Eldred and his parents' family were surveyed for the census in the Steel Creek Township
Precinct 1 of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina on January 19th. All of their children listed were
born in North Carolina. In that household were:

       Tom I Nivens, age 38 ("Head")
       Bessie L Nivens, age 37 ("Wife")
       Eldred Nivens, age 16 ("Son")
       Cora L. Nivens, age 14 ("Daughter")
       Fred M. Nivens, age 9 ("Son")
       Robbie M. Nivens, age 6 ("Daughter")
       Catheline Nivens, age 1 year 6 months ("Daughter")

1930 - This survey was taken in Eldred's parents' home in Charlotte Township, Mecklenburg County,
North Carolina on April 14th. The household included:

       T I Nivens, age 51 ("Head")
       Bessie Nivens, age 47 ("Wife")
       Eldred Nivens, age 26 ("Son")
       Fred Nivens, age 19 ("Son")
       Rob Mae Nivens, age 16 ("Daughter")
       Kathleen Nivens, age 12 ("Daughter") (Mary Kathleen Nivens b. June 11, 1918 South Carolina
        d. April 27, 2004 in a Charlotte nursing home, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina at age 85
        m. divorced at her death)
       John P Nivens, age 8 ("Son")

LEWIS R. ALEXANDER
A son of Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry", and Laura M. Raines
Born: About 1907
Burial: Reportedly, Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina Lewis is reportedly buried in the
Greenville, South Carolina area.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1910 - April 15th was the date of this survey in Greenville Township, Greenville County, South
Carolina. Henry is absent from the household in this survey, with his wife as "head". Laura's mother
and a boarder were present in this household. Lewis was age 3 at the time of the survey, yet he did
not appear on the next decade's (1920) survey, when he would have only been 13 years old.

       Mrs. L M Alexander, age 28 ("head") (Laura M. Raines Alexander)
       John Alexander, age 7 ("son")
       Lewis Alexander, age 3 ("son")
       Eugene Alexander, age 1 ("son")
       Mrs. S A Raines, age 70 ("mother") (Susan A. Raines)
       Mrs. Nannie Ray, age 25 ("boarder")

LOIS PATRICIA ALEXANDER
"Lois"
A daughter of Wilton Kenneth Alexander "Kenneth" and Beatrice Lloyd "Bea"
Born: October 1, 1943

LURIE ALLEN ALEXANDER
(Infant)
A son of Vivian Loren Alexander “Loren” and Eunice Lee
Born: August 16, 1935
Died: February 5, 1936
Burial: Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church, Timmonsville, Florence County, South Carolina

MAGGIE LOUISE ALEXANDER
"Maggie"
A daughter of John Wesley Alexander "John" and Sarah Ann M. Stewart "Sallie"
Born: November 25, 1879
Died: August 7, 1965 at age 86
Marriage: None
Burial: Pine Grove United Methodist Church, Darlington County, South Carolina near Timmonsville with
close relatives nearby.

    Maggie, a schoolteacher, served as the Alexander family "historian" for this particular line. She
wanted to make sure that the Alexander family's information, photos, and documents that she had
accumulated would make their way into the Darlington County Historical Commission in Darlington for
perpetual care. She had talked with the DCHC's Historian, Horace Fraser Rudisill several times about
the family before he became active with the Commission. She eventually gave what has been
described as a "trunk" with family pictures, documents, etc., but Mr. Rudisill told me in the 1970s that
he did not remember the trunk. He did acknowledge receiving items from Maggie, but soon after
separated them in categorical files at the DCHC building on Hewitt St., just off of the "square" in the
city of Darlington.
    I only remember "Aunt Maggie", as my mother called her, from family reunions during my
childhood, but those who I have asked about her say that she was an extremely nice, intelligent, and
all-around good woman.
    After her mother, Sallie Stewart Alexander had died in 1917, the 1920 United States Federal Census
erroneously listed her as father John Wesley Alexander's "Wife". As I understand it, she was a person
who took charge, wrote obituaries for the family, and put together her father's "Reminiscence". Since
her father was aging, she probably took care of the day to day running of the household. Another
likely reason for making the enumerator think that she was John Wesley's wife was that she was an
older person, 36-years-old, who was living with John Wesley, then in his early 70s. She was around
thirty-seven years younger than her dad, so as they say "go figure".
    Although Maggie was engaged at one time, she never married, and continued to lived in her
father’s home most of her life. Later on she became a housemate of her widowed sister-in-law,
Bertha Lechner Alexander. There were at least two articles written about their living together in
different editions of the Florence Morning News newspaper. The reported reason she never married
was that she took in her sister Addie O. Alexander Hill's children, an admirable feat. According to my
first cousin Mary Alexander Jensen, an article's mentioning that the parents left four children is not
correct, and that three is correct.
    Maggie Alexander wrote a "typescript" entitled “History of Pine Grove Church”. According to a
bibliography at the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, entitled “Local and Family
History in South Carolina” by Cote, page 122, the typescript was reportedly in the possession of the
Darlington County Historical Commission. I've never asked to see it, but I'm sure it would be
interesting reading because some of the Alexanders were very active within the church. John Wesley
Alexander was Sunday School Superintendent, and Maggie's brother, John Luther Alexander, Sr. (1)
was the assistant to his father.
    Maggie was the person to who, I'm guessing, persuaded her father to dictate his autobiographical
“Reminiscence” to her, mostly covering highlights of his stint as a Confederate Private during the War
Between the States. She probably figured that he had a story to tell, and then was the time to do it
as he was about 86 at the time, was already having heart problems, and he was the only known
member of approximately one hundred and twenty men originally in Company A, 14th Infantry
Regiment, South Carolina Volunteers, C.S.A.

Obituary - Publication not known by this research.

   DARLINGTON – Miss Maggie Louise Alexander, 85, of the Pine Grove Community died Saturday
morning at the residence after an illness of several months.
   Funeral services will be conducted at 3 p.m. Sunday in Pine Grove Methodist Church by Rev.
Kenneth Bobo. Burial, directed by Kistler’s Funeral Home, will be in the church cemetery.
   Pallbearers will be Howard Lee Jordan, Otto Davis, Charles Ham, Olin DuBose, Henry Wallace and
Earl Wallace.
   Miss Alexander was born in Darlington County, a daughter of the late John Wesley Alexander and
Sallie Stewart Alexander. She had made her home with her sister-in-law, Mrs. Bertha Alexander of
the Pine Grove Community, for the past 28 years.
   She was a member of the Pine Grove Methodist Church where she taught Sunday School for 64
years, 45 of them in the primary children’s classes.
   Several nieces and nephews survive.
   It was Miss Alexander’(s) request that all former Sunday School pupils attending the funeral wear a
flower.
   The body will be at the funeral home until one hour before services. Friends may call at the
residence of Mr. and Mrs. Robert White Jr. of the Pine Grove Community.

Newspaper Article - Includes Maggie Louise Alexander and Bertha Rosalie Lechner Alexander
Florence Morning News dated March 17, 1958:

                BERTHA AND MAGGIE ALEXANDER HAVE LIVED TOGETHER 20 YEARS
                                     by Bess Truman

   They have lived together in harmony for 20 years.
   Perhaps it is because there is no husband to complicate matters. Mrs. Bertha Alexander lost her
husband three years ago; Miss Maggie Alexander never had one - but the reason comes later.
   Anyway, I got somewhat confused when I was sent to (I thought) Mrs. Alexander's to get her ‘This
is my life,’ only to be met at the door by Miss Alexander, who told me there was a Miss and Mrs.
Alexander living there. Which did I want to see? Well, I knew the one I wanted to see was 81 years
old and Miss Alexander not looking that old, I decided, it must be Mrs. Alexander - only to find out
later it was Miss Alexander I had been sent to see.
   So, although I have written a little about Mrs. Bertha Alexander in a previous article, the situation is
so unusual, I thought I would write them up together.
   Their fathers fought on opposing sides in the civil war. Miss Maggie's father, John Wesley
Alexander, joined the Confederate Army at 16 and served four years, being taken prisoner twice.
   Bertha's father was a Yankee, who liked the South so much, and he married the girl he met while
driving a group of horses from the North to sell. Bertha's mother's first husband was killed by
jumping off the train in his anxiety to get home quickly, little knowing his wife would marry a Yankee
after his death.
Maggie's father came home penniless, as so many others, having lost all his Confederate money and
his slaves. He would have starved if an officer, who was not quite so unfortunate, had not fed him
until he got on his feet.
   Evidently it did not take long for this, as he married a Miss Sallie Stewart a year later, *son of Abel
S. Stewart. They reared four boys and four girls. John W. Alexander lived near Newman Swamp
Church two miles north of Lamar.
   He stayed there 12 years later moving to the Lake Swamp Community near the Pine Grove Church
in which community Maggie has lived and taught Sunday School for 62 years.
   Now comes the most important and self-sacrificing part of Maggie's life.
   Due to the death of her sister, Mrs. Limuel Hill of near Timmonsville, leaving four children, the
oldest four, the youngest a tiny baby, Maggie gave up all thought of marrying - even turning down
her fiancé, and devoted her life to rearing these four children of her sisters, all of them turning out
fine, being very devoted to their aunt and foster mother.
   Well, all of her nieces and nephews (seeming like her own children to her and to them), Bertha's
husband having just died and her last daughter having married, she invited Maggie to come live with
her, after being alone for only two weeks.
   And live together in love and harmony, they have for twenty years. Maggie’s apartment is in the
front, Bertha's in the back. They even cook separately as if you remember my telling you, Bertha lives
mostly on the sprouts of young vegetables, while Maggie eats normally.
   And I think they are wise, as it is a well known fact there is no kitchen big enough for two women.
But evidently this is the exception that proves the rule.
   Each prepares her own supper - in the winter before dark, as they both stay at night with Miss
Alexander's niece, Mrs. White, whose home is a short distance away.

Footnote: * “daughter” is correct, not “son”.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1880 - John Alexander and his family were living in the Lisbon Township, Darlington County, South
Carolina on the 25th day of June, when his home was surveyed. Occupants of the home included:

       John Alexander, age 32 ("Farm Laborer") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Sarah M Alexander, age36 ("Wife") (Sarah Ann M. Stewart Alexander "Sallie")
       Mary Alexander, age 13 ("Daughter") (Mary Berta Alexander "Mary")
       Ella Alexander, age 10 ("Daughter") (Ella L. Alexander)
       Charles Alexander, age 9 ("Son") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Henry Alexander, age 8 ("Son") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Mollie Alexander, age 5 ("Daughter") (Mattie Viola Alexander "Mattie" and "Mollie")
       Luther Alexander, age 3 ("Son") (John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" [1])
       Maggie Alexander, age 1 ("Daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")

1900 - This survey was taken on the 20th of June in the High Hill Township, Darlington County, South
Carolina. The household included:

       John W Alexander, age 53 ("Head") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Sarah A Alexander, age 60 ("Wife") (Sarah Ann M. Stewart Alexander "Sallie")
       Maggie L Alexander, age 20 ("Daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")
       Henry L Alexander, age 26 ("Son") (Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry")
       Addie O Alexander, age 17 ("Daughter") (Addie Olivia Alexander "Addie")
       Joseph K Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe")

1910 - This survey, taken in the Ebenezer Township of Florence County, South Carolina on April 19th,
finds only three inhabitants in the John Alexander household. It was to be the last survey his wife,
Sallie, who died in 1917. Notable is the recorded age of Sallie, who was older than John Wesley, but
showed up as the same age as him in this survey. The household included:

       John W Alexander, age 64 ("head") ("Farmer") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Sallie M Alexander, age 64 ("wife") (Sarah Ann M. Stewart Alexander "Sallie")
       Maggie L Alexander, age 28 ("daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")

1920 - This botched survey was taken in what was then called Ebenezer Township of Florence County,
South Carolina. It was the location of John's "Lone Tree Farm" on Sallie Hill Road near Timmonsville
in Florence County. Now, people think of Ebenezer as part of the west end of Florence near the
shopping mall on Business I-20, yet today it is much smaller, and does not extend all the way over to
Timmonsville. Florence and Timmonsville are around thirteen miles from each other. The survey
listed John as married, although he was a widower, and daughter Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie"
was listed as his wife. Also, the Hill boys were John's grandchildren, not nephews, they were,
however, Maggie's nephews, sons of Addie Olivia Alexander Hill. She probably answered the
questions from the enumerator by saying that the children were her nephews, and since the census
taker thought that Maggie was John's wife, it made them John's "Nephews". With that many mistakes
in one survey, it makes you wonder if some of the census takers of that day drank on the job. Real
wife Sallie Stewart Alexander died in 1917. The survey for John's neighborhood area was taken on
both the fifth and sixth of January. The household included:

       John W Alexander, age 73 ("Head") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Maggie Alexander, age 38 ("Wife") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")
       Carlisle Hill, age 13 ("Nephew") (Luther Carlisle Hill "Carlisle")
       Gary Hill, age 11 ("Nephew") (Martin Gary Hill "Gary")

1930 - Dying in 1934, this was John's last census survey. His household in Timmonsville Township,
Florence County, South Carolina had diminished to three people including him. The survey was
enumerated April 4th. Included were:

       John W Alexander, age 83 ("Head") (John Wesley Alexander "John")
       Maggie Alexander, age 45 ("Daughter") (Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie")
       Luther C Hill, age 24 ("G. Son") (Luther Carlisle Hill "Carlisle")

MARGARET LEOLA ALEXANDER
"Leola"
A daughter of Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie" and Ida Jeffords "Ida"
Born: May 14, 1924
Died: December 28, 2007 at age 83
Marriage: Howard Melvin Watford "Howard"
Burial: Leola and Howard are buried at Darlington Memory Gardens, Hartsville, Darlington County,
South Carolina.

    Leola and Howard lived in Lamar, South Carolina. She was the last living child of her siblings.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1930 - As a six-year-old, Leola was living with her family on her grandfather's "Lone Tree Farm" in
Timmonsville Township, Florence County, South Carolina during this survey. In his household were:

       Charlie E Alexander, age 60 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Ida Alexander, age 48 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
       Earl Alexander, age 20 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl")
       James I Alexander, age 19 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "Earl")
       Woodrow W Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
       Ira Alexander, age 9 ("Son") (Charles Ira Alexander "Ira")
       Leola Alexander, age 6 ("Daughter") (Margaret Leola Alexander "Leola")
       Sallie L Alexander, age 1 year 10 months ("Daughter") (Sally Louise Alexander "Sally")

MARVIN ESKER ALEXANDER
"Marvin"
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe" and Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: December 8, 1929
Died: December 9, 1971 at age 42 near Newberry, South Carolina
Marriage: Florence County, South Carolina to Lynette Pigate
Born: May 17, 1934 Florence County, South Carolina
Burial: Marvin's buried at Bethany Free Will Baptist Church Cemetery, Florence County, South
Carolina.

Marvin and Lynette's children include:

       Ronald Marvin Alexander "Ron" and "Ronnie" b. November 2, 1952, m. Rhonda (nee?)
       Vivian Sally Alexander "Vicky" b. December 29, 1953 d. January 25, 2011 m. John Joseph
        Scrughan. Vicky was buried on January 28, 2011 at Holy Cross Cemetery, James Island,
        Charleston County, South Carolina just outside of the city of Charleston
       Judy Elaine Alexander "Judy" b. June 22, 1955 m. Robert Reid "Bob"
       Larry Hoyt Alexander "Larry" b. February 19, 1968 m. Shannon (nee?)

Lynette's parents were:
     Hoyt Pigate b. June 6, 1910 d. January 22, 1986
     Leonlun Vause b. November 4, 1912 d. January 21, 2002 - burial: Bethany Cemetery,
        Florence County, South Carolina

Lynette's paternal grandparents were:

       Charlie R. Pigate b. July 19, 1864 Motts Crossroads, Florence County, South Carolina d. June
        16, 1929 Motts Crossroads, Florence County, South Carolina
       Sarah Rebecca Welch "Sally" b. March 8, 1874 Camp Branch, Florence County, South Carolina
        d. September 12, 1950 Motts Crossroads - burial: Bethel Baptist Church, Olanta, Florence
        County, South Carolina

Her paternal great grandparents were:

       James N. Pigate b. About 1833 Motts Crossroads d. October 5, 1908 Motts Crossroads
       Margaret McElveen d. Motts Crossroads - burial: Bethel Baptist Church, Olanta, Florence
        County, South Carolina

Lynette's maternal great grandparents were:

       Robert Welch
       Harriet Smith

Her paternal 2-great grandparents were:

       Lewis R. Pigate
       Eleanor Mott

   James N. Pigate was a Confederate soldier in Company B, 6th South Carolina Infantry, Confederate
States of America.
   As an infant, Larry Alexander was referred to as “Tater” by Marvin.
   As a widow, Lynette Pigate Alexander married Eugene Baker "Gene". He passed from this life on
February 12, 2011.

Obituary - Possibly published by the Florence Morning News, Florence, South Carolina:

   Funeral services for Marvin Esker Alexander, 42, of 515 Carroll St., Florence, will be conducted at 3
p.m. Saturday in the Sardis Baptist Church, near Timmonsville, by the Rev. Clyde Fox and the Rev.
Paul M. Door. Burial, directed by Waters Funeral Home of Florence, will be in Bethany Free Will
Baptist Church Cemetery.
   Pallbearers will be Terry Welch, Jerry Alexander, Jimmy Alexander, Terry Alexander, Joey
Alexander, and Wayne Alexander.
   Mr. Alexander, a foreman for Fruit Growers' Express, was accidentally shot Thursday morning at a
rest stop near Newberry, while en route to Nashville, Tennessee.

MARY ALEXANDER (1)
A daughter of John Alexander and Mary Woodham “Polly”
Born: About 1805
Mary is not a direct descendant in this line. She was Rev. John William Reese Alexander’s sister.

   Mary is listed as Mary Magee in the 1850 United States Census. She was 45 years of age, at the
time, and what appears to be three children between 8 and 14 years old were listed as "Paupers", but
no husband. Mary Alexander Magee lived either with her mother, or next to her. Her listing came
right after the listing of her widowed mother, and brother Ervin M. Alexander.
    As family research copied information from other people, the belief of where our Mary was buried
became that she was buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery in the Rocky Head community near Ariton, Dale
County, Alabama, but researcher friend Sue Gill did some research, and determined that the one in
Mt. Olive was not the same Mary Alexander McGee.

MARY ALEXANDER (2)
A daughter of Rev. John William Alexander "William" and Delila Alexandra Kea, "Delila" and "Liley"
Born: About 1838 South Carolina
Burial: Possibly buried in Coweta County, Georgia, the Newnan, Georgia area, where she reportedly
moved to following her marriage.

MARY A. ELIZABETH ALEXANDER
"Mary"
A daughter of John Wesley Alexander "John" and Sarah Ann M. Stewart "Sallie"
Born: February 27, 1867
Died: August 28, 1886 at age 19
Marriage: Eliphus Gary Rogers "Gary"
Born: July 28, 1861
Died: June 2, 1916
Burial: Mary, Gary, and all of the Rogerses mentioned are buried near each other at Newman Swamp
United Methodist Church, Lamar, Darlington County, South Carolina. Gary Rogers remarried, and his
grave is beside his second wife, Minnie S. (nee?).

MARY BERTA ALEXANDER
"Mary"
A daughter of John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" and Nettie Hatchell
Born: August 14, 1907
Died: April 26, 1961 at age 54
Marriage: Archie Jacob McKay "Archie"
Born: March 29, 1898
Died: January 23, 1959 at age 60
Burial: Mary and Archie are buried at Peniel Baptist Church, Timmonsville, Florence County, South
Carolina

Mary and Archie's children include:

       Rev. Archie Gerald McKay "Gerald" b. April 6, 1933 in Florence County, South Carolina, m.
        Frances Hill. Rev. McKay was Pastor at Hebron Baptist Church, Scranton, Florence County,
        South Carolina for six years; Eastside Baptist Church, McColl, Marlboro County, South Carolina
        for three years; Neill's Creek Baptist Church, Angier, Harnett County, North Carolina for seven
        years; Highland Baptist Church, New London, Stanly County, North Carolina for three years;
        First Baptist Church, Johnsonville, Florence County, South Carolina for ten years; and then
        retired. Although he was never Pastor at Peniel Baptist Church, he preached at revivals there,
        and filled-in when needed. Information from his wife, Frances Hill McKay.
       Evelyn Ramona McKay "Evelyn" b. February 6, 1931 m. Loyd Emery Wall "Loyd" d. Of
        pancreatic cancer at age 75 in 1977
       An unnamed male infant b. 1936 d. 1936 (full-term stillborn), and was buried at Peniel Baptist
        Church Cemetery

Archie's father’s parents were:

       Maxey McKay
       Mary (nee?)

   Archie McKay is listed in his parents household in the 1900 United States Census for Effingham
community, Florence County, South Carolina, along with brother Maxey E. McKay.
   Son Gerald McKay is a retired Baptist minister. He married Frances Hill, a daughter of Walter and
Maude (nee?) Hill.
   Daughter Evelyn and her husband had three children, and two of them are adults.
   Thanks to one of my consultants, Frances Hill McKay "Frances", Mrs. Gerald McKay, for her
information on this family. Mrs. McKay's parents were Walter Hill and Maude (nee?).

MARY MARGARET ALEXANDER
"Polly"
A daughter of Mrs. Frances (nee?) Alexander
Born: Before 1774 possibly old Dobbs County, Newbern District, North Carolina
Died: Before or shortly after 1836 reportedly in the Choctaw area of Mississippi
Polly is not a direct descendant in this line. She was an aunt of Rev. John William Reese Alexander
Marriage: About 1805 to Paris Hickman
A son of William Hickman
Born: 1774 in South Carolina
Died: Reportedly June 21, 1838 in Neshoba County, Mississippi

   I'm not attempt to list the children of Paris and Mary Margaret Alexander Hickman, nor those of
Paris and his next wife, Phoebe Taylor's, a reported Choctaw. The listing of children between the two
wives varies from source to source, sometimes merges, and just would not be accurate.

Paris' parents were:

       William Hickman of the old Kershaw District of South Carolina, within the larger old Camden
        District
       Mary Margaret McPherson of the old Kershaw District of South Carolina, within the larger old
        Camden District

Paris Hickman's paternal grandparents were:

       Issac Hickman
       Elizabeth (nee?) of Virginia, who migrated into South Carolina during the early 1700s

   After leaving South Carolina, and moving into Alabama for a relatively short stay, Paris and Polly
moved on to Mississippi. They settled in Nesboba County near the Choctaw Reservation west of Pearl
River. Polly apparently did not live long after settling in Mississippi, but so far I've not found her
death place, death date, or burial location.
   I have seen conflicting histories on Paris Hickman, and his first wife, Mary Margaret Alexander. Her
death dates are different in each one. I could tell that the researchers were doing their study based
on what happened in Paris' life after Mary Margaret. She was sort of a "side item" to them.
   According to a couple of accounts, Paris married a Choctaw woman in Mississippi, Phoebe Taylor, in
Claiborne County, Mississippi on November 7, 1828. Phoebe was a daughter of Thomas Taylor. Paris
and Phoebe had several children of their own, although Paris and Polly had children, it is said that
Paris' children with Phoebe spoke better Choctaw than English.

Last Will and Testament of Paris Hickman:

                          The State of Mississippi in the name of God, Amen

   I Paris Hickman Neshoba County of the state and County of the state and Country aforesaid and
being presently in my right mind and proper senses but weak in body and calling to mind the mortality
of the human body and that is appointed to all men once to die do make and ordain this my last will
and testament as follows.
First of all I commend my soul to God who gave it and my body to be buried with a Christian burial at
the decisions of my executors as for the worldly goods that God has been pleased to bless me with it
is my will to dispose of them in the following manner.
    In the first place I will that all my just debts be paid and the next place I bequeath to my beloved
wife Mary Hickman all my goods and chattels to have and to hold during her life and at her death to
be divided amongst my children as follows and in the next place I give to my son Samuel Hickman
one Negro boy named Carolina and to my sons Joshua and Robert Hickman one Negro boy named
Titus, and to my daughter Lettice Ann a Negro girl named Matilda and to my two sons Ladson L. and
Elias E. F. one Negro woman with her increase from and after this date to be divided equally and to
my daughter Tabitha Donald I give the sum of fifty dollars and to my daughter Jane Ellis’ heirs I leave
the like sum of fifty dollars and to my son John Hickman and my granddaughter I leave one Negro girl
Raney to be equally divided and for the purpose of executing and attending to and to transact this
business of my last will I appoint my sons William A. and Samuel Hickman my executors of this my
last will and testament revoking all other wills or deeds by me made previous to this date. Signed
sealed and acknowledged 12 December 1837.
Paris Hickman
In presence of
John Morris
John G. West
Will recorded May 28, 1838
by Wm R.B._______, Clerk

United States Federal Census Reference:

1830 - Paris and Polly were found in Alabama, previous to the relocation of Polly's nephew James
Alexander from old Sumter District, South Carolina who settled in Alabama during the latter 1830s.

MATTIE VIOLA ALEXANDER
"Mattie" and "Mollie"
A daughter of John Wesley Alexander "John" and Sarah Ann M. Stewart "Sallie"
Born: November 4, 1874 Lisbon Township, Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: April 3, 1951 at age 76
Marriage: December 31, 1896 George Chapel Hatchell "George"
Born: May 22, 1875
Died: April 20, 1961 at age 85
Burial: Mattie and George are buried at Lake Swamp Baptist Church, Lake Swamp community,
Darlington County near Timmonsville.

Mattie and George's children include:

       Roy Dudley Hatchell "Roy", b. June 17, 1899 in Darlington County, South Carolina, d. May 27,
        1973 in Darlington County, South Carolina, buried at Darlington Memory Gardens, Hartsville,
        Darlington County, South Carolina
       Glenn Carl Hatchell "Glenn", b. December 29, 1913, d. September 18, 1976, buried at Lake
        Swamp Baptist Church, Darlilngton County, South Carolina near Timmonsville, grave marker
        inscription: “ASLEEP IN JESUS”
       Roger Hatchell (last known to live in North Carolina)
       Maude Hatchell
       Susie Lou Hatchell
       Ruff Hatchell (last known to live in Columbia, South Carolina)

George Hatchell's parents were:

       Theodore C. Hatchell
       Eliza Kelley
       George's paternal grandparents were:
       William Hatchell
       Mary Jordan

  I suspect that George's middle name is actually spelled like the area family of Chappells spell theirs,
and not the spelling on his grave marker of "Chapel". It seems to me like it may have been a
mistaken spelling.
  George and Mattie were first cousins, and son Roy married a first cousin, Sadie C. Alexander.
  I’ve seen Mattie referred to as “Mollie” in a census survey.

Obituary - Published the day of Mattie’s burial:

    TIMMONSVILLE – Funeral services for Mrs. G.C. Hatchell, 76, of the Lake Swamp community in
Darlington County will be held at Lake Swamp Baptist Church at 3:30 this afternoon.
    Rites will be conducted by her pastor, the Reverend Ray Halson, assisted by the Reverend Robert
E. Clyde, pastor of High Hill and Central Baptist Churches of Darlington. Interment will follow in the
church cemetery.
Mrs. Hatchell died suddenly at her residence after returning from a missionary meeting late Tuesday
afternoon. She was very active in all religious work in her community.
    Survivors besides her husband, include two daughters,Mrs. R.A. Blackman of Darlington and Mrs. E.
Ellisor of West Columbia; four sons, Roy D. of Darlington, Glenn C. of Timmonsville; Ruff T. of Marion
and Roger J. of Roanoke Rapids, N.C.; one sister, Miss Maggie Alexander of Timmonsville; and two
brothers, Luther Alexander of Timmonsville andJoe Alexander of Elim; 25 grandchildren, 11 great
grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews.
    Grandsons will serve as pallbearers and granddaughters will be in charge of the flowers.
    The body will remain in the chapel of Ham and Perry in Timmonsville until 2 o’clock Thursday when
it will be moved to the church.

MYRTIS GLADYS ALEXANDER
"Gladys" (“Myrtie” during her childhood)
A daughter of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe" and Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: March 8, 1921 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: April 22, 1969 at age 48 in a medical college hospital in Charleston, Charleston County, South
Carolina
Burial: Gladys and Jake Ruther are buried together at Pine Grove United Methodist Church, Darlington
County, South Carolina, near Timmonsville.
Marriage 1: Olin Clyde Folsom "Olin" of Darlington County, South Carolina
Born: May 6, 1916 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: May 18, 1943 in the South Pacific during World War II
Burial: Although Olin was originally buried in the general area of his death in the South Pacific, later in
the 1940s he was moved to Honolulu Memorial Cemetery, Honolulu, Hawaii, Plot Q Row 0 Grave 76.
The cemetery is well known as the “Punchbowl”. A grave marker type of monument to Pvt. Folsom is
located in his family's grave plot at Wesley Chapel United Methodist Church, Lydia community,
Darlington County.
Marriage 2: Wilbur Frank McGinness "Wilbur" and "Pat" of Higginsville, Lafayette County, Missouri
Born: June 11, 1922 Higginsville, Lafayette County, Missouri
Died: March 29, 1976 Alvin C. York Veterans Administration Hospital, Murfreesboro, Rutherford
County, Tennessee
Burial: Pat is buried at Nashville National Cemetery, Madison, Davidson County, Tennessee, adjacent
to Nashville.
Marriage 3: Early 1950s to Jacob Augustine Ruther "Jake" of Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio
Born: May 27, 1914 Glouster, Athens County, Ohio
Died: March 5, 1977 Saunders Memorial Hospital, Florence, Florence County, South Carolina

Gladys had her only child with Pat McGinness:

       Patrick Val'ere McGinness, Sr. "Val" b. September 1, 1948, Warrensburg Clinic, Warrensburg,
        Johnson County, Missouri

Olin Folsom's parents were:

       Alvin Shuford Folsom "Alvin" b. June 25, 1889 in South Carolina
       Cassandra B. (nee?) "Cassie"

   The Folsoms are buried at Wesley Chapel United Methodist Church, Lydia community, Darlington
County, South Carolina. In the same location is a memorial marker for Olin. It appears to be an
actual grave marker, but he's not there. He is buried in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Pat McGinness' parents were:

       James Leonard McGinness "Leonard" b. September 27, 1877 d. November 1946
       Sophia Leas "Sophie" b. July of 1897 Freedom Township, Lafayette County, Missouri d.
        February 4, 1971

Jake Ruther's parents were:

       Joseph Ruther b. Austria
       Karolina (nee?) "Karrie" b. Austria

   The Joseph Ruthers immigrated to the United States in either late 1913 or early 1914. Jake was
born in May of 1914 in America, and his mother was pregnant with him on the way here.
   Gladys attended and graduated from Lamar High School after completing eleven grades. That’s as
far as they went, back then.
   First husband Olin Folsom was from the Philadelphia Community of Darlington County, South
Carolina, and was reportedly shipped off to World War II almost immediately following his marriage to
Gladys. He apparently was wounded, then became seriously ill, and died a short time later from some
sort of liver infection. Olin was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal and Purple Heart with
Oak Leaf Cluster and "additional Army awards". His name and three others, including Barney K.
Alexander (B.K.), Gladys’ brother, are inscribed on a gatepost at Philadelphia United Methodist
Church, Darlington County, South Carolina, memorializing the church members who died in World War
II. Another monument to Olin is located at his family’s grave plot at Wesley Chapel United Methodist
Church, Darlington County, South Carolina. Gladys and Olin are said to have been childhood
sweethearts.
   Pat McGinness' parents were farmers in Higginsville, Lafayette County, in west central Missouri
where he grew up. Pat finished law school at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Davidson County,
Tennessee, yet never practiced law as a career. He was “Wilbur” to his family, but “Pat” to most
everyone else. Mr. McGinness is buried at the Nashville National Cemetery, Madison, Tennessee,
adjacent to Nashville. He was a Corporal in the United States Army.
   Jake's parents immigrated to America in 1914 while his mother was pregnant with him. He was the
oldest child of the family and first to attend school, teaching his entire family how to speak English.
At that time they lived in the coal mining hills of Athens County in the Appalachian foothills of
southeastern Ohio. The Ruthers later moved upstate to Barberton, Ohio, adjacent to Akron, in a
community surrounded by many others of Prussian descent. Jake’s father, Joseph Adolph Ruther
"Joseph" b. November 17, 1887 Austria, and mother Karoline "Karrie" b. About 1893 Austria, but they
considered themselves to be basically German. Joseph and Karrie's parents were born in Austria.
Their language was German. Austria and Germany were all part of what was known as Prussia, then.
In 1942, Joseph's draft registration was completed, and he was listed as living in Glouster, Trimble
Township, Ohio. He was listed as age 54. His signature is on the registration card, and he was un-
employed at the time, and later fell victim to the disease, Dropsy. They resided at 160 Liberty Avenue
in Barberton.
   Although Jake started out working in coal mines in the hills of southern Ohio, he later managed a
Shell Oil Company service station on United States Route 40, West Broad Street in Columbus, Ohio,
the state capitol.
   In the early 1960s Gladys and Jake moved to Gladys home area of South Carolina, their first job
was managing a truck stop, fifty miles away from their home, and commuted each day. Jake ran the
truck part, and Gladys managed the restaurant. Jake worked in Florence, Florence County, South
Carolina with brother-in-law Belvin Alexander for City Products as night manager. City Products was
an ice plant that mainly iced Atlantic Coast Line railroad cars until refrigerated cars became the norm.
Atlantic Coast Line was the name of the railroad company then, but now it’s known as CSX.
   With the takeover of refrigerated boxcars, City Products eventually closed, and Jake became a
crane operator at a steel company in Florence, South Carolina where he worked until the time of his
death, in fact he started having his eventually fatal stroke while working there. He told me on more
than one occasion that it was dangerous and stressful, and that he was always afraid that he could
hurt someone with the crane.Gladys worked in Florence with a popular Howard Johnson's restaurant
at the intersection of Irby and Palmetto streets at a turn of United States Highway 301 within
Florence. She and her fellow workers dealt with a large number of tourists in cars and buses. In that
day, there was no Interstate 95, so U.S. 301 was the "Maine to Miami" route.
   After Gladys' death, Jake Ruther married the former Pauline Goodson, a twice-widowed woman b.
April 10, 1921 Darlington County, South Carolina d. February 20, 1995 Florence County, South
Carolina. Pauline is buried to the left of Jake and Gladys’ grave and double marker.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1930 - Jake's parents were living in Trimble Township, Athens County, Ohio on April 11th. In the
household were:

       Joseph Ruther, age 43 ("Head")
       Karrie Ruther, age 37 ("wife")
       Jacob Ruther, age 15 "Jake" ("son")
       John Ruther, age 14 ("son")
       Anthony Ruther, age 12 "Tony" ("son")
       Hendrick Ruther, age 9 "Henry" ("son")

Obituary - Florence Morning News dated April 24, 1969 (Page 2-A):

   TIMMONSVILLE - Mrs. Gladys Alexander Ruther, 48, wife of Jacob Ruther of Florence, died Tuesday
in a Charleston hospital after an illness of several months.
   Funeral services will be conducted Friday at 3 p.m. at Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church by Rev.
Thomas Truluck and Rev. Clyde Kerley. Burial will be in Pine Grove Cemetery, directed by Layton-
Perry Funeral Home.
   Surviving are a son, Patrick V. McGinness of Charleston; seven brothers, Lee Alexander, Willard
Alexander, Clifton Alexander, Joe Alexander of Timmonsville, Kenneth Alexander of Effingham, Belvin
and Marvin Alexander of Florence; a sister, Mrs. Edgar (Mildred) Powers of Timmonsville.
Newspaper Articles - From newspapers unknown to this research:

This one is dated May 24, 1942, during World War II:

                    DARLINGTON COUPLE NOTIFIED OF DEATH OF SOLDIER SON

   DARLINGTON, May 24 - Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Folsom, of Darlington County were today notified by the
War Department of the death of their son, Private Olin Folsom, with the U.S. Army somewhere in the
Pacific. Early last week the couple received news informing them of their son's serious illness, and
news of his passing reached here today, the message stating that he died on May 18. Some time ago
Private Folsom was wounded in action in the Southwest Pacific, and later his parents were informed
by the War Department that he had been returned to active duty. He had been in the service for
more than a year.
   Private Folsom is survived by his parents, his wife, who was formerly Miss Gladys Alexander, and
several brothers and sisters, two of the brothers also being in the service. Memorial services were
being planned today to be held in the Philadelphia Methodist Church, South, near here, some time in
June.
   To date, Darlington has lost four men dead in the present World War, five missing. Two men have
lost their legs, and others seriously wounded. This is the heaviest casualty list in the entire state.

This one is dated June 1, 1942:

                                         BURIED WHERE HE DIED

    DARLINGTON, June 1 - Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Folsom of Darlington County, whose son, Private Olin
Folsom, died somewhere in the Southwest Pacific on May 18, have been notified by the War
Department that the body of the young man has been buried in the locality in which his death
occurred and may be claimed after the war is over.
   Private Folsom died after being seriously ill in a hospital overseas in the Pacific for several weeks.
He was 26 years of age, and was serving with the U.S. Army. He had been in the service for more
than a year, and has a brother, J.B. Folsom, also with armed forces in Europe.
   Memorial services for the young man will be held sometime this month at the Philadelphia
Methodist Church, South.

MILDRED OLIVIA ALEXANDER
"Mildred"
A daughter of Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie" and Frances Olivia Jernigan "Olivia"
Burial: In the family cemetery on the old "Lone Tree Farm", once belonging to Mildred's grandfather,
John Wesley Alexander (1) "John". It is an old vandalized family cemetery near the waters of Lake
Swamp, on Sallie Hill Road at the Florence and Darlington counties line, on the Florence County side
near Timmonsville, South Carolina.

PATRICIA KAY ALEXANDER
"Patricia" and "Pat"
A daughter of Belvin Ryan Alexander "Belvin" and "Bill" and Jennie Caddell
Born: May 11, 1949

  Patricia is a retired schoolteacher.

REBECCA FAYE ALEXANDER
"Becky"
A daughter of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Jr. "Joe" and Josie Rebecca Timmons “Rebecca”
Born: March 29, 1966

  Becky is a pharmacist.
RONALD MARVIN ALEXANDER
"Ron"
A son of Marvin Esker Alexander "Marvin" and Lynette Pigate
Born: November 2, 1952
Married: Rhonda (nee?)

RUSSELL DALE ALEXANDER
"Russell" and "Bosco" (to fellow baseball players)
A son of Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton" and Mavie Edna Jolly "Mavie"
Born: August 11, 1949

RUTH ALEXANDER
(Infant)
A daughter of John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" (1) and Nettie Hatchell
Born: April 5, 1910
Died: May 14, 1911

SADIE ALEXANDER
A daughter of John Luther Alexander, Sr. "Luther" (1) and Nettie Hatchell
Born: March 22, 1900 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: August 9, 1942 at age 42 in the High Hill community of Darlington County, South Carolina
Marriage 1: January 31, 1919 in Darlington County, South Carolina to George Raleigh Galloway
"Raleigh"
Born: About 1890 in Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: About 1925 in Darlington County, South Carolina at about age 65
Marriage 2: 1927 in Darlington County, South Carolina to Roy Dudley Hatchell "Roy"
Born: June 17, 1899 in Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: May 27, 1973
A son of George Chapel Hatchell and Mattie Viola Alexander "Mattie" and "Mollie"
Burial: August 10, 1942, the day after her passing, at Pine Grove United Methodist Church, Darlington
County, South Carolina near Timmonsville, listed on her death certificate by its old name, "Thornal"
Cemetery”. The undertaker was J.H. Kistler of Darlington. The certificate also stated that she was a
"Domestic" “at Home". Raleigh Galloway is reportedly buried at Wesley Chapel United Methodist
Church, Lydia community, Darlington County, South Carolina, although I have no confirmation of that.
After Sadie's passing, Roy married Ruth Norwood Lowery. Ruth had a son by her previous marriage,
John Lowery. Roy and Ruth were buried next to each other at Darlington Memory Gardens, Hartsville,
Darlington County, South Carolina.

Sadie's children with Raleigh Galloway include:

       Morrell Galloway b. About 1918 d. About 1938 (one research I’ve seen has her as Merril G.
        Galloway) Darlington County, South Carolina, Morrell was buried at Wesley Chapel United
        Methodist Church, Darlington County, South Carolina
       Mary Gladys Galloway "Gladys" b. About 1919 d. Of Colitis on May 11, 1921 at age 9 months
        in the Lydia community of Darlington County, South Carolina - burial: May 12, 1921 at Wesley
        Chapel United Methodist Church, Lydia community, Darlington County, South Carolina
       Eunice Galloway b. About 1921 m. ? Nivens
       Alvin Galloway b. About 1923 d. Deceased, and reportedly buried in Maryland

Sadie's children with Roy Hatchell include:

       Marvin Roy Hatchell "Marvin" b. October 17, 1928
       Faye Hatchell b. January 8, 1931 m. ? Adams
       June Hatchell b. January 1, 1933 m. Herbert Martin
       William Glenba Hatchell "Billy" b. October 31, 1935 d. September 19, 1989 - burial: Pine
        Grove United Methodist Church, Darlington County, South Carolina near Timmonsville

Raleigh Galloway's mother was:

    Mrs. Leonora F. Galloway "Nora"
Roy Hatchell's parents were:

       George Chapel Hatchell "George"
       Mattie Viola Alexander "Mattie" and "Mollie"

   Sadie's poor-quality photo as an adult in this biography was taken in a group of close relatives in
the Spring of 1942 just a few months before her death in August.
   Her death resulted from a cerebral hemorrhage, brought on by childbirth. There seems to be no
confirmation of a live birth, only her death. She, according to her death certificate had the
hemorrhage on August 8, 1942. Husband Roy was the "informant" of her death. Dr. J.F. Davenport
of Timmonsville attended her, and signed her death certificate.
   Sadie’s name has been seen as “Sadie C.” and “Sadie E.”

Roy and Ruth had the following children:

       Judy Diane Hatchell m. ? Andrews
       Ronald Allen Hatchell "Ronnie"
       Ruth Marie Hatchell m. John Alexander White "Johnny" (son of Helen Flora Alexander and
        Robert White, Jr.)

Obituary - Publication not known by this research:

   DARLINGTON - Roy Dudley Hatchell, 73, of Rt. 4, died late Tuesday evening in a Darlington
Hospital after a short illness.
   Funeral services will be conducted Thursday at 3 p.m. in Pine Grove Methodist Church by the Rev.
Guy Mayor, and the Rev. R.N. Wells. Burial, directed by Belk-King Funeral Home, will be in Darlington
Memory Gardens.
   Pallbearers will be Otto Davis, Olin DuBose, Richard Brown, Bernice Brown, and Alvin Dewitt.
   Mr. Hatchell was born in Darlington County, a son of the late George and Mattie Alexander
Hatchell. A veteran of WW I, Mr. Hatchell was employed as a carpenter and a farmer before his
retirement.
   Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Ruth Norwood Hatchell; five sons, William Hatchell of Florence, Marvin
Hatchell of Charlotte, N.C., Alvin Galloway of Perryville, Md., Ronald Allen Hatchell, and John Lowery
both of Darlington. Five daughters, Mrs. Judy Andrews of Lamar, Mrs. Eunice Nivens of Nashville,
Tenn., Mrs. June Martin, Mrs. Faye Adams, and Miss Marie Hatchell all of Darlington, a sister, Mrs.
Maude Jordan of Darlington; three brothers, Ruff Hatchell of Columbia, Roger Hatchell of Roanoke,
N.C., and Glen Hatchell of Timmonsville; 11 grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

SALLY LOUISE ALEXANDER
"Sally"
A daughter of Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie" and Ida Eula Jeffords "Ida"
Born: May 5, 1928 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: March 3, 1999 at age 70 in Florence, Florence County, South Carolina
Marriage: Harley A. Newsome
Born: November 18, 1928
Died: September 1, 1998 at age 69
Burial: Sally and Harley are buried at Magnolia Cemetery, Hartsville, Darlington County, South Carolina

Harley's parents were:
       Carl Wellington Newsome, Sr.
       Mattie King

  Although Sally spelled her name slightly different than her grandmother, Sallie Stewart Alexander,
she was likely named after her. In a census survey, Sally's name was spelled “Sallie”, but that could
have been the preference of the enumerator. Census takers often misspelled names. The name
Louise may have been borrowed from her aunt Maggie Louise Alexander "Maggie".

Obituary - Florence Morning News, March 10, 1999:

   Hartsville - Sally Louise Alexander Newsome, 70, died Tuesday evening in a Florence hospital after
an illness. Funeral Services will be 3 p.m. Thursday in the Lamar Chapel of Belk Funeral Home.
Interment will follow in Magnolia Cemetery Hartsville.
   Mrs. Newsome, wife of the late Harley A. Newsom, was born in Florence County the daughter of
the late Charlie Ingram (Engram is correct) and Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander. She was a member of
Wesley Chapel United Methodist Church and Ladies Bible Class of the church.
   Surviving are a sister, Leola A. Watford of Lamar; and several nieces and nephews.
   Mrs. Newsome was preceded in death by five brothers, Charles Ira Alexander, Woodrow Wilson
Alexander, James Ervin Alexander, Hamilton Earl Alexander, and Frank William Alexander.
   The family will receive friends from 7-9 p.m. today at the funeral home.

1930 - Sally's and her parents' family were living on her grandfather's land, "Lone Tree Farm" in
Timmonsville Township, Florence County, South Carolina during this survey. In the household were:

       Charlie E Alexander, age 60 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Ida Alexander, age 48 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
       Earl Alexander, age 20 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl")
       James I Alexander, age 19 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "James")
       Woodrow W Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
       Ira Alexander, age 9 ("Son") (Charles Ira Alexander "Ira")
       Leola Alexander, age 6 ("Daughter") (Margaret Leola Alexander "Leola")
       Sallie L Alexander, age 1 year 10 months ("Daughter") (Sally Louise Alexander "Sally")

SANDRA GAYLE POWERS
"Sandy"
A daughter of Frances Mildred Alexander "Mildred", and Edgar Powers "Edgar" and "Sonny"
Born: August 2, 1949 at home in Timmonsville, Florence County, South Carolina
Marriage: Gregory Haskell Joye "Greg"
Born: January 31, 1949 Pamplico, Florence County, South Carolina

Sandy and Greg's children:

       Heather Brooke Joye "Brooke" b. Palmetto Baptist Hospital, Columbia, Richland County, South
        Carolina m. William Edward Anthony "Will" b. April 25, 1979 Palmetto Richland Hospital,
        Columbia, South Carolina
       Brandon Kyle Joye "Kyle" b. February 3, 1986 Palmetto Baptist Hospital, Columbia, Richland
        County, South Carolina

SUSANNAH ALEXANDER
"Susan"
A daughter of John Alexander and Mary Woodham "Polly"
Born: December 28, 1809
Died: July 4, 1847
Susan is not a direct descendant in this line. She was patriarch John Alexander's daughter, and Rev.
John William Reese Alexander's sister.
Marriage: October 14, 1829 to John Wesley Stuckey
Born: April 23, 1810
Died: March 15, 1896 at age 85
Burial: Although buried separately, Susan and John Wesley Stuckey are buried near each other at
Bethlehem Cemetery, Bishopville, Lee County, South Carolina. Her gravestone is inscribed with
“Consort of J.W. Stuckey”. A consort is a husband or wife, a spouse, a companion, associate or
partner, a confidant.

  Susan died relatively young at age 38, widower John Wesley Stuckey lived a long life, and was
married two addition times in his 85 years. As a census enumerator, his name as "J.W. Stuckey"
appeared on numerous area United States Federal Census surveys during the 1800s as "Assistant
Marshall". Susan's name has been seen with the spelling of “Susanna” as well as "Susannah".

VIVIAN LOREN ALEXANDER
"Loren"
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. and Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: September 18, 1915 South Carolina
Died: January 7, 1954 at age 38 Florence, Florence County, South Carolina
Marriage: September 29, 1934 in Timmonsville, South Carolina to Eunice Lee
Born: October 1, 1914
Died: November 18, 1978
Burial: Loren and Eunice are buried at Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church, Timmonsville, Florence
County, South Carolina

Loren and Eunice’s children were:

       Evelyn Gayle Alexander b. January 15, 1938 Florence County, South Carolina d. March 5, 1938
        Florence County, South Carolina
       James David Alexander "David" b. August 6, 1939 Florence County, South Carolina d.
        September 28, 2008 Ridgeway, Fairfield County, South Carolina
       Lurie Allen Alexander b. August 16, 1935 Florence County, South Carolina d. February 5, 1936
        Florence County, South Carolina

Eunice Lee Alexander's parents were:

       James Madison Lee
       Estelle Thigpen

    The James Madison Lees reportedly, earlier on, lived in Sumter County, South Carolina.
    Loren's death was reportedly caused by being given an incorrect medication for an illness, and
dying from the reaction to it.
    At my last contact with David, in the middle 1990s, he was married and had a family.
    Loren, Eunice, Lurie Allen, and Evelyn Gayle are all buried at Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church,
Timmonsville, Florence County, South Carolina.
    Most official documents I've seen have Loren's first name as "Vivian", yet his grave marker says,
"Loren Vivian Alexander". Many times, people assume that if a person is called by a certain name that
it has to be the first name.

Obituary - Published in the Florence Morning News, Florence, Florence County, South Carolina on
January 9th:

                                         V. Loren Alexander
    TIMMONSVILLE, Jan. 8 - V. Loren Alexander, 38, died at Charleston Hospital early Thursday
following a lingering illness.
    Funeral services were held from Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church at 3 p.m. today with the Rev.
Oswald Smith officiating assisted by the Rev. M.B. Gunter, the Rev. Walter Jernigan and the Rev. M.R.
Galloway. Burial was in the church cemetery.
    Surviving are his wife, Eunice Lee Alexander; one son David Alexander of the home his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. J.K. Alexander Sr. of Effingham; two sisters, Mrs. Jake Ruther of Columbus, Ohio, and Mrs.
Edgar Powers of Timmonsville; seven brothers, Clifton, Lee, Kenneth, Willis and Joe Alexander Jr., all
of Timmonsville, Marvin and Belvin Alexander of Florence.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1920 - Loren and his parents' family were living on his grandfather's land, "Lone Tree Farm". The
household was surveyed on one of the two days that his area was enumerated, January 5th and 6th.

       Joseph K Alexander, age 35 ("Head") (Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe")
       Fannie L Alexander, age 33 ("Wife") (Frances Leitha Hancock Alexander "Fannie")
       Jessie Alexander, age 14 ("Son") (Jessie Clifton Alexander, Sr. "Clifton")
       Joseph Alexander, age 11 ("Son") (Joseph Lee Alexander "Lee")
       Kenneth Alexander, age 9 ("Son") (Kenneth Wilton Alexander "Kenneth")
       Ryan Alexander, age 6 ("Son") (Belvin Ryan Alexander "Belvin" and "Bill")
       Vivien L Alexander, age 4 ("Son") (Vivian Loren Alexander "Loren")
       Dewey Alexander, age 1 year 6 months ("Son") (Willard Terry Alexander, Sr. "Willard". His
        original middle name was "Dewey".)

1930 - Loren's family was living in Timmonsville Township, Florence County, South Carolina when the
survey was taken in the neighborhood on April 14th and 15th. In the household were:

       Joseph K Alexander, age 45 ("Head") (Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe")
       Fannie L Alexander, age 43 ("Wife") (Frances Leitha Hancock Alexander "Fannie")
       Joseph L Alexander, age 21 ("Son") (Joseph Lee Alexander "Lee")
       Wilton K Alexander, age 19 ("Son") (Wilton Kenneth Alexander "Kenneth")
       Vivian Alexander, age 16 ("Son") (Vivian Loren Alexander "Loren")
       Willard D Alexander, age 12 ("Son") (Willard Terry Alexander, Sr. "Willard". His original
        middle name was "Dewey".)
       Myrtie G Alexander, age 10 ("Daughter") (Myrtie Gladys Alexander "Gladys")
       Barney K Alexander, age 6 ("Son") (Barney Kirby Alexander "Barney" and "B.K.")
       Fannie M Alexander,age 3 years 5 months ("Daughter") (Frances Mildred Alexander "Mildred")
       Marvin E Alexander, ("Son") age 4 months ("Son") (Marvin Esker Alexander "Marvin")

VIVIAN SALLY ALEXANDER
"Vicky"
A daughter of Marvin Esker Alexander "Marvin" and Lynette Pigate
Born: December 29, 1953 Florence, Florence County, South Carolina
Died: January 25, 2011 Charleston, South Carolina area
Marriage: John Joseph Scrughan
Burial: January 28, 2011 at Holy Cross Cemetery, James Island, Charleston County, South Carolina

The Scrughans' children included:

       Cimberly Danielle Scrughan
       John Joseph Scrughan, II "John"

  By occupation, Vicky was a in-home Caregiver.
Obituary - Charleston Post and Courier newspaper Charleston, South Carolina, January 26, 2011:

    CHARLESTON - Entered into eternal rest on the morning of January 25, 2011, Vivian Sally
Alexander Scrughan, wife of John Joseph Scrughan. Residence, Charleston, SC. The relatives and
friends of Vickie Scrughan are invited to attend her funeral service Friday, January 28, 2011, at 1:00
p.m., in J. HENRY STUHR, INC., DOWNTOWN CHAPEL. Burial will be conducted later in Holy Cross
Cemetery. The family will receive friends Thursday in Stuhr's Downtown Chapel between 5:00 and
7:00 p.m. Mrs. Scrughan was born December 29, 1953, in Florence, SC, the daughter of Marvin E.
Alexander and Lynette Pigate Alexander Baker. She attended James Island Baptist Church. She was
an In Home Caregiver. She is survived by her husband of Charleston, SC; one daughter, Cimberly
Danielle Scrughan (Sam) of Charleston, SC; one son, John Joseph Scrughan, II (Wendi) of Charleston,
SC; two brothers, Ronald M. Alexander (Rhonda) and Larry H. Alexander (Shannon) both of
Charleston, SC; one sister, Judy Alexander Reid (Bob) of Santa Rosa, CA; and two grandchildren.

WANDA LEIGH ALEXANDER
"Wanda"
A daughter of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Jr. "Joe" and Josie Rebecca Timmons "Rebecca"
Born: October 8, 1957
Marriage: Ricky Vance Kelly

WAYNE TIMMONS ALEXANDER
"Wayne"
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Jr. "Joe" and Josie Rebecca Timmons "Rebecca"
Born: April 5, 1953

  Wayne, a Master Mason, is a 3-times elected "Past Master", a highly-honored position.

WILLARD TERRY ALEXANDER, JR.
"Terry"
A son of Willard Terry Alexander, Sr. "Willard" and Nobia Stricklen
Born: March 1, 1954 Florence County, South Carolina
Marriage: the former Margie Hayes (divorced)

Terry had three children with the former Margie Hayes:

       Williard Terry Alexander, III "Trey" b. February 10, 1980 m. Deanna Cannon
       Tara Michelle Alexander "Tara" b. March 4, 1983 m. Chris Steger
       Justin Hayes Alexander b. August 9, 1984 m. the former Lindsey Ward, the couple had a child,
        Layton Hayes Alexander on July 30, 2011

  Terry is a merchant who owns and runs an appliance retail store. Although not as active as he
once was in farming, he still runs the family farm.

WILLARD TERRY ALEXANDER, SR.
"Willard"
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe" and Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: April 29, 1918 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: March 9, 1996 at a Florence, Florence County, South Carolina hospital at age 77
Marriage: July 18, 1942 to the former Nobia Elizabeth Stricklen "Nobia" (pronounced "No-bee")
Born: October 27, 1921 in Florence County, South Carolina
Burial: Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church, Sparrow Swamp community, Timmonsville, Florence County,
South Carolina, as well as his and Nobia's three infants.

Willard and Nobia had six children, and three lived:
       Daphne Elizabeth Alexander "Daphne" b. May 6, 1946
       Gloria Diane Alexander "Diane" b. May 23, 1953
       Willard Terry Alexander, Jr. "Terry" b. March 1, 1954
       Infant son b. and d. September 9, 1943
       Infant daughter b. and d. March 25, 1945
       Infant son b. and d. April 27, 1949

Nobia's parents were:

       Emerson Stricklen
       Agnes Leroy Sansbury

   Willard's family were primarily tobacco farmers, and earlier on sold items from their farm at the
farmers market in Florence. They sold everything from pork to butter.
   Although they moved their church membership to Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church, the Alexanders
continued to attend Sardis Baptist until transferring back to Sparrow Swamp in October 1990. They
were previously members of Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church for many years, the church where Willard
became a member at age 12, was baptized by Rev. J.W. Truluck, and became a deacon in 1945. The
family then transferred their membership to Timmonsville’s Sardis Baptist Church when they moved
into the Sardis Community in 1952.
   A dedicated farmer, Willard was a sharecropper for 18 years previous to purchasing a farm in the
Glenwood Community near Timmonsville, which the family still operates.
   Willard was a Master Mason with Benton Lodge #226 of Timmonsville, and was a Woodmen of the
World member with Cedar Camp #245 of
Timmonsville.
   As a teenager, Willard served two separate terms in the Civilian Conservation Corps, known to most
as the “C.C.C” during the Depression era. The C.C.C., among other projects, developed Lee State Park
between Lamar and Bishopville, South Carolina. The first term was from October of 1936 to April of
1937, and the second term lasted from October of 1937 to October of 1939.
   At age 22, Willard joined the National Guard to receive training for one year, and then to be
discharged. Everything was going according to plan - in fact, he was home on leave just prior to his
discharge when World War II was declared. He was called into active duty until May of 1943 when he
was allowed to go home with an honorable medical discharge due to stomach ulcers.
   Willard's name at birth was Willard "Dewey" Alexander, but due to a clerical error made by a
secretary with the Civilian Conservation Corps, he was officially listed as Willard "Terry" Alexander.
I've been told that it worked out okay, because his name carried with him through the Army and the
rest of his life, in fact, he named his son "Terry".
   The Social Security Death Index lists Willard death date as March 10, 1996.

Tribute - The granchildren remember "Papa"...

“He always went to church.”
“He was a hard worker.”
“He loved his grandchildren, and would always greet us with outreached arms for a hug when we
arrived and left.”
“He joked with everyone.”
“He sang hymns as he worked, even making up words as he sang.”
“He enjoyed Christmas like a little kid.”
“He slept and snored.”
“He always told us to be 'particular'... and that means in everything.”
Spence remembers going with “Papa” to sell sweet potatoes.

Tribute - Daughter Daphne remembers...

   Growing up on a farm meant spending lots of time with Mom and Dad around the farm and helping
or watching as chores were done. We have vivid memories of my Dad assuring us that we could
accomplish a unique task if only we tried our very best. As a young inquisitive child, one night I asked
why chickens lay eggs and I couldn't. My Dad told me that if I would cackle like a chicken, I could
indeed lay an egg. Boy, was I excited as I anxiously watched Dad make a straw nest in a basket. I
perched myself upon the nest and began to cackle, frequently pausing to look for an egg.
   Finally Dad got up, straightened my nest and told me to cackle with all my strength. I did and
jumped up to find a beautiful egg in my nest. I was so proud. I thought my Dad was so wonderful to
encourage me to accomplish such a task. I laid so many eggs in my early years, but soon became
suspicious when I realized I could only lay eggs when my Dad assisted me.
   Dad has always been so friendly and never meets a stranger. When we would go places, he
always struck a conversation with someone. He was visiting with us in Texas and we were shopping
in a big department store. As Dad wandered around the store, he bumped into a mannequin. Being
a gentleman, he stopped, patted her arm, and apologized in his warm gentle way. Of course we were
watching, and to see Dad talking to a mannequin was too much. As we always said, “Dad can talk to
anyone!”

Tribute - One of Willard's friends, Rev. Stan Sullivan, wrote this poem which was read at Willard's
funeral, and it's inscribed on his grave marker. It's dated March 11, 1996.

This friend of mine, the other day,
Left from this earth and went away
To be with the One Whom he loved so.
I really hated to see him go.
He loved to farm and love the land,
And being led by His Master’s Hand,
Planted the seed that he would tend.
You know, he was a special friend.
He loved his wife and family.
And lived his life so you could see
His love for Christ, his Savior dear,
Who in his heart, was always near.
For many years he served his Lord,
Followed Him, and trusted His Word.
The prayers he prayed were from his heart
And went to God’s throne right from the start.
I lost a friend the other day,
But in my sorrow I hear him say,
Weep not for me, O kindly friend.
I am not lost, this is not the end.
My sister one, and brothers eight,
Welcomed me home through the Pearly gate.
Life for me has just begun.
I’m with my Lord having lots of fun.
“Weep for yourself, if you must cry,
But we’ll meet again in the by and by.
We’ll renew our friendship forevermore
When you arrive on Heaven’s shore.”
These words I heard, they eased my pain,
It may be my loss, but Heaven’s gain,
Brother Willard’s at ease, a broad smile on his face.
”Thank you, God, for Your Amazing Grace.”

Obituary - Florence Morning News, March 11, 1996:

  TIMMONSVILLE - Willard Terry Alexander, Sr., 77, died Sunday, March 10, 1996, in a Florence
hospital after a brief illness.
  He was born in Darlington County, a son of the late Joseph K. and Frances Hancock Alexander. He
was a U.S. Army veteran of World War II and was a retired farmer. He was an active member of
Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church and was a member of Woodmen of the World, Camp No. 245.
   Surviving are his wife, Nobia Stricklen Alexander, a son, W. Terry Alexander Jr. of Timmonsville;
two daughters, Mrs. Spencer (Daphne) Jones of Birmingham, Ala., and Mrs. Johnny (Diane) Lynch of
Timmonsville; a brother, Joe K. Alexander of Timmonsville; a sister, Mrs. Mildred A. Powers of
Timmonsville; and seven grandchildren, Spence and Melissa Jones, Wil and Wes Lynch, and Trey,
Tara and Justin Alexander.
   Funeral services will be at 4 p.m. today in Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church. Burial will be in the
church cemetery, directed by Layton-Anderson Funeral Home of Timmonsville.
   Memorials may be made to Sparrow Swamp Baptist Church, 3234 S. Hill Road, Timmonsville, South
Carolina 29161.

WILLIAM ALEXANDER
A son of Henry Lee Alexander "Henry" and "Harry", and Laura M. Raines
Born: About 1915
Burial: Reportedly, in the Greenville, South Carolina area

United States Federal Census Reference:

1920 - William appears in a census for the first time in this survey for Greenville Township, Greenville
County, South Carolina, taken on January 10th. In the household were:

       Henry L Alexander, age 48 ("Head") (Henry Lee Alexander)
       Laura Alexander, age 36 ("Wife") (Laura M Raines Alexander)
       Eugean Alexander, age 11 ("Son")
       Edna Alexander, age 7 ("Daughter")
       William Alexander, age 4 years 9 months ("Son") (William A Alexander)
       Carl Alexander, age 1 year 8 months ("Son") (Carl H Alexander)

1930 - William and the family were living in Greenville Township, Greenville County, South Carolina in
this survey, taken on April 14th. The household included:

       Henry L Alexander, age 57 ("Head") (Henry Lee Alexander)
       Laura M Alexander, age 47 ("Wife") (Laura M Raines Alexander)
       Willliam A Alexander, age 15 ("Son")
       Carl H Alexander, age 12 ("Son")
       Leland S Alexander, age 9 ("Son")
       James H Alexander, age 6 ("Son")

WILLIAM ELBERT ALEXANDER
"Elbert" (Infant)
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe" and Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: 1923 Florence County, South Carolina
Died: 1924 Florence County, South Carolina
Burial: Pine Grove United Methodist Church, Darlington County, South Carolina near Timmonsville

WILLIAM FRANK ALEXANDER, JR.
"William"
A son of William Frank Alexander, Sr. "Frank" and Grace Andrews

WILLIAM FRANK ALEXANDER, SR.
"Frank"
A son of Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie" and Frances Olivia Jernigan "Olivia"
Born: May 30, 1903
Died: September 18, 1990 at age 87
Marriage: Grace Andrews
Born: July 14, 1921
Died: September 17, 2004 at age 83
Burial: Frank and Grace are buried at Elim United Methodist Church, Oates community, Darlington
County, South Carolina

Their children include:

       William Frank Alexander, Jr. "William"
       Ann Alexander

   At the time of his death, Frank was the oldest living Alexander in our immediate “clan”, covering
Darlington and Florence counties in South Carolina. I had the privilege of meeting with him at an
Alexander-Ward reunion not long before he passed, and got some first-hand family information from
him. I remember several of the senior Alexanders in the gathering treating him as somewhat of a
celebrity.
   As I talked with Mr. Alexander, I asked him About his father’s middle name. Some have written it
as “Ingram”, but he stated emphatically, more than once, that Charlie's middle name was indeed
Engram with an “E”, not an “I”, and that it was not “Engle”, as some have thought. In addition, he
said his father's first name was Charles, not officially Charlie as some have said.

Obituary - Florence Morning News, Florence, Florence County, South Carolina, dated September 19,
1990:

   Hartsville - Services for William Frank Alexander Sr. will be 5:20 p.m. today in Elim Methodist
Church. Burial will be in the church cemetery, directed by Norton Funeral Home.
   Mr. Alexander, 87, died Tuesday, Sept. 18, 1990, in a Hartsville hospital after an illness.
   He was born in Florence County, a son of the Late Charles I. and Francis Olivia Jernigan
Alexander. He was a retired farmer and a member of Elim Baptist Church.
   Survivors include his wife, Grace Andrews Alexander of Hartsville; a daughter Ann Rhodes of
Hartsville; a son, William Alexander, Jr of Hartsville; two brothers, James Alexander of Hartsville and
Woodrow Alexander of Lamar; two sisters, Sally Newsom of Hartsville and Leola Watford of Lamar.
   Memorials may be made to the Elim Methodist Church, c/o Jimmy Freeman, Route 1, Lamar.”
Obituary - Florence Morning News, Florence, South Carolina:
   “Hartsville - Funeral Services for Grace Andrews Alexander, 83, widow of William Frank Alexander
Sr., will be 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept 19, 2004 from Elim Methodist Church. Burial will be in the church
cemetery directed by Norton Funeral Home. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral
home.
Mrs. Alexander was born in Darlington County the daughter of the late Clyde and Ollie Mae Thomas
Andrews. She was a member of Elim Methodist Church and the DeEtte Oates W.M.U. Group.
   Surviving are daughter and son-in-law, Ann and Andy Rhodes of Hartsville; son and daughter-in-
law, William and Mitzie Alexander of Hartsville; a grandson and his wife Drew and Amy Rhodes of
Savannah, Ga.; and three great-grandsons Jack, Alden, and Gavin of Savannah, Ga.
   She was predeceased by two brothers, Marvin and Francis Andrews, and two sisters, Cora Truett
Watford and Vera Parnell.
   Memorials may be made to the Elim Methodist Church, in care of Muryl J. Gardner, 3596 Oates
Highway, Lamar, S.C. 29069.

United State Federal Census Reference:

1920 - Frank's parents were living on "Lone Tree Farm", his grandfather's farm in the area then
known as Ebenezer Township, Florence County, now the name of an area considered farther east on
the edge of the City of Florence in Florence County, South Carolina. The survey was taken in their
area on both January 5th and 6th.

       Charlie Alexander, age 49 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Ida Alexander, age 38 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
       Frank Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (William Frank Alexander "Frank")
       Earl Alexander, age 10 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl")
       James Alexander, age 8 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "James")
       Woodrow Alexander, age 5 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
       Allen Alexander, age 1 and a half years ("Son") (Daniel Allen Alexander "Allen")

WILTON KENNETH ALEXANDER
"Kenneth"
A son of Joseph Kirkland Alexander, Sr. "Joe" and Frances Leitha Hancock "Fannie"
Born: November 22, 1910 Darlington County, South Carolina
Died: May 22, 1986 at home in the Effingham community, Florence County, South Carolina at age 75
Marriage: Beatrice Lloyd "Bea"
Born: September 19, 1913
Died: December 7, 1990 at age 77

Kenneth and Beatrice's children include:

       Albert Dewey Alexander "Dewey"
       Joyce Virginia Alexander "Virginia"
       Hoyt Allen Alexander "Hoyt"
       Carolyn Beatrice Alexander "Carolyn"
       Lois Patricia Alexander "Lois"
       Betty Evelyn Alexander "Evelyn"
       James Carl Alexander "Jimmy"

Bea's parents were:
     Rosier Lloyd
     Annie Mims

   Kenneth Alexander once worked for the Worker's Progress Administration, also known as the
W.P.A., a job-generating program of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's “New Deal” to help get
people working back in those hard times during the first half of the 20th century.
   During a phone conversation with Beatrice several years ago, she told me that her parents use to
spell their name “Loyd”, but that someone in the family changed the spelling to eliminate confusion
with another Loyd family on the same mail route. One of her daughters has disputed that.
   Virginia's late husband, Harry Lee Dennis "Harry" was a United States Army veteran of the Korean
conflict. Harry was a son of Horace Wendell Dennis and Maude McKnight.
   Beatrice married again after Kenneth’s death to Earl Ward b. Around April 28, 1913 d. December
17, 1989 Florence County, South Carolina. Earl died previous to Beatrice.

Tribute: Daughter Carolyn remembers...

   He was a very generous man with a heart so big, very few people could match it, and a sense of
humor that never failed to leave his family and friends laughing for hours.
   His role as a husband and father was commendable, and as a grandfather, his job was unlimited.
From the first grandchild to the last, their highlight of the week was the visit to granddaddy's house.
They began by visiting the ‘clay hole’, a place described by the children as a ‘great big hole in the
woods’.
   Another talent was his ability to capture his grandchildren, and all other children in the
neighborhood with his humorous stories he would tell as they all gathered under ‘the big oak tree’.
   In working, his first love was farming, although he was forced to do public work, he never lost his
love for growing things. After his retirement, his garden was his haven. Each year his ‘little small
garden’ grew to be a very big one. This is where he spent his last day, his last moment. He died in
his garden May 22, 1986.
Obituary - Columbia, South Carolina newspaper The State, May 24, 1986.

   W. Kenneth Alexander, 75, died Thursday.
   Born in Darlington County, he was a son of the late Joe K. and Fannie Hancock Alexander.
   He was a retired employee of La-Z-Boy East of Florence and a member of Elim Baptist Church.
   Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Beatrice Lloyd Alexander; Dewey Alexander of Effingham, Hoyt
Alexander of Charleston, and Jimmy Alexander of Florence; daughters, Mrs. Virginia Dennis and Mrs.
Evelyn McCutcheon of Effingham, Mrs. Carolyn Welch of Florence, and Mrs. Lois DeWitt of Pamplico;
brothers, Lee, Willard, and Joe Alexander of Timmonsville, and Belvin Alexander of Florence; a sister,
Mrs. Mildred Powers of Timmonsville; and grandchildren.
   Services will be held at 4 p.m. today at Elim Baptist Church.
   Memorials may be made to Elim Baptist Church.
   Layton-Perry Funeral Home of Timmonsville is in charge.

Obituary: Kenneth Alexander, Florence Morning News, May 1986.

   Effingham - Funeral services for Kenneth Alexander will be at 4 p.m. Saturday in Elim Baptist
Church. Burial will be in the church cemetery, directed by Layton-Perry Funeral Home.
   Mr. Alexander died Thursday.
   He was born in Darlington County, a son of the late Joe K. and Fannie Hancock Alexander. He was
retired from La-Z-Boy East and a member of Elim Baptist Church.
   Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Beatrice Lloyd Alexander of the home; three sons, Dewey Alexander of
Effingham, Hoyt Alexander of Charleston, and Jimmy Alexander of Florence; four daughters, Mrs.
Harry (Virginia) Dennis of Effingham, Mrs. Joe (Evelyn) McCutcheon of Florence, and Mrs. Jennings
(Carolyn) DeWitt of Pamplico; four brothers, Lee Alexander, Willard Alexander, and Joe Alexander of
Timmonsville, and Belvin Alexander of Florence; a sister, Mrs. Edgar (Mildred) Powers of
Timmonsville; and 13 grandchildren.
   Memorials may be made to the church building fund.

Obituary – Beatrice Lloyd Alexander Ward, Florence Morning News, December 8, 1990:

     “Timmonsville - Services for Beatrice Lloyd Alexander Ward will be 2:00 pm Sunday in Elim Baptist
Church in Effingham. Burial will follow in the church cemetery, directed by Layton-Perry Funeral
Home.
    Mrs. Ward, 77, died Friday, December 7, 1990, in a Florence hospital after an illness.
    She was born in Florence County, a daughter of the late Rosier and Annie Mims Lloyd. She was
first married to the late Kenneth Alexander and later to the late Earl H. Ward. She was a member of
Elim Baptist Church. She retired from Florence Manufacturing Company.
Survivors include three sons, Dewey Alexander of Effingham, Hoyt Alexander of Charleston and Jimmy
Alexander of Florence; three step-sons Arnold Ward, Billy Ward, and Don Ward, all of Timmonsville;
four daughters, Virginia Dennis and Evelyn McCutcheon, both of Effingham, Carolyn Welch of Florence
and Lois Dewitt of Pamplico; a step-daughter Shirley W. Holliday of Florence; a brother, Thomas E.
Lloyd of Florence; two sisters, Grace Taylor and Mildred Bell, both of Florence; 13 grandchildren; and
three great grandchildren.
    The family will receive friends from 7-9 pm today in the funeral home and at other times in the
home of Harry Dennis of Effingham.

WOODROW WILSON ALEXANDER
"Woodrow"
A son of Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie" and Ida Eula Jeffords "Eula"
Born: September 1, 1914
Died: September 25, 1990 at age 76
Marriage: Dorothy W. (nee?)
Born: November 14, 1931
Burial: Pine Grove United Methodist Church, near his parents, in Darlington County, South Carolina
near Timmonsville.

Woodrow suffered through a long bout with Diabetes, and consequential blindness.

United States Federal Census Reference:

1920 - Woodrow's parents were living on "Lone Tree Farm" in the area then known as Ebenezer
Township, Florence County, now the name of an area considered farther east on the edge of the City
of Florence in Florence County, South Carolina. The survey was taken in their area on both January
5th and 6th.

       Charlie Alexander, age 49 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Ida Alexander, age 38 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
       Frank Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (William Frank Alexander "Frank")
       Earl Alexander, age 10 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl")
       James Alexander, age 8 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "James")
       Woodrow Alexander, age 5 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
       Allen Alexander, age 1 and a half years ("Son") (Daniel Allen Alexander "Allen")

1930 - Woodrow's parents were still living on "Lone Tree Farm" in Timmonsville Township, Florence
County, South Carolina during this survey. In his household were:

       Charlie E Alexander, age 60 ("Head") (Charles Engram Alexander "Charlie")
       Ida Alexander, age 48 ("Wife") (Ida Eula Jeffords Alexander "Ida")
       Earl Alexander, age 20 ("Son") (Hamilton Earl Alexander "Earl")
       James I Alexander, age 19 ("Son") (James Ervin Alexander "James")
       Woodrow W Alexander, age 15 ("Son") (Woodrow Wilson Alexander "Woodrow")
       Ira Alexander, age 9 ("Son") (Charles Ira Alexander "Ira")
       Leola Alexander, age 6 ("Daughter") (Margaret Leola Alexander "Leola")
       Sallie L Alexander, age 1 year 10 months ("Daughter") (Sally Louise Alexander)

				
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