WITH REGARD TO INSURANCE

Document Sample
WITH REGARD TO INSURANCE Powered By Docstoc
					INSURANCE CHECK‐UP 
Every one knows that regular visit to your medical professional can identify and prevent a minor 
health problem from developing into a major illness. 

As members of an industry homeowners association, do we regularly schedule an examination of 
our insurance coverage and risk management in order to prevent a minor issue from becoming a 
very expensive major problem? 

Individual owners as part of a larger condominium and homeowners' association can become 
liable for a collective debt via special assessments if association fails to have the proper type and 
amount of coverage when something unexpected happens.  

Is it time for a check‐up? 

What coverage is necessary?  What coverage is available? 
Insurance coverage is one of the best investments a homeowners’ association can make.  HOAs 
need to insure: A) the common property owned by the association and B) the actual association 
itself against libility; and should strongly consider insuring:  C) the association’s leadership,  and 
D) against the crime/theft and other types of insurance listed here as well. 

(A) Property Insurance on the Residence Units and Common Areas at 100% of its replacement 
value (including contents and Electronic Data Processing equipment) against loss or damage by 
fire and lightning and all other risks covered by the usual standard endorsement for "All Risks". 

Special option considerations:  

          Flood & Earthquake coverage  

          Building Ordinance and Demolition coverage 

          Sprinkler Leakage coverage 

         Business Interruption & Extra Expense coverage (to include Alternate 
       Accommodations and Extended Period of Indemnity) 

          Contingent Business Interruption coverage  

Obviously an association should always insure the property it owns.  Personal property insurance 
protects the property from vandalism, theft and damage from storms, fires and natural disasters.   

Liability insurance protects the association for any acts of “negligence” it may inadvertently 
commit.  If the association is found negligent because of an action it took (or didn’t take) they can 
be liable for damages.  A good liability policy will not only cover the damages if negligence is 
proven; but it will also cover the costs of the association’s legal defense.  It is not uncommon for 
the governing documents of associations developed in the last decade to require a liability policy 
of $1 Million per occurrence.   

(B)  Commercial  General  Liability  Insurance  protecting  Association  and  Management  Firm, 
(including  Liquor  Law  Liability  and  Product  Liability)  against  claims  for  Personal  injury, 
Advertising injury, Employee Benefits Liability, and Property Damage occurring on, in, or about 
the premises with a total limits on not less than One Million Dollars ($1,000,000) per occurrence, 
Two  Million  Dollars  ($2,000,000)  aggregate  per  location,  with  deductibles  as  agreed  by  the 
Board.  Furthermore,  it  must  provide  medical  payments  coverage  of  at  least  $5,000  per  person 
with no aggregate and no deductible, unless agreed otherwise by the Board. 

Special option considerations:  

          Garage Insurance coverage  

          Guest's and Owner's Property coverage  

For industry HOAs that maintain insurance, typically property and liability are the two most 
common forms of coverage they carry.   

But what about other risks?  Given the propensity for litigation in this county, no homeowners’ 
association is immune to the possibility of  a lawsuit.  And what is the association’s risk for theft 
or embezzlement?  One only has to search to Internet to find numerous tales of HOAs which have 
become victims of a failure to property manage risk with insurance coverage.  There are many 
apparent reasons homeowners’ associations should consider a more comprehensive insurance 
package.  

C) Directors & Officers (“D&O”) Liability insurance with limits of at least One Million Dollars 
($1,000,000)  per  occurrence  and  in  the  aggregate,  covering  the  actions  and  decisions  of  the 
Board, Officers, and which should include entity coverage for the Association. 

Directors and Officers Liability Insurance is a must have for self‐managed boards and is often 
recommended by professional managers and property management firms as well.   HOA bylaws 
commonly include an indemnity clause stating that the board of trustees or association officers 
shall be held harmless for most types of legal liability.  In other words, if the courts find that an 
HOA board acting on behalf of the association has erred and broken the law, the association has 
agreed (through the presence of the  indemnity clause) to hold the board harmless.  Meaning the 
association is responsible for the legal defense fees of behalf of the board members and they are 
not personally liable. 

A typical D&O policy covers errors made by board or committee members while acting on behalf 
of the association.  It will not protect willful acts of dishonesty, slander, defamation of 
character.  However, it will cover board members and officers when they step outside legal 
bounds accidentally and without malice. 

(D)  Fidelity  Bond  or  bonds,  and/or  Crime  Insurance,  for  all  officers  and  employees  of  the 
Association and Management Firm having control over the receipt and disbursement of funds, in 
such limit sums as shall be determined by the Association in accordance with its By‐Laws. 
(E)  Errors  and  Omissions  insurance  coverage  for  the  Association  and  Management  Firm,  if 
available, for a limit on not less than $1,000,000 per occurrence, covering the management of the 
Association. 

Fidelity Insurance protects the association from theft committed by an employee, contractor, and 
even association volunteers.  If you decide to carry fidelity insurance, remember to confirm with 
your insurer to verify your policy extends to theft committed by non‐paid, volunteers of our 
association. 

(F) Workers' Compensation and Employer's Liability insurance as required under applicable 
laws. Policy limits of at least $500,000 for Employers Liability per Accident, $500,000 for Disease 
per Employee, as well as in the aggregate. 

(G)  Automobile  Liability  insurance  covering  owned,  hired,  and/or  non‐owned  vehicles,  with 
separate coverage in an amount no less than One Million Dollars ($1,000,000) combined single 
limit. 

(H) Employment Practices Liability insurance of at least One Million Dollars ($1,000,000) and 
coverage that extends to third parties, as well as all employees, with a deductible of no more than 
$25,000. 

(I)  Umbrella  Policy  of  at  least  Five  Million  Dollars  ($5,000,000)  that  will  be  in  excess  of  all 
primary casualty insurance policies; to be an umbrella and not a straight excess policy. 

(J) Other Insurance considerations:  

          Builders Risk (during construction or renovation of Association property)  

Final thought 
These highlights have very obviously only touched the tip of the iceberg with regard to Insurance 
pertaining  to  Owner  Association,  Directors  and  Management.  The  key  for  Associations  and 
Management  is  to  establish  a  mutually  beneficial  relationship  with  an  insurance  firm  and/or 
agent  which  can  guide  them  through  the  minefield  of  final  determination  of  the  coverage 
necessary for the individual property in question.

At the endof the day, it is the association’s duty to protect the association and its members from 
theft, liability, accidents and catastrophies. A comparhensive insurance plan will help provide 
peace of mind.  There are insurance agents who specialize in insurance for homeowners’ 
associations.  These agents can work with you to build a package that meets the needs of your 
unique community.     Please visit the ARDA Resort Buyers Marketplace at www.arda.org for 
contacts to insurance companies and agents who have experience in our industry. 

 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:6
posted:12/16/2011
language:
pages:3