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					                                Biodiversity of Singapore – What’s up?
                            The Biodiversity of Singapore Symposium 2003
                          Lecture Theatre 25, National University of Singapore
                                        11th & 12th of July 2003

                                                               Program
Day 1 – 11th July2003
Opening Ceremony
07:30 am           SARS Screening and Registration
08.50 am           Guests to be seated
09:00 am           Guest of Honour arrives
                           Welcoming address by Chairman
                           Opening address and launch of Chek Jawa Guidebook by Guest of Honour,
                            Dr. Vivian Balakrishnan, Minister of State for National Development.

09:30 am           Slideshow by Ria Tan, Project Editor of Chek Jawa Guidebook
09:40 am           Award presentations
10:00 am           Tea Break (tea will be served)

Research Session
(Chairs: Dr Ruth O’Riordan and Mr. Lim Cheng Puay, Department of Biological Sciences, NUS)

10:30 am           Plenary Session I - Biodiversity Research

                   R1 Wailings from the Ivory Tower: What Role, Our Researchers?
                   Assoc. Prof. Peter Ng Kee Lin (Director, Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, Department of Biological Sciences,
                   NUS).

                   Research Seminars
11:30 am           R2 Are Birds Declining in Singapore?
                   Mr. Lim Kim Seng (Nature Society Singapore).

11:45 am           R3 The Role of Wildlife Reserves in Research and Conservation in Singapore
                   Dr. G Agoramoorthy (Director, Research & Conservation, Wildlife Reserves of Singapore).

12:00 nn           R4 The Role of National Parks in Biodiversity Research
                   Dr. Ruth Kiew (Keeper of Herbarium & Library, AD Botanical Research, Singapore Botanic Gardens, National Parks
                   Board).

12:15 pm           R5 Marine Biodiversity Research at the Tropical Marine Science Institute, NUS
                   Dr. Tan Koh Siang (Tropical Marine Science Institute, NUS).

12:30 pm           R6 Biodiversity Research at the Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research (RMBR), NUS
                   Assoc. Prof. Benito Tan (Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, Department of Biological Sciences, NUS).

12:45 pm           R7 Overview of Biodiversity Besearch in the Natural Sciences Academic Group
                   Assoc. Prof. C.H. Diong & Asst. Prof. Jean Yong Wan HongPresenting author (National Institute of Education, NTU).

1:00 pm            Lunch Break

Management Session
(Chairs: Mr. Jeffrey Low, National Parks Board; Ms. Ng Ngan Kee, Department of Biological Sciences, NUS)

2:00 pm            Plenary Session II - Biodiversity Management

                   M1 Partnership in Managing Singapore’s Biological Diversity Dr. Leong Chee Chiew (Chief Operating Officer,
                   National Parks Board).

3:00 – 3:30 pm     Tea (tea will be served)

                   Management Seminars
3:30 pm            M2 Balancing Nature Conservation and Development
                   Mr. Seow Kah Ping (Deputy Director, Physical Planning Division, Urban Redevelopment Authority)

3:45 pm            M3 Management of Pulau Ubin
                   Mr. Robert Teo (Pulau Ubin Branch, National Parks Board)

4:00 pm            M4 Habitat Management in a Nature Reserve – the CNR Experience
                   Mr. Benjamin Lee (Central Nature Reserves Branch, National Parks Board)

4:15 pm            M5 The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)
                   Dr. Astrid Yeo (Head, Import & Export Division Agri-food and Veterinary Authority)


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Day 2 – 12th July 2003
08:00 am            Registration and SARS screening
Education Session
(Chairs: Ms. Grace Leng, Creative Kids; Ms. Uma Sachidhanandam, Singapore Environment Council)

09:00 am           Plenary Session III - Biodiversity Education

                   E1 The Importance of Biodiversity Education
                   Prof. Leo Tan Wee Hin (Director, National Institute of Education, NTU)

10:00 am           Tea Break (tea will be served)

                   Education Seminars
10:30 am           E2 Environmental Education in Schools
                   Mr. Cheong Kim Fatt (Curriculum Planning Officer, Ministry of Education)

10:45 am           E3 "Fun with nature" - A New Approach to Nature Education with Kids
                   Assoc. Prof. Vilma D'Rozario (Chairman, Education Group, Nature Society, Singapore)

11:00 am           E4 Sow Together, Reap Forever
                   Ms. Linda Goh (Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserves, National Parks Board)

11:15 am           E5 Life Science Education at the Science Centre
                   Mrs. Anne Dhanaraj, (Singapore Science Centre)

11:30 am           E6 “The Green Volunteers Network"
                   Mr. Grant W. Pereira (Head, Green Volunteers Network, Singapore Environment Council)

11:45 am           E7 Activities and Programmes of the Singapore Environment Council
                   Mr. Howard Shaw (Executive Director, Singapore Environment Council)

12:00 nn           E8 Promoting Biodiversity Research and Education through the Singapore Institute of Biology
                   Assoc. Prof. Lim Tit Meng (Singapore Institute of Biology)

12:15 pm           E9 Care for Nature, Respect for Animals - The work of SZG Docents
                   Mr. Tyrone Lim (Chairperson, Singapore Zoological Gardens Docents)

12:30 pm           E10 Stepping Out - Biodiversity Education as a Conduit to Cooperative Teaching and Partnerships
                   Ms. Tan Beng Chiak (Raffles Girls Secondary School)

12:45 pm           E11 Lessons from the Refugia - Strategies in Biodiversity Education
                   Mr. N. Sivasothi (Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, Department of Biological Sciences, NUS)

1.00 pm            Lunch Break (Lunch will be served)

Conservation Session
(Chairs: Mr. Subaraj Rajathurai, Natural History Consultant; Ms. Tun Phyu Phyu Karenne, Tropical Marine Science Institute, NUS.)

2:00 pm            Plenary Session IV - Biodiversity Conservation

                   C1 Conserving Singapore’s Biodiversity –Should We, Can We, Will We?
                   Prof. Chou Loke Ming (Department of Biological Sciences, NUS)

3:00 pm            Tea Break (tea will be served)

                   Conservation Seminars
3:30 pm            C2 A Review of Recent Conservation Activities and Projects undertaken by the Nature Society
                   Dr. Ho Hua Chew (Chairman, Conservation Committee, Nature Society, Singapore)

3:45 pm            C3 Conservation of Urban Trees in Singapore
                   Mr. Simon Longman (Arboriculture Division, National Parks Board)

4:00 pm            C4 Legal Protection of Singapore’s Botanical Heritage
                   Assoc. Prof. Lye Lin Heng, Irene (Deputy Director, Asia-Pacific Centre for Environmental Law, Faculty of Law, NUS)

4:15 pm            C5 The Raffles Museum and Biodiversity Conservation in Singapore- Tapping a Century-Old Resource
                   Dr. Darren Yeo Chong Jinn (Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, Department of Biological Sciences, NUS).

4:30 pm            C6 Web for Nature: Reaching out with the Internet
                   Ms. Ria Tan

4:45 pm            C7 Creativity in Conservation
                   Mr. Jagdish Ramakrishnan (Creative Director, Saatchi & Saatchi)

5:00 pm            Closing Remarks
                   Mr. N. Sivasothi (Coordinator, The Biodiversity of Singapore Symposium 2003)



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Visit the symposium webpage at: http://rmbr.nus.edu.sg/biodiversitysymposium

Abstracts
Research Session
R1 (Plenary) “Wailings from the Ivory Tower: What Role, Our Researchers?”
A/P Peter Ng (Director, Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, Department of Biological Sciences, NUS)
Abstract
What should biodiversity researchers in Singapore be working on? Local issues and problems relevant to Singapore's challenges that will
help strengthen biodiversity conservation? Applied aspects that will help local agencies balance and manage environmental concerns and
conservation needs? Perhaps focus on impact assessments and specific faunaistic or floristic conflicts? Or go regional, considering
Singapore is so small and so much has already been lost. Or challenge the big boys in the west and participate in "international cutting
edge biodiversity work", focusing on big theoretical questions, biogeography, phylogeny, etc. With the pervasive effects of researchers
needing to publish in top journals with high "impact factors" so as to ensure funding and survival - is there really a choice? And what about
very competent "amateurs", whose research knowledge of specific habitats and organisms often outstrips that of professionals? What is
their role in the research picture?

R2 “Are birds declining in Singapore?”
Mr. Lim Kim Seng (Nature Society of Singapore)
Abstract
The Bird Group of the Nature Society (Singapore) has been conducting a nation-wide census since 1986. These counts involve observers
walking a regular route for approximately three hours on a fixed day in March annually at between 19 and 25 sites in various parts of the
country. Comparing data between 1991 and 2003, there has been a decline of 39% in terms of number of birds and 16% in terms of number
of species. The avifaunal changes have not been uniform for all species. Some birds have been consistently amongst the top 20 most
numerous birds surveyed while others have declined precipitously. Why is this so? This presentation attempts some answers.

R3 The Role of Wildlife Reserves in Research and Conservation in Singapore
Dr G Agoramoorthy (Director, Research & Conservation, Wildlife Reserves Singapore)
Abstract
The Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS), the organization managing the Singapore Zoological Gardens, Night Safari and Jurong BirdPark
has been involved in the conservation of biodiversity in Singapore for the past decade. With more than 30 years of experience managing
captive populations of several species of endangered wildlife, the WRS has used its expertise in collaborative efforts with local institutions
such as the National Parks Board and National University of Singapore to promote biodiversity conservation. Projects include conservation
breeding of local fauna such as the lesser mousedeer (Tragulus javanicus), leopard cat (Felis bengalensis), slow loris (Nyticebus coucang),
small-clawed otter (Aonyx cinerea), and three-striped palm civet (Arctogalidia trivirgata). In addition, it also works to actively support
students and biologists who conduct research and contribute to conservation of local fauna; examples are the on-going population census
of flying lemurs (Cynocephalus variegatus) and long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Furthermore, WRS has established the Wildlife
Research and Conservation Fund to encourage biologists to carry out research on the conservation of biodiversity in Singapore as well as
other countries in South East Asia.

R4 The Role of National Parks in Biodiversity Research
Dr. Ruth Kiew (Keeper of Herbarium & Library, AD Botanical Research, Singapore Botanic Gardens, National Parks Board)
Abstract
NParks involvement in biodiversity research covers six main aspects: to carry out ground surveys to collect baseline data; to facilitate
research in areas under NParks jurisdiction; to collate information in the form of databases; to make herbarium specimens for permanent
reference; to publish pertinent data; and to carry out biodiversity research at a regional level. Examples of some of the past, present and
future biodiversity research activities carried out by staff of the Biodiversity Centre, Central Nature Reserve, Pulau Ubin, Sungei Buloh and
the Singapore Herbarium will be presented.

R5 Marine Biodiversity Research at the Tropical Marine Science Institute, NUS
Dr. Tan Koh Siang (Tropical Marine Science Institute, NUS)
Abstract
It is well known that the marine environment in Singapore is characterized by high biodiversity (i.e., large number of biological species per
unit area). However, our ability to recognize and identify marine organisms is still rather limited, so much so that assessment and monitoring
of the health of our marine ecosystems cannot be carried out satisfactorily. Perhaps with the exception of marine plants, scleractinian
corals, decapod crustaceans, gastropod and bivalve molluscs, echinoderms, fish and other vertebrates, most other marine organisms
cannot be readily identified. As new species continue to be described from the marine habitats in Singapore, even less is known about the
ecological roles of common marine flora and fauna. At TMSI, preliminary efforts are now being made to address some of these
shortcomings. In particular, studies of natural and artificial habitats including mangroves, estuarine reefs, tidal monsoon drains, seawalls
and navigation buoys are beginning to reveal hitherto undocumented sponge, polychaete, molluscan and ascidian diversity. Undesirable
marine growth (or fouling) are startlingly diverse, beginning with marine bacteria. In addition to these systematic studies, other on-going
projects aim to analyse the life history of common marine organisms in different habitats, with particular emphasis on microhabitat
utilisation, growth, reproduction and predator-prey relationships. The results of these studies will not only provide the necessary baseline for
robust environmental impact assessment of man’s activities in Singapore, but also contribute towards a better understanding of the tropical
marine environment in Southeast Asia, of which we know so little.

R6 Biodiversity Research at the Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research (RMBR), NUS
Assoc. Prof. Benito Tan (Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, Department of Biological Sciences, NUS)
Abstract
Progress and accomplishment in biodiversity research at the Raffles Museum (RMBR) at NUS over the past decade are reviewed. Due to
manpower and financial constraints, the extent of research has focused on Southeast Asia and Singapore. In spite of challenges from many
quarters, RMBR has become an important centre of biodiversity study in the region today.




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R7 Overview of biodiversity research in the Natural Sciences Academic Group
Assoc. Prof. C.H. Diong & *Asst. Prof. Jean Yong Wan Hong (National Institute of Education, NTU)
Abstract
Education is the surest way to make people learn about, appreciate and treasure their natural heritage. We study, teach and share the
knowledge of biodiversity with three major groups of people or organizations in Singapore. The first group is the students of NTU pursuing
their basic degrees or diplomas in various fields of study (e.g. Science, Arts, Engineering, Accountancy, and Business). The second group
comprises school teachers from primary and secondary schools and junior colleges. Such “in-service” continuing education has become an
important facet for the professional development of teachers. The third group is the various governmental ministries, agencies (e.g. National
Parks Board, Wildlife Reserves of Singapore), and non-governmental organizations (e.g. Singapore Environment Council, Nature Society
(Singapore)) in Singapore. Our efforts in biodiversity education, research and conservation can be broadly categorized into two areas:
marine habitats and animal diversity, and forest, mangroves and plant diversity. The underlying theme that unites all our staff interested in
biodiversity is the recognition of the importance of biodiversity education in shaping the minds of all people living in Singapore towards the
conservation of our diverse and wondrous natural heritage. For further information about our group and staff members, please visit us at
http://sci.nie.edu.sg/ns/.
(*Presenting author)

Management Session
M1 (Plenary) Partnership in Managing Singapore’s Biological Diversity
Dr Leong Chee Chiew (Chief Operating Officer, National Parks Board)
Abstract
The conservation and sustainable use of Singapore’s remaining biodiversity to optimise benefits for the present and future generations of
Singaporeans involve diverse activities and responsibilities. These include meeting Singapore’s international and regional responsibilities
as a member of the Convention on Biological Diversity, ensuring the health of natural ecosystems and habitats, carrying out research to
document biodiversity, implementing educational programmes, planning compatible recreational experiences for the public, and so on. No
single agency, government or non-government, has all the resources, or the complete knowledge and skill sets required for these varied
tasks. Indeed, the conservation of Singapore’s biodiversity requires the collective effort of all sectors of the public, private and people
communities. This paper reflects on some of the tasks involved and ways in which collaboration can be effected.

M2 Balancing Nature Conservation and Development
Mr. Seow Kah Ping (Deputy Director, Physical Planning Division, Urban Redevelopment Authority)
Abstract
Careful and rigorous planning has played an important role in achieving a balance between nature conservation and development. Urban
planners recognise the importance of protecting valuable nature areas and strive to achieve a sustainable environment and retain and
enhance our existing natural heritage. Through the 2001 Concept Plan, which is a long-term strategic land use plan, we have safeguarded
sufficient land for the needs of a 5.5mil population. Public feedback during the Concept Plan Review showed that the public values our
natural and built heritage. Having considered this and our development plans, we are able to commit, as a long-term planning strategy, for
our nature areas to be kept for as long as possible. In addition, for the first time, we have taken a significant step to reflect 22 nature areas
in our land use plans, these nature areas are not likely to be affected by development in the long term. This shows a higher level of
commitment to protect our nature areas. Land use plans are reviewed regularly and our planners continuously seek to balance nature
conservation and development.

M3 Management of Pulau Ubin
Mr. Robert Teo (Pulau Ubin Branch, National Parks Board)
Abstract
The National Parks Board (NParks) manages the Pulau Ubin Recreation Area and the intertidal flats at Chek Jawa. NParks also monitors
the health of the Nature Area designated under the Singapore Green Plan in other parts of Pulau Ubin. The primary objectives in managing
Pulau Ubin are to enhance visitor experiences and a sense of community by preserving the rustic and natural charm of the island and
providing an integrated network of facilities and programmes for compatible outdoor pursuits. Basic visitor amenities complement nature
awareness and community involvement programmes. Baseline data on the island's natural heritage is also being gathered through surveys
with the help of volunteers and NGOs. The effective management of Pulau Ubin is dependent on developing strong partnerships and having
good support from the people, private and public sectors.

M4 Habitat Management in a Nature Reserve – the CNR Experience
Mr. Benjamin Lee (Central Nature Reserve Branch, National Parks Board)
Abstract
The Central Nature Reserve (CNR), which consists of Bukit Timah and Central Catchment Nature Reserves, are set aside for the purposes
of conservation, research, education and compatible recreation. NParks is entrusted with its management. To achieve all these in a
sustainable manner, active management is needed. This involves getting the people, private and public sectors interested and engaged in
the activities of the CNR. In this paper, the habitat management of the CNR, will be discussed. Some aspects of habitat management to be
discussed include trail planning, weed removal, plant salvage and propagation and reforestation. Some notable plant research (past and
present) within the Nature Reserves will also be highlighted to show how scientific research contributes to the biodiversity knowledge and
management of our remaining rainforest reserves.

M5 The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)
Dr Astrid Yeo (Head, Import & Export Division, Agri-food and Veterinary Authority)
Abstract
The presentation will give an overview of what is CITES and how it is implemented in Singapore. The presentation will also touch on
regulation of other wildlife, which are not protected under CITES."

Education Session
E1 (Plenary) The Importance of Biodiversity Education
Prof. Leo Tan Wee Hin (Director,National Institute of Education, NTU)
Abstract
This address will look at biological diversity as it relates to our understanding (through education and other means) of the interconnected
nature of the living world and its processes at three different levels - genetic diversity; species diversity and ecosystem diversity. Why are
these important? The value of biodiversity to humankind's wellbeing and survival will be discussed.




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E2 Environmental Education in Schools
Mr. Cheong Kim Fatt (Curriculum Planning Officer, Ministry of Education)
Abstract
Environmental education is infused and integrated into the school curriculum. The approach to environmental education is through subjects
that lend themselves well e.g. sciences, social studies, geography, and civics and moral education. Environmental education is also
approached through programmes like National Education, Community Involvement, and
Clean and Green Week."

E3 "Fun with Nature" - A New Approach to Nature Education with Kids
Assoc. Prof. Vilma D'Rozario (Chairman, Education Group, Nature Society, Singapore)
Abstract
In January 2003, the Education Group of the Nature Society (Singapore) launched a new nature education programme specifically
addressed to children and their accompanying parents. The "Fun with Nature" series of workshops was conducted at the Botanic Gardens
and incorporated show and tell sessions by a team of naturalists, which illustrated aspects of Singapore's native fauna. Concepts of ecology
and conservation were sown in and each workshop was rounded off with a relevant hands-on craft work session. The series has been very
well received by participants and the probable reasons for this is discussed along with plans for its introduction to Singapore schools.

E4 Sow Together, Reap Forever
Ms. Linda Goh (Sungei Buloh Branch, National Parks Board)
Abstract
Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve is a nature reserve of diverse tropical biodiversity. Support for the wetland reserve is crucial for its continued
growth and relevance. Increasing the public’s interest and understanding becomes an important priority. Through SBWR’s education
outreach programmes, Singapore’s residents and friends from overseas can experience nature and discover opportunities to make
meaningful contributions to the wetland reserve. The sustained conservation and relevance of SBWR is a shared responsibility and depend
on the involvement of the people, private sector and other public agencies.

E5 Life Science Education at the Science Centre
Mrs. Anne Dhanaraj (Singapore Science Centre)
Abstract
The Science Centre is a place that creates many non-formal situations for learning to take place. It adopts an interactive approach that
invites visitors to see, hear, touch and explore exhibits and phenomena. In the 25 years the Science Centre has been open, more than 17
million visitors have passed though its doors of which more than half are children. How does Science Centre contribute to awareness of
nature and the environment? We take a look at the programme areas offered by the Science Centre: exhibitions, enrichment classes,
publications, promotional events and movies.

E6 "The Green Volunteers Network"
Mr. Grant W. Pereira (Head, Green Volunteers Network, Singapore Environment Council)
Abstract
The Green Volunteers Network - how it evolved from its inception and what activities we do today, both our past, present and future
activities. We encourage schools to set up Green Clubs and other activities.

E7 Activities and Programmes of the Singapore Environment Council
Mr. Howard Shaw (Executive Director, Singapore Environment Council)
Abstract
The Singapore Environment Council (SEC) is a non-profit, non-government organisation that works towards nurturing a more
environmentally conscious society. The Council's on-going activities aim to increase the level of environmental awareness among the
general public and help individuals and organisations translate awareness into positive action. This session will highlight SEC's role in
providing environmental education across diverse sectors of society with the eventual goal of changing mindsets. The presentation will also
explain SEC's strategic focus both in terms of environmental issues and target groups.

E8 "Promoting Biodiversity Research and Education through the Singapore Institute of Biology"
Assoc. Prof. Lim Tit Meng (Singapore Institute of Biology)
Abstract
The Singapore Institution of Biology has a long history of promoting professionalism in biodiversity related research and education activities.
The institute's Research Trust Funds support projects that investigate the fauna and flora in the region. Outreach events such as student
competitions and workshops are organized periodically, in conjunction with local tertiary institutions, government and non-government
organizations.

E9 Care for Nature, Respect for Animals - The work of SZG Docents
Mr. Tyrone Lim (Chairperson, Singapore Zoological Gardens Docents)
Abstract
The SZG Docents are a group of volunteers who complement the educational efforts of the Singapore Zoological Gardens (SZG) and Night
Safari (NS) by providing special programmes which educate visitors on conservation awareness and encourage love and respect for
animals. SZG docents are united by the commitment to reach out to visitors to raise awareness about conservation issues and to fulfill the
mission of bringing the understanding of nature closer to the hearts of both young and old the mysteries and wonders of nature.

E10 Stepping Out - Biodiversity Education as a Conduit to Cooperative Teaching and Partnerships
Ms Tan Beng Chiak (Raffles Girls Secondary School)
Abstract
Learning about biodiversity and its concomitant issues while built on a foundation of biology, must engage the diversity of subjects that
inherently shadow the topic. English, geography, history, mathematics and other sciences are important elements that contribute towards a
proper understanding of biodiversity. This complexity can be harnessed as a strength to introduce diverse and enjoyable methods in
cooperative teaching that dispense with compartmentalization. The current popularity of the topic is an aid to such practices. It is important
to engage partnerships with agencies that provide an expertise and realism to constructive projects from which the students draw lessons
for a more comprehensive understanding of biodiversity and life.
Web links: Mandai Reforest Project http://www.reforest.org; Chek Jawa http://www.reforest.org/chekjawa; Voyage to the Future
http://www.nhk.or.jp/voyage/ http://kidscentral.mediacorptv.com/tv/localprog/voyage/index1.htm; Students' Project - Clean & Green
Singapore http://www.rgs.edu.sg/student/cyberfair2002/

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E11 Lessons from the Refugia - Strategies in Biodiversity Education
Mr. N. Sivasothi (Research Officer, Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, Department of Biological Sciences, NUS)
Abstract
The Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research is a research organization with neither directive nor budget for education. Oddly enough,
even as biodiversity education of undergraduates receded in the university, the museum began reaching out to schools and the public.
Through partnerships with volunteers and other organizations, some issues in biodiversity and heritage have been addressed. A re-
examination of objectives have resulted in new methods to fit current needs. The strategies, methods and results of these are discussed.

Conservation Session
C1 (Plenary) Conserving Singapore’s Biodiversity – Should We, Can We, Will We?
Professor Chou, L.M. (Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore)
Abstract
With intensive competing demands for the country’s limited space and a high population density, biodiversity conservation in Singapore
appears to be a remote luxury as it does not appear to contribute to economic growth. Should Singapore participate in biodiversity
conservation? One of the strongest challenges is the fact that the significance of biodiversity in terms of ecological benefits is not fully
understood nor appreciated. These benefits are seldom translated into monetary language that is more readily understood by decision
makers. There is a direct monetary cost in conserving biodiversity accompanied by a larger indirect economic cost of delayed development.
However, Singapore supports international conventions covering biodiversity conservation and has those obligations to fulfill. Can
Singapore conserve its biodiversity? The record demonstrates the country’s capability for managing its natural resources. A management
and legal framework is in place. There are a number of Nature Parks and Wildlife Reserves. Biodiversity protection is however, almost
lacking for the marine environment. Will Singapore conserve its biodiversity? It has done so for some of the terrestrial and coastal habitats,
but not all habitats are adequately represented. A few surprises e.g. Chek Jawa emerge occasionally from an otherwise usual policy
response of pragmatism due to limited space and economic survival. However, such surprises can be regarded as a “stay of execution”.
What is needed is a totally fresh approach where biodiversity protection is not considered in isolation and at the expense of economic
growth, but integrated with overall environmental protection and given some importance. Only then can we address sustainable
development in a positive and effective manner.

C2 A review of recent conservation activities and projects undertaken by the Nature Society
Dr. Ho Hua Chew (Chairman, Conservation Committee, Nature Society, Singapore)
Abstract
Nature Conservation has become a hot topic in the past decade in Singapore. In recent years, more issues have cropped up. The speaker
will review the more recent conservation issues and the efforts made by the Nature Society to deal with them. The main obstacles to
successful results will be highlighted with a view to paving the way to happy solutions.

C3 Conservation of Urban Trees in Singapore
Mr. Simon Longman (Arboriculture Division, National Parks Board)
Abstract
The Heritage Trees Scheme was launched on 23 Sep 2002 by Minister of State for National Development, Dr Vivian Balakrishnan. Majestic
mature trees are the natural heritage of Singapore and serve as graceful green landmarks of our tropical Garden City, lending a sense of
permanence and identity. The Heritage Trees Panel has endorsed an initial list of 36 such trees in Singapore that are worthy of
conservation. Some of these trees range between 80-100 years old, and many are located in parks and roadsides. A nomination scheme
allows the public to nominate suitable trees to the Heritage Trees Panel for evaluation as Heritage Trees. Through such channels, a greater
sense of community ownership for the scheme is developed. By engaging the community in the growing of the scheme, this initiative has
received enthusiastic response from the public, with more than 270 nominations island-wide being received. A list of 55 Heritage Roads
has also been designated. These are roads lined with mature trees and greenery, which give a special “greenery ambience” to the Heritage
Road. For category “A” Heritage roads such as Mount Pleasant Road and South Buona Vista Road, legislative measures are being
proposed to facilitate the conservation of green buffers of natural vegetation along the roads.

C4 Legal Protection of Singapore’s Botanical Heritage
Assoc. Prof. Lye Lin Heng, Irene (Deputy Director, Asia-Pacific Centre for Environmental Law)
Abstract
Many in Singapore are unaware that there are laws to protect our plants. This came to the forefront when the last Changi Tree was
unwittingly cut down by a property management company. This talk will focus on the laws that protect our botanical heritage.

C5 The Raffles Museum and Biodiversity Conservation in Singapore- Tapping a Century-Old Resource
Dr. Darren Yeo Chong Jinn (Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, Department of Biological Sciences, NUS)
Abstract
By pursuing its dual objectives of research and education, the Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research plays a part in biodiversity
conservation in Singapore. This presentation focuses on the research component, including the museum’s collections as important sources
of information as well as the significance of collaborative work with visiting scientists, and surveys for baseline data. In addition, it will also
touch on various aspects that can be enhanced to further meet the needs of conservation efforts.

C6 Web for Nature: Reaching out with the Internet
Ms. Ria Tan
Abstract
An Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore survey in 2000 revealed that five out of ten homes in Singapore has internet access!
Websites are thus a potentially significant tool to help spread a message. They can also expand educational outreach and develop the sort
of community of volunteers and supporters needed for conservation effort by individuals or civil groups with practically no funding. This
avenue of expression and organisation is within easy reach of all of us and this will be demonstrated.
Useful links: Ria's homepage: http://www.naturia.per.sg Chek Jawa homepage: http://chekjawa.nus.edu.sg On-line Guide to Chek Jawa:
http://www.wildsingapore.com

C7 Creativity in Conservation
Mr. Jagdish Ramakrishnan (Creative Director, Saatchi & Saatchi)
Abstract
Is it possible to get an impactful, effective conservation message across to a mass audience on a shoestring budget? With probono
advertising and non-traditional, ambient media, it certainly is. This brief overview will cover work done by Saatchi & Saatchi Singapore for


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environmental and animal welfare groups. It will also include examples of innovative public service campaigns from Saatchi offices
worldwide to understand what else is possible.
Organisers

Jointly organised by:
Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, Department of Biological Sciences, NUS
Nature's Niche Pte Ltd (Botanic Shop)
The Singapore Institute of Biology

Central Coordinating Team

Peter Ng
N. Sivasothi
Ng Bee Choo
Jacques See
Darren Yeo
Greasi Simon
Angeline Tay
Sasi Nayar
Adrian Loo
Airani Ramli
Koh Li Ling
Ng Ngan Kee
Kok Oi Yee
Cynthia Lee
Kelvin Lim
Yong Ann Nee
Joelle Lai

Supported by

Lee Foundation
Swarovski Optik
Asian Geographic




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