Docstoc

Masters Degree in Career and Technical Education Report Introduction

Document Sample
Masters Degree in Career and Technical Education Report Introduction Powered By Docstoc
					                      California State University, San Bernardino
                     College of Education - Annual Program Report
    Masters Degree in Career and Technical Education Report
    This report was prepared by Joseph A. Scarcella, Ph.D. – June 2004, Career and Technical
     Education Program Coordinator. Ronald K. Pendleton, Ph.D. reviewed this study and
                provided information relative to current curricular development.


Introduction
The purpose of this document is to provide information about the MA in Education
Degree Career and Technical (Vocational) Education Option so that an external
reviewer may evaluate both the strengths of the program and make recommendations
relative to improvements that may need to be made. Most of the supporting
documentation has been published and is accessible on the CSUSB College of Education
Web site. When web based supporting documents are cited the URL (specific web site
address) will be provided in bold.
This degree is intended for teachers and administrators with vocational, occupational
and/or technology backgrounds who are interested in career development for positions
with Regional Occupational Programs, Community Colleges and/or any private or public
institutions that are involved with vocational, occupational and/or technology training.
To enter the MA degree program in Career and Technical (Vocational) Education at
CSUSB a candidate must have completed a Bachelor's degree from an accredited
institution and must have demonstrated writing proficiency through completion of the
EDUC 306 (Upper Division Writing Course) or it's equivalent.
Candidates must successfully complete a minimum of 45 units of prescribed course work,
with 32 of those units completed in residence at CSUSB, and must maintain a minimum
grade point average of 3.0 (B) in all course work related to the M.A. degree. Each course
is 4 units and meets once a week for 4 hours for 10 weeks. All courses are scheduled to
meet either in the evening or on weekends. Required course work includes:
•     Career and Technical (Vocational) Education Core (three courses EVOC 637, 638 and
      639)
•     College of Education Core (EDUC 603, 663 and 695).
•     M.A. Thesis and Comprehensive Exams (EDUC 600, 601, and 699 - see information
      below).
•     Emphasis Areas (Four courses) in one of the areas listed below: Coordination/Supervision
      - EVOC 508, 509 & 510 plus 4 units of approved electives. This course work may also be
      applied toward the D.S. Supervision Credential. Counseling - ECLG 650 plus 12 units of
      approved electives. This course work may also be applied toward the Certificate in
      Counseling. Curriculum Development - EVOC 520 plus 12 units of approved electives.
      Evaluation & Testing - EVOC 521 plus 12 units of approved electives. Special Education
      - ESPE 530 plus 12 units of approved electives. Educational Computing - ETEC 546 plus
      12 units of approved electives. This course work may also be applied toward the Certificate
      in Ed. Computing. Educational Technology - EVOC 519 plus 12 units of approved
      electives. This course work may also be applied toward the Certificate in Ed. Technology.
      School Administration - EADM 673 plus 12 units of approved electives. This course work
      may also be applied toward the Administrative Services Credential. Adult Education -



                                                 1
                                                                                         9/14/2007
   EVOC 504 plus 12 units of approved electives. This is a proposed new emphasis area
   (available through special arrangement). Correctional Education - EDUC 542d plus 12
   units of approved electives. This is a proposed new emphasis area (available through special
   arrangement).

The Career and Technical (Vocational) Education Core (EVOC 637, EVOC 638 and EVOC
639) consists of three sequential courses. A wide range of topics related to contemporary training
and education are discussed in these three courses. Anyone entering the Career and Technical
(Vocational) Education MA program should start with the EVOC 637 course and plan on taking
EVOC 637 and EVOC 638 during the following two quarters. Anyone who has not met the
Upper Division Writing Requirement must complete the EDUC 306 course (or it's equivalent)
with a grade of at least "B" before they allowed to sign up for EVOC 637. The College of
Education Core also consists of 3 courses: EDUC 603 is a course in interpersonal
communication, EDUC 663 is a survey of research course, and EDUC 695 is a course in
foundations of education. All of these courses are usually offered during all four quarters and are
recommended to be completed before entering the core courses.
The Emphasis Areas (indicated above) offer the opportunity to focus on a particular area
of personal interest. Graduate level courses from other programs (either at CSUSB or any
accredited university) can be used as electives. The result is that we can custom design a
program of study to meet almost anyone's needs.
Qualified applicants apply for GRADUATE admission to CSUSB and sign up for the
next scheduled EVOC 637 course.
Information about program options, each course within the program, admission to
CSUSB, registration and credentialing is posted on the Career and Technical Teacher
Education Web Site at http://soe.csusb.edu/vema/EVOCMA/index.html.
NOTE: The program coordinator has submitted a P and C Form, and expects approval
from the University Curriculum Committee in June. The required EDUC 600 and 601
courses will be replaced with EVOC 640 – Topics in Education. Because the EVOC core
course are a cumulating experience working toward research and thesis project completion, the
EVOC 640 course was created to allow students an opportunity to study topics in education
concurrently with Thesis Project or Comprehensive Examination completion.
Responses to the Previous Accreditation Review and Outcomes Assessment Feedback
The Masters program was last reviewed in 1998 by Dr. Jerry Streichler, a distinguished
professional educator and former Dean at Bowling Green University, Ohio. The
following provides highlights of the summary he prepared. This report was based on
reviews of materials, interviews and a concentrated site visit concerning the five-year
cycle self-studies of the College of Education’s M.A. degree programs and program
options. The latter were organized according to the CSUSB guideline document
"Organization of the Self-Study." Accordingly, most self-studies also included faculty
resumes, sample syllabi, handbooks, guidelines, or information packets for students, and
information about teaching credential programs associated with the particular program.
Significant accomplishments are reported. Also, concerns about resources, governance,
program structure, and program delivery are noted in this report. Themes addressed in the
full report emerged from reading the self-studies, impressions from interviews with
faculty and university administrators, information culled from other documents, and
consideration of events in the state and nation that seem connected to the issues under
consideration.



                                                2
                                                                                          9/14/2007
Dr. Streichler commended the design of the program, the dedication and effectiveness of
the faculty and the overall quality of instruction. A snap shot of his comments are noted
below. The complete accreditation review documents are on file in the College of
Education Office.
On the Campus
Instructional productivity is marked by some exemplary innovative arrangements for
internships and credential course offerings, cohorts for master’s degree offerings with
school districts, occupational training centers, and other sites (such as at The College of
the Desert) in the CSUSB 27,000 square mile service area. Not to be overlooked are the
several grant-funded projects, such as the one in Rehabilitation Counseling, and the
exciting program to prepare Korean students who will return to their nation as teachers of
English as a Foreign Language. It would be unfair to allow these few efforts to alone
represent the college faculty. There are faculty connected with virtually every program
who are productively engaged in grant writing or administration of a grant, publication,
innovative arrangements for clinical work, internship arrangements and program
conceptualizations and instruction.
For the most part these accomplishments are being recorded in what appears to be the
most productive college on the CSUSB campus. What makes this statement even more
dramatic is that it is being accomplished by 253 individuals, 182 of whom are part-time
instructors. The latter are producing between 80 to 90 FTES a number that exceeds the
college’s 71 FTE faculty. This is an extraordinary disparity for a senior public university.
Quality and the institution’s reputation should be taken into consideration along with the
effects that scheduling and supervision has upon the productivity of the college’s full
time cadre.
Then there are programs that may have significantly more potential than has been
realized, such as Career and Technical (Vocational Education) whose mission includes
service to business and industry as well as in the traditional public school occupational
education programs. In this instance, as appears also to be the case in Special Education
and TESL, histories of either inability to attract and hold full-time faculty or failure to
receive authorization to add staff have severely limited the potential for program
development and delivery in areas of clear needs.
Program Elements
Faculty should be commended for the continuing thought and effort displayed in
conceptualizing and re-conceptualizing their programs. These efforts have been
stimulated by changing credentialing requirements, by the findings and recommendations
from previous reviews, and by faculty response to changes in practice and knowledge in
their discipline. In general, course configurations and sequences seem to produce the
desired competencies. Surveys of alumni reveal that graduates are essentially satisfied
with their studies.
Recommendation Highlights
• Faculty are the heart of quality graduate programs. Conceptualizing goals and a
mission that embrace teaching and learning over the human life span, cradle to grave,
pedagogy to andragogy, early childhood to adult. The themes that have been popularized
about the learning organization and independent lifelong learning are real and are being
seriously pursued and will be permanent fixtures in our society. The college should
engage in inventorying the degree to which faculty expertise is available to engage in


                                                 3
                                                                                              9/14/2007
scholarly, program development and teaching pursuits related to these areas and the
extent to which faculty would need to be augmented for the purpose.
• (One of the department’s names may be communicating something unintended. There
exists a nationally recognized, NCATE accredited area known as Technology Education.
Its professional organization has been strongly supported by NSF and NASA grants as it
has cooperated with and followed the science education community in developing
standards for science education in the public schools. Standards for teaching the subjects
of technology in the public schools are nearly complete and will be disseminated this
spring. They have wide approval of many engineering societies. Technology education
(used to be industrial arts) as taught in other states and as depicted in the standards is
hardly in evidence in California.)
• Provisions should be made for teaching and research assistants to serve in any one of
the participating options. While there may be conditions stemming from CSU guidelines
or union contract provisions that inhibit such an arrangement, every creative effort should
be extended to accomplish it. The same sort of creativity could be extended to funding
such personnel. The faculty will most certainly conceive creative ways and means with
grant agencies, school districts, benefactors and the CSU to achieve this goal.
• Reconsider, revise or remove and substitute for the three courses that comprise the
"Education Core" that appears in almost every option and program. The faculty needs to
work rather quickly to remove the disharmony and disagreement on this topic and
determine whether there ought to be a core and if so, what it should include. A first step
to be taken should be to determine, rather than courses, the essentials that can be agreed
upon about the content that ought to be common to all Master’s degree options and
programs in education. Then there may be some alternate strategies to pursue to
implement instruction of whatever is determined as common.
• If the faculty decides to leave the Introduction to Educational Research course in the
curriculum it is strongly recommended that all instructors of all courses buy into the
standards taught in the course. If it is really to have value and significance, then in every
course that requires written assignments and that have a modicum of inquiry and research
(research papers and such), the standards taught and established in EDUC 663 should be
consistently expected and thus reinforced. If this is not done, then the program faculty
projects to students an image, not only of inconsistency, but really a comment that the
content of that course may not be truly valued. Further, consistent expectation that the
standards be applied in all writing in all courses will give the student a leg up on the work
that she or he will do in the Master’s Project.
• The provisions for admission and advancement to candidacy should be made as
consistent as possible for all options/programs. Bring the catalog and publicity materials
dealing with the individual programs into a consistent presentation format. But, some of
the differences that are pointed out on page 7 fall into the area of important policy
considerations.
• Simplify admissions provisions as much as possible. Make them consistent. For
example:
       1. Evaluate the provision of "advancement to candidacy" as opposed to allowing
          rigorous admission standards and maintenance of a GPA and completion of a
          designated number of credit hours or courses to serve the purpose. If the provision




                                                 4
                                                                                             9/14/2007
          will stand, it should be simplified for better understanding and to facilitate its
          administration.
       2. The following is offered for consideration as an alternative. Simply require the
          student to achieve a certain grade point average with a minimum grade in all courses
          and in a particular sequence of required courses. The computer will handle the course
          grades and GPA. Instructors of those courses completing simple one page forms for
          each student could probably reveal more meaningful information more quickly and
          simply than can be obtained from letters of reference.
       3. Faculty should measure the time, energy, and effort called for by this requirement.
          The faculty may consider that the only time to resort to letters of reference would be
          in the case of an applicant with a marginal academic record. Letters attesting to
          growth, maturation and projections of capabilities for success from respected
          professionals may allow the faculty to "gamble" on such an individual.
Advisory Committee Feedback
The purpose of the CSUSB Career and Technical Teacher Education Programs Advisory
Committee is to provide advice and recommendations to help insure that the vocational teacher
preparation programs offered through the College of Education at California State University,
San Bernardino, continue to meet the needs of the students who enroll in those programs and the
needs of local education institutions that employ those students as instructors. Committee
membership consists primarily of people who represent institutions that hire the students who
complete CSUSB Career and Technical (vocational and adult) Teacher Education courses and
programs. Membership also includes all CSUSB program faculty who currently teach EVOC
courses, as well as both current and past EVOC students. Advisory Committee members agree
to:

   •   Review curricular and program related materials (posted at this web site) and make
       specific content related suggestions (in person at committee meetings or via e-mail).
       Bring to the attention of the committee any matters that relate to the quality of career &
       technical teacher education at CSUSB and how our programs might better meet the needs
       of teachers or potential teachers.
   •   Attend (or arrange to have a proxy attend) all meetings of the Advisory Committee. One
       or two meetings are scheduled each year. Meetings typically last for 2 hours and a
       proposed agenda is posted at this web site prior to each meeting (see below). During the
       meeting, each member is asked to provide a brief synopsis of "what's happening" at the
       institution that he/she represents.
   •   Maintain professional interaction with instructors who teach in an ROP, Community
       College, Adult Education Program, Correctional System Vocational Training Program,
       Training Academy or Private Vocational School, and/or with people who have gone
       through (or are in the process of going through) courses at CSUSB for the following
       programs:

 Advisory committee feedback was positive. The committee feels what is being done is
consistent with what is needed in the county, specifically, the thesis projects integration
with academic standards. Other comments included technological literacy education, not
computers and advancing the Standards and Assessment Standards for Technological
Literacy. It was further noted that graduates are responding positively to the curricula and
web based activity.




                                                 5
                                                                                           9/14/2007
What Program Graduates Have Said About the EVOC Courses

The names of some of the individuals who have completed our EVOC courses, along with names
of institutions where they are employed and their observations about the EVOC courses they
took are posted below:

   •   Denise Spurlock, Distance Learning Option (2004) - Ms. Spurlock is an instructor of
       business courses at Bryman College, Whittier, California. Her comments are posted on
       her personal web site at: http://dspurlock.tripod.com/evoceval.htm

   •   Ken Capistrand, Distance Learning Option (2004) - Mr. Capistrand is an ROP instructor
       of computer applications courses at Chester Jr Sr High School, Chester, California. His
       comments are posted on his personal web site at:
       http://www.chs.pcoe.k12.ca.us/capi/evalpage.htm

   •   Starley Dullien, Traditional In-Class Option (2002) Instructor of English as a Second
       Language (ESL) and General Educational Development (GED) at Palm Springs Adult
       School, Palm Springs, California. - She states: "The specific competencies required in the
       EVOC courses provide the teacher with concrete skills and training to facilitate effective
       learning in the classroom. The program offers a foundation of administrative, managerial,
       and pedagogical teaching tools appropriate and beneficial for all teachers."

   •   Vance Bloom, Distance Learning Option (2001) Mr. Bloom is an ROP Instructor of
       Automotive Technology at Murrieta Valley High School, Murrieta, California. - He
       states: "I recently took the courses EVOC501, EVOC518, and EVOC519 at California
       State University San Bernardino. I chose to use the Distance Learning Option for all
       three. I highly recommend that anyone considering getting their vocational credential,
       consider these courses. Since I teach Automotive Technology full time at Murrieta Valley
       High School, spare time is not something I have a lot of. I was able to work on the
       assignments at home, when it was convenient for me. All of the EVOC instructors are
       very willing to work with students. Their goal is to help you 'Succeed'. The work I did in
       these courses was directly used with my students and my teaching abilities have been
       much enhanced from the instruction I received." Mr. Bloom also has a great web site for
       his Automotive Technology students with lots of excellent, very interesting information.
       The address for that site is: http://www.murrieta.k12.ca.us/mvhs/staff/vbloom/

   •   Brian Frost, (Traditional In-Class Option (2001). Capt Frost is Senior Marine JROTC
       Instructor, Ramona High School, Ramona, California. - He states: "I recommend the
       CSUSB Designated Subjects Teaching Credential Courses to all new JROTC instructors
       in Southern California and to any busy professional seeking a teaching credential. Dr.
       Pendleton took the time and effort to tailor a plan to meet my busy schedule. The course
       schedules and learning options allowed me to complete all the course work in less than 9
       months. Dr. Pendleton and his staff are polished professionals who meet the individual
       needs of their students. They are great role models who enlightened and inspired me to
       raise the bar for myself and my students." Capt. Frost has also created and maintains an
       excellent Web site that should be of interest to anyone interested in JROTC. The address
       for that site is: http://ramonaweb.rusd.k12.ca.us/d1/mcjrotc.html

   •   Dawn Guzman, (Traditional Option (2000). Ms Guzman is Instructor and Clinical
       Coordinator of Radiologic Technology Program at El Camino College, Torrance,


                                               6
                                                                                        9/14/2007
    California. - She states: "Anyone who plans on teaching should take the EVOC courses at
    CSUSB. Good teaching involves a lot more than just knowing the subject matter. These
    courses really helped me to develop and refine the knowledge and skills needed for good
    teaching."

•   Mike McCarthy, Traditional Option (2000). Mr. McCarthy is an ROP Automotive
    Instructor at Claremont High School, Claremont, California. - He States: "Through my
    EVOC course studies I now have ample lesson plans that help me to organize my class
    curriculum in an efficient and well thought out manner. One of the great pluses was
    learning from working professionals in the education field. I have also updated my
    computer skills and built a web site that students can access for updated course
    information."

•   Jennifer Oberhelman, Instructor of Computer Literacy and General Office Skills at San
    Bernardino Adult School - "I found the EVOC courses very applicable to the job I am
    doing and I draw on the classes each time I compile a lesson plan or present a lesson. The
    classes were presented in a way that was easily understood. The flexibility of the course
    was an added bonus. I enjoyed the different teaching/presenting styles of the instructors
    and their obvious love of what they are doing. I highly recommend the EVOC program at
    CSUSB." - doberhelman@msn.com

•   Lorie Suntree, ROP Floral Design Instructor at Valley View High School - "I found the
    EVOC courses to be both positive and stimulating. The quality of instruction was
    excellent and consistent with current educational standards. I highly recommend these
    courses to all teachers whether they are veterans of the classroom or just starting their
    educational teaching experience." - lorie.suntree@gte.net

•   Tim Thelander, Electronics Instructor at Citrus Community College - "The EVOC
    courses are excellent preparation for teaching. They are well organized, provide essential
    information that is presented in clear straightforward language and include meaningful
    interactive activities." - ttheland@pacbell.net

•   Shelley Tofflemire, ROP Diversified Occupations Instructor at Milor/Zupanic/Rialto
    Adult Schools and Rialto High School - "These classes have been very informative and
    well structured. I like that you know what the lesson objective is and what is expected of
    you as a student. There is an example of every assignment and if you still have questions,
    the instructor is only an "e-mail" away. Some of the lessons were challenging, but with
    the help of other students, I was able to complete each assignment. There is something
    else about these classes; the instructor encourages you to interact with your fellow
    classmates. Because of this interaction, I have made a lot of new friends. After
    completing these classes, I redesigned my own curriculum similar to the EVOC format."
    - Tofflesj@cs.com

    Yvette Toro, Business Department Chair/Instructor at Victor Valley High School - "In
    regard to the vocational courses at CSUSB, I would not be the instructor I am today,
    would not have had the confidence to survive the first two years of teaching, become
    Department Chair and Digital Grant Coordinator, if it were not for the EVOC courses I
    took at CSUSB. I only wish that they were mandatory for administrators as well as
    instructors (old and new).



                                             7
                                                                                      9/14/2007
       My own students score in the 89%-99% (in MANY areas) on their Stanford Achievement
       Tests. None of their scores have been below 55%. When I am asked about their success I
       can only think of two things. I believe my children have: an excellent learning
       environment, and they have a clear model to follow. That is exactly what I found in the
       EVOC courses I took. I attribute my success in those courses and then on the job, directly
       to the environment and to the PERFECTLY CLEAR models I was able to glean from
       while I attended CSUSB (EVOC Courses)." - yvette_toro@vvuhsd.k12.ca.us

In addition to recommendations by program graduates, the administrators from all of the
institutions who have hired our program graduates praise the quality of our program. Typical of
their comments is the observation made by Bob Ciauri, Director (retired) of the San Bernardino
County ROP:
         "I can say with certainty that the teachers from San Bernardino County ROP who have
         completed the Designated Subjects Credentials course work at California State
         University, San Bernardino, have received excellent instruction that has been a
         significant factor in their success as teachers. The Designated Subjects Program at
         CSUSB is staffed by highly qualified professional educators who are dedicated to helping
         the people who take their course work become the most effective teachers possible. These
         same educators work closely with a dedicated program advisory committee to insure that
         program goals and objectives are consistent with the instructional needs of all of the
         institutions where program graduates are employed as teachers. Student to faculty ratio in
         the CSUSB courses remains small enough that all students are assured individual
         attention and an excellent learning experience. Teachers in our employ who have
         completed this program all praise the quality and the applicability of what they learned. It
         is without qualification that I recommend this program to anyone who is interested in
         developing and/or improving their effectiveness as a teacher."

Curriculum
The following listed courses were offered from Fall 2003 through Spring 2004. The total
number of sections, total number of students and average number of students is indicated
for each course. There is also a URL indicated for each course where a course description
and additional related information is posted. Class schedules are projected two years in
advance and can be seen by following the "class schedule" link from the Career and
Technical Teacher Education Web Site.
   EVOC 637 – Foundation of Vocational Education (averaged 15 students per section).
   As this is a methods course with required student presentations and multiple student
   activities, we try to limit enrollment to not more than 16 students per section.
   EVOC 638 – Critical Issues for the Vocational Educator (averaged 15 students per
   section). As this is a second of a sequence of three methods courses with required
   student presentations and multiple student activities, we try to limit enrollment to not
   more than 16 students per section.
   EVOC 639 – Professional Competencies in Vocational Education (averaged 15
   students per section). As this is a third of a sequence of three methods courses with
   required student presentations and multiple student activities, we try to limit
   enrollment to not more than 16 students per section.
   EDUC 600 – Masters Thesis Project (15 students per section, all of which completed
   their Masters Thesis and Degree).


                                                 8
                                                                                              9/14/2007
   EDUC 601 – Advanced Independent Study (15 students per section, of which worked
   at the PALS Center to advance their practicum and MA Studies as their thesis
   projects was implemented at the center).
   EVOC 999 – Comprehensive Examination (1 student per section, this student passed
   the comprehensive examination and completed the Masters Degree). This was the
   first year this course was offered after the program change was approved in 2002.

Innovations
All course materials are presented in a Web based format, with a traditional, distant learning,
or documentation option. The traditional in-class option requires a "smart classroom" with a
computer connected to the World Wide Web and a LCD projector. This equipment is used
both by the instructor and by students to access and present information. Additional advanced
independent study work was completed at the PALS Center where the students implemented
the findings of their master thesis project. Service Learning activities were required, each
student was required to write journal and reflection papers documenting their successes and
pitfalls.

Faculty
There are currently two full time faculty members and one part time faculty member as
indicated below. Every faculty member has his own Web page and the URL for each
page is indicated following the faculty member's name. Current enrollments, which have
been steadily increasing over the past several years, justify one additional full time
faculty. The program faculty are as follows.
Joseph Scarcella, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Career and Technical Education
Program Coordinator http://soe.csusb.edu/scarcella/index.html
Dr. Scarcella has been at CSUSB since 1997 and has received the College of
Education Outstanding Professional Development Award. He has also been
recognized by CSUSB as an Outstanding Advisor and has received considerable
recognition for leadership and service from the Association for Career and Technical
Education, International Technology Education Association, and Technical
Foundation of America. He serves on the Board of Directors for the Association for
Career and Technical Education, and served as Region 4 Board of Director for the
International Technology Education. He was also awarded the Prestigious Laureate
Prospectus Award from Epsilon Pi Tau, The International Fraternity for Profession in
Technology for Outstanding Leadership/Service and Achievements on local, regional,
and national teaching and scholarship in the field of Technology. Dr. Scarcella is
primarily responsible for ETEC 546, EVOC 502, EVOC 503, EVOC 637, EVOC 638
and EVOC 639, and EDUC 595, EDUC 600, and EDUC 601 courses.
Ronald K. Pendleton, Ph.D., Professor and DS Credentials Program Coordinator
http://soe.csusb.edu/rpen/index.html
Dr. Pendleton has been at CSUSB since 1981 and has received the College of
Education Outstanding Teaching Award (2001) and the CSUSB Outstanding
Professor Award (1987). He has also been recognized by CSUSB as an Outstanding
Advisor, by the League of Women Voters as a Citizen of Achievement and by
Baron's Who's Who as one of 500 International Leaders for the 21st Century. Dr.
Pendleton is primarily responsible for the EVOC 501, EVOC 502 and EVOC 503
courses. He also serves as Web Master for the College of Education, the Department
of Science, Math and Technology Education, and the Career and Technical Teacher


                                                9
                                                                                          9/14/2007
Education Programs.

Candidates
Since the program coordinator embarked on his duties, he has acted as first reader for
more than 75 students, all of which have graduated from the program – nearly one
hundred percent of the students that enrolled in pursuit of the program have graduated
with the Master Degree in Career and Technical Education. Three of which were selected
to the Honorary Phi Delta Kappa academic fraternity and 12 of which were nominated
into EPT’s CSUSB Gamma Nu Chapter. The program continues to grow and is being
recommended by many former students that have graduated from the program. For
instance, a recent graduate was hired as an associate professor at CSU Pomona’s
Veterinary Program and her master thesis curriculum was reviewed by the state of
California. Another student was hired as the associate dean at Riverside Community
College and one of his recent hires has begun taking course in the program. Others have
served on the Apple Valley School Board, President of private vocational schools, and
are administrators or faculty at four year institutions, community colleges, regional
occupational programs, and high schools. It should be noted that almost all of the
students in this program are non-traditional adults who have been successful in business
and/or industry. However, a recent change has occurred as 20 percent of the students
enrolling in the MA program currently are holding either single or multiple teaching
credentials. A small, but steadily increasing number of students who live in remote areas
or who are otherwise unable to attend regularly scheduled classes are also completing
their course work via the Distance Learning Option.

Resources
Program faculty need to continue developing computer literacy skills. Further, it is hoped
the department will provide the program with additional funding for the upgrades of
computer technologies every 2 years.

Grants/Projects
Dr. Scarcella has submitted National, State, and Intellectual Life Grants. His accomplishments
include:

   •   California State University, San Bernardino Intellectual Life Grant (Awarded Summer,
       2003). Discovering New Views About Science and Technology: Dr. Rodger Bybee's
       Visit ($5,000)
   •   National Science Foundation, Course Curriculum Laboratory and Improvement
       (Submitted December, 2003: Pending). Developing a Technological Literacy
       Demonstration Lab. ($250,000)
   •   National Science Foundation, Advanced Technology Education (ATE) (Submitted
       October, 2003: Not Accepted). A Comprehensive Approach to Technology Education for
       Diverse Students Through Linked Hispanic Serving Institutions. ($900,000)
   •   National Science Foundation, Advanced Technology Education (ATE) Pre-proposal
       Encouraged to Submit Final Proposal. (Submitted April, 2003). The Inland Empire
       Technology Education Institute Project. ($825,808)
   •   Department of Education (November, 2002). [Not Accepted] Enhancing Coordination of
       Training Efforts in San Bernardino County: A Pilot Program.




                                               10
                                                                                         9/14/2007
   •   California State University, San Bernardino Intellectual Life Grant (Awarded Fall, 2000).
       Technology Education and Technology for All Americans Symposium: Dr. Bill Dugger's
       Visit. ($4,500)
   •   Inland Desert Tech Prep Consortium, San Bernardino County Schools and California
       State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB) Tech Prep Partnership Grant (Summer 1999
       and Sping, 2000). Web-Based In-Class and Distance Materials for a Teacher Education
       Course(s). ($7,900)
   •   California State University, San Bernardino Intellectual Life Grant (Awarded Fall, 2000).
       CSUSB School-To-Career Reception. ($500)
   •   California School-To-Career Interagency Partnership with California State University,
       Hayward Professional Educators Faculty Engagement Grant, San Bernardino School-To-
       Career (Awarded Spring, 2000). ($20,000.00) California School-To-Career Interagency
       Partnership with California State University, Hayward Professional Educators Faculty
       Engagement Grant, San Bernardino School-To-Career (Awarded Spring, 1999 ($21,300)
       and 2000 ($20,000).
   •   California State University, San Bernardino Teaching Resource Center Grant (Summer,
       1999). Web-Based In-Class and Distance Materials for a Teacher Education Course(s).
       ($2,900.00)
   •   California School-To-Career Interagency Partnership with California State University,
       Hayward Professional Educators Faculty Engagement Grant, San Bernardino School-To-
       Career (Spring, 1999). ($21,300.00)
   •   California State University, San Bernardino Foundation Faculty Professional
       Development (Micro) Grants (October, 1998). ($500.00)

Feedback to the Program
Advisory Group Meetings - The program has an active advisory committee that meets
once or twice each year. Prior to each meeting an agenda and related materials are posted
on the Advisory Committee's Web site and after each meeting an executive summary is
posted on the same site at:
http://ve.csusb.edu/
Surveys - All EVOC students are surveyed and tested both at the beginning and at the
end of each course. Surveys measure student perceptions of the relative value of various
knowledge and skills taught in the class. Testing is vocabulary centered and measures
student knowledge of course related vocabulary and verifies that such knowledge does
increase throughout the course. CSUSB also has a system for surveying College of
Education graduates.
Commendations - Every quarter individual students convey their appreciation, both
orally and in writing, to faculty members who have instructed individual courses.
Number of Grievances - No grievances.
Other - We are very much interested in finding or developing software that can be used
to facilitate online surveys.
Assessment Activities
Determine how well the program is meeting student/s needs? Develop leaders in the
region? Develop alternate mechanisms for delivering instruction?
Assessment Results



                                               11
                                                                                           9/14/2007
Based on the activities listed above, assessment results have been productive. In other
words, what was found is that students need to feel there are mechanisms in place to help
them succeed in their pursuit of the master degree in career and technical education. With
that in mind, the program coordinator, Dr. Scarcella, has developed various mechanisms
for achieving success.
   1. The program coordinator has developed a Career and Technical (Vocational) Education
      Web site (http://soe.csusb.edu/jscarcella/ve/index.html) and an Information Packet that
      easily walks individuals through the process
      (http://soe.csusb.edu/jscarcella/master/Information.pdf).
   2. As of spring of 2002, students will have three options available for completing the
      program (i.e., traditional, comprehensive and thesis, and distance learning options). The
      program coordinator has developed all materials and they are posted on the web under the
      above three education delivery strands.
   3. The International Honorary Fraternity Epsilon Pi Tau’s (EPT) CSUSB Gamma Nu
      Chapter representing Career and Technical (Vocational) Education on campus has been
      resurrected. As of spring 2001, the program coordinator with Ron Pendleton and others
      have held chapter initiations annually.
   4. The web site and resource information the program coordinator has developed has
      become a catalyst for recruiting new students already enrolled and not enrolled at
      CSUSB.
The results from the program’s assessment activities have been excellent. The program continues
to grow and is being recommended by many former students that have graduated from the
program. Currently, Dr. Scarcella is under final review by the Dean of Graduate Studies at
CSUSB for the programs outcomes assessment plan.

Implementation: Use of Findings for Program

Program improvement is continuous and never ending. Evidence is obtained on multiple
dimensions using personal interviews, surveys, and other. Although, no singe measure is yet to
be perfect, it was found, however, student feedback renders the best feedback.
As stated, since the program coordinator was appointed to this position he has developed several
mechanisms for assisting students (i.e., program information packet, web site related materials,
etc.) and using what interaction he has with students to gather feedback and improvement
strategies for furthering and enhancing the program.

Time-Line and Implementation Strategies
   1. One-Year Departmental Commitment: Traditional, Comprehensive and Thesis, and
      Distance Learning Option self-sufficiently working to recruit students and assist them in
      their academic goals.
   2. Five-Year Departmental Commitment: Additional faculty and resources for enhancing an
      already solid program. The goal of the Career and Technical Education program is to
      foster a quality educational program for quality students at CSUSB.

Summary
Feedback is positive in all areas. Program strengths include highly professional and well
qualified faculty (both full-time and part-time faculty); reasonable faculty to student



                                               12
                                                                                            9/14/2007
ratios that facilitate interactive learning experiences; highly effective on-line course
materials; curriculum that has been developed and standardized through faculty
coordination. It is regularly updated based on feedback from advisory committee and
student surveys; and an excellent Web based distance learning option and a highly
effective infusion of technology across the curriculum. The program could be improved
by the addition of at least full time faculty member and several more "on-call" part time
faculty members. As enrollment continues to grow additional sections of almost all
courses will need to be added.

Goals
Web based curricular materials will continue to be developed and upgraded in all courses. The
distance learning option will continue to be developed for all courses and that should lead to
increased enrollments by distance learning students. We need to add one additional full-time
faculty member to the program. Ideally one of our part-time lecturers could matriculate into a
full-time position. We also need to recruit at least three additional people as standby part-time
lecturers
Outcomes Assessment and Candidate Performance Information

Attached is the program’s Outcomes Assessment Report required by the university.
  Conceptual        NCATE Element                    Assessment Outcome                Related Actions Taken
 Framework
  Component
Rich subject       •    Content            EVOC 637 Knowledge                       NOTE:
matter             Knowledge
knowledge          •    Pedagogical        Goal 1:                                  All assignments, assessment,
                   Content Knowledge                                                program coordinator
Sound              •    Pedagogical        Write for professional tasks, using      qualifications are aligned in
pedagogical        Content Knowledge       standards of American Psychological      the program outcomes
knowledge          •    Pedagogical        Association (APA) Style, the College     assessment plan and course
                   Knowledge               of Education, as established in the      curriculum.
Practical          •    Professional       EDUC 306 Expository Writing Course
knowledge of       Knowledge               (essential), and CSUSB Graduate          Please see program syllabi
context,           •    K-12 Student       Thesis Handbook.                         curriculum for information.
including          Learning                Objective:
culture
                                           Conduct and critique research by
Sensitivity to     NCATE Standard 1 –      writing abstracts or summaries on
peers &                                    related literature (essential).
students/clients   Candidate               Goal 2:
                   knowledge, skills,
Reflective         and dispositions.       Possess or develop basic
practice                                   microcomputer literacy, as established
(comfort with      Element 1.2, 1.5, 1.6   in the EVOC 519 Computer
uncertainty of                             Applications for Vocational Educators
outcomes of                                or ETEC 546 Computer Based
decisions)                                 Technology in Education (essential).
                                           Objective:
                                           Present research as assigned using MS
Wise educators                             Power Point or the Internet’s Web.
possess rich                               Goal 3:
subject matter
knowledge.                                 Communicate complex ideas related to



                                                        13
                                                                                                       9/14/2007
They have a                                the field effectively in the intense
structural                                 interpersonal setting of career and
understanding                              technical (vocational) organizations
of their                                   (essential).
discipline’s                               Objective:
concepts,
procedural                                 Demonstrate knowledge of
knowledge and                              interpersonal aims and strategies by
skills, and                                passing tests on the definitions and use
understand the                             of some terms and concepts related to
interactions and                           career and technical (vocational)
place their                                education and the professional
discipline                                 organizations associated with
within the                                 education (essential).
context of other   NCATE Standard 2 –      EVOC 637 Skills
disciplines and
society.           Assessment System       Goal 4:
                   and Unit Evaluation     Write thoughtfully and edit carefully
Wise educators                             while using precision of terminology
use sound          Element 2.0, 2.2, 2.3   in work (essential
pedagogical
judgment. They                             Objective A:
are grounded in                            Conduct research at Pfau Library
learning theory,                           (recommended).
classroom
management,                                Objective B:
curriculum and                             Critique and write abstract on a
instruction, and                           refereed career and technical
assessment and                             (vocational) education journal.
know how to
represent and                              Goal 5:
explain their                              Speak professionally before a public
subject matter                             audience (essential).
in ways that
make that                                  Objective:
subject matter                             Present research as assigned using MS
understandable
                                           Power Point or the Internet’s Web.
to students.
                                           EVOC 637 Dispositions
Wise educators                             Goal 6:
demonstrate a      NCATE Standard 3 –
practical                                  Advocate career and technical
knowledge of       Field Experiences       (vocational) education in the
context. They      and Clinical Practice   democratic setting, showing how it
know and                                   relates to technological literacy,
understand the     Element 3.2             community workplace needs, and
specific                                   employment/educational opportunities
contexts that                              for citizenry (recommended).
result in the                              Objective A:
implicit
understandings                             Apply integral and interdisciplinary
brought to the                             approaches to career and technical
classroom by                               (vocational) education
the learner.                               (recommended).
                                           Objective B:
Wise educators
are sensitive to                           Evaluate the writing and speaking of
the relativism                             others, to include fellow scholars,
associated with                            critically and constructively



                                                          14
                                                                                      9/14/2007
variations in the                        (recommended).
values and                               Goal 7:
priorities of
their peers,                             Explore professional associations and
students,                                schools of thought as they relate to
families, and                            career and technical (vocational)
communities.                             education.
They have an                             Objective:
understanding
of the values of                         Plan preliminary themes of a
the various                              personalized research agenda, rooted
groups with                              in one’s school of thought as it applies
whom they                                to the field (recommended).
interact and                             Goal 8:
make a
concerted effort    NCATE Standard 4 –   Identify whether or how their
to incorporate                           personal/professional aspirations about
knowledge of        Diversity            career and technical (vocational)
and sensitivity                          education to communicate complex
to those values     Element 4.4          messages to others about the field have
into all                                 changed as a result of this course
instructionally                          (recommended).
related                                  Objective:
decisions.
                                         Compare and contrast those same
                                         personal/professional aspirations with
Wise educators
                                         their current capabilities
are flexible and
                                         (recommended).
comfortable
when making                              Goal 9:
instructional                            Engage in graduate-level classroom
decisions                                dialogue (essential).
knowing that
precise                                  Objective:
outcomes of                              Earn a class participation grade
such decisions                           reflecting attendance; timely
are not always                           completion of course related tasks; and
predictable.                             periodic engagement in content-
They draw from                           oriented class discussions
subject matter,                          (recommended).
pedagogy and
context to                               EVOC 638 Knowledge
develop a broad                          Goal 1:
repertoire of
                                         Comment meaningfully on the
instructional
                                         underlying assumptions of career and
strategies.
                                         technical (vocational) education;
                                         regardless of setting or target client
                                         group; using customary, accepted
                                         foundations of vocational education
                                         concepts and terms (essential).
                                         Objective:
                                         Demonstrate understanding of the
                    NCATE Standard 5 –   philosophical and theories of career
                                         and technical (vocational) education by
                    Faculty              writing well developed, conceptual and
                    Qualifications,      systematic reports, and by passing
                    Performance, and     paper and pencil tests related to the
                    Development          terms, themes, and classroom
                                         implications of the discipline


                                                      15
                                                                                    9/14/2007
Element 5.2, 5.3        (essential).
                        Goal 2:
                        Comment from an informed
                        perspective on aspects of the history
                        and schooling (essential).
                        Objective A:
                        Demonstrate knowledge by
                        effective/informed classroom dialogue
                        and passing tests on the educational
                        contributions the field has made
                        (essential).
                        Objective B:
                        Describe the connections between
                        general education and career and
                        technical (vocational) education from
                        secondary through post-secondary
                        education and various alternatives to
                        its delivery both informal and formal
                        (essential).
                        Goal 3:
                        Discuss the organizational structure of
                        career and technical (vocational)
                        education as they relate to the United
                        States (essential).
                        Objective A:
                        Demonstrate knowledge by
                        effective/informed classroom dialogue
                        and passing tests on the educational
                        contributions the field has made
                        (essential).
                        Objective B:
                        Describe impacts of social economic
                        status on school achievement
                        (recommended).
                        Objective C:
                        Explain the differences between the
NCATE Standard 6 –      pedagogy of children and andragogy of
                        adults (recommended).
Unit Governance and
                        EVOC 638 Skills
Resources
                        Goal 4:
Element 6.3, 6.4, 6.5   Contextualize career and technical
                        (vocational) education reform in the
                        classroom, school, and school system
                        (essential).
                        Objective A:
                        Present program recruitment and
                        equipment needs plan using micro-
                        computers (essential).
                        Objective B:
                        Lead a trends and issues debate against



                                       16
                                                                  9/14/2007
another scholars about an issue facing
career and technical (vocational)
education; being well informed about
the facts and clearly recognizing the
differences between issues and
problems (essential).
EVOC 638 Dispositions
Goal 5:
Anchor one’s personal approach for
learning/teaching to the generalizations
acquired through the course
(recommended).
Objective A:
Define personal/professional
philosophy as to how it relates to the
theory of career and technical
(vocational) education
(recommended).
Objective B:
Discuss informally in class, through
relevant comments and dialogue about
content-oriented questions as they
relate to one’s research agenda
(essential).
Goal 6:
Engage in graduate-level classroom
dialogue (essential).
Objective:
Earn a class participation grade
reflecting attendance; timely
completion of course related tasks; and
periodic engagement in content-
oriented class discussions
(recommended).
EVOC 639 Knowledge
Goal 1:
Briefly articulate how career and
technical (vocational) education
integrates across disciplines; and the
importance of contextualized teaching
(essential).
Objective A:
Explain how contextualized teaching
across disciplines engages studies,
understanding, and knowledge about
science, mathematics, and
technological literacy (recommended).
Objective B:
Conduct career and technical
(vocational) education administrator
interview (essential).



               17
                                           9/14/2007
Goal 2:
Discuss the quantitative and qualitative
orientations, and trends in career and
technical (vocational) education
research (essential).
Objective A:
Define and use some of the terms of
career and technical/educational
research (essential).
Objective B:
Compare and contrast scientific
inquiry and discovery with
technological innovation and design
(essential).
Goal 3:
Learn the structures of some
educational research products
(essential).
Objective:
Describe the parts of research products
and their sequence: proposal, theses
projects, program evaluation, and
research studies (essential).
EVOC 639 Skills
Goal 4:
Locate and use resources to prepare a
research design, write a project, and
disseminate the findings (essential).
Objective A:
Use library resources to review the
literature related to an assigned topic
(essential).
Objective B:
Negotiate a plan and develop a
research project through a series of
review and adjustment processes
(essential).
Objective C:
Develop a proposal for acceptance at a
professional conference related to the
field of career and technical
(vocational) education
(recommended).
EVOC 639 Dispositions
Goal 5:
Read and write research reports as they
relate to the theses (essential).
Objective A:
Critically evaluate career and technical



               18
                                           9/14/2007
(vocational) education research articles
(essential).
Objective B:
Prepare the results for a theses project
that will demonstrate advocacy for the
field (essential).
Goal 6:
Engage in graduate-level classroom
dialogue (essential).
Objective:
Earn a class participation grade
reflecting attendance; timely
completion of course-related tasks, and
periodic engagement in content-
oriented class discussions
(recommended).




               19
                                           9/14/2007
                CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SAN BERNARDINO
    MA IN EDUCATION CAREER AND TECHNICAL (VOCATIONAL)
                EDUCATION ASSESSMENT PLAN
Academic Program Name: Career and Technical                         Level: Master
                       (Vocational) Education

   College: Education:      Department: EVOC 637, 638, and 639 are located in the department
                            of Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education

Date Submitted: January 28, 2002             Person Who Prepared Report:
                                             Joseph A. Scarcella, Ph.D.

PROGRAM MISSION

This degree is intended for teachers and administrators with vocational, occupational and/or
technology backgrounds who are interested in career development for positions with Regional
Occupational Programs, Community Colleges and/or any private or public institutions that are
involved with vocational, occupational and/or technology training.

Specifically, a goal to develop leaders in the career and technical (vocational) education program
is desired.

COURSE STUDENT GOALS/OBJECTIVES/STRATEGIES

Students who successfully complete course activities will perform or demonstrate the following:

EVOC 637 Knowledge

Goal 1: Write for professional tasks, using standards of American Psychological Association
(APA) Style, the College of Education, as established in the EDUC 306 Expository Writing
Course (essential), and CSUSB Graduate Thesis Handbook.
   Objective: Conduct and critique research by writing abstracts or summaries on related
              literature (essential).
Goal 2: Possess or develop basic microcomputer literacy, as established in the EVOC 519
Computer Applications for Vocational Educators or ETEC 546 Computer Based Technology in
Education (essential).
   Objective: Present research as assigned using MS Power Point or the Internet’s Web.
Goal 3: Communicate complex ideas related to the field effectively in the intense interpersonal
setting of career and technical (vocational) organizations (essential).
   Objective: Demonstrate knowledge of interpersonal aims and strategies by passing tests on
              the definitions and use of some terms and concepts related to career and technical
              (vocational) education and the professional organizations associated with
              education (essential).
EVOC 637 Skills



                                               20
                                                                                         9/14/2007
Goal 4: Write thoughtfully and edit carefully while using precision of terminology in work
(essential).
   Objective A: Conduct research at Pfau Library (recommended).
   Objective B: Critique and write abstract on a refereed career and technical (vocational)
                education journal.
Goal 5: Speak professionally before a public audience (essential).
   Objective:    Present research as assigned using MS Power Point or the Internet’s Web.
EVOC 637 Dispositions
Goal 6:Advocate career and technical (vocational) education in the democratic setting, showing
how it relates to technological literacy, community workplace needs, and
employment/educational opportunities for citizenry (recommended).
   Objective A: Apply integral and interdisciplinary approaches to career and technical
                (vocational) education (recommended).
   Objective B: Evaluate the writing and speaking of others, to include fellow scholars, critically
                and constructively (recommended).
Goal 7: Explore professional associations and schools of thought as they relate to career and
technical (vocational) education.
   Objective:    Plan preliminary themes of a personalized research agenda, rooted in one’s
                 school of thought as it applies to the field (recommended).
Goal 8: Identify whether or how their personal/professional aspirations about career and
technical (vocational) education to communicate complex messages to others about the field
have changed as a result of this course (recommended).
   Objective:    Compare and contrast those same personal/professional aspirations with their
                 current capabilities (recommended).
Goal 9: Engage in graduate-level classroom dialogue (essential).
   Objective:    Earn a class participation grade reflecting attendance; timely completion of
                 course related tasks; and periodic engagement in content-oriented class
                 discussions (recommended).
EVOC 638 Knowledge
Goal 1:Comment meaningfully on the underlying assumptions of career and technical
(vocational) education; regardless of setting or target client group; using customary, accepted
foundations of vocational education concepts and terms (essential).
   Objective:    Demonstrate understanding of the philosophical and theories of career and
                 technical (vocational) education by writing well developed, conceptual and
                 systematic reports, and by passing paper and pencil tests related to the terms,
                 themes, and classroom implications of the discipline (essential).
Goal 2: Comment from an informed perspective on aspects of the history and schooling
(essential).
   Objective A: Demonstrate knowledge by effective/informed classroom dialogue and passing
                tests on the educational contributions the field has made (essential).




                                                21
                                                                                           9/14/2007
   Objective B: Describe the connections between general education and career and technical
                (vocational) education from secondary through post-secondary education and
                various alternatives to its delivery both informal and formal (essential).
Goal 3: Discuss the organizational structure of career and technical (vocational) education as
they relate to the United States (essential).
   Objective A: Demonstrate knowledge by effective/informed classroom dialogue and passing
                tests on the educational contributions the field has made (essential).
   Objective B: Describe impacts of social economic status on school achievement
                (recommended).
   Objective C: Explain the differences between the pedagogy of children and andragogy of
                adults (recommended).
EVOC 638 Skills
Goal 4: Contextualize career and technical (vocational) education reform in the classroom,
school, and school system (essential).
   Objective A: Present program recruitment and equipment needs plan using micro-computers
                (essential).
   Objective B: Lead a trends and issues debate against another scholars about an issue facing
                career and technical (vocational) education; being well informed about the facts
                and clearly recognizing the differences between issues and problems (essential).
EVOC 638 Dispositions
Goal 5: Anchor one’s personal approach for learning/teaching to the generalizations acquired
through the course (recommended).
   Objective A: Define personal/professional philosophy as to how it relates to the theory of
                career and technical (vocational) education (recommended).
   Objective B: Discuss informally in class, through relevant comments and dialogue about
                content-oriented questions as they relate to one’s research agenda (essential).
Goal 6: Engage in graduate-level classroom dialogue (essential).
   Objective:    Earn a class participation grade reflecting attendance; timely completion of
                 course related tasks; and periodic engagement in content-oriented class
                 discussions (recommended).
EVOC 639 Knowledge
Goal 1: Briefly articulate how career and technical (vocational) education integrates across
disciplines; and the importance of contextualized teaching (essential).
   Objective A: Explain how contextualized teaching across disciplines engages studies,
                understanding, and knowledge about science, mathematics, and technological
                literacy (recommended).
   Objective B: Conduct career and technical (vocational) education administrator interview
                (essential).
Goal 2: Discuss the quantitative and qualitative orientations, and trends in career and technical
(vocational) education research (essential).
   Objective A: Define and use some of the terms of career and technical/educational research
                (essential).


                                                22
                                                                                           9/14/2007
   Objective B: Compare and contrast scientific inquiry and discovery with technological
                innovation and design (essential).
Goal 3: Learn the structures of some educational research products (essential).
   Objective:    Describe the parts of research products and their sequence: proposal, theses
                 projects, program evaluation, and research studies (essential).
EVOC 639 Skills
Goal 4: Locate and use resources to prepare a research design, write a project, and disseminate
the findings (essential).
   Objective A: Use library resources to review the literature related to an assigned topic
                (essential).
   Objective B: Negotiate a plan and develop a research project through a series of review and
                adjustment processes (essential).
   Objective C: Develop a proposal for acceptance at a professional conference related to the
                field of career and technical (vocational) education (recommended).
EVOC 639 Dispositions
Goal 5: Read and write research reports as they relate to the theses (essential).
   Objective A: Critically evaluate career and technical (vocational) education research articles
                (essential).
   Objective B: Prepare the results for a theses project that will demonstrate advocacy for the
                field (essential).
Goal 6: Engage in graduate-level classroom dialogue (essential).
   Objective:    Earn a class participation grade reflecting attendance; timely completion of
                 course-related tasks, and periodic engagement in content-oriented class
                 discussions (recommended).
STUDENT OUTCOMES CRITERIA

EVOC 637, 638, 639 are a series of three courses in the Master of Education: Career and
Technical (Vocational). Scholars majoring enrolled in this program need an understanding of
critical issues in the field. Most master degree scholars develop a good understanding of their
particular service area during the baccalaureate program, but lack knowledge about the larger
issues in general for the profession. Additionally, the changes taking place in society, and
particularly in business and industry, make it imperative that scholars have such an understand if
they are to be effective educators and play a role in adapting their studies to the changing needs
of society. Along with the course objectives, research and writing competence toward theses
completion will be required. The MA sequence program courses in Career and Technical
(Vocational) Education have been structured in the best interest of the student.

The teaching activities to facilitate and monitor student learning have been developed
specifically to attain the goals and objectives. Some of these activities have been analyzed with
precision, according to criteria that are updated periodically in light of changing contexts within
the delivery of the field and educational services in California. These have been committed to
standard trajectories that identify various levels of student product outcomes. Specifically, the
following outcomes criteria apply – to be successful in these courses the scholar will:



                                                 23
                                                                                           9/14/2007
           Actively demonstrate interest and work toward completing all assignments.
           Possess or develop basic microcomputer literacy.
           Make adequate progress on Master Thesis/Project.
           Demonstrate strict APA format on written assignments (4th ed.).
           Present at the pre-arranged date and time.
           Cover the content required for the presentation effectively.
           Stay within the timeframe recommended by the professor.
           Demonstrate a level of enthusiasm for the topic that helps others to develop and
           maintain interest.
           Apply the essentials of public speaking.
           Perform other professional tasks that may be required of the course.

Additional criteria and rubrics can be obtained from the materials maintained by the program
coordinator.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Program faculty will apply the following methods of assessing, monitoring, and recording
content-oriented student learning toward attainment of the goals and objectives.

       Written tests are graded by the professor according to pre-established criteria.
       Reports, papers, or presentations are also graded by the professor according to pre-
       established standards.
       In class presentations are intended to be of professional quality.
       Portfolios and Websites are excellent tools for tracking educational development and are
       graded by the professor for quality of thinking and accuracy of the subject.
       Other assessment methods applied by the professor.

It should be noted, any good course of instruction should be designed to help the scholars who
take that course develop and/or improve specific skills. Those skills, referred to as competencies,
are clearly written in terms that indicate exactly what scholars should be able to do as a result of
instruction. Upon completion of these courses all scholars must demonstrate competency and are
fully discussed and may be demonstrated in class with the course professor.

The professor provides information for each of the competency assignments. The pages provide
information about what each assignment should look like. Each assignment must have an
objective and rationale for the assignment, the specific criteria that scholars are expected to meet,
recommended resources, and information about evaluation. The competency assignments for
these courses are intended to be the vehicles through which scholars will demonstrate their
knowledge of course topics and indicate their ability to master specific course competencies. All
assignments are evaluated by the professor and returned to the scholar not later than the next
class session after the session that they were received. Anyone who does less than satisfactory
work on any assignment is given specific suggestions relative to what needs to be improved and
asked to redo that assignment.

Evaluation for this course is based on the criterion reference system (competency based) rather
than norm reference system (the norm reference system, based on the statistical "normal curve,"
actually dictates how many "A's", "B's", "C's", etc., can be given). By using the criterion
reference system, Scholars grade will be based on their achievement on selected criteria, not how


                                                 24
                                                                                            9/14/2007
they compare with other scholars. All scholars are expected to score 100% on all four quizzes.
The vocabulary words and definitions for each quiz are discussed in detail in the class session
before the session in which the quiz is administered.

Further, academic dishonesty is strictly enforce and is an offense against California State
University, San Bernardino. A scholar who has committed an act of dishonesty has failed to meet
a basic requirement of satisfactory academic performance. This, academic dishonesty is not only
a basis for disciplinary action, but is also relevant to the evaluation of the scholars level of
performance. Academic honesty requires that scholars do not cheat, use another scholars work in
the place of their own (Plagiarism), or knowingly assisting another to do so. Also, unauthorized
access to or changing of grades on examination is unacceptable.

TIME FRAME

The Career and Technical (Vocational) Education Committee meets at least monthly to review
and update standards discussed herein. The purpose of these meetings will be to assess whether
or to what degree the assessment outlined in the current document are accomplishing the
purposes for which they are intended. It is likely to expect periodic updates and refinements to
continue to improve and consolidate the Career and Technical (Vocational) Education courses.
In addition, the program coordinator also serves on the Master in Education Core committee,
which meets bi-monthly for the discussion of relevant dialogue related to the Master in
Education Option.

WHO WILL DO THE ASSESSMENT, COLLECT AND ANALYZE DATA?

On completion of the Master in Education: Career and Technical (Vocational), each scholar is
required to submit a reflection, introspection, and feedback statement summarizing their feelings
about the program to the program coordinator. Further, the program coordinator conducts exit
interviews informally and formally inquires with every scholar as they progress through the
program. This information is analyzed and synthesized, by the Career and Technical
(Vocational) Education committee and the information is used for internal and incremental
program action. In all case, any actions or modifications taken will be consistent with the Master
in Education Core committee and the College of Education Dean.

TYPES OF FEEBACK/DATA REPORTING MECHANISMS

The Career and Technical (Vocational) Education program coordinator and Career and Technical
(Vocational) Education committee is charged with the responsibility to monitor student success
and failure to meet the goals and objectives outlined above. The monthly meetings are designed
to promote dialogue about problems and concerns that accrue from this process, and to identify
alternative ways to accomplish the assessment indicators.

HOW WILL DATA BE USED TO IMPROVE THE PROGRAM AND REVISE THE
CURRICULA?

The material outlined above is required for the Master in Education: Career and Technical
(Vocational). It provides a periodic evaluation of what has been completed, what modifications
may need to be addresses, and opens a dialogue for further discussion to promote the program’s




                                                25
                                                                                          9/14/2007
effectiveness and procedures to gather, treat, and report relevant data in with the course are
allocated. The resultant data will be used to systematically improve the program.




                                                 26
                                                                                           9/14/2007

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:5
posted:12/14/2011
language:English
pages:26