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					      Axiom Press
Marketing Research Project



        April 2002



       Produced by


   JNS2 (J.N.S. Squared)
       Joseph Pacini
      Nancy Canales
        Sakura Kato
    Stephanie Throssel
       JNS2 Marketing Research Group Brigham Young University Provo Utah


April 1, 2002

Kristine Widtfeldt
Executive Vice President
Axiom Press
333 South 520 West
Lindon, Utah

Dear Ms. Widtfeldt:

JNS2 has the pleasure of presenting Axiom Press with the results of their completed
survey.

As stated in the proposal, the main purpose of this study was to help Axiom Press better
understand its primary market as well as the current needs of this market and how Axiom
Press can fulfill these needs. This project summarizes the research findings and provides
recommendations as to how Axiom Press can accomplish its objectives.

JNS2 is hopeful that this study will contribute to the success of Axiom Press and its goal
of bringing cultural understanding to others. Thank you for allowing us to serve your
marketing research needs.

Sincerely,

JNS2

_______________________
Nancy Canales

_______________________
Sakura Kato

_______________________
Joseph Pacini

_______________________
Stephanie Throssel
JNS2 Acknowledgments

JNS2 gratefully acknowledges and expresses appreciation to the following parties for
their assistance in completing this research study.

      Kristine Widtfeldt – Axiom Press General Manager and Executive Vice President
      Dr. Michael Geurts – Marketing Research Professor at Brigham Young
       University
      Cheree Marcov – Axiom Press Web Master
      Jennia Parkin – Marketing Consultant
      Focus Group Participants
      Survey Respondents
JNS2 Marketing Research Group




            Executive Summary
JNS2 Executive Summary
Introduction

JNS2 contacted Kristine Widtfeldt, Executive Vice President and General Manager of
Axiom Press. These parties agreed on the scope and details of the project that would be
completed.

Objectives

      Discover perceptions of Axiom Press, and their main product line CultureGrams,
       held by current customers
      Find out demographic information of current customers
      Discover current purchasing habits of current customers
      Expose major obstacles current customers feel in purchasing more often
      Discover critical pricing points for current flagship product, CultureGrams World
       Edition
      Better understand the curriculum used with Axiom Press’ products
      Assist Axiom Press in research concerning a new product for the business market

Methodology

JNS2 used exploratory, secondary, and primary research to gather the necessary
marketing research information for this project.

Exploratory data was gathered from the following sources:
    Focus Group help March 21, 2002 at Axiom Press Headquarters in Lindon, Utah

Secondary research was gathered from the following sources:
    Internet websites of current Axiom Press competitors

Primary data was gathered from the following sources:
    1,022 emailed questionnaires to current Axiom Press clients

Research Findings

Exploratory Research

During our the Focus Group prepared by JNS2, we found out a few major items:

      Cultural information is extremely important to international business individuals
      Most individuals go to the library or ask someone who has been to a foreign
       country before traveling to that country
      Individuals that participated in our focus group stated that CultureGrams are
       contain valuable information, yet they would not purchase them because of lack
       of perceived value
      Individuals in the focus group stated that a CD-ROM or online version of a
       CultureGram would have a higher perceived value
      Individuals in the focus group recommended that Axiom Press focus on
       workshops and educational training videos or CD-ROMs instead of creating a
       printed version of their product

Secondary Research

JNS2 found that although the majority of direct competitors also had information on
individual countries, none focused specifically on culture, as did Axiom Press’ products.
We did find that the majority of competitor products were priced above the current price
for CultureGrams, and they were generally sold on an individual basis.

Primary Research

During our research, JNS2 found out some interesting information. First of all, the
majority of Axiom Press customers that responded to our survey are librarians, above the
age of 50 that have been teaching in the school system for over 20 years. JNS2 also
found that a majority of customers purchased Axiom Press products each three to five
years.

Other information that was gathered includes:

      The overwhelming majority of those surveyed, over 80 percent of respondents,
       have an extremely positive viewpoint of CultureGrams
      Over 80 percent of all respondents felt that CultureGrams were extremely useful
       in the classroom
      60 percent of those surveyed felt that CultureGrams World were inexpensively
       priced
      30 percent of those surveyed felt that CultureGrams World Edition were
       adequately priced
      10 percent of those surveyed felt that CultureGrams World Edition were
       overpriced
      There was a strong correlation between age and price; specifically, the older the
       respondents to our survey the more overpriced they felt CultureGrams were
       priced, and the younger the respondents the more inexpensive they felt
       CultureGrams were priced
      Teachers use Axiom Press products for a variety of reasons in their curriculum

Recommendations

Due to the information received in the survey, we suggest the following:

      Because the majority of respondents to our survey were older individuals, older
       than 50 years of age, we suggest that Axiom Press focus on marketing to younger
       teachers and future teachers that are currently in college.
   JNS2 recommends that Axiom Press send discount coupons to older teachers who
    may think that CultureGrams are overpriced
   Because the majority of Axiom Press’ customers do not purchase on a yearly
    basis, JNS2 recommends that Axiom Press figure out what purchasing cycle their
    customers are on and only market to individuals during their purchasing year
   Because the majority of those surveyed feel that the price for CultureGrams is
    either inexpensive or adequate, we recommend increasing the price of your
    product between 15 to 20 percent
   Because there was such a variety of uses for Axiom Press products, JNS2
    recommends that Axiom Press focus on building customer awareness of the
    variety of uses for Axiom Press products
   JNS2 feels that Axiom Press should enter the business market, and in doing so
    should create a multimedia CD-ROM to add perceived value to the cultural
    information that they will present
JNS2 Marketing Research Group




             Table of Contents
JNS2 Table of Contents
Letter of Completion............................................................................................... i

Acknowledgments ..................................................................................................ii

Executive Summary ............................................................................................. iii

Introduction ............................................................................................................ 1

Research Objectives ............................................................................................... 2

Methodology ........................................................................................................... 3

Findings................................................................................................................... 6

Purchase Decisions ............................................................................................... 18

Limitations ............................................................................................................ 19

Recommendations ................................................................................................ 21

Proposal ............................................................................................... Appendix A

Focus Group Comments ..................................................................... Appendix B

Survey................................................................................................... Appendix C

Survey Question Responses................................................................ Appendix D

Survey Data ......................................................................................... Appendix E

Frequencies and Regression ................................................................ Appendix F

Cross Tabulations ............................................................................... Appendix G
JNS2 Marketing Research Group




                Introduction
JNS2 Introduction
The information that was researched, gathered, and analyzed in this report is designed for
the purpose of providing Axiom Press with necessary information about its current target
audience in order to better understand and fulfill the needs of this market. This report
illustrates the main demographics of Axiom Press’ target audience, including age, grade
that is taught, and average purchasing habits. This report also states what type of
curriculum Axiom Press’ main product, CultureGrams, is used for in the classroom.

JNS2, in working with Kristine Widtfeldt, produced the following report to help
determine what steps may be taken in the future to increase Axiom Press awareness
among their clientele as well as to better understand the needs of their market.
JNS2 Marketing Research Group




            Research Objectives
JNS2 Research Objectives
The following objectives outline JNS2’s purpose in this research process:
    Discover perceptions of Axiom Press, and their main product line CultureGrams,
       held by current customers
    Find out demographic information of current customers
    Discover current purchasing habits of current customers
    Expose major obstacles current customers feel in purchasing Axiom Press
       products
    Discover critical pricing points for current flagship product, CultureGrams World
       Edition
    Better understand in what curriculum Axiom Press’ products are used in the
       classroom
    Assist Axiom Press in research concerning a new product for the business market
JNS2 Marketing Research Group




               Methodology
JNS2 Methodology
JNS2 used multiple techniques to achieve the research objectives. Exploratory,
secondary, and primary research was used to gather the necessary information to
complete the survey.

Exploratory Research – Focus Group

A focus group was conducted to obtain perceptions of international businessmen and
businesswomen concerning the need for cultural reports on different countries. The focus
groups contained international businesspeople of differing levels of experience in the
business world, although all had extensive experience in international travel. JNS2 used
the information gained from these studies to inform Axiom Press of the possible market
for cultural reports for the business market.

The focus group was held at Axiom Press headquarters in Lindon, Utah. The focus group
lasted approximately one hour and a half. To show appreciation to these participants,
JNS2 served cookies, chips, a vegetable platter, as well as bottled water during the
meeting. After the focus group had concluded, each participant was given a $20 gift
certificate to the University Mall of Orem.

The members of the focus group included the following:

      Mike Baiamante – Buyer for NuSkin International, with a specific responsibility
       for the region of Japan
      Spencer Throssel – Former employee at the U.S. Embassy of Rome, Italy
      Bill Anderson – Former Managing Director of the Purchasing Department for the
       Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
      Sakura Kato – Employee of Japan Travel Bureau, of Japan

Each of the members of this focus group had traveled extensively, with Mr. Anderson
being the most experienced in international business, followed by Mr. Baiamante, and
then Mr. Throssel and Ms. Kato. Each of the members of this focus group was a personal
acquaintance of at least one member of JNS2, yet all were unfamiliar with CultureGrams
or other Axiom Press products.

The moderators of this focus group were Nancy Canales, Stephanie Throssel, and Joseph
Pacini. The group met at Axiom Press headquarters at 5:30pm on Thursday March 21,
2002. After beginning with a discussion on international business and whether or not it
would increase or decrease over the next few years, the focus group was shown a
CultureGrams World Edition and asked to tell the moderators whether or not they felt
that something of this nature would be important to international businesspeople in
general.

They all expressed the opinion that they thought that CultureGrams contained great
information, yet they felt that packaging and presentation could be changed in order to
increase the perceived value of this product to a business market. They also suggested
that it might be more valuable to focus on training CD-ROMs instead of a printed
version. For detailed information concerning the focus group, please see the section
entitled JNS2 Exploratory Research Findings as well as Appendix B

Secondary Research – Competitive Analysis

The secondary research compiled by JNS2 focused on competitive analysis of companies
in direct competition with Axiom Press. Much of this information was obtained through
Axiom Press as part of their company research. Of the main competitors, JNS2 focused
on five main competitors and analyzed them according to the following sections:

      Company
      Product
      Product Description
      Product Target Market
      Product Price

For a more complete explanation of these findings, please look to the section entitled
JNS2 Secondary Research Findings.

Primary Research – Online Survey

Sample Size

To determine our sample size, we relied on the desires of our client, Axiom Press.
Axiom Press requested a sample size of 100 with an acceptable error of 2 (.05
significance level). We sent out 1022 email surveys, and we achieved a near 20%
response rate, giving us 176 surveys.

Since our sample size is over 30, we used Z-testing as a more reliable measurement for
sample size. The following is an example of Z-testing:

Null Hypothesis: The proportion of teachers in the 50 to 59 range reporting the price of
CultureGrams to be 5 or higher (ranked from a scale where 1 is very inexpensive and 9 is
very expensive) is the same or less than the proportion of teachers in the 20 to 29 range
reporting 5 or greater.

In other words, do older (50 to 59) teachers feel CultureGrams are priced more
expensively than do younger (20 to 29) teachers?

Alternative Hypothesis: The proportion of teachers in the 50 to 59 range reporting the
price of CultureGrams to be 5 or higher is greater than the proportion of teachers in the
20 to 29 range reporting 5 or greater.

Once completing the calculations we get a calculated Z-value of 2.32
We analyze this against the critical Z-value, which is 1.97 with a sampling error of .025,
and find that because our calculated Z-value is higher, we reject the null hypothesis. This
means that we conclude with 97.5% confidence that the proportion of teachers aged 50 to
59 who rank CultureGrams pricing to be 5 or higher is greater than the proportion of
teachers 20 to 29 who rank pricing 5 or higher.

This means that teachers in the age group 50 to 59 feel that CultureGrams are priced
more expensively than do their younger (20 to 29 year old teachers) contemporaries do.

Data Method

JNS2 collected primary research in the following way:
    An email was sent to 1,022 current customers of Axiom Press
    Of those sent surveys, 247 were returned as unusable email addresses, and 176
       complete surveys were submitted
    Each surveyee was permitted access to a CultureGrams database through March
       31, 2002 in response to the survey

For a more complete analysis of these findings, please turn to the section entitled JNS2
Primary Research Findings
JNS2 Marketing Research Group




                 Findings
JNS2 Exploratory Research Findings
Our focus group was conducted in March of 2002 in the Axiom Press conference room in
Lindon, Utah. All the participants of the focus group had some kind of international
business background. The following four people participated in the focus group:

          Bill Anderson—Retired CEO
          Mike Baiamonte—Nuskin
          Sakura Kato—Japan Travel Bureau, Tokyo, Japan
          Spencer Throssel—US Embassy

Each participant was given a $20 gift certificate at University Mall for participating.

The purpose of the focus group was to learn more about the general attitudes towards
international business and how culture affects international business.

Joseph Pacini and Stephanie Throssel moderated the focus group. They each asked a
series of questions to the focus group and waited for their responses. The following
information represents the questions asked and the most pertinent responses to them.

Do you feel that international business will increase or decrease within the next few
years?

      Especially with multimedia and the Internet, the world will open up with
       international relations
      Increase

What do you feel is the most important aspect of International Business?

      How well you can communicate with different cultures
      Culture

What are your feelings on cultural understanding in international business?

      I think there is a lot to be learned. In my organization, we have to support our
       different affiliate companies globally.
      We need to understand the culture if we are to be successful in those international
       boundaries.
      It is especially now that we need to appreciate and recognize those differences for
       they can be especially significant
      If you learn the differences of other cultures than you will know how to best deal
       with the people.

How do you learn about the countries that you are going to?

      Go to the library
      Talk with someone from that culture, and then speak with someone not of that
       culture but has done business in that area
      You do a lot of reading you ask a lot of questions, and understand their history to
       understand the basic fundamental beliefs
      My experience with texts are that they are put together in a limited format for
       someone going into a two-week vacation

Have you ever used or bought a product to help you learn of a culture?

      Just in the MTC

Have you ever bought something to do research about a country?

      I’ve gone to a library and checked out materials.
      I would take in a dictionary in my briefcase

Have you ever seen this product? (Shown CultureGrams) They are very short
pieces of information about the culture of different countries.

      Were fun to read but they were too brief to even start to explain the countries
       where you are going.

How applicable would something like this be to a businessperson going overseas?
Do you think that this is something that they would use?

      You would be scratching the surface of your region
      You would need to know much more before you were to do a major business deal
      Something like a video, where you are visually seeing something about a country,
       which would be more fun would be very helpful.
      A starting point and not as an exhaustive list, and as long as it was current, then I
       think it would be good.

As a follow up, would something about this long, maybe a bit longer, but you had it
in a multimedia on the computer, where possibly someone explaining online the best
way to do business in a foreign country, do you think that would be better or would
you rather use something like these printed reports? What do you think a
businessperson would be most interested in?

      I think that the CD would be a very effective way because you could have the
       text, but also the multimedia part of it
      I don’t see selling these as a tremendous amount of money in it.
      Keep in mind these things, for example tipping, dress, language, etc.

How much would you pay for this one country?

      Maximum, a couple bucks.
      If it was presented in a CD-ROM, in a jewel case, and you have color pictures, I
       think you could have a higher price tag because the perceived value is much
       higher

What would be the maximum you would be willing to pay for all 177 countries?

      $177.00 or maybe $19.95 for a group of them.
      I would say way below the $500 mark.
      I don’t think I would buy the whole thing; I would just purchase the one I need.

Would you think it would be best to have 200 countries where we discuss the basics
of all the countries, or do you think it is better to focus on a few countries, like
China and Japan, and then be more precise and specific and in depth in those
countries? Maybe on a CD-ROM?

      Common countries, like Asia, Europe, South America…I mean I know that all
       these countries have their own cultural differences, I think that might be more
       effective than maybe one at a time, or the most popular countries.
      The data gathering shouldn’t be pages and pages like this, it should be basic: what
       do they eat?, what is their currency?, what would be impolite in that country?,
       what do you think would be the best thing to wear?

How long do you think something like this should be?

      A CD-ROM you could possibly play on an airplane and see the spots you want, or
       even read the entire thing

On the CD-ROM would you have it print, or multimedia? Which would you
prefer?

      If I had a CD-ROM it would have different categories and it would drill into those
       categories, with possibly a presentation on that subject matter
      I could see the value of having an update every six months that people would
       purchase
      As far as the Internet, they have a story, the text, the graphs, and the interactivity.
       I think that type of presentation to me would be very attractive.
      Something for a PDA, a laptop, CD-ROM, and you’ll be able to get larger market
       share by giving that information on a palm pilot and other mediums.

Would it be best to develop very few countries but have deep information, or
develop many countries with less information?

      I would suggest that you do a lot, because you aren’t going to learn a ton by one
       of these
      There is a great market, I believe, in training and offering a very good training
       program where you go to their headquarters and spend a day discussing about
       those countries.
      Don’t expect to get rich

Which do you think would be better, have something general concerning
international business, or focus specifically on the countries?

      Generalities are really only in foods, dress, and coins. The details are what is
       really important

How much would someone be willing to pay for a seminar versus a print copy or
CD-ROM version for business executives?

      Your cheapest would be the print form, your medium would be the CD-ROM, and
       the most expensive would be a seminar
      Individual business people would want to see the immediate benefits of
       something
      You could have all sorts of pricing on these items

If you were to purchase a CD with print, that had an opportunity to network, like
an online chat room, would you find that beneficial?
   
       I think it is a good idea.
      I cannot see Blake Roney (CEO NuSkin), saying, ―I want all of my people to have
       a full set of these.‖ But I think you could speak to him by saying ―We have five
       countries, and we can give you really up to date in depth for these.‖ I think he
       would much more listen to that.
   
JNS2 Secondary Research Findings
In order to better understand the market for Axiom Press’ products, JNS2 compiled
information by some of Axiom Press’ direct competitors. In doing this, JNS2 was better
able to understand the marketplace for cultural reports by analyzing the target audience of
direct competitors. The following is brief list of direct competitors, as well as a
description of their products, the key markets they focus, as well as their pricing.

Company 1: Across Frontiers

Product: Country Focus

      Description – All 191 UN recognized countries; approx. 38,000 characters with
       spaces/5,750 words; delivered via Internet, Intranet and Extranet (Web based
       technologies), In-flight entertainment technologies, customized technology
       formats (they do print, but they prefer electronic delivery), as well as subscription
       services and site licenses.
      Key Market – First-time business travelers to a country or countries (focus on the
       in-country aspect)
      Pricing – Online subscription service for all countries: $99

Product: Global Business Navigator

      Description – In-depth, high technology interactive learning tool for 12 countries
       (Brazil, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan, Mexico, Singapore, South
       Africa, Switzerland, UK, and the USA); use in-country videos, narration,
       simulations, role-plays, and narration to provide in-depth knowledge on doing
       business in a certain country, explaining in detail culture, business practices, and
       protocol. Approximately 10 more countries are in development.
      Key Market – Businesspeople who are traveling abroad to make deals, negotiate,
       and conduct business (with other companies it seems). The distinction between
       the products are as follows: Country Focus is for the business traveler (someone
       who is going for the first time and is not a decision maker or is working within the
       same company just in a different country); Global Business Navigator is for the
       decision maker and one doing business abroad, and Country Series is for the one
       who will be living abroad.
      Pricing – $399.00 for CD-ROM

Product: Global Country Series

      Description – 12 countries with approximately 10 more in development.
      Key Market – U.S. businesspeople relocating abroad.
      Pricing – $750.00
Company 2: Country Watch

Product: Country Reviews

      Description – 191 countries, 50-100 page report. Categories include:
       demographics, history, politics, economics, business and environmental
       background. Doesn’t seem to include very much culture. The Political section
       includes people and history, but it doesn’t make any specific mention of culture.
       Bi-annually reviewed but are updated as needed for major changes. Available in
       bound volume or individual reports, CD-ROM, or subscription service. Discounts
       for volume purchases, co-branding Intranet subscriptions available, Internet and
       Intranet.
      Key Market – Businesspeople who want to understand the business, political, and
       economic sector happenings in a country. Not to travel there but to make
       preliminary decisions about moving or doing business abroad.
      Pricing – Different pricing structures for individual users, academics, businesses.

Product: Country Watch Business Services

      Description – Includes Country Partners (includes International Partner Links,
       Regional Partners, Country Partners, International Trade and Investment,
       Business Magazines, International News, Company and Country Reference links
       on web), Country Regulations (they just link with the U.S. State Department
       produced Country Commercial Guides), and access to Country Experts
       (international consulting service offering information search and in country
       consulting assistance paid at a per hour or per engagement basis).
      Key Market – Businesses doing business abroad. Not individuals who will be
       traveling, doing business, or living abroad, however. Statistical information and a
       network of links and resources.
      Pricing – Different pricing structures for individual users, academics, businesses,
       and is only included for a Premium Subscription.

Company 3: Global Road Warrior, World Trade Press

Product: Country Handbook for the International Business Traveler

      Description – 158 countries; 670 pages (print) and 1200+ pages (CD-ROM);
       categories include: people, economy, workweek, holidays, money and climate,
       information on visas, passports, immunizations, entry and departure formalities,
       emergencies, in country travel information, detailed country map, information on
       business centers, communication (country dialing codes, access, etc.) business
       service providers (contact info for fax, translation services, courier services, etc.),
       technical support information while in country, and business culture (greetings,
       women in business, decision-making, meetings, entertainment, etc.). 40 countries
       feature color photos.
      Key Market – First-time international business traveler
      Pricing – $29.95 for both print and CD-ROM versions

Company 4: Worldbiz.com

Product: Pre-departure Reports

      Description – 45 countries available, approx. 33,000 characters/5,500 words,
       delivered w/in minutes of online order via e-mail. Specific sections include:
       business language, gender and equality, communication, names and titles,
       greetings, initial contact, protocol, wining and dining, gifts, sales presentations,
       business ethics, business hours, holidays, business entertainment, eating, drinking,
       travel, climate, health, clothing, currency, and electricity. Many of these topics
       (factual ones like ―electricity,‖ ―health,‖ and ―currency‖ are no more than 1-3
       sentences.)
      Key Market – First-time, individual business travelers only interested in a single
       country
      Pricing – $50 per report, charged on a credit card. No bundling/discounts
       available for multiple purchases.

Product: Executive Reports

      Description – 45 countries available; 67,000-70,000 characters, or 10,000-12,000
       words; promises to include all the information in the pre-departure report (tough
       to ensure that it does, though, with its poorly organized menu and restatements of
       inclusions), PLUS geography, history, customs, taxes, residency issues, etc.
       Delivered w/in minutes of order via e-mail.
      Key Market – First time, individual business travelers—presumably more senior-
       level than ―pre-departure report‖ buyers by topics included. Clearly aimed at
       those with a LONG-TERM interest in doing business in the country.
      Pricing – $95 each, not available or discounted for multiple countries.

Company 5: State Department

Product: State Department Guides

      Description – Lengthy (ave. 60 print pages), detailed commerce reports prepared
       by 31 countries embassy for use by U.S. businesses. Feels very much like an
       annual report—facts, figures, not instructional or intended as insightful.
       Categories include economic trends, politics, marketing U.S. products, trade regs,
       travel, investments, financing, and contacts.
      Key Market – High-end international business players with significant corporate
       (not merely personal or business relationship) interests in a country.
      Pricing – Free.
JNS2 Primary Research Findings
JNS2 compiled data from completed email surveys—176 in total. These were then
analyzed according to four main categories:

      Age
      Gender
      Years Taught
      Grade Taught

The data was organized in cross tabs and then tested for significance at the 95%
confidence level using Chi-Square statistical testing. However, many Chi-Square tests
indicate that these results are valuable at the .005 levels or with 99.5 % confidence that
this didn’t happen by chance. We have touched on these highlights in this section, but for
the complete data you must see the Appendixes C – G.

Age

The majority of respondents were in the 50 to 59-age range. This represents 44 % of the
sample size that responded to the question. The age group 40 to 49 was the next frequent
response with 25% of the respondents in this category.


                                    Ag e Group s

                              9%          6%
                                                       16%
                                                                         20 to 29
                                                                         30 to 39
                                                                         40 to 49
                                                                         50 to 59
                44%
                                                        25%              60 plus




According to the Chi-Square test of age and purchase frequency, we find that there is a
significant difference between age group and their frequency of purchases. This
information can be used to target programs specifically aimed at each age group, as their
frequency of buying is different.

Another area of interest is that of age and pricing. The Chi-Square test indicated that
differences in age account for differences in valuing the price of CultureGrams. This
gives us valuable feedback—some age groups, especially 50 to 59, ranked the price of
CultureGrams as being relatively more expensive than did their younger peers. These
respondents need to be more convinced of the value of CultureGrams relative to the
price. A marketing plan could be designed to combat this belief. Or, CultureGrams
could send the people in this age group a coupon in order to entice them to buy.

Gender

The sample indicates that the majority of customers who responded to the survey are
female—76%, while the male respondents only make up 24%.


                                      Gender

                                               Male
                                               24%


                                     Female
                                      76%




We conducted a statistical test and found that gender and how respondents feel about the
pricing of CultureGrams was significant at the .005 levels. This tells us that males and
females feel differently about pricing, and should be targeted separately based on their
feelings of price in regards to CultureGrams.

There is statistical significance as well when it comes to gender and how useful
respondents find CultureGrams to be for their students. Females generally found
CultureGrams to be more useful for their students then did males. This indicates that
when targeting males, a focus should be made on usefulness for students.

Years Taught

The majority of the teachers have been teaching for 25 or more years (40 respondents).
Twenty to 24 years is the next frequent response (24 respondents) with the other age
categories ranging from 16 to 22 respondents.

Of the information collected, it is interesting to note that there was a high correlation
between a number of variables. For example, even though many individuals felt that
CultureGrams were extremely useful in their classroom, when cross-tabulated against the
years someone taught in the school system, this was significant to a .005 level. This was
also a similar result when comparing years of teaching with the satisfaction of the current
price level.
                                 Years Teac hing

                   40

                   30

                   20

                   10

                    0
                         Less 5 to 9    10 to   15 to   20 to   25 or
                        than 5           14      19      24     more




This indicates that length of years teaching has an impact on how teachers rank the
usefulness of CultureGrams. Perhaps focusing on student usefulness and low price when
it comes to marketing newer teachers could improve this ranking. (Teachers having
taught fewer years felt CultureGrams were priced more affordably than did teachers
having taught more years). Furthermore, when it comes to marketing teachers with more
experience usefulness could be emphasized relative to price. It could be reinforced that
they are so useful and therefore the price may be higher.

Of these results, it would be stated that there were some results that showed no statistical
significance, and should not be used in any form of correlation comparisons. For
example, the years of teaching had no statistical significance when compared to
likelihood of purchasing within the next six months, how much they would be willing to
pay if their item was stolen, or how they learned about Axiom Press products.

Grade Taught/Position in School

The majority of respondents are librarians, representing 63% of the overall sample size.
Teachers, however, make up the rest—37% and represent grades 4-12 and kindergarten.

The Chi squared test showed there was a significant correlation between the grade taught
and the amount of funding received. The majority, 66.3 percent, of respondents has a
funding level of five or less. This can be attributed to the fact that education is given
tight budgets to work with. Many of the teachers, grades K-12, reported that they don’t
get any kind of classroom budget; and the money they use is their own. Librarians also
reported low budgets that must be stretched to last the year
              Grade Taught or Position in Sc hool
                                    2%
                                      1%                            4th Grade
                                                                    5th Grade
                                       1%
                                                    4%              6th Grade
                                             10%
                                                        4%          7th Grade
                                                        3%          8th Grade
                                                                    9th Grade
                                                        6%          10th Grade
        63%
                                                     3%             11th Grade
                                                                    12th Grade
                                                   3%
                                                                    Kindergarten
                                                                    Librarian



There is a significant correlation between the grade taught and they way someone learned
about CultureGrams.

One can see the following in the raw data:

      40 percent of 11th grade teachers heard about CultureGrams at a convention
      50 percent of 7th grade teachers heard about CultureGrams from a fellow teacher
      33.3 percent of 8th grade teachers had never heard of CultureGrams before
      100 percent of kindergarten teachers heard about CultureGrams from a fellow
       teacher
      37.7 percent of librarians heard about CultureGrams from another source not
       listed

A significant correlation between the grade taught and how often CultureGrams is
purchased was established.

Some of the most significant figures from the cross tabulation include the following:

      66.7 percent of 10th grade teachers purchase CultureGrams once a year
      60 percent of 11th grade teachers purchase once every five years or more
      50 percent of 7th grade teachers purchase once every five years or more
      66.7 percent of 8th grade teachers purchase every two years
      35.8 percent of librarians purchase every two years while 28.3 percent purchase
       every year
      22.9 percent of the ―not applicable‖ purchase every five years or more
The majority of respondents were either librarians or their position was not applicable
with 30.3 percent and 40 percent of the 175 respondents, respectively. The respondents
were mainly divided in whether or not they would buy the product in the next six months.
The majority of respondents (50.3 %) marked that they would either definitely not buy or
probably not buy. The grade taught by the respondents was not significantly correlated
with their purchase habits of the last six months.

Some of the more notable findings in the cross tabulation between the grade taught and
the likelihood of purchase in six months include the following:

      35.8 percent of librarians marked ―Probably will Purchase‖
      35.7 percent of the ―not applicable‖ marked ―Definitely will not Purchase

Looking at the data one can see that the marked answers for likelihood of purchase
follow no pattern. The likelihood of purchase here is not dependent on the grade taught
by the purchaser, but more likely based upon the last date of purchase.

If the respondents had an unlimited budget, all, with the exception of the ninth grade
teachers (75% would purchase every three years), would purchase every two years or
less.
JNS2 Marketing Research Group




            Purchase Decisions
JNS2 Purchase Decisions
In order to assist Axiom Press in preparing for future purchases, JNS2 asked each
surveyee to indicate whether or not they would be purchasing CultureGrams within the
next six months. The following were the results of all 176 surveys received:

       50 respondents, or 28.4 percent of all surveys received, indicated that they would
        ―Definitely Will Purchase‖ within the next six months.
       39 respondents, or 22.2 percent of all surveys received, indicated that they would
        ―Probably Will Purchase‖ within the next six months.
        27 respondents, or 15.3 percent of all surveys received, indicated that they would
        ―Probably Will Not Purchase‖ within the next six months.
       60 respondents, or 34.1 percent of all surveys received, indicated that they would
        ―Definitely Will Not Purchase‖ within the next six months

According to reasonable but conservative estimates given by Roger Gates and Carl
McDaniel in their book Marketing Research Essentials, Third Edition1, 70 percent of
those that suggest that they will ―Definitely Will Purchase‖ actually will, while 35
percent of those who state that they will ―Probably Will Purchase‖ actually will, and 10
percent of those who state they ―Probably Will Not Purchase‖ actually will, and 0 percent
of those who state that they ―Definitely Will Not Purchase‖ purchase.

In using these estimates, we find that approximately 51 of the 176 individuals surveyed
will be most likely purchasing CultureGrams World Edition within the next six months.
These estimates were determined from the following information:

       70% * 50 = 35
       35% * 39 = 13.65
       10% * 27 = 2.7
        0% * 60 = 0
       35 + 13.65 + 2.7 + 0 = 51.35 or approximately 51 individuals




1
 Roger Gates and Carl McDaniel, Marketing Research Essentials, Third Edition (Ohio: Thomson
Learning, 2001), p. 278
JNS2 Marketing Research Group




                Limitations
JNS2 Limitations
JNS2 employed professional researching techniques and tried to maintain as much
objectivity as possible in the research process; nevertheless, one will find it impossible to
eliminate all possibilities of error and limitations of the study. The following limitations
should be taken into account when assessing the findings of the study.

Limited Scope

Surveys—The scope of the project was limited because the survey was only sent to
current customers of CultureGrams.

Focus Group—Furthermore, the focus group was limited in that the people that were
invited to participate in the focus group were acquaintances of the members of JNS2.

Time Constraints

Since JNS2 had a deadline at the end of the semester, it had to stop receiving surveys to
evaluate by a certain date. Had JNS2 been given the opportunity to wait for all possible
surveys, the results of the study might have been different.

Non-Response

Although this survey was sent out to 1,200 current customers, only 176 solid responses
were submitted. Although this is a response rate of almost 15 percent, the information
that we have gathered should only be used as a representative sample of Axiom Press
clientele, and there will be some leeway in viewpoints and ideas from customer to
customer.

Response Errors

Surveys—the first type of response error possible is encountered on the surveys that were
emailed to Axiom Press customers. The respondents might not have been very truthful in
their responses—maybe lied about their age.

 In addition, the respondents might not have understood some of the survey questions.
The pre-testing of the survey minimized this possibility, but error is still possible. If the
respondents did not understand the questions, then a different response than intended will
change the results of the study.

Focus Group—the second type of response error that might have occurred was in the
focus group. Since the participants in the focus group were acquaintances of JNS2, they
might have felt obligated to give only positive feedback on the CultureGrams.

The moderator of the focus group might also have contributed to response bias. The way
the moderator worded the questions might have elicited a certain response from the
participants. They might have tried to guess the intentions of the moderator and answer
in a way that might be pleasing to the moderator.
JNS2 Marketing Research Group




            Recommendations
JNS2 Recommendations
In reviewing the information that we have gathered, JNS2 has the following
recommendations:

Because the majority of respondents to our survey were older individuals, older than 50
years of age, we suggest that Axiom Press focus on marketing to younger teachers and
future teachers that are currently in college. If Axiom Press continues to market to their
current target audience they may find that many of their current clients will be retiring
within the next five to ten years. In targeting students that will be entering into teaching,
JNS2 feels that Axiom Press may build their brand awareness in teachers who will
purchase their products for years to come.

JNS2 recommends that Axiom Press send discount coupons to older teachers who may
think that CultureGrams are overpriced. Because the older teachers feel that
CultureGrams are generally more expensive, JNS2 feels that if Axiom Press was to send
coupons to those individuals they may be more likely to purchase Axiom Press products
in the future.

Because the majority of Axiom Press’ customers do not purchase on a yearly basis, JNS2
recommends that Axiom Press figure out what purchasing cycle their customers are on
and only market to individuals during their purchasing year. In doing this, JNS2 feels that
Axiom Press may better focus their marketing efforts towards the customers that are
purchasing each year.

Because the majority of those surveyed feel that the price for CultureGrams is either
inexpensive or adequate, we recommend increasing the price of your product between 15
to 20 percent. Because the general population is willing to pay up to 20 percent more for
an item at a given time without much notice of change, we feel that Axiom Press can
currently increase the price of their CultureGrams World Edition without causing too
much of an uproar from their clients.

Because there are such a variety of uses for Axiom Press products, JNS2 recommends
that Axiom Press focus on building customer awareness of the differing uses for these
products. CultureGrams World Edition has been used from curriculum such as
geography to world politics. JNS2 feels that in promoting the different uses for
CultureGrams that teachers will feel a higher perceived value in Axiom Press products.

JNS2 feels that Axiom Press should enter the business market. In doing so, JNS2 feels
that Axiom Press should take the time and effort to differentiate their current product and
gear it towards a business audience. We feel that this product should be created as a
multimedia CD-ROM or Internet Site License. In doing so JNS2 feels that the perceived
value will greatly increase and it will be better suited for a business market.

JNS2 also recommends that Axiom Press take the time to overhaul their design so that a
business market may be more likely to purchase this product. In doing so, we
recommend that you make your web design more graphically appealing, with more
graphs, as well as up to date stock quotes from those markets. We also suggest removing
any pictures and content that may seem targeted towards a younger audience, and instead
focus on the necessary items needed to succeed in business in a foreign country. These
items include accounting practices, dos and taboos of international business, basic dress
codes, etc.
JNS2 Marketing Research Group – Appendix A




                 Proposal
JNS2 Marketing Research Group – Appendix B




          Focus Group Comments
                         Focus Group dialog
Q.     Do you feel that international business will increase or decrease within the
next few years?

Mr. Baiamonte: Increase. NuSkin's growth is very much a part of international markets.
A lot of people are looking at China to open up the boarders and increase free trade.

Mr. Anderson: People must be prepared for an international market. By the technology,
and the ease of travel, and the fact that we are getting more comfortable with one another,
we know communicate well, we are getting more multilingual, and the more
sophisticated effort to learn English. And, we see that in Europe they have one currency.
So yes, I feel that it is very important.

Mr. Throssel: I think, especially with multimedia and the Internet that it will open up the
world with international relations

Mis. Kato: I think it is important.

Q.     What do you feel is the most important aspect of International Business?

Mis. Kato: I think it is how well you can communicate with different cultures.

Mr. Anderson: You get the best of all the cultures, and suffer a bit with the worst of
them. If we can get into a free market, the person that can do it the best will produce
those items. I think that you will see more specialty driven markets. We, as a society,
become more proficient when we capitalize on others strengths. I think we should get the
politicians out of the way and let the free market work.

Mr. Baiamonte: He said it all.

Mr. Throssel: I agree.

Q.     What are your feelings on cultural understanding in international business?

Mr. Baiamonte: I think there is a lot to be learned. In my organization, we have to
support our different affiliate companies globally. Sometimes its difficult for us to
understand their expectations and what they want. We need to understand the culture if
we are to be successful in those international boundaries.

Mr. Anderson: I feel that it is critical. I feel that a large mistake is the way that we take
U.S. capitalism and expect that everyone is to perform according to our beliefs. We must
be extremely patient and realize the importance of other areas and cultures. Just, as in
business, the difference in the way we give and take business cards is extremely
important. If you learn the differences of other cultures than you will know how to best
deal with them.
Mr. Throssel: I feel, as we’ve discussed, that there is so much universalization and
social morays; it is especially now that we appreciate and recognize those differences for
they can be especially significant. Appreciation of foreign ideas are important in a
business setting.

Mis. Kato:

Q.     How do you learn about the countries that you are going to?

Mr. Baiamonte: Good question. I think that, obviously, if you could turn to other people
that have been there. Turn to people that have been to those countries and try and gain
information from them. I guess you could go to the library and check something out. It
is really, probably, you’ll need to do a lot of homework on your own. It really isn't an
easy thing, but if you aren’t prepared that you will really have some challenges if you are
trying to be successful. I don’t know what else you can do besides going to the library
and maybe turning to people who have had those experiences.

Mr. Anderson: I think it is like all learning, you have to get taught to ride a bicycle, and
if you are really bent on learning, you do a lot of reading you ask a lot of questions, and
understand their history to understand the basic fundamental beliefs. It is part of the
cardinal rule; just keep your mouth shut and watch. Dress, for example, study ahead on
that and I have found it is wise to have conservative clothing.

I understand why we’re here for, my experience with texts are that they are put together
in a limited format for someone going into a two-week vacation. There are certainly
highlights to draw, done in causitionary format, stating that these aren’t all the things that
you need to know.

Mr. Throssel: Ideally you would want to get two different perspectives: talk with
someone from that culture, and then speak with someone not of that culture but has done
business in that area, I think that would be beneficial

Mis. Kato:

Q.     Have you ever used or bought a product to help you learn of a culture?

Mr. Baiamonte: Just in the MTC. Ha ha ha.

Mr. Anderson: Ha ha ha.

Mr. Throssel: Ha ha ha.

Mis. Kato: Ha ha ha.
Q.     Have you ever bought something to do research about a country?

Mr. Baiamonte: I’ve gone to a library and checked out materials.

Mr. Anderson: I would take in a dictionary in my briefcase, but one of the problems
with using dictionaries you have words that don’t beam the same.

Mr. Throssel:

Mis. Kato: There are books in Japan on what you need to do to do business or go to
school in America, and those books are really really popular.

Q.     Have you ever seen this product? (Shown CultureGrams) They are very
short pieces of information about the culture of different countries.

Mr. Baiamonte:

Mr. Anderson: Are these Dale Miller’s? If so, they were fun to read but they were too
brief to even start to explain the countries where you are going.

Mr. Throssel:

Mis. Kato:

Q.     How applicable would something like this be to a businessperson going
overseas? Do you think that this is something that they would use?

Mr. Baiamonte: I think you would be scratching the surface of your region. This would
be a starting point, but you would need to know much more before you were to do a
major business deal. To me, something like a video, where you are visually seeing
something about a country, which would be more fun would be very helpful.

Mr. Anderson:

Mr. Throssel: As long as you were to look at this as a starting point and not as an
exhaustive list, and as long as it was current, then I think it would be good.

Mis. Kato: I could see someone using it at first.

Q.      As a follow up, would something about this long, maybe a bit longer, but you
had it in a multimedia on the computer, where possibly someone explaining online
the best way to do business in a foreign country, do you think that would be better
or would you rather use something like these printed reports? What do you think a
businessperson would be most interested in?
Mr. Baiamonte: With the invention of the computer, and laptops, I think that the CD
would be a very effective way because you could have the text, but also the multimedia
part of it. I think it would help.

Mr. Anderson: I think you have to always see your audience in it. I don’t see selling
these as a tremendous amount of money in it. I think it is a good thing to do. I would say
keep in mind these things, for example tipping, dress, language, etc. I think this has some
merit, but I wouldn’t throw a $100 thousand into something, I just don’t think you’ll get a
fax return. This is looking at this printed product.

Mr. Throssel:

Mis. Kato:

Q.     How much would you pay for this one country?

Mr. Baiamonte: Maximum, a couple bucks. I think a lot of it is how it is presented. I
mean if it was presented in a CD-ROM, in a jewel case, and you have color pictures, I
think you could have a higher price tag because the perceived value is much higher.
Where as, you know, monochrome piece of paper, even though the information maybe
equal to what is presented, I don’t see it worth as much.

Mr. Anderson:

Mr. Throssel:

Mis. Kato:

Q.     What would be the maximum you would be willing to pay for all 177
countries?

Mr. Baiamonte: $177.00 or maybe $19.95 for a group of them.

Mr. Anderson: I would have to look at why you would buy this. I mean if you are
looking for an encyclopedia type thing, maybe more. I would say way below the $500
mark.

Mr. Throssel:

Mis. Kato: I don’t think I would buy the whole thing; I would just purchase the one I
need.

Q.     Would you think it would be best to have 200 countries where we discuss the
basics of all the countries, or do you think it is better to focus on a few countries, like
China and Japan, and then be more precise and specific and in depth in those
countries? Maybe on a CD-ROM?
Mr. Baiamonte: I think it would be good to have common countries, like Asia, Europe,
South America…I mean I know that all these countries have their own cultural
differences, I think that might be more effective than maybe one at a time, or the most
popular countries.

Mr. Anderson: It is tough, because I think the data is wonderful. They are fun to read.
The problem is that they seem very basic. I don’t believe, I would rely on this as much as
I would with those that had been there. I would ask those that had already done business
in those areas.

The data gathering shouldn’t be pages and pages like this, it should be basic: what do
they eat?, what is their currency?, what would be impolite in that country?, what do you
think would be the best thing to wear?

Mr. Throssel:

Mis. Kato:

Q.      How long do you think something like this should be?

Mr. Baiamonte: A CD-ROM you could possibly play on an airplane and see the spots
you want, or even read the entire thing.

Mr. Anderson: It’s hard.

Mr. Throssel:

Mis. Kato:

Q.     On the CD-ROM would you have it print, or multimedia? Which would you
prefer?

Mr. Baiamonte: I think, if I had a CD-ROM it would have different categories and it
would drill into those categories, with possibly a presentation on that subject matter. I
don’t know.

As far as a revenue stream, I could see the value of having an update every six months
that people would purchase.

I think, as far as the Internet, they have a story, the text, the graphs, and the interactivity.
I think that type of presentation to me would be very attractive.
Because there are so many different mediums for this information…I mean even
something for a PDA, a laptop, CD-ROM, and you’ll be able to get larger market share
by giving that information on a palm pilot and other mediums.

Mr. Anderson: It is really difficult. I think country-to-country is going to vary. The
reliability is really based on experience and current events.

Year to year it has to change, unless you have some way to give the synoptic overview of
international travelers with various intermittent updates on each country.

I think it depends on the evolvement of the countries over the years, how often that they
change.

We are in a dynamic world economy. Some are slower than others, but I think you need
to be on top of countries.

Another item is, how sensitive are people of a country sensitive to your country? Do they
speak English, or is that something polite to us? Make sure you understand that aspect.

Mr. Throssel:

Mis. Kato:

Q.     Would it be best to develop very few countries but have deep information, or
develop many countries with fewer information?

Mr. Baiamonte: I would suggest that you do a lot, because you aren’t going to learn a
ton by one of these, you will contact others etc. I think that this would give you a good
foundation.

Mr. Anderson: I think that people learn more from watching T.V. selectively than in
reading books. I just came back from South Africa. I can tell you that you can get killed
if you leave at night, but you can read that all day and say ―gee, that’s interesting‖ but
when I tell you you will pay more attention.

There is a great market, I believe, in training and offering a very good training program
where you go to their headquarters and spend a day discussing about those countries. I
would suggest that this is much more productive.

I would say that you have a good idea with this print, but don’t expect to get rich off of it.
The training that may do it for you.

Mr. Throssel:

Mis. Kato: I would want to know a lot about a country, I would be more interested.
Q.     Which do you think would be better, have something general concerning
international business, or focus specifically on the countries?

Mr. Baiamonte:

Mr. Anderson: Generalities are really only in foods, dress, and coins. The details are
what is really important.

Mr. Throssel:

Mis. Kato:

Q.     How much would someone be willing to pay for a seminar versus a print
copy or CD-ROM version for business executives?

Mr. Baiamonte: Obviously, your cheapest would be the print form, your medium would
be the CD-ROM, and the most expensive would be a seminar.

If you bring in an international person with years of experience, and you are focusing on
managers and directors, you’ll be able to charge quite a bit for it.

Mr. Anderson: You could have all sorts of pricing on these items. If you were talking
about managers, your company would pay a lot of money in them, trusting that they’ll
come back and train their people on what they learned.

The greatest thing is cross-germination among people.

Mr. Throssel: What would be an incentive to take these seminars? Would a company
pay for them to take it, or would they pay individually?

I think individual business people would want to see the immediate benefits of
something.

Mis. Kato:

Q.      If you were to purchase a CD with print, that had an opportunity to network,
like an online chat room, would you find that beneficial?

Mr. Baiamonte:

Mr. Anderson: I think it is a good idea. I think that what you have is an embryo really.
It will blow our minds what will happen in the next quarter century. I think that the
market now is still limited.
For example, I cannot see Blake Roney (CEO NuSkin), saying, ―I want all of my people
to have a full set of these.‖ But I think you could speak to him by saying ―We have five
countries, and we can give you really up to date in depth for these.‖ I think he would
much more listen to that.

We selectively watch and learn, and likewise I think it would work in this matter. A great
thing that you have is through the returned missionary program. I mean, if you want to
know about Scotland, I would call in the last five missionaries that served there.

Mr. Throssel:

Mis. Kato:
JNS2 Marketing Research Group – Appendix C




                  Survey
«Email»

Dear «First» «Last»:

Hello, my name is Joseph Pacini and I am a Business Marketing student at Brigham
Young University, located in Provo, Utah.

This semester I am taking a Marketing Research course that requires that we do a group
marketing research consulting project for a local business. I received your email address
through Axiom Press, the publishing company for CultureGrams, in order to perform a
marketing research project for them.

We are emailing you to request that you take a brief online survey concerning
CultureGrams products in order to successfully complete this class project. This survey
should only take 5 minutes of your time, and would be greatly appreciated. (Because we
are doing this project for Axiom Press, they have also agreed to let us use some space on
their server to host our survey.)

In filling out this survey, Axiom Press has also agreed to give you a free trial of their Site
License Web Edition through March 31, 2002.

(You will receive further information concerning their Sit License Web Edition trial after
you have submitted your survey.)

To take our online survey, please click here to go to:

http://www.culturegrams.com/survey.php
*1. Concerning funding allocated to you by your school for your classroom
budget, do you feel that it is:

Inadequate                                                        Very Adequate




Please explain the reasons to your above response in the following box:

*2. How did you first learn about CultureGrams products?

By Direct Mail

From a fellow teacher

At a convention

Via the Internet

I have never heard of them

No Answer

        Please select a choice
Other

If other, how?

*3. How often do you purchase CultureGrams products?

More than once a year

Once a year

Every Two years

Every three Years
Every four years

Five years or More

Not Applicable

No Answer

 Please select a choice


*4. If you had sufficient funds in your yearly budget, how often would you
purchase CultureGrams products:

More than once a year

Once a year

Every Two years

Every three Years

Every four years

Five years or More

Not Applicable

No Answer

 Please select a choice


*5. How useful do you find CultureGrams products for your students? (Please
select one answer.)

                                                                           Do not
Not at all Useful                                         Extremely Useful have
                                                                            an
                                                                       opinion




Please explain your above selection in the following box:

*6. How often are CultureGrams products used by your students in the
classroom?

Once a day

Once a week

Once a month

Once per semester

Once a year

Never

Do not know

No answer




*7. How often are CultureGrams products used by your students outside of
class?

Once a day

Once a week

Once a month

Once per semester
Once a year

Never

Do not know

No answer




*8. For what type of curriculum do you use CultureGrams products in your
classroom?




*9. Regarding price, do you find that CultureGrams products are:

                                                                          Do not
Very Inexpensive                                            Too Expensive have an
                                                                          opinion




*10. If your current copy of CultureGrams Standard Edition was stolen, how
much money would you be willing to pay to replace it with either a similar
product, or a newer version of CutlureGrams?

$ ------------------




*11. Concerning CultureGrams Standard Edition, are you planning that within the
next six months you:

Definitely will buy
Probably will buy

Probably will not buy

Definitely will not buy

No Answer




*12. What is your gender?

M

F

13. What is your e-mail address?

14. What is your school phone number?

*15. What is your school name?

*16. Which grade do you teach?

K–3

4th

5th

6th

7th

8th
9th

10th

11th

12th

I am a librarian

Not applicable

No response

*17. How old are you?

Less than 20 years old

20-29 years old

30-39 years old

40-49 years old

50-59 years old

60 years old or older

No answer

*18. How many years have you taught school?

Less than 5 years

5-9 years
10-14 years

15-19 years

20-24 years

25 years or more

19. Which CultureGrams products have you previously purchased? (Please
check all that apply.)

                                                CultureGrams
   CultureGrams          CultureGrams CD-                            CultureGrams Kids
                                               Standard Edition
  Standard Edition             ROM                                         Edition
                                               Bundled Package



                           CultureGrams
  StateGrams Kids                             CultureGrams All-        CultureGrams
                         Deluxe Edition CD-
       Edition                                 in-One Package         Combo Package
                               ROM



                                                                     CultureGrams for
CultureGrams Area          CultureGrams           Individual
                                                                     the International
       Sets                Language Sets         CultureGrams
                                                                          Visitor



                          Multiple Copies                            Site License Web
     InfoGrams                                Subscription Service
                             License                                      Edition



  Site License Network Version         I have never purchased CultureGrams products




20. If you had sufficient funds in your budget, which additional CultureGrams
products would you purchase? (Please check all that apply.)

   CultureGrams          CultureGrams CD-        CultureGrams        CultureGrams Kids
  Standard Edition           ROM           Standard Edition          Edition
                                           Bundled Package



                       CultureGrams
 StateGrams Kids                          CultureGrams All-       CultureGrams
                     Deluxe Edition CD-
      Edition                              in-One Package        Combo Package
                           ROM



                                                                 CultureGrams for
CultureGrams Area      CultureGrams           Individual
                                                                 the International
       Sets            Language Sets         CultureGrams
                                                                      Visitor



                       Multiple Copies                           Site License Web
    InfoGrams                             Subscription Service
                          License                                     Edition



                         I have never
   Site License           purchased
 Network Version        CultureGrams
                           products




Thank you again for your assistance! Please click submit to receive your free Site
License Web Edition Trial!
We appreciate greatly your cooperation in taking our online survey!

You now have free access to CultureGrams Web Edition Site License through
March 31, 2002.

To access your online site license, please go to
http://culturegrams.com/site/demo.htm.

Once at that site, please click on the link entitled "CultureGrams Remote
Access."

PLEASE WRITE DOWN YOUR USERNAME AND PASSWORD TO USE THE
TRIAL AT A LATER TIME.

Your username is: trial

Your password is: culturegrams

Thank you again for your cooperation!
To the CultureGrams Free Trial!

Just a reminder, this trial will be
terminated as of March 31, 2002.

Click below on "CultureGrams Remote
Access" and input your username and
password.
JNS2 Marketing Research Group – Appendix D




        Survey Question Responses
This section contains a list of responses when asked for specific feedback on each
section. These answers have not been edited or altered in any way from their original
submission as part of the survey. The question number corresponds to the question posed
in the original survey, while the numbered responses simply illustrate the number of
individuals that responded to this question and not necessarily the specific respondent.

Question 1: Concerning funding allocated to you by your school for your classroom
budget, do you feel that it is inadequate or adequate? The following are the
responses received:

1. We have sufficient funds to purchase any reasonable materials.
2. We are a study abroad office, not a classroom.
3. mY BUDGET IS ONLY 100.00 PER SEMESTER. ANYTHING AFTER THAT IS OUT OF POCKET.
PROGRAMS SUCH AS CULTURE GRAMS WOULD BE GREAT IN MY CLASSROOM BUT WOULD
DEPLETE MUCH BUDGET TOO QUICKLY.
4. This is a school of 1500 students. We are a Library Media Center and have only received $9,000 this
year and only due to a levy that will run out after next year. This year the Site Council has agreed, after a
presentation on the State of the Library, to write us into the School Plan and budget.
5. Our main problem is our building. It was built before 1920 and is overcrowded and needing to be
updated. Even if we had all the funding to bring us into the technology age, there wouldn't be room for
both the students and the equipment!
6. I don't have any classroom budget.
7. This is a school of 1500 students. We are a Library Media Center and have only received $9,000 this
year and only due to a levy that will run out after next year. This year the Site Council has agreed, after a
presentation on the State of the Library, to write us into the School Plan and budget.
8. What? My students buy the culturgrams at our university bookstore.
9. I am a middle school media specialist. Our library funding is quite good for developing our collection. I
marked a box towards the middle as classroom funding may be a bit less than ideal.
10. Our budget for our library is "adequate." We are fortunate to have many resources, but there is
always something new to consider and ownership" if data seems to be dwindling. Now we are only
renting data. This causes us to spend more or have less.
11. I feel that funding for my position is adequate. Some years I need more money for conferences but on
the whole, it is adequate.
12. MEI is a University ESL program. I'm not a teacher in the classroom, but
rather the Activities Coordinator. I get everything I need to do my job.
I would say that the teachers feel the same.
13. I teach in two buildings, but only get one budget for both buildings.I teach Kindergarten -4th grade
and many levels,so I need many materials to cover all their needs.
I feel that funding for my position is adequate. Some years I need more money for conferences but on the
whole, it is adequate.
14. I do not have a budget line..I have to tap someone elses budget
15. I don't receive a classroom budget. I would like to have one. I purchased CultureGrams through my
grant monies.
16. There never is enough money for a school library but in myn case I am starting from scratch
since I lost everything in my library due to a school fire in May of 2000.
17. Our school media center receives 100% of funds allocated by the state based on student
population. While I wish we had more, it is at least all that we are allotted and some
schools in our state keep out a portion of the media funds for other purposes.
18. not classroom budget- campus wide programming budget for apartment and residence life, but we
have enough money to do most of what we want/need
19. I do not have a classroom but I work in the Department of International Education at Furman
University. Our budget is limited in providing for the needs of our international students.
20. Is the budget you get ever enough!
21. Budget increases for years have not kept up with inflation. Periodical increases
have been more than inflation rates for years. Meanwhile technology costs & demands
have also increased tremendously.
22. CSI is a ministry, not a school; therefore, the question is not applicable.
23. We are a study abroad office and do not teach courses.
24. We are very fortunate to have adequate funding for our projects. Funding is
 available from state and private funds.
25. The budget varies from year to year. Sometimes we have enough and other times we must tighten
our belts.
26. question does not apply to our situation - but additional dollars are in need
27. I would like to purchase more of the products but we are resources are somewhat limited for
purchasing new materials.
28. The community colleges are always underfunded in comparision with the four-year colleges.
29. We can purchase most everything we need, but there is alway more that we want.
30. Only recently have we suffered from major budget cuts. The Commonwealth of Virginia is facing a
huge deficit currently.
31. We could always use more budget in the classroom, but our budget at Bismarck State College is
greater than previous budgets of other colleges I have taught at before my current position. (Snow Junior
College, Ephraim , Utah)
32. We are in a serious budget crunch in our state. It is a backlash from the attack on 9/11.
33. State funds for three years have provided money that has been sorely needed, but when this ends
soon we will have real difficulties purchasing books.
34. Not applicable--we are a school association and therefore do not have a classroom budget.
35. I teach talented and gifted students in grades 3, 4, and 5 as a magnet pull out program
I have this year 72 students. There is also a 6th grade level in another building and she
around 24 students each year. All the materials, supplies, and technology that I purchase
is done through a state level grant. I can always say that there is more that I would like
to purchase than there are funds for. We have built up a great deal over the years but
there is always more that I could do.
36. My school is very supportive of our ESL classes.
37. The budget is usually 0.00 dollars to start the year. Only at the end of the year, if anything is left, do
we occasionally get to order something. I usually buy things myself as I did with CultureGrams.
38. I am a Library Media Teacher with funds from Calif. AB862. If this funding continues, we will be able
to make adequate, quality selections for our library.
39. Despite the fact that print material costs have soared over the past few years and electronic materials
are very costly my budget has remained the same for the same years. To accomodate, the only thing we
can do is make the best of what we have. I personally am not into fund raising.
40. Current budget cuts due to economic turn down
41. I am currently not in the classroom, but our school does receive a lot of funding.
42. Our class budget is only 30.00 per month...we have 28 students, and we are supposed to supply all
class materials (pencils, paper, etc)
43. Webster University is a small school dependent upon tuition. Therefore creativity with limited
resources contributes to our success.
44. Webster University is a small school dependent upon tuition. Therefore creativity with limited
resources contributes to our success.
45. There is never enough money in the budget for materials and references. I probably spend $3,000 to
$5,000 annually out of pocket! This is NOT an exageration.
46. I think the school is given enough money. UNF doesn't budget good.
47. I do not have a budget. I put in for what I want and it usually is okayed. I would be more restricted if I
had a budget.
48. Funding is sufficient, but there is never enough for all of the things that we think we need.
49. we now receive approximately 21 dollars per student which gives me a budget of about 38,000 a
year. We have found this to be adequate since the Texas Library Connection provides us with Gale and
Britannica web access.
50. I am not in a classroom. I am Associate Director of International Education at a large Catholic
university in the Midwest. I am responsible for the pre-departure orientation/preparation of students
studying abroad for a semester or year.
51. Recent allocations to California School Libraries have made it possible to recover from years of
budgetary neglect. In order for the funding to remain adequate it must continue, which it likely will not in
these financially uncertain times.
52. I must depend on Parent Teacher Assoc. to help fund major purchases of books for our middle school
library. My allotment from the school has been cut each year.
53. more students less time per student
54. Education has been badly hurt by the budget crunch...no one has enough money!
55. I am the librarian in a school of 400 students. I receive only $1,000 from the building budget. This is
not enough money! I supplement this with money I make from book fairs and from money the PTA
generously gives the library. We should have per pupil funding.
56. NOTE: I have a separate school library resources budget, and am not dependent on the classroom
funding. Our library funding has been "soundly adequate" up until this year. That will change drastically
for 2002-2003.
ALSO: the answers to #6 & #7 refer to "LIBRARY" use instead of "classroom" use.
ALSO: my answers are significantly different for the paper vs the online formats. E.g. #9--Online is
reasonably priced if it was as accessible as promised. The paper formats are insultingly expensive.
57. The Administrations rarely refuses a request for materials that help students.
58. I am a resource/media specialist and i have the good fortune to have a generous principal and one
who trusts my judgement with purchases, I work within a budget, I buy wisely, and she will find dollars if I
need them.
59. As the school librarian, I am very concerned that the average of our materials is 21 years old and see
this as a result of inadequate funding over a long term.
60. I am only given a budget of $1500 to buy books for a high school that serves 150 students. This is
not much money to keep a library updated. I get no money to purchase online software.
61. Funding is never adaquate, especially with the high cost of on-line services.
62. We are able to purchase all necessities to run our program
63. It is very difficult to buy items I have found on my own, but not on an
"approved list".
64. I have a self supported program and funds are being used for other matters, now that times are tight,
it is lower than I would like to see it.
65. I am a Spanish teacher who spends probably $2,000-$2,500 of her personal money to prepare good
lessons for my students. I am given $50 to buy supplies. My students (like all) use staples, paper, pens,
dry erase pens, etc. I live in a poor rural community and help my impoverished students. Also, in order
to teach culture, Hispanic life and the sort, I buy items, food, films, etc., which, of course, go over my $50
budget.
66. I haven't really asked for much, but when I do I usually get it.
67. A lot of resources that I use and have in my classroom I purchased including the Culture Grams.
68. As librarian, I get to order once a year. I am never told exactly what my budget is, however if I write a
justification for each purchase, I am never turned down. However, I always have a large "wish list."
69. Money is very tight for the State of Tennessee and the legislature is waffling on an inevitable income
tax.
70. Funding is very tight in our school district and, although some purchases are paid for by the school, I
buy many resources for my class with my own money.
71. It is a wonderful resource. I have shared the 98 version with various other teachers across the
curriculum.
72. You have to make the costs every year for only a couple of country files
73. My school corporation is located in upper class area and financially sound. We have a great history of
supporting Library Media servcies
74. There is never enough in a university budget for everything you'd like
75. Does not apply.
76. We are particularly underfunded in technology resources and training in using new technologies and
integrating them into the curriculum.
77. There is enough funding for the basics, but not for all of the extras that would enhance our program.
(I am not a classroom teacher, I am an international student advisor at a university).
78. Virginia's state budget right now is causing a lot of cuts to state universities.
79. Funding has improved but it still is not keeping pace with the escalating cost of material; choices are
made concerning purchases with cost/effectiveness in mind.
80. We have funds to provide our students and staff with both print and online resources and feel that we
can adequately support the curriculum.
81. good price for lots of information that is up to date
82. I use culturegrams in the library and I do not have enough library funds to keep my collection updated
83. I am a homeschool teacher and pay for everything myself and also pay full taxes.
84. While funding is never enough, we get money from our district and special funds from the state. The
state funds will disappear for next year so our budget will be much tighter.
85. Not applicable
86. We need to use money from the PTO to supplement and still cannot purchase
one book per student per year.
87. I work in the Library Media Center, not a classroom, but our school is very generous in its support of
the Library Media program.
88. Budgets in Minnesota schools are being severely cut for the 2002-2003 and thereafter because of a
budget shortfall for the state.
89. We are a private school. Depending on the available money, we do receive adequate consideration
by the administration.
90. In California, we had a few years of state funding for school libraries. However, my district did not
give it to every site every year. Now that funding is gone. We do get all of the Title 6 allocated to our
school along with about $5,000 from the site budget for our department.
91. We get enough money for the library to order plenty of books for the students.
92. I would always like more funds to support the curriculum and teacher and student requests.
93. Books and materials are very expensive and the demand for Accelerated Reader books, reference
and curriculum materials are high and the budget doesn't cover our needs. I have to beg for more money
from the building funds.
94. Massachusetts Proposition 2 1/2 cut funds to schools years ago and
they are just getting back the addition of necessary educational funding.
95. has not increased in 20 years.
96. I am actually the library media specialist for a middle school. The school district has always
responded positively to my budget requests.
97. I get $2000 per year for software, supplies, upgrades and sometimes a new computer. I have 33
Macintoshes, so it's stretched thin.
98. I used all of my own money in my classroom to get what I need
99. I have no classroom budget
100. There are always mitigating circumstances that require involvemnet in new programs/projects and
beginning year budgets never seem to take this into account.
101. cant have everything.
102. Of course, no one ever has enough funding for the library.
103. By the time shipping and taxes are paid very little is left. Not enough to get needed equipment
either. My students need everyday stuff and we have to paid for computer paper/ink and in my class we
use that a lot.
104. My department administers overseas programs and has access to funds for orientation
activities. Culturegrams are used as a tool as part of this process and is worth the cost.
105. Budget cuts at both Federal and State levels. Also, no federal or state mandates to fund media
centers.
106. I don't think a teacher ever has enough money to do what they really what to do in the classroom.
107. I am a school Psychologist - many of the responses for this question and the following do not apply
to my situation because I do not teach in a classroom
108. My budget is approximately 76% of what it should be according to our state standards.
109. As an ESL (English as a Second Language teacher, I am responsible to serve a K-12 population &
travel to 5 schools in my district. Because funding is not provided by my district, I purchase materials for
my students from my salary & pay for professional conferences--I do however, receive mileage
reimbursement.
110. Our students are very needy and our limited budget does not allow for much in the way of
subscriptions
111. There is no funding for teaching in the class room.Funding is only available for research.
112. Many products and services are becoming more expensive as time goes by. In order to provide
innovative learning experiences, we must group several classes together, or even several institutions, to
afford materials.
113. I was able to make a few purchases but still feel that I could use more funding for programs like the
Culturegrams and appropriate videos
114. In order to keep up with technology, textbooks, changing curriculum, etc. it is necessary
for education to receive additional funding.
115. This is for libraries, not classrooms. We currently (after many years of drought) have good funding
from the state. That will probably soon disappear.
116. I am a media specialist, not a classroom teacher. This question is not really applicable to me.
117. We are a school library, not a classroom. As I talk to other librarians we have a larger budget than
most but still we fall behind every year on keeping our collection current and relevant.
118. I am not a teacher but a media specialist. I have to purchase for all curriculum areas so their is
never enough money. Culturegrams are used the most by our 7th grade teachers so one of the teachers
will answer some of these questions.
119. The budget for ordering instructional material for classroom is limited. The cost often has to be
passed on to the student.
120. I can purchase most of the materials I need for the media center, but not all.
121. I don't understand this question. I don't use them in the classroom.
I use them because I guest lecture around the world.
122. I have more of a problem with space for reference materials than I do with budget right now. I would
love to have more money for reference materials but then I would face the problem of not having room for
them.
123. i can usually buy anything I need as long as I'm not too extravagant.
124. Libraries need CONSTANT updating. School boards don't seem to realize that a one-time budget
allowance is not a cure.
125. I am not a classroom teacher but a Media Specialist that purchases materials for the media center.
1. My regular allocation was cut this year.
2. The continued increase in cost of materials but not increase in funds.
3. Larger demands on the funds we have.
126. As the number of students goign abroad increases and the risk factorsincrease, the budget has not
kept pace.
127. The State continues to cut funding. Technology (computers, software) is essential in the classroom.
It is difficult to obtain funding for new computers and software to keep the technology current.
128. We can purchase any new books and classroom resources that we need. I've never been told I can't
have something. However, I am reasonable and somewhat conservative with what I purchase.
129. I have no budget to buy videos to use in classroom
130. My funding is based on a private donation solely for our program
131. Schools have difficulty keeping up with increasing costs and changes ongoing changes in software
versions, site licenses, and hardware memory to accommodate these changes.
132. I am a school librarian and am well supported by the district. Classroom teachers might not respond
in the same manner as I.
Question 2: How did you first learn about CultureGrams products, besides by direct
mail, from a fellow teacher, at a convention, or via the Internet? The following are
their responses:

1. Saw a sample.
2. I had received one many years ago.
3. A STUDENT FOUND THEM AT THE PUBLIC LIBRARY
4. I know they are used in the missionary program and I was surprised that, when I was a 4th
grade teacher of gifted students, a student copied one of them at the public library to use as
5. Military Sponsor Program at CGSC
6. I know they are used in the missionary program and I was surprised that, when I was a 4th
grade teacher of gifted students, a student copied one of them at the public library to use as a
resource! I didn't know they were made available to libraries everywhere outside of BYU!
7. We have had the print version for a very long time and we had a site lic. for the old original
software product.
8. Since there was no room to respond for the last questions, I can't answer the questions
because I have no idea what all the different products are.
9. I used them in my previous classroom for country research projects
10. older version in the office
11. Through the organizaton that I went overseas with- ESI
12. Listed on a bibliography
13. A Pastor of Missions at a local church
14. NAFSA
15. From another department on campus.
16. From the Director of the Program I work for
17. from a co-worker who works with 4-H and global ed
18. in a NAFSA pyublication, I believe
19. I am a BYU alum. Knew of them while a student.
20. Another department in the university
21. I honestly can't remember. It was a while ago.
22. It was already in the library when I started.
23. It was already in the library when I started.
24. Plainfield Public Library
25. I had ordered samples of CultureGrams for Frenchj-Speaking world in the past. Heard about
them from Am. Assoc. of Teachers of French meeting
26. Old issue in the office when I was hired
27. I first learned about Culturegrams when I worked as a Title VII resource teacher. We used
them as we worked with teachers to help share cultural information with workshop participants.
28. From a high school librarian when I designed a cultural study unit and took my students to the
library for research. Many school and many librarian, however, are NOT familiar with
CultureGrams. I have the puchase of CultureGrams in many workshops that I have given.
29. Church News
30. I read about them while on a course at the Intercultural Summer School, Portland, Oregon.
31. I used them as a grad student at Dallas Baptist Univ.
32. At the Summer Institute for Intercultural Communication in Portland, OR -- many years ago
33. Used them in a another library
34. I have an old set and use them in my geography class
35. A textbook author introduced it.
36. I also was familiar with them from my library degree training & practica.
37. we had older editions in our media center, and I happened to receive a advertisement in the
mail for the 2000 edition.
38. We have been using Culturegrams for several years.
39. I have used them so many years, I don't remember.
40. Preparing for a foreign study-abroad program, my professor gave us each one.
41. As a student in a BYU performing group
42. Dr. Taylor introduced me to them when I traveled with him to Europe in 1985. I was a student
at BYU.
43. When I took over my library, there was an old set on the shelf.
44. I attended BYU MBA program and know many missionaries and friends in Provo.
45. from a university professor
46. from a colleague
47. I don't remember...I've had it for several years
48. library research
49. in our library
50. From the director of the international student office during my first job.
51. Through mailings. We have purchased Culturegrams in print for many years.
52. I've seen them in other libraries
53. I honestly don't remember how--I've just used them for years
54. fellow librarian
55. from a 4-H leader
56. It was already on our network in 1995 when I came.
57. colleague in student affairs
58. I really do not remember. Sorry.
59. The librarian has me order them every year.
60. Library School
61. The school I went to work for already had them.
62. They were available in our library when I was a teacher.
63. I don't know how I got on this list
64. our high school library
65. A former university employer used them during the orientation program and I found them to
be most useful. When I became Director of my own office I decided to use Culturegrams as well.
66. Via emails on a librarians listserv in which several people spoke highly of them.
67. Read about them
68. ran across it in a library while taking a class
69. From a fellow librarian
70. Through a catalog, I believe it was World Almanac, it has been several years.
71. The previous librarian already subscribed to Culturegrams when I got this job.
72. Because I am a graduate of the BYU International Relations program.
73. Choice Magazine
74. I honestly do not remember; it has been so long.
75. our library has your products
76. From a fellow librarian.
Question 5: Please explain how useful CultureGrams products are for you personally.
The following is a list of responses:

1. I think they are useful when preparing students to go abroad.
2. Some students say they are too lengthy.
3. I don't use them with my students, but as I am an ESL teacher, they give me a good insight into
the different cultures my students are coming from.
4. WE PARTICIPATE IN A MODEL UN PROGRAM. HAVING AN ONLINE RESOURCE TO
RESEARCH NATIONS WOULD AID IN DETERMINING WHICH COUNTRY TO SELECT AND
WHAT THE PROBLEMS FACING THAT COUNTRY MIGHT BE.
5. We have a Minnesota history section in our 6th grade curriculum and it is very difficult to find
child-friendly supporting material--your state culturegrams fit in nicely. When we study immigration,
the country culturegrams provide up to date, pertinent information.
6. They give a nice short rounded up insight into a country they might not have known much about
beforehand.
7. CultureGrams are purchased by CGSC to give to 3 sets of sponsors of international officers
from some 80 countries; plus a set is given to their Student Ambassadors and Academic
Counselor and Evaluators.
8. Social studies classes and special ed classes use them heavily.
9. They are good, but very general. Some sections are better than others. More current events
would be good, news, actual things going on currently in the country, and more detailed history,
not just general facts.
10. We use CultureGrams for a lengthy study of SE Asian countries. Students find the information
easy to understand and accurate. It does not contain all of the information students need because
we have designed the research so that it requires multiple resources. The coverage provided by
CultureGrams is excellent.
11. We have an assignment that directly uses your product. The teachers expect it to be there.
12. Culture Grams are wonderful for general information about a country. I think that you do an
excellent job and thank you for providing them!
13. Currently, we use them for our Speaking Parnters program, so that both the American
volunteers & the international students have some cultural
background on the people they are meeting with.
14. I and other teachers use them more as a reference. The students don't really use them.
15. Culture Grams are wonderful for general information about a country. I think that you do an
excellent job and thank you for providing them!
16. The value added is the personal.communication style.hospitality protocol.Most of the other info
is available at govt. sites.
17. they are a good resource for students beginning to learn about countries in which they might
want to study..a good over-view
18. Student need to know about different cultures.
19. Our 7th grade teacher uses them almost daily with his lesson plans.
20. They are used by a variety of classes for a variety of different assignments (English, Social
Studies, Health, etc.)Also, some teachers have created assignments
just to be able to use the information in Culturegrams.
21. very helpful in Passport to the World programming, as well as for personal research, students
enjoy the quick facts, but say it is difficult to get to where they are kept (central location)
22. They are particularly useful for when I do orientation and training for short term trips overseas.
23. I only have some samples but my students do find them very useful.
24. I did not purchase them.
25. Because we serve in so many countries, the concise information relative to culture, politics,
demographics, etc. helps to prepare our thinking as well as our strategy (as well as what to say
and what not to say).
26. We use them for students and also faculty travelling abroad but also for class presentations.
27. CultureGrams are used by students, who are pursuing a master's degree in International
studies CultureGrams are used by faculty, students and the community who need more
information for traveling CultureGrams are used by faculty, students and the community for course
work or information for travel.
28. I dont teach, I am the secretary who does the ordering.
29. we use them with host families and youth traveling to other countries as part of their
orientation
30. Culturegrams are helpful in giving students a quick overview of the country.
31. Although we are a small rural community college we receive students from many different
cultures. Neither our Student Services staff of faculty are particularly knowledgeable regarding the
customs of our diverse student body.
32. The China culturegram would be a good supplement for my Chinese language students,
perhaps I should require it as a text.
33. The Culturegrams are my primary textbook for my Humanities 210 course--Hispanic
Civilization and Culture. This is a introductory course to Hispanic Culture and the Culture Grams
are the best way to present the information in a concise manner since culture is such a broad
topic.
34. They are great for country reports,
35. It has just the right amount of information for 7-12 grades.
36. In a city like New York where our schools are so ethnically diverse, any tool to help promote
understanding is very useful.
37. We use it as a ready reference in the classroom when every student needs information. I also
use them when we do country research when students can't
find informtion related to their topics in other sources. I don't use the CultureGrams as their first
resource because one focus of the research is
learning to use different resources. They are a great ready to use country resource.
38. I use CultureGrams with my ESL students and also share my CultureGrams with fellow
colleagues.
39. The PDF versions are especially nice, authoritative but not overly complicated.
40. Very useful for country reports. However, some nations are not represented, especially in
Africa.
41. Our foreign language and geography classes use them frequently and their information is
accurate and up to date for them.
42. Very little contact with students
43. Helps me understand my students better.
44. I feel like the Culturegrams would be very useful with older students, but I find them to be most
useful with teachers and administrators.
45. One of my former teaching partners had a collection and I used them and found them
extremely useful in class projects.
46. CulturalGrams provide valuable information about a particular country. The information
contributes to increase knowledge and hopefully broadens the individual's cultural diversity.
47. CulturalGrams provide valuable information about a particular country. The information
contributes to increase knowledge and hopefully broadens the individual's cultural diversity.
48. I use the life style, gestures, customs (traditions), greetings, dating, etc. sections extensively. I
ask the students to pretend that they are exhange students and ask them to explain what sort of
behavior and sentitivies might add to the success of their exchange student experience. I
encourage them to investigate and report on the subtle differences that make such a BIG
difference!
49. I know the material was accurate
50. They are useful as general introductory background, concise info. But my students are going
to do an internship for 6mths in CEE countries and would need more info.
51. I am going to be teaching an honors international business course in the fall smester and the
type of information in CultureGrams would be very relevant to the topics to be discussed.
52. We use them in World Geography ( a required course for all Texas students); in economics
(also required for all); in foreign language classes; in sociology classes.
53. A country-specific Culturgram is placed in the orientation packet of every student going abroad
-- whether on a 'long-term' [semester/year] program, or on a short-term [3-week study tour] with
our own faculty
54. It would be helpful if all the countries of the world would be included. Otherwise, this is often
the only source of information about customs and cultures.
55. This product is perfect for the middle school student. The information is factual, short, to the
point and just what they need for country reports. We also have about 60 English Second
Language learners in our school and they always want to learn about their former homeland, so
this works out well.
56. best cultural material out there
57. I haven't been able to purchase
58. I like the format. I like that they tell about social customs. I like the design--4 pages in length-
not overwhelming. I have made it so students can check individual countries. Culturegrams might
think of putting them in indiv. folders and then the folders in a box and marketing them that way.
59. The Online version is sadly significantly less useful than I had hoped because of the strange
screen design/interface. Students won't go there, they go to CIA World Factbook online and can
find their way around. The paperback edition, while outdated and limited to two users at a time, is
used more.
60. Several teachers in the ESL department use the Culture Grams, from the Speech teacher to
the Geography teacher. They are excellent.
61. easy to follow, well organized, straight forward information
62. Students often have assignments to study countries. I generally recommend CulureGrams for
social and cultural information, combined with the State Department's Background Notes for
political and economic information as being the best starting points for research that I have for
country based assignments.
63. THis is a great reference for our geography class. They used it for their research project.
64. We are a magnet school, Center for Internatinal Studies. The country information is exactly
65. what the teachers are asking the students to find.
66. suitable for middle schoolers, up-to-date information available elsewhere, especially statistics
67. They are current up to date information and easy to read
68. That is hard to rate as we give them to the homestay families to give them some cultural
background.
69. I have my students write country reports on each Spanish speaking nation and present their
findings to the class. Culture Grams are a fantastic way to teach them more than just the facts. I
hate it when a student writes on mine. I bought the entire Spanish set and they slowly get out of
my reach. The library at my school also has an entire set of the world. Also, when I lecture on a
country, I read about it first in Culture Grams & when I travel I read about it.
70. I don't usually send students abroad.
71. I enjoy using them. I think that the students like them okay but are not thrilled. It is just more
work for them. I haven't checked out whether work or a worksheet exists to go with them or not.
72. They are invaluable for 9th grade World Cultures students. It is the perfect length and depth
for their assignments.
73. We took a group of MBA students to Chili each year and wanted to introduce them to the
culture. The MBA program also gets the culturegrams for internationalizing the class.
74. In my school district we use the Culturegrams as resources for teachers, not for students.
75. They contain a lot of concise, timely information that gives students a 'shapshot' view of what
a particular culture is like.
76. It can be used in various parts of my curriculum including: foods, clothing, parenting, and
housing. It has also been used successfully with our GT program.
77. have used it only once
78. It is just a general introduction into a country's culture. We expect students to go deeper into
the political and cultural context.
79. At the elementary level, we don't study world cultures very much, but they CultureGrams are
useful when we do.
80. The U.S. students who work with our International Orientation program, and with our
International Family Program have benefitted from the introduction
to specific cultures that Culturegrams provide.
81. If the students use the products, they're great. However, they do not always use them. We
have them in our office as reference (We are a study abroad office).
82. We have a Global Studies class that usese them each semester as an integral part of their
initial research on a country. They are also very useful for foreign language classes when they
research individual countries.
83. The product is used by a wide range of students: various classes and varying degrees of
academic ability.
84. I'm hoping that more visuals will be added to the Web product in the future to enhance the
data.
85. I do not purchase country books because they became outdated too quickly, but Culturegrams
offer excellant current information that has generally filled the information needs of most
assignments
86. good, concise country information
87. They are absolutely awesome. We love the info we get from them.
88. The information available in Culturegrams is not easily found elsewhere.
89. Use for study abroad students.
90. We have students from over 40 countries and research countries.
91. I have been using this product for many years and have found that it is extremely informative
and ties in beautifully with the social studies curriculum. I also value the currency of the
information.
92. I teach middle school and the reading level is a little high. What about a middle school
version?
93. The reports are perfecr for our Middlers: reading level, interest level, topics discussed for each
country.
94. In large part, 9th graders use our Culturgrams. They are a good reading level for them and
the information is easy to find.
95. Because of computers, students are more likely to look there than in books.
96. They're invaluable for students doing research projects on countries.
97. They are concise and simple for students of many ages to use.
98. We use with the Econ Summit, ELL, and foriegn language classes. Cultural material is hard to
find in another source.
99. CultureGrams are very valuable for students who are doing country reports. They are short
and concise, with a lot of information pertinent to what elementary students are studying.
100. Many classes do research on countries and their are few resources out there with good
cultural information. Also, the reading level is appropriate for middle school students; they can
easily use them without assistance.
101. My copy of culturgrams is almost 10 years old and I have not had the opportunity to purchase
any newer version yet.
102. When I taught "Exploring Languages," they were very useful when students researched their
roots and specific countries. Now that I teach Spanish, the curriculum is a bit different--students
are not required to research.
103. They are a good tool to develop inquire thinking.
104. The culturegrams are very important to verify the culture from any student
105. our semester hasnt started yet, so they are untested.
106. Geography and Sociology love them!
107. The stuff is great! One of the best things I have used both the children and regular versions!
108. They provide a very good inroduction to the culture of another country and
can be used to encourage students to read and learn more about a society before
traveling to that region of the world.
109. We have several classes who research countries and find the product meets the student
needs.
110. My kids use the culturegrams at leawt once a week in different lessons.
111. I find them useful in understanding cultural background of students referred to special
services for assessment
112. They WOULD be useful, but they won't take them out of the binder!
113. It allows my students to learn about their peer group 1st language culture, & customs &
present information about their own 1st language, culture, & customs to them. A very educational
experience for all!
114. no opinion because we don't have them here.
115. Provides students with very good insights into country cultures, etc.
116. To help them to learn different culture and geography.
117. They are concise and provide great discussion topics.
118. For my geography class I usually pull it out once per unit as a comparitive analysis.
119. I use CultureGrams in my Communications class to better inform students about cultural
differences in body language. The students are interested and listen extremely well to the
information given.
120. The brief, fact-filled format is very handy and students like them.
121. We have used them for several years in the media center. I love them and promote them to
teachers who are not aware of them.
122. They are a very good resource for concise counrty information.
123. It is useful in the sense that it has all the information available in one spot. I do prefer that
students research the material themselves.
124. We use them for background information on the countries customs in the social studies and
the culinary arts curriculums
125. I use them for travel purposes
126. Very useful. Students are looking for this kind of information.
127. The new "kids" version is wonderful. Perfect for those elementary reports.
128. This is the first year I have purchased CultureGrams but my teachers are very excited about
them.
129. It is one of a number of tools we use.
130. I teach a series of travel and tourism classes as part of the National Academy of Travel and
Tourism. CultureGrams provide a quick and easy resource when they are researching a country.
Question 8: For what type of curriculum do you use CultureGrams products in your
classroom? The following were the responses:

1. In the library--social studies, foods, foreign language classes
2. Prepare for study abroad.
3. do not use
4. Again, we are not a classroom. Students consult them when researching places to study
abroad.
5. I don't.
6. MODEL UN, FUTURE PROBLEM SOLVING
7. For social studies--Minnesota and US history
8. cultural studies
9. NA
10. Social studies. . .world cultures class, foreign language classes (French, German, Spanish)
11. Foreign language instruction.
12. Social Studies/ Language Arts interdiciplinary project in Grade 7.
13. Social Studies, Sociology, Science
14. I use them when I am doing diversity workshops. I used them this year to give students a brief
overview of Afghanistan. I use them for international students as well as host families for
international students.
15. n/a
16. I use them as references when we are doing a project and other teachers also use them.
17. I use them when I am doing diversity workshops. I used them this year to give students a brief
overview of Afghanistan. I use them for international students as well as host families for
international students.
18. background for study abroad or prior to receiving visitors
19. I advise students who are going overseas to study (university students). Students use the
materials to begin learning about the country or countries in which they might be interested in
studying
20. I haven't used directly in class. I read about the different cultures and use bits and pieces of it
in my teaching. If I had a website they could go to, I would refer the students to them to look up
different materials.
21. Social Studies classes and when students are working on Social Studies Fair projects.
22. Social Studies, Geography, English, Health
23. any international programming across campus, other events or cultural programs, holiday
celebrations, etc.
24. For overseas training.
25. Freshman Country Research
26. As previously stated, this is not a "classroom," so questions pertinent to this setting are not
applicable.
27. As I said before, we do not have a classroom and do not teach courses.
28. Research and travel.
29. Graduate Business Communications
30. for global education program with non formal youth development organization - 4-H Youth
Development / with host families and youth traveling outbound. Youth and adults of all ages are
involved.
31. Family and Consumer Sciences Education
32. Internationa Studies; International Business
33. social studies - world history
34. I do not use them in a curriculum, but in counseling/advising.
35. Haven't used for chinese classes.
36. They are my primary test bank source for exams and they allow for instructional dynamic
game-type activities in the classroom.
37. I do not use them for curriculum but for self development
38. Business Communications
39. I use them as additional information for faculty and staff to gain insight to our international
students.
40. World history, language classes
41. Study Abroad orientation
42. Study Abroad Information Booklet
43. Our equivalent of a World Cultures class
44. Intercultural communication
45. Social Studies
46. Social Studies
47. Not applicable
48. Country Research, Cultural explorations, We have a Spanish componet for our
Talented and Gifted program and they are a great reference for that.
49. orientation packets
50. We use them when we study the countries that my studenets come from.
51. foreign language curriculum, especially French. Also use for a US cultural diversity class.
52. social studies
53. Foreign language, social studies and media center reference materials
54. this is an administrative office
55. Peripatology (Orientation and Mobility for the Visually Impaired) is my area of teaching.
56. I would use Culturegrams for students when we are learning about countries and about their
cultures. They are great for Country reports & projects.
57. social science projects, geography
58. Cultural Diversity Classes; Social Sciences; History and Politics; Philosophy; World Religions.
59. Cultural Diversity Classes; Social Sciences; History and Politics; Philosophy; World Religions.
60. I use them for a major research project.
61. marketing & logistics
62. As background info to the country they are going to work in.
63. I use them to teach general business, but also in the future for the international business
course.
64. world geography, sociology, economics, foreign language
65. See #5 above
66. Study abroad programs
67. Study abroad programs
68. Social studies.
69. Since I am the Librarian for the whole school and the set is housed in the Library, all different
classes use this resource.
70. Geography
71. social studies
72. Communication...Cross Cultural
73. I use them for a mini-research project with 6th graders. Also the individual 6th grade teachers
assign country reports once a year.
74. 7th grade geography curriculum; Family & Consumer Ed (Home Ec) "world foods" unit; foreign
language classes; individual inquiries (vacation travel, news events, etc.)
75. ESL
76. generally our 6th and 7th grade social studies teachers refer to them.
77. Global Studies in particular, but they might be appropriate for MUN or any other world-based
78. social studies or language clases. It will come in handy for International Baccalaureate
students as well.
79. Our geography class used them for their research projoct on countries
80. All curriculum areas use Culturegrams.
81. History, Geography, Foreign Language
82. 7th grade Geography
83. My position is not in the classroom.
84. Foreign language, but I have encouraged the students to use them for social studies, also.
85. None--I ordered a culturegram for my university-related travel
86. I use them in my Spanish class -- high school -- all levels.
87. 9th grade World Cultures classes.
88. Preparation for trip to Chile. Another teacher makes extensive use of them.
89. Not used in the classroom
90. Social studies, language arts
91. see previous answers
92. for one of the Salzburg Seminar's so called University projects to give the participants an
overview about different participating countries
93. first introductions in regional context
94. Spanish culture projects for the Intro Spanish classes
95. Social Studies, Foreign Language, Family and Consumer Science, Business, English
96. Intercultural communication
97. they are used as a resource in our tutoring area.
98. Study of other countries.
99. For the training of our Peer Advisors for International Orientation, and
for the training of a student that will work with me doing outreach to
international families.
100. I am a study abroad advisor, not a teacher. The information is there for the students to
research a country where they may want to study.
101. Social studies and modern foreign languages
102. Business, vocational, English as a Second Language, Social Studies, Foreign Language.
103. social studies
104. We purchase CultureGrams for the library, available to all, used especially in Social Studies,
foreign language classes, comparative cultures, international business.
105. Foreign language, social studies
106. This is the library--several disciplines use throughtout the year.
107. Geography and world cultures
108. Foreign Language; World Studies
109. Not applicable
110. Multicultural curriculum
111. Mainly for geography assignments, and sometimes for world language classes as well.
112. Cross cultural studies -- I'm a geography teacher.
113. Middle School Social Studies
114. Geography and world language classes
115. WE have them in the library.
116. Social Studies
117. Soicial studies
118. Social Studies, Foreign Language department research especially
119. Social Studies, Language Arts, ELL, Foriegn Language, History etc.
120. Country reports
121. Again, since I'm the librarian, I see many different uses. They are used for geography 122.
research on countries, as well as for background information about student's ancestors' countries
of origin.
122. Modern World History
123. I teach history
124. "Exploring Languages" classes
125. Itnernational business courses
126. Diversity Awareness and training
127. English as a Second Language to learn about my students background
128. EFL intercultural classes.
129. Geography and sociology
130. I am using it to do a cross-curriculum project called "A Global Mosaic" through which I teach
math, science, social studies, English,economics, daily living skills and fines arts. My students are
high school special education students
131. Various study abroad programs in the social and behavioral sciences, the humanities, arts
and theatre.
132. The product is available for all students in the media center.
133. Used for staff education
134. World Geography
135. I do not teach in a classroom - my use of CultureGrams is in connection with special services
assessments and consultation with classroom teachers
136. Mostly 6th grade social studies , which is world geography.
137. reading/comprehension/note-taking, oral presentation
138. Within the country screening topics
139. Classroom , introduction of different coumtries
140. Contemporary World Literature
141. As mentioned above, I typically use it in geography class for lower level freshman
142. I am a Business instructor and I use CultureGrams in my unit on non-verbal communication.
143. Country reports---in the library, not the classroom.
144. Socail studies, language arts, band and strings.
145. Geography, foreign language, English, history projects.
146. Internation organizational behavior Cross-cultural management
147. Cultural awareness for physicians traveling for an emergency medicine fellowship program.
148. We have them in our library media center and available for any project that a student is
working on.
149. I am not a teacher; I'm the librarian, so I am not familiar with the curriculum, but in general
the humanities students use CultureGrams.
150. Social Studies, Culinary arts
151. Not used in the classroom
152. I am a college librarian, so I don't really know. I assume they're using them for intercultural
communication and marketing programs.
153. course on Cross-cultural Management
154. Sixth grade world geography.
155. Diversity studies and Courtries
156. Departure Briefings
157. Travel and Tourism classes
158. I used them when teaching a unit on the Middle East and Africa last year.
JNS2 Marketing Research Group – Appendix E




                Survey Data
Please look to Excel file entitled ―Final Research Survey‖ and SPSS file entitled
finalsurveyresponseswithsixmonths.sav.
JNS2 Marketing Research Group – Appendix F




        Frequencies and Regression
Please look to SPSS file entitled regression.spo.
JNS2 Marketing Research Group – Appendix G




             Cross Tabulations
Please look to SPSS files entitled croostabGRADETAUGHT.spo, crosstabAGE.spo,
crosstabGENDER.spo, and crosstabYRSTEACHING.spo.

				
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