ROLAND PARK COUNTRY SCHOOL

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					                          ROLAND PARK COUNTRY SCHOOL

                        UPPER SCHOOL CURRICULUM GUIDE

                                                    2011-2012


         The Upper School Curriculum is designed to provide a balanced liberal arts foundation in the first three
years and a senior year that enables the student great choice and exploration of interests. Students must carry five
full courses each semester in addition to physical education, graduating with a minimum of 22 credits (any
exceptions must be approved by the Upper School Head.) Final course load for each individual student is
determined by the Upper School Head. Courses that meet at least five times per ten-day cycle earn ½ credit per
semester. Courses that meet three times per cycle earn ¼ credit per semester.

          In the first three years students take English, laboratory science, mathematics, history, and foreign language
in addition to courses in the fine and performing arts, affective education, physical education, SAT preparation, and
public speaking. In the senior year, an English course must be taken each semester and a fourth year of mathematics
is required.

9th Grade                  10th Grade                           11th Grade                  12th Grade

English 9                  English 10                           English 11                  English electives
Alg II-Geo I               Alg II-Geo II                        Math 11                     Math electives
Biology                    Physics                              Chemistry                   Physical education**
Medieval History           European History                     American History            Electives
Language*                  Language*                            Language*
Physical Education         Physical Education                   Physical Education**
Arts***                    10th Grade Issues                    Public Speaking
SAT Prep                   SAT Prep                             SAT Prep

      In addition to the academic requirements, each student is required to devote a minimum of sixty hours of
community service before she graduates, forty of which must be served in one location.

       Honors as well as Regular sections are available in most languages, English, history, and science.
Mathematics classes have three sections, Honors, Accelerated, and Regular.

          Advanced Placement courses are available in English, French Language, Spanish Language and Literature,
Latin, Russian Language, Chinese Language, European History, American History, Government, History of Art,
Economics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Psychology, AB Calculus, BC Calculus,
Statistics, Computer Science, and Studio Art. Students who wish to take more than three AP courses a year must
have permission of the Head of the Upper School.




* One language must be taken for three years in the Upper School regardless of the level where one begins.
** Physical Education in grades 11 and 12 may be individually designed.
*** Each student must take ¾ credit (3 semester courses) of Fine and Performing Arts. One of the courses must be
completed by the end of ninth grade. At least ¼ credit (1 semester course) must be in Studio Art and ¼ credit in
Performing Arts (dance, drama, music). The final ¼ credit is at the student‘s choice.




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                                                         ARTS
Students are required to take a studio art course in grade 9 or 10. They may take either the semester-length Studio
Art Appreciation course or a year of Art I: Foundations in Studio Art

Grades 9 and 10
Studio Art Appreciation                       ¼ credit                   3/10                        Semester

Studio Art Appreciation is a semester length hands-on studio. The student is shown how art achieves its visual order
through an introduction to the elements of art and principles of design. Both two and three-dimensional pieces will
be developed.

Art I: Foundations of Studio Art              ½ credit                   3/10                        Year

Students will apply concepts about the elements of art and principles of design (line, shape, form, color, texture,
space, emphasis, repetition, unity, etc.) through a variety of experiences in learning the language of art. Activities
are designed to build creative problem solving skills through a variety of studio practices in drawing, painting,
printmaking, sculpture, and other disciplines. As students gain a sense of how artists find and interpret ideas, they
will better understand the role of the artist in a culturally diverse world.

Art II: Developing Ideas in Media             ½ or 1 credit               3/10 or 5/10               Year
Prerequisite: Art I

Students will solve art problems in both two and three dimensions. Emphasis is placed on working from direct
observation. Both natural and man-made light will be explored, along with a variety of mediums, including oil
paints, oil pastels, charcoal, printmaking and contemporary crafts. Besides technical skill building, the student will
enhance their own creative problem solving through independent research and learning, task commitment, and a
variety of special topics.

Grades 11 and 12
Art III: Portfolio Development                1 credit                   6/10                        Year
Prerequisite: 2 years Studio Art or Portfolio Review

Students will maintain a cumulative portfolio which includes work from class, a sketchbook/journal and related art
experiences. The portfolio is a vehicle through which students can demonstrate their ability to handle visual arts
media with a sense of quality, show a breadth of formal, technical and expressive experiences; and concentrate on a
particular interest or problem. Students will continue to maintain a sketchbook/journal which incorporates personal
expression through visual, collected and written commentary to employ as a reference and to generate future ideas.
AP Credit is also available for seniors and at 6/10.

Grade 12
Art IV: Personal Directions in Art Studio 1 credit                       6/10                        Year
Prerequisite: 3 years Studio Art or Portfolio Review

Students continue to maintain a cumulative portfolio and sketchbook/journal to develop personal imagery and
meaning. Students analyze and apply ways cultural exemplars, artists, their work and other curricular disciplines
serve as catalysts for in-depth pursuit of a personal idea for artworks and a thesis project. A written statement of
purpose explaining personal artistic pursuits and on-going dialogue with instructor and peers helps to develop an
informed aesthetic viewpoint. AP Credit is also available for 6/10.




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The Advanced Placement Portfolio                      1 credit           6/10                       Year
Examinations in Studio Art

The Advanced Placement program in Studio Art is intended for highly motivated students who are seriously
interested in the study of art. Students should be made aware that AP work involves significantly more commitment
than the typical high school art course. Students can submit one of three Advanced Placement Studio Portfolios –
Drawing, Two-Dimensional Design, or Three Dimensional Design. The AP Portfolio consists of three sections –
Quality, Concentration and Breadth. The Quality Section provides the student the opportunity to show their actual
ability and ―permits the student to select the works that best exhibit a synthesis of form, technique, and content.‖
The Concentration Section asks the student ―to demonstrate a depth of investigation and the process of discovery.‖
And the Breadth section asks the student ―to demonstrate a serious grounding in visual principles and material
technique.‖ For the Quality section, the student sends in five actual artworks. For both the Concentration and
Breadth sections, students submit twelve slides each. The three sections are scored separately by different
evaluators but are weighed the same. The three scores are then combined and the medium becomes the score of the
portfolio.

It is advisable for all candidates to take supportive courses in History of Art and Photography. The majority of the
portfolio is submitted in slide form, and all knowledge of artistic trends, movements, methods of interpretation, and
representation would be most beneficial.

The following Visual Arts electives are available to students who have fulfilled the prerequisites for the
course.

Photography I: Intro to Photo                        ¼ credit          3/10                         Semester
Prerequisite: Studio Art Appreciation or Art I
This course is a requirement for all advanced photography.
***Students are required to supply a 35 mm SLR camera.

This is an introductory course to traditional black and white photography. The emphasis is on mastering techniques
for taking pictures, processing film, printing enlargements and print presentation. Students explore the history of the
medium and participate in several projects throughout the semester that teach them how to achieve specific visual
effects through manipulation of camera and darkroom settings. Attention is paid to composition and fine tuning of
craft.

Photography II:
Developing Concept and Creativity                 ¼ credit               3/10                       Semester
Prerequisite: Photo I
***Students are required to supply a 35 mm SLR camera

While Photo I places heavy emphasis on mastering technique, Photo II emphasizes strong concept, individual
expression and creativity. Students work mostly in black and white film, doing projects that explore unusual shots,
storytelling, studio lighting, and extended/multiple exposures. Projects towards the end of the semester give the
student beginning exposure to digital photography and manipulation through the use of Photoshop. Students further
their darkroom experience with visual journaling, individual research, dialog with teacher and peers and visits to
exhibitions.

Photography III: Alternative Processes            ¼ credit         3/10                              Semester
Prerequisite: Photo I and II
***Students are required to supply a 35 mm SLR OR a digital SLR camera

Photography III gives students the opportunity to delve into alternative processes. Projects build upon the
foundation established in photo I and II with further emphasis on risk-taking and the development of an individual
voice. Supplements to projects include visual journaling, research, and visits to exhibitions.




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Photography IV: Personal Directions in Photo            ¼ credit           3/10                     Semester
Prerequisite: Photo I-III

Photography IV is intended for the highly motivated student who wishes to pursue AP Photography her Senior Year.
Emphasis in this class is on completing the breadth section of the AP Portfolio with additional projects geared
towards student‘s individual interests and others that give exposure to advanced technical and conceptual problems.
Visual journaling and individual research is an integral part of the work in this course.


Advanced Placement Photography               1 credit                    6/10                       Year

AP Photography is a yearlong course for students committed to the completion of the Two Dimensional Design
portfolio. AP Photography is for highly motivated art students wishing to submit their portfolio for AP credit
consideration.

Seniors may take Photo 6/10 either at Levels II, III or IV.


Introduction to Ceramics                    ¼ credit                    3/10                        Semester
Prerequisite: Studio Art Appreciation or Art I

This course is designed so that the student becomes familiar with the technical, artistic, and historical approaches to
Ceramics. The beginner student explores basic hand building and potter‘s wheel techniques. The advanced student
furthers this investigation by applying various innovative sculpting and throwing techniques to a piece of work.
Students will maintain a visual journal.

Students may continue to study Advanced Ceramics following the sequence outlined below

Ceramics II                                  ¼ credit                    3/10                       Semester

In this course, students research three fine arts movements/trends/or noteworthy artists in Ceramics. The student
designs three pieces per movement or trend or particular ceramic artist studied, and presents her/his final work in
clay at the end of the semester. Students keep visual journals and visit at least three outside 3D exhibits throughout
the course of the semester. Students continue to hone skills in clay construction, finishing, and repair techniques.

Ceramics III                                 ¼ credit                    3/10                       Semester

In this course, students focus on the use of altered work, narratives, and the effects of light on 3D artwork. Students
design and construct multiple component pieces, increase their skills in paper clay joining and repair, and pay
careful attention to the juxtaposition of positive and negative shapes. Students design work that explores meaningful
self-expression, and may opt to combine imagery with words. Students keep visual journals and visit at least three
outside 3D exhibits throughout the course of the semester. Students continue to hone skills in clay construction,
finishing, and repair techniques.

Ceramics IV                                  ¼ credit                    3/10                       Semester

In this course, the student researches an ancient culture or historic movement in clay art and creates five related
pieces. Students keep visual journals and visit at least three outside 3D exhibits throughout the course of the
semester. Students continue to improve skills in clay construction, finishing, repair, and glazing techniques.

Ceramics V/VI                                ¼ credit                    3/10                       Semester

In this course, the student produces a body of work based on a particular theme. The student researches various 3D
and ceramic artists, then designs a series or concentration of twelve pieces based on the findings. The student
continues to dialogue with the Ceramics Instructor and US Fine Arts Coordinator regarding the development. In



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addition to in class work, the student continues to work in the visual journal to compliment the in class work based
on the particular concentration idea. (AP available for seniors 6/10 year long.)

Seniors may take Ceramics full time (6/10) at I-IV level either semester.

3D Design                                   ¼ credit                     3/10                        Semester
Prerequisite: Studio Art Appreciation or Art I

The 3D Design art course will explore a variety of techniques for making sculpture. These techniques will include,
but are not limited to, assembling, carving, and modeling. Materials will include, metal, wood, clay, paper, plastic,
and mixed media. One of the main goals of the course is for the student to address artwork that is to be seen in the
round, questioning issues of space, depth, and form.

Studio Art Fees: There is a $30.00 supply fee per ¼ credit for each Visual Arts course.


                                 BRYN MAWR ART ELECTIVES

Portfolio 1: Breadth                      ½ credit                   6/10                          Semester 1
(Prerequisite: Drawing or Painting or permission of your instructor)

This course expands the student‘s repertoire to include more challenging points of view and perspectives. Group
assignments and independent projects are designed to meet the individual student‘s portfolio needs. The course
explores illustration, narrative, and abstraction in both dry and wet media. An independent journal is kept to
encourage the development of ideas and experimentation. Students create their own artist‘s statement and exhibit
their work. Students are required to submit a portfolio in a digital format on completion of the course. In
consultation with the instructor, portfolios may be designed to meet AP standards.

The Silver Screen:                            ½ credit                 6/10                         Semester 1
Understanding and Making Movies
BMS

This tri-school senior elective will provide each student with the tools and understanding to craft a polished short
narrative or documentary video production as a final project. After viewing a successful commercial film for study,
the students will be introduced to the basic concepts of photography and videography, the elements of film and
sound technique and aesthetics, screenwriting rules and formatting with Final Draft software, and digital editing
with Apple‘s Final Cut software.

Portfolio 2 Honors: Concentration           ½ credit                  6/10                         Semester 2
(Prerequisite: Portfolio 1: Breadth or permission of your instructor)

An independent course designed around a specific proposal to produce a body of work connected by a theme. Each
proposal must be approved by the department prior to the start of the course. The instructor guides the student in
individual work. In addition, the student is expected to keep a journal demonstrating the development of her work,
to create an artist‘s statement for each work, and to exhibit her work. The student is required to submit a portfolio in
digital format on completion of the course. In consultation with the instructor, portfolios may be designed to meet
AP standards.

                                     GILMAN ART ELECTIVES
Design Drawing                               ½ credit                     5/10                     Semester 1

This course introduces students to basic design principles while teaching the techniques of two and three
dimensional drawing, sketching, and modeling. As an integral and inseparable part of the design process, students
will learn the fundamentals of graphically communicating design ideas, form, and space through drawing and



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modeling. The course will include a series of studio projects allowing for a combination of free-hand drawing,
drafting, and computer-aided model making skills to be developed.

Drawing & Painting II                         ½ credit                    6/10                        Year

This course will deal with creative as well as technical skill development in drawing. A variety of materials will be
handled, such as pencil, pen and ink, conte crayon, wash drawing and scratchboard. Problems will include
composition, perspective, and tonal and contour drawing. The class will also work from live models.
Recommended for students interested in taking Advanced Studio Art in future years.

Architectural Drawing                         ½ credit                    5/10                        Semester 2

 This course seeks to expand on the concepts presented in the Design Drawing course, while introducing more
specific principals of architectural design through drawing, sketching, observation, and analysis. Project assignments
will engage students in the practice of designing architectural form and space as well as drawing and analyzing
notable existing architectural works. Students will develop hand drawing skills and three dimensional modeling by
conventional and computer-aided methods, as well as learn about basic building construction methods and materials.

Advanced Studio Art H                        1 credit                  6/10                       Year
Prerequisite: A full year of Studio Art, Drawing & Painting, and/or portfolio review and approval from the teacher.
Fee required

This course covers many of the same projects as the semester-long sections of Studio Art, but this section will
continue on for a full year and permit students to explore a wider range of projects in greater depth. Emphasis is on
more fully developing one‘s personal style and vision. Students who wish to prepare a portfolio for Advanced
Placement in Studio Art will be best served in this course, but interested and motivated students of all levels of
ability are welcome. Limited to 12 students.


                                            HISTORY OF ART
Grade 12
History of Art AP                             1 credit                    7/10                        Year

This course is a chronological survey of the history of art, primarily but not exclusively Western art, based on the
newest edition of Gardner's Art Through the Ages, with its topical emphasis on great cities (Athens, Florence),
major artists (Michelangelo, Picasso), and seminal stylistic movements (Renaissance, Impressionism). The student
begins to understand that art is a reflection of religious, political, and social conditions, and that there is a logical
stylistic development in art. Slides are studied and compared daily. The class sees art objects firsthand and meets
with curators and museum professionals regularly, as trips to the Walters Art Museum and Baltimore Museum of
Art are built into the schedule. In addition, there is a one day trip to Washington, D.C., and a one day trip to New
York City, when possible.

                                                      DANCE
Dance Appreciation                            ¼ credit                    3/10                        Semester 1, 2

This course is designed to introduce and acquaint students to the art of Western Theatrical dance through the study
of the evolution of movement into the present day forms of theatrical dance. Historical and critical readings, lectures
by the instructor and video viewings will allow the student to gain insight into the theory and practice of dance.
This is primarily an academic course although some movement experiences will be required . This course is
strongly recommended for any student who is interested in the Roses Repertory Dance Ensemble. Required text:
Learning about Dance by Nora Ambrosio.




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Studio Dance Technique                       ¼ credit                    3/10                       Semester 1, 2

This course is designed for the student who is interested in learning the basics of ballet, modern dance, jazz and
composition. Students will concentrate on the technique of western concert dance, will study dance composition
and may have the opportunity to create their own dance piece. Students will work on performance technique and
may have an opportunity to perform in a RPCS concert.

Advanced Studio Dance Technique           ¼ credit                       3/10                       Semester 1, 2
Prerequisite: Studio Dance Technique or permission of instructor

This course is designed for the student who has experience in studying ballet, modern dance, jazz and composition.
Students will work on performance technique and will have an opportunity to perform in a RPCS concert.

Dance Company                            1 credit                   5/10                             Year
Admission by audition only
Grades 11 & 12
Prerequisite: One semester Studio Dance or Advanced Studio Dance or permission of instructor

Roses Repertory Dance Company is an auditioned ensemble for juniors and seniors. The company will learn
repertory choreographed by the teacher, company members and guest artists. The repertory will be performed at the
RPCS Dance Concert, Performing Arts Concert and other engagements arranged by the teacher. There are
mandatory rehearsals during the last two weeks of August to prepare for RPCS‘ Opening Day Convocation. Every
other year, Roses, along with Semiquavers and FTE, creates an interdisciplinary piece that tours abroad in the
summer.

                                                       MUSIC

Chorus                                      ¼ credit                     4/10                        Year

This non-auditioned large choral ensemble is for the student who enjoys singing music of varying styles and time
periods. Students will study techniques of good vocal tone production, musicianship, and showmanship. The Chorus
performs at the traditional RPCS Christmas Program and in the spring Performing Arts Concert as well as other
school events during the year.

Music Theory                           ¼ credit                   3/10                     Semester 1, 2

This course is designed for the student who is interested in learning basic music theory skills and applications. It is
specifically geared to students in the 9th and 10th grades, but may also be taken in the 11th and 12th grades. The
course will cover the fundamentals of music theory: note names and clefs, rhythm and meter, major and minor
scales, intervals, and triads. Ear training and listening to important major works are integral components as well. No
extensive musical background is required, but the course can be tailored to the more experienced musicians also.

GRADES 9 & 10
A capella                                          ¼ credit                     3/10                 Year
Somettos
Admission by audition only

An auditioned vocal ensemble for ninth and tenth graders, Somettos performs a variety of repertoire, including
classical, folk, popular, jazz, and original music. Students study techniques of good vocal tone production,
musicianship, and showmanship. The audition takes place in the late spring of the previous year. A student selected
for Somettos for her ninth grade year may participate in the second year without re-auditioning (at the instructor‘s
discretion). Membership in Glee Club is a requirement for participation in Somettos. This ensemble performs at the
two major RPCS concerts and other school events during the year.


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GRADES 11 & 12
A capella                                   1 credit                       5/10                      Year
Semiquavers
Admission by audition only
Prerequisite: Membership in Chorus during the year of the audition

This performance-oriented course provides an opportunity for selected students (juniors and seniors chosen by
audition the previous spring) to participate in a challenging vocal ensemble under faculty supervision. Repertoire
includes classical, folk, popular, and original materials. Students study techniques of good vocal tone production,
musicianship, and showmanship. A student selected for Semiquavers for her junior year may participate in her
senior year without re-auditioning (at the instructor‘s discretion). Membership in Chorus is a requirement for
audition and participation in Semiquavers. Extensive public appearances in the school and community are an
integral part of the Semiquavers experience. There are mandatory rehearsals during the last two weeks of August to
prepare for RPCS' Opening Day Convocation. Every other year, Semiquavers along with Roses and FTE, creates an
interdisciplinary piece that tours abroad.

AP Music Theory                               1 credit                    6/10                         Year

This yearlong course is offered to the student who has achieved a mastery of basic music theory skills. We build on
the fundamentals of music theory: note names and clefs, rhythm and meter, major and minor scales, intervals, and
triads. This course will cover four part harmony, figured bass notation, scales and modes, modulations, cadences,
and form. Listening to and analyzing major works are integral components of this course as well as ear training and
sight-singing.


                                             THEATRE ARTS
Theatre Appreciation                          ¼ credit                    3/10                         Semester
No Prerequisite

This course is designed to give a historical overview highlighting some of the most influential theatre movements
from the Golden Age of Greece thru contemporary theatrical genres. This is an academic course with a required text,
regular reading assignments and assessments through testing, projects, presentations and classroom exercises. The
course includes the use of students‘ laptops, analysis of plays and productions, and in-class readings of dramatic
text. The course is neither acting nor a technical theatre course, but an introductory class that exposes the student to
numerous aspects of theatre.

Acting Styles                                ¼ credit                    3/10                         Semester
No Prerequisite

Through research, exercises and script work, this course will explore the craft of acting. Students will use hand-outs
and online sources in order to learn the grammar of acting and the steps to creating a character. Through
experimentation and scene study the students will build on their understanding of acting fundamentals and will
display this understanding in a final showcase. The course can be taken for either one semester or for the entire year,
and can be repeated and tailored to the student‘s level of understanding.

Design Elements                              ¼ credit                    3/10                         Semester

This class will explore through research and practical exercises the many different facets involved in creating
costume and scenic designs for the theatre. This course can be repeated and tailored to the student‘s level of
understanding. In seminar sessions organized and guided by the instructor, the students will learn to create basic
costume and scenic designs for the theatre through experimentation and hands-on projects that explore the
fundamentals of stage design. The semester will culminate in the students designing with the instructor the set for
the next semester‘s main stage play or musical .



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Theatre Ensemble                            1 credit                     5/10                      Year
Footlights Theatre Ensemble (FTE)
Admission by audition or portfolio review (Grades 11 & 12)
RPCS/GILMAN
Prerequisite: Theatre I & Theatre II A and/or Theatre II D unless a transfer or Gilman student

Footlights Theatre Ensemble (FTE) is an auditioned theatre ensemble for Upper School juniors and seniors at
Roland Park Country and Gilman Schools. A select group of student actors, designers, directors, stage managers
and technicians are chosen to create a collective ensemble. Students are required to read six plays over the summer.
Then through rigorous script analysis of each play, students are encouraged to expand their critical thinking and
investigative skills, vocabulary, and familiarity with a diverse selection of plays. Throughout the school year
students attend productions of these plays and meet for discussions with professionals who have worked on the
productions. Acting students develop a repertoire of monologues while design and production students develop a
fully realized portfolio of their work. The ensemble creates two productions each year performed in the Tyler Studio
Theatre. Every other year FTE takes part in an interdisciplinary production which tours abroad (Greece 2005, Italy
2007). Students are encouraged to audition/provide a portfolio for FTE prior to their junior year. If a student is
accepted as a junior, the class may be repeated senior year with the consent of the instructor. The advantages of
taking this class for two full years are significant. RPCS students must be available for mandatory rehearsals during
the last two weeks of August to prepare for RPCS‘ Opening Day Convocation (Gilman students are exempt from
this requirement.) There are limited out-of-class technical rehearsals for Tyler Studio productions. RPCS students
are required to participate in both RPCS Main stage productions each year. Gilman students are required to
participate in two Main stage productions each year, one of which must be at RPCS.



                                                  ENGLISH
English 9                                    1 credit                   5/10                     Year
(Regular/Honors)

The ninth grade English curriculum builds upon the literature interests and language skills developed in the middle
school, supplying the foundations for more sophisticated demands of the 10 th, 11th and 12th grade programs.
Designed around a study of literature, the ninth grade course works to develop in students good reading habits,
critical thinking skills and effective expression in their creative and analytical writing. Guided vocabulary and
grammar instruction enhances language skills and mechanics. Students continue to develop their writing skills in a
process approach, learning to express their own insights effectively. Literature studied may include a Shakespearean
drama, Macbeth, the novels Jane Eyre and The Catcher in the Rye, and selected short stories. The course also
includes a study of the Bible as a literary text , a writing workshop and a poetry anthology.

English 10                                   1 credit                   5/10                       Year
(Regular/Honors)

The 10th grade English course uses classical and contemporary literature to continue developing writing, language
and critical thinking skills. The syllabus includes Pride and Prejudice, A Separate Peace, Shakespeare‘s Othello,
Sophocles‘ Antigone, Chinua Achebe‘s Things Fall Apart, Charles Dickens‘ Great Expectations (Honors only), and
Emily Bronte‘s Wuthering Heights (Honors only). In addition, sophomores explore poetry by studying the collected
poems of Richard Wilbur, and they read selected short stories. The literature serves as the basis for developing
verbal articulation and analytical skills through discussion and writing. Students practice the process approach to
writing; consequently instructors emphasize outlining, revising and peer reading. The course individualizes the
study of grammar and mechanics of writing as much as possible to allow each student to progress at her own pace.
Students build their vocabulary through a guided study of words gathered from the literature, which helps prepare
them for the PSAT and SAT.




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English 11                                    1 credit                     6/10                        Year
RPCS/GILMAN

The 11th grade English curriculum is designed to enable students to approach literature and writing on a more
sophisticated basis than in earlier years and to prepare them for the increasing challenges of senior year and
expectations for college. Students have the opportunity to study, discuss and write about texts of different genre and
time period. They examine individual works for literary merit and richness of theme and develop their own ideas in
their analytical and creative responses. Literature includes Hamlet, as well as selected poetry and novels chosen to
complement the juniors‘ study of American history: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Beloved,, and The Great
Gatsby. Students follow the process approach to writing, completing full preliminary drafts for revision in a
workshop atmosphere. They review rudiments of style and form in writing as their own needs demand. Some
students may elect to take the English Language or English Literature Advanced Placement examination in May.
11th grade students may take English at Roland Park or Gilman.

AP English 11                                 1 credit                     6/10                        Year

This Advanced Placement course is designed to engage qualified students who have a deep interest in literature and
writing. Students have the opportunity to read, discuss and write about challenging texts of different genre,
examining works for literary merit and richness of theme. They will continue to develop their analytical and
creative writing skills, following the writing process in a workshop atmosphere. Works to be studied will include
the regular English 11 curriculum, with the additions of The Scarlet Letter , The Awakening, and poetry selections
from a variety of American authors. Reading, writing and discussion expectations will be demanding, to prepare
students to succeed in the English Language or Literature Advanced Placement Examination in May. Advanced
vocabulary and grammar study will complement and enhance the reading and writing.



                                       SENIOR ENGLISH ELECTIVES
To fulfill their English requirement, seniors at Roland Park Country School enroll in semester-length elective
courses. These courses are individually designed by instructors with the advice and consent of their colleagues in
the Upper School English department. The overall offering of courses is carefully evaluated by the department to
ensure that students have a variety of authors, genre, cultural representations and historical periods from which to
choose for the study of literature and writing. Each course provides a solid and challenging academic foundation for
college work by requiring students to read critically acclaimed literature and to write both analytically and creatively
in response. Students may elect to take the English Language and/or Literature Advanced Placement examinations
in May. Roland Park Country School seniors may also elect to take English courses at our coordinating schools,
Gilman and Bryn Mawr. The department chairs and division heads of the three schools meet regularly to ensure that
the combined list of courses offers both academic challenge and variety.


                                    RPCS ENGLISH ELECTIVES

20th Century British Novel                    ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 1

In the 20th century the novel had to adapt itself to a world dominated in many ways by wrenching and increasingly
rapid change. The novelists we will read in this course – Joseph Conrad, E.M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Graham
Greene, Muriel Spark, and Pat Barker – address in their work the upheavals of war, the dwindling of the British
Empire, the collapse of previously unquestioned ideals and assumptions, and the search for a redeeming vision in
chaotic times. In their attempts to find not only the right stories to tell but also the right ways in which to tell them,
they have expanded the range of the novel as a literary form and as a document of human experience. The tentative




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reading list includes Greene‘s The Power and the Glory,, Forster‘s A Passage to India, Woolf‘s Mrs. Dalloway,
Sparks‘ The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie.

All’s Fair in Love and War                    ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 1

Some of the most- loved and celebrated fiction is set in the midst of military conflict. Ironically, the destructive
violence and chaos of warfare often creates and intensifies relationships between soldiers, family members, and
lovers. In this course, we will explore the way that war impacts characters and their relationships. Our readings will
include Charles Frazier‘s Cold Mountain (the American Civil War), Ernest Hemingway‘s A Farewell to Arms
(World War I), Joseph Heller‘s Catch-22 (World War II), Tim O‘Brien‘s Going After Cacciato (Vietnam War), and
contemporary fiction on the Iraq War (including works by Annie Proulx and Sherman Alexie).


Exploring Adult Themes in                     ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 1
Children’s Literature

Since the last half of the 18th century, children‘s literature has offered adult writers a forum to explore the
imaginative world of children. It has also provided a way to nurture, educate and entertain children for many
generations. In this course, we will consider themes that will challenge our notions of justice, good and evil, and
right and wrong. We will also examine the role of imagination and storytelling as a means of effecting personal and
cultural change. By reading several selections from well-known authors, the first half of the course will explore the
historical development of children‘s stories and consider the cultural context of their work. The second half will
focus on analyzing the literary structure of children‘s fantasy stories and identifying the essential components of
most literature in this genre. Students will write several critical essays in response to the readings and will also have
an opportunity to write their own fairy tale or fantasy story. Readings may include selected tales from The Norton
Anthology of Children’s Literature, The Wand in the Word: Conversations with Writers of Fantasy (Marcus), the
Grimm’s Fairy Tales, Through the Looking Glass (Carroll), Dominic (Steig), Charlotte’s Web (White), The Hobbit
(Tolkien), The Chronicles of Narnia (Lewis), A Wind in the Door (L‘Engle), The Prince and the Pauper (Twain),
Haroun and the Sea of Stories (Rushdie), The Princess Bride (Goldman) and The Uses of Enchantment: The
Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales (Bettelheim).


Literature of the American West                 ½ credit                  6/10                         Semester 1

What do you picture when you think about ―heading west‖ towards the plains and the Rocky Mountains? What
ideas, values, and lifestyles do you associate with ―Big Sky Country‖? This course examines different symbols in
western literature and film—deserts, cattle, horses, guns—and explores how these images continue to shape
American culture today. The literary selections and films also focus on the connections between national identity
and physical space: how did writers and film directors perceive the ―open‖ frontier? How has the closing of the
frontier led to the emergence of new traditions in the American West? Students will produce short papers
comparing filmic and literary depictions of the Wild West and examine how narratives from this region continue to
shape our understanding. Literary selections include works by Cormack McCarthy, Annie Proulx, Wallace Stegner,
and Native American writers such as Louise Erdrich.

Reading and Writing Poetry                    ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 1

According to William Butler Yeats, ―Out of the quarrel with others we make rhetoric; out of the quarrel with
ourselves we make poetry.‖ Because of its raw and personal nature, poetry is one of the most intimidating, yet
fulfilling, art forms. In this course, you will be challenged to delve deeply into the reading, analysis, and writing of a
variety of forms, including ekphrastic, formal, narrative, and free verse poetry. In this course, students will engage
in daily writing exercises to practice various fundamental techniques and to generate ideas for longer pieces of
writing. Additionally, students will learn the process of formal workshopping as a means for discussing, gaining
feedback upon, and publically sharing their work in a semi-public, but safe and respectful, setting. Throughout the
semester, we will read poems by contemporary poets including, among others, Elizabeth Bishop, Phillip Larkin,
Adrienne Rich, Mary Oliver, Louise Gluck, Seamus Heaney, and Billy Collins. Additionally, we will read Anne




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Lamott‘s fantastic book on writing, Bird by Bird. This course will culminate in the creation of a sizeable portfolio
of completed poems.

Reading and Writing Short Fiction             ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 2

F. Scott Fitzgerald famously said, ―The reason one writes isn‘t the fact he wants to say something. He writes
because he has something to say.‖ Writing fiction is an opportunity both to express your own beliefs, and to create
people and places and experiences far removed from your own reality. In this course, students will engage in daily
writing exercises to practice various fundamental techniques and to generate ideas for longer pieces of writing.
Additionally, students will learn the process of formal workshopping as a means for discussing, gaining feedback,
and publically sharing their work in a semi-public, but safe and respectful, setting. For inspiration throughout the
semester, we will dip into the compelling and diverse stories in The Best American Short Stories (2009), as well as
read selections from Stephen King‘s brilliant book on craft, On Writing (which he wrote as he was recovering from
a near fatal accident). The course will culminate in the creation of a portfolio of short stories.

Dreams and Disasters
in Western Literature                         ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 2

In 21st century England, violent gangs roam the streets while the justice ministry uses new technologies to
―reprogram‖ repeat offenders. A handsome man dreams of ageless beauty and his wish is granted with surprising
results. A happy couple dreams of familial bliss but the arrival of their fifth child unleashes a destructive force that
disrupts their lives. Through five novels and one play, this course examines the thin line between a shining idea and
a brilliant disaster. Texts include Marlowe‘s Doctor Faustus, Mary Shelley‘s Frankenstein, Doris Lessing‘s The
Fifth Child, Tim O‘Brien‘s Going After Cacciato, and Oscar Wilde‘s The Picture of Dorian Gray.

Exploring the Bible as Literature             ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 2

The Bible, with more than 100 million copies sold worldwide every year, remains one of the most important records
of western thought and traditions. No other piece of literature has had a greater impact on our understanding of
human behavior and the challenges of living with others in community. Many writers, artists and musicians have
taken biblical themes or allusions to illumine and confront our conceptions of human nature. This course will
consider major stories and characters in both the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) and the New Testament and
examine the use of biblical themes in a variety of literary formats. Key films and discussions of art and music, along
with several critical and creative writing assignments, will serve as a conduit to explore the connections between
these stories and our world today. The Bible, as our primary text, will be supplemented by other works which may
include The Bible As/In Literature (Ackerman and Warshaw), The Art of Biblical Narrative (Alter), Walking the
Bible (Feiler), The Sabbath (Heschel), The Power and the Glory (Greene), Lying Awake (Salzman), Silence (Endo)
as well as articles from other biblical scholars and writers.

Literature of Leadership                                                 6/10                        Semester 2
Grade 12

What makes great leaders? Are they born or are they made? Are you one in the making? This course will explore
the various facets of leadership through classic novels, social science literature, and periodic conversations with
modern leaders in the fields of business, education, medicine, religion, and law. Core texts include Lord of the
Flies, Catch-22, Cat’s Cradle, and Waiting for Godot. Students will also learn to read and dissect academic papers
exploring what modern research reveals about leadership. Finally, students will have the opportunity to interact
with and pose questions to some of Baltimore‘s most established leaders.

Course Texts:Lord of the Flies, William Golding; Catch-22, Joseph Heller; Cat’s Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut;
Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett; Gang Leader for a Day, Sudhir Venkatesh.




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Inspired by the Bard                         ½ credit                    6/10                       Semester 2

It is often said that imitation is the highest form of flattery, and many contemporary writers and filmmakers, in
emulating William Shakespeare‘s brilliant work, flatter the bard with the fruits of their imitation. In this course, we
will read (or review, in the case of Hamlet) four of Shakespeare‘s plays, then read or view corresponding works
inspired by those plays, including David Wroblewski‘s The Story of Edgar Sawtelle (Hamlet), Jane Smiley‘s A
Thousand Acres (King Lear), ―Ten Things I Hate About You‖ (The Taming of the Shrew), and Shakespeare in Love
(Twelfth Night). Students will discuss and analyze each work both in its own right and in comparison to
Shakespeare‘s plays.




                                GILMAN ENGLISH ELECTIVES
China and Modern East Asia                   ½ credit                    6/10                       Semester 1

China is the most populous country on earth, enjoying both rich cultural traditions and modern dynamic growth. Its
contact with the United States through trade and the presence of cultural icons like Yao Ming expands daily, but is
the developing relationship destined to be based on friendship, or rivalry? China is at the forefront of a region which
has undergone a remarkable transformation in recent decades, leading many to consider whether there is an ―Asian
way‖ of development which provides an alternate model to that of the West. This course will introduce students to
the societies of China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. After examining some of the major cultural traditions of
the region, such as Confucianism and Daoism, we will focus our attention on the twentieth century. In addition to
historical texts, we will make extensive use of modern fiction and film to examine the evolution of these societies.
(This course may be taken for English or history credit.)

American Literature of the 60’s              ½ credit                    6/10                       Semester 1

A Revolution in the Air: American Literature of the Sixties -- Rising from the reverberations of Allen Ginsberg‘s
great Howl, the sixties were a decade of revolution, protest, polarization, liberation, experimentation, and promise.
The fear of nuclear annihilation and the paranoia of the Cold War permeated the American psyche. The civil rights
movement gave voice to disenfranchised African Americans and fueled the movement for women‘s liberation. The
conflict in Vietnam, raging violently in the East, was broadcast nightly on American television. The New Left
protested for a new form of politics while the counterculture encouraged the youth of America to expand their
consciousness. In all, the sixties were a wide-spread convergence of the political, the personal, the philosophical,
and the artistic. Through the study of such writers as Ginsberg, Kerouac, Atwood, Mailer, Vonnegut, Plath, Friedan,
Pynchon, King, X, Thompson, Baraka, Sexton, Kesey, Wolfe, and others, students will analyze how literature and
other forms of art from the sixties reflect that turbulent and often romanticized decade.

Literature of the American South             ½ credit                    6/10                       Semester 1

Exploring the texts of several southern writers including Frederick Douglass, Anne Moody, William Faulkner,
Eudora Welty, Flannery O‘Connor, Wendell Berry, Tennessee Williams, and Josephine Humphreys, we will study
several genres, from poetry and prose to drama and non-fiction. As we closely read and analyze the literature of the
south, we will engage and discuss these questions: ―What does it mean to be a southerner?‖, ―How has literature of
the south developed?‖, and ―To what extent does a region define characters, literature, and humans?‖


Classical Drama                              ½ credit                    6/10                       Semester 1

The Classical Drama course will provide a survey of ancient Greek drama and the society that produced it. The
course will examine a representative sample of the major plays of the tragedians Aeschylus, Sophocles and
Euripides, as well as the comic playwright Aristophanes. In addition, modern adaptations of certain tragedies will be
read. Among the topics considered will be: the tragic and comic festivals, the origin and nature of Greek theater,
ancient theatrical production techniques, myth and tragedy, and the legacy of Greek tragedy in the modern world



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through film adaptations. Plays to be read include the Oresteia, Bacchae, Antigone, and Frogs. Time permitting, the
comedy Menaechmi by the Roman playwright Plautus will also be read. Film adaptations of nine of the plays will
be viewed. These include Mourning Becomes Electra by Eugene O‘Neill, the Antigone by Jean Anouilh, and A
Funny Thing Happened On the Way to the Forum (with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by Burt
Shevelove and Larry Gelbart.).

Dante Alighiere:                               ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 1
His Life and Works

This course will be an introduction to the work of medieval poet, Dante Alighiere. The primary text will be Dante's
last and most famous work, The Divine Comedy. Supplementary readings include A Grief Observed, by C.S.
Lewis, The Passionate Intellect, by Barbara Reynolds, and selected pieces by Sam Keen.

Holocaust Studies                              ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 1
Interdisciplinary

This course will guide students' investigation of the events surrounding the Nazi destruction of European Jewry
during World War II. As students study the evolution of the 'Final Solution,' they will consider the history of anti-
Semitism in Europe, the role of anti-Semitism in the nature of the Nazi regime, and the contingencies, which shaped
Nazi anti-Jewish policies. At the heart of this analysis will be a close study, culminating in an analytical essay, of
the key events, which transformed persecution into genocide during World War II. The Holocaust Museum will be
an important resource during this process.

During the final section of the course, students will investigate the personal experiences of Jews and Germans
during the Holocaust. They will consider testimony of Jewish survivors, Nazi authorities, and German bystanders.
Students will develop an independent project on a topic of their choice drawn from the wealth of literary, dramatic,

This course is offered either for English or History credit.


Reading and Writing Fiction                    ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 1
The Reading/Writing Fiction elective will focus primarily on contemporary short stories and how they are
constructed. The students will learn to read with the writer's eye. Students also will write their own fiction. Class
sessions will involve analyzing the style of stories from The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction
both in a journal and in discussion, doing writing exercises, and responding to student writing in a workshop format.
Homework will involve plentiful reading, both in the anthology and in a writing text, doing writing exercises,
writing fiction, and responding in writing to student stories. The final evaluation will be a portfolio of student
writing. This is obvious, but perhaps worth saying, the course is designed for students who like to read and write
fiction.


Russian Studies I                              ½ credit                     6/10                         Semester 1
Interdisciplinary

What is to be done about Russia? Russian philosophers, writers and political activists have struggled with that
question for nearly two hundred years now, and the answers seem no clearer today than they were in 1815. Even
after the fall of the Soviet Union in 1990, even after the institution of western economic and political reforms,
Russia still struggles to right itself amidst a continuing succession of crises. Can a civil society, be it authoritarian or
democratic, be it socialist or capitalist, be established in this country? This course examines the current events in
Russia today through the lens of Russian literature from the 19 th century. Course Texts include The Overcoat and
Other Stories by Nikolai Gogol, Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev, Crime and Punishment by Fyodor
Dostoevsky, The Deeath of Ivan Ilych by Leo Tolstoy and Five Great Stories by Anton Chekhov.

This course may be taken either for English or History credit.




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Scandal of Ulysses                            ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 1

Among the Western literary canon‘s most challenging and rewarding books, James Joyce‘s Ulysses employs
revolutionary narrative techniques while responding to the timeless themes and motifs of The Odyssey and
Hamlet. Students of this course will engage central human issues of family, religion, heroism, prejudice, and charity
as they follow the wanderings of Stephen Dedalus and Leopold Bloom through the city of Dublin on June 16, 1904.

20th Century African-American                 ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 1
Literature

This course offers a study of African-American culture, as it relates to living in the multi-racial United States,
through literature produced by 20th century African-American writers. In addition to dynamic discourse, students
will enhance their personal library on this topic. Works from Wright, Baldwin, Hansberry, Fuller, Wilson, Hughes,
and others are selected.

Writers in Revolt:
Response and Rejection                        ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 1

How writers respond to the conditions of their time will be the focus of this course. Readings will be drawn from
British and American fiction and will include works by Melville, Chopin, Ellison, Steinbeck, Kesey, Orwell, and
Waugh. In part, we will explore the role of the rebel and anti- hero in literature.

Workshop in Creative Writing                  ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 1, 2
Taught by the Gilman Writing Fellow, this course is an intensive workshop in creative writing. Because each new
Fellow will design the curriculum according to his or her interests and talents, the course content is variable; it will
include elements in both fiction and poetry, and may cover playwriting. Students should expect to write daily, read
the works of accomplished writers, and participate in critiques of one another's writing in workshop format. Only
students who enjoy reading and writing and who are willing to work hard to improve their writing should consider
taking this course.

American Literature                           ½ credit                   6/10                         Semester 2
in the 20s & 30s
Encounter Option available

In the context of historical study, students will attempt to understand the literature of these fertile periods of
American life. Our national literature has always been as reactive as much as it seeks to define its own time. This
course will seek to place poetry, short fiction, drama, and the novel in the stream of American history, and answer
some of the questions artists such as Jean Toomer, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, Thornton Wilder and Lillian
Hellman pose. Students should expect to research the historical setting, and they will be asked to write analytically
and creatively. Finally, each student will deliver an afternoon poetry presentation.

C. S. Lewis                                   ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 2

―Celestial Cross-Pollination at Work‖: C.S Lewis and Charles Dickens Meet Modern Literature--- My college
advisor stressed years ago that the ―history of literature is the story of ―one grand conversation‖ (Fr. Anthony
Farrell). This course will embrace that glimpse of the truth. We will read selected works by C.S. Lewis and Charles
Dickens and then read a modern work such as Nobody’s Fool by Richard Russo, trying hard to think well about how
the ―vision and virtue‖ of each text helps inform the others. The fact that ―books are alive‖ (Dow Mossman) and
can talk with one another (celestial cross-pollination‖ coined by Prof. William Stephany) will be honored on a daily
basis.




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Narrative Technique in Drama and Film            ½ credit                   6/10                          Semester 2

This course is designed for students interested in writing, and in theater and film studies. The focus in this class will
be on analyzing storytelling techniques in plays and films, learning and becoming fluent with the vocabulary of play
scripts and screenplays, exploring the dramatist‘s and the screenplay writer‘s craft, and studying plays and films
from a writer‘s point of view. The works studied will include both classic and contemporary plays and both classic
films from the Golden Age of Hollywood and from modern cinema. In our study, we will take into account the
contributions made to the storytelling of a particular play or film by other collaborative artists such as the director,
designers, and actors, and evaluate those contributions in terms of an overall understanding and appreciation of the
work as a whole. The class will be discussion based.

Poetry of Revolt                               ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 2

When elevated into the realm of poetry, language wields an immense power to reject political realities and inspire
cultural change. Walt Whitman defined the ideals of a fledgling American nation while shattering the British
conventions of meter and line. W. B. Yeats used his poetry to lead Ireland toward political independence. Tupac
Shakur illuminated modern social issues such as poverty, violence, and racism. By reading the works of these poets
and others, students of this course will consider poetry‘s ability to give voice to the spirit of revolt.

Rites of Passage                               ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 2
Encounter Option available

Young men and women becoming adults and learning about the world and their place in it will be examined in a
variety of short works of fiction. Through consideration of moments of growth and passage in a diversity of lives,
students will explore the common experiences, themes, and moral dilemmas that many young people encounter.
Works from Hemingway, Ford, Murray, Chopin, and Gibbons.

Russian Studies II                             ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 2
Interdisciplinary

What is to be done about Russia? Russian philosophers, writers and political activists have struggled with that
question for nearly two hundred years now, and the answers seem no clearer today than they were in 1815. Even
after the fall of the Soviet Union in 1990, even after the institution of western economic and political reforms,
Russia still struggles to right itself amidst a continuing succession of crises. Can a civil society, be it authoritarian or
democratic, be it socialist or capitalist, be established in this country? This course examines the current events in
Russia today through the lens of Russian literature from the 20 th century. Course Texts include ―The Twelve‖ by
Alexander Blok, Heart of a Dog by Mikhail Bulgakov, ―Requiem‖ by Anna Akhmatova, Life and Fate by Vasily
Grossman, and One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisiovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn.

This course may be taken either for English or History credit.

Urban Studies                                  ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 2

This course investigates the evolution of American attitudes and policies toward urban poverty in the 20 th century by
studying the work of novelists, social scientists, historians and journalists. In addition, students will participate in an
experiential program in which they will work as tutors or aides in the Baltimore Public School system.


                                  BRYN MAWR ENGLISH ELECTIVES
AP English                                     1 credit                     7/10                        Year

While it is called AP English, this class will not merely prepare students for the AP exam; rather, it is designed to
function as an Honors class. AP English will be a fast-paced, reading intensive, year-long course for students who
are ready to participate actively and independently in thinking and writing about literature at the highest level. Class



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will be conducted using the Harkness discussion model and will begin with the students‘ participation in the
development of the reading list for both semesters.

English teachers will nominate eligible students in the third quarter of their junior year and students may then opt to
enroll. Interested students who are currently taking English at Gilman should ask their teachers to nominate them in
a letter. Nominations will reflect a student‘s performance in tenth and eleventh grade and final enrollment must be
approved by the department chair. This is a year-long course and may not be dropped at the end of the first semester.

Creative Writing                              ½ credit                    6/10                        Semester 1

This is essentially an art class. That is, we approach the writing process as an art form and practice the craft with the
disposition of the artist. As we grow more comfortable with the format and with one another, we strive to form a
writing community using the workshop as a forum for shared growth. Our concentration is on creating poetry and
fiction, while interests in other genres may be explored. We write every day, and develop each piece with active
revision toward final drafts. A writer‘s portfolio is used to maintain the complete record of progress toward
completed works and is submitted for an interim and final evaluation. Summer reading is Bird by Bird, by Anne
Lamott.

The Literary Imagination and                  ½ credit                    6/10                        Semester 1
American Politics

Writers reflect and give voice to the social and political climates of their times, but they also have the power to
influence their cultures profoundly. This elective raises questions about the intersection of literature and history.
Students focus both on the responses of writers and on the forms these writers choose to express their views. The
curriculum includes drama, fiction, and film, as well as a field trip to the Barnes collection in Philadelphia. Possible
texts include: Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee‘s Inherit the Wind, Robert Penn Warren‘s All the King’s Men,
Hilary Henkin and David Mamet‘s Wag the Dog, Thomas Gibbons‘s Permanent Collection, Doug Wright‘s I Am my
Own Wife, and David Mamet‘s Oleanna. Summer Reading is Tim O‘Brien‘s In the Lake of the Woods.

Modern Drama: From Script to Screen           ½ credit                    6/10                        Semester 1

In this elective, students consider the many engaging challenges of producing plays for contemporary audiences. As
students read and study texts, they posit and respond to questions of performance and endeavor to create
imaginative, workable solutions. In the context of these ideas, students view and evaluate film versions of the plays,
working to determine what makes the translating of scripts to screen effective, evocative, or disastrous. Through
such explorations, students have the opportunity to know, understand, and interpret these plays, on paper and in
production.

Native American Studies                        ½ credit                    6/10                       Semester 1

This course is an interdisciplinary study of Native American culture focusing on the history, literature, and
anthropology of North American Indians. Among other writing assignments, students keep a journal about the
readings and write a short research paper. Readings may include Black Elk Speaks, First Peoples and Ceremony.
Students may elect this course as either a History or English credit. The Required Summer Reading for this
course is The Toughest Indian in the World by Sherman Alexie.

American Poetry
Since Whitman                                 ½ credit                    6/10                        Semester 2

One hundred fifty years have passed since Whitman sounded his ―barbaric yap.‖ This elective begins with Whitman
and then focuses on those American poets who have followed him, both the ones who have continued in his tradition
and those who have reacted against him. Students will explore the work of Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, Allen
Ginsberg and the Beats, Sylvia Plath, and Anne Sexton, among others. Written assignments will include journal
entries in response to the poems we read, poetry of our own, and literary analysis.




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Memoirs: Exploration of the Reading           ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 2
and Writing of Selves

What shapes our identities? And how do we express the answer to that question? Through reading and writing
nonfiction, students in this course will explore the cultivation and expression of self. In reading about the lives of
others, they will come to know how to better access and express the pieces of their own lives. As these different
elements are explored, students will also encounter different forms of literature (graphic novels, oral histories, short
essays, dramatic monologues, etc.) and ways these different media present biographies. As students explore different
forms of expression, they will understand them as distinct; they will, as well, aim to choose and apply what fits their
own stories as they put who they are down on paper. Different writers to instruct and inspire may include: James
McBride, David Sedaris, Bailey White, Alison Bechdel, and more.

Recreating Nature                             ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 2

Using naturalist Aldo Leopold‘s classic volume, A Sand County Almanac as both inspiration and example, students
will create an illuminated journal combining focused nature writing and drawing. A daily practice of Zazen
meditation and observation techniques will allow students to heighten awareness and re-train their perceptions of
nature so they can better record them. Short selections from the writings of Charles Darwin, John Muir, Dorothy
and William Wordsworth, Annie Dillard, Barry Lopez, Walt Whitman, Rachel Carson, W. S. Merwin and others
will supplement the Leopold readings. In addition to our travels on the Bryn Mawr campus, we will take short, early
morning field trips.



                                       FOREIGN LANGUAGES

                                                    FRENCH
French I                                      1 credit                   5/10                        Year

This beginning level course is designed for those students who have had little or no French. The material is
presented and mastered through the use of CDs, video cassettes, and interactive vocabulary and grammar exercises
on the internet. Students learn the present tense, including the command form, of regular and irregular verbs; the
passé composé; the alphabet and numbers; time; adjectives and adjective agreement; and vocabulary related to
school, family, the home, shopping, eating, and travel. Assessment is based on the students‘ performances in the
four areas of speaking, listening reading, and writing.

French II (Regular/Honors)                    1 credit                   5/10                        Year

The aims of this class are to extend the basic language skills - reading, writing, listening comprehension and
speaking - and develop the student‘s ability to use his/her skills with increasing ease and confidence. The material is
presented and mastered through the use of CDs, video cassettes, and interactive vocabulary and grammar exercises
on the Internet. Le Petit Prince is read in Honors and Francophone movies are presented in both levels. The course
is designed to create an awareness of French culture and is given almost entirely in French.

French III (Regular/Honors)                   1 credit                   5/10                        Year

The emphasis of level III French is on the rich nuances of the French language; more sophisticated grammatical
concepts and their usage, including a thorough review of all verbs and tenses, grammatical structures and idioms;
greater fluency in oral and writing skills; and enjoyment of French poetry and prose in cultural context. Bizet‘s
Carmen introduces the student to the world of opera in French.




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French IV                                    1 credit                    6/10                       Year

This course seeks to further the development of the four language skills, listening, speaking, reading, and writing,
through cultural readings and literature as well as through grammatical review. Students work in the text Trésors du
Temps as well as read and discuss two literary works, a traditional mystery novel, Maigret tend un piège by Georges
Simenon, and the film scenario Au revoir, les enfants by Louis Malle. Students engage in discussion and prepare
presentations on cultural and historical topics. Writing skills are emphasized through paragraphs and compositions
with opportunities to refine and edit work. The course is conducted in French.

French V: French Cinema                      ½ or 1 credit               6/10                       Semester/Year
for Conversation and Culture

This course will concentrate on improving conversational skills through the study of various aspects of French and
Francophone cultures and history as represented in the cinema. When appropriate, the course will examine to what
extent various cultural aspects of the given Francophone country are accurately represented in each film studied.
The course will also try to examine how accurate subtitles are and what is lost in the necessary steps of translating
the spoken word into short written sentences that will fit on the screen. Conversation and vocabulary acquisition
will be based on the situations and vocabulary presented in the films. Assessment will include, but not be limited to,
vocabulary acquisition, conversation skills, written critical analyses, as well as students‘ research related to the
political and social situations related to the time period represented in each film. Students will often have the
opportunity to act out and/or interpret scenes and characters from the films in a round-table forum. Open to students
who have successfully completed French IV or French Language AP.

French V Honors: Advanced
French Literature                         1 credit                 6/10                       Year
Prerequisites: AP French Language or French IV with a minimum of 87% and teacher recommendation

This course is designed to introduce students who have advanced language skills to the formal study of a
representative body of literary works in French. Students will examine some of the most intriguing points of
intersection between literature (drama, prose and poetry), cinema and history. They will engage in lively discussion
of a variety of themes, such as the nature of the hero/heroine and the reasons protagonists are often forced to adopt a
"double identité" while examining the various aspects of French culture that have influenced these themes. Course
material will include works from both Francophone and French writers such as Corneille, Césaire, Zobel,
Maupassant, Molière, Camus and Sartre. Poets may include Baudelaire, Apollinaire, Tyrolien, Eluard, Senghor and
Damas. The class will be conducted in French in a manner which enables students to maintain and increase their
already advanced level of fluency. Students will be assessed primarily on their reading comprehension, class
discussion, and critical essays.

Summer reading is required.

                                                   SPANISH
Spanish I (Beginning)                        1 credit                    5/10                       Year

This course is open to students with little or no previous training in Spanish and to those who wish to start a second
(or third) foreign language in the 10 th or 11th grade. This program must be followed by level II (Intermediate) for
language credit. The main objective of this course is to enable students to attain a measurable degree of
communicative competency and proficiency in each of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing,
and to learn up-to-date, authentic information about the Spanish-speaking worlds.




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Spanish II (Regular/Honors)                   1 credit                    5/10                        Year

This course integrates the teaching of grammar with the development of communication skills and cultural
knowledge. Individual projects (oral and written) are encouraged with the primary aim of increasing students‘
ability to use the materials and language with progressive ease and confidence.

Spanish III (Regular/Honors)                  1 credit                    5/10                        Year

This third-level Spanish course aims to reinforce the linguistic skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing, and
to actively incorporate more sophisticated structural concepts and vocabulary to encourage greater fluency. Cultural
focus is to broaden students‘ global awareness of Spain and Latin America.

Spanish IV                                    1 credit                    6/10                        Year

This integrated course aims to offer a balanced program to enable students to use the Spanish language with a higher
degree of accuracy and fluency in both informal and formal situations. A variety of approaches and materials are
used to develop linguistic and critical thinking skills, as well as knowledge about Spain and Latin America and their
cultural traditions. Short stories, poetry, films, music, art and drama are studied.

AP Spanish Language                           1 credit                    7/10                        Year
RPCS
Department Approval Required

The AP Program in Spanish Language is designed for qualified students who have chosen to develop their
proficiency in Spanish without special emphasis on literature. Students who enroll should already have a basic
knowledge of the language and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples and should have attained a reasonable
proficiency in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. The course covers the equivalent of a third
year college course in Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation stressing oral skills, composition and
grammar. Students are introduced literature from the 17 th to the 20th centuries. Students are expected to take the
three hour Spanish Language Examination in May. Required summer reading: La Tarde Prodigiosa de Balthazar

Hispanic Women Writers                        ½ or 1 credit               6/10                        Semester, Year
Prerequisite: Spanish 4

This course, conducted in Spanish, will focus on major female authors from Spain and Latin America throughout
history. Some of the authors include: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Alfonsina Storni, Julia Alvarez, Isabel Allende, and
Esmeralda Santiago. A variety of genres and styles will be explored the first semester. The focus of the second
semester work will be the contemporary novel. A variety of technologies, including films and recordings, will be
used to aid with the study of the literature. Conversation practice is an integral part of the course. Students will
present special projects and write compositions based on the literature.




                                                    RUSSIAN
Russian I                                     1 credit                    5/10                        Year

This course introduces the fundamentals of Russian grammar and a basic vocabulary which will enable the students
to communicate in the Russian language in simple, everyday conversation and to read and understand simple texts.
Emphasis is also placed on authentic Russian pronunciation.




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Russian II                                    1 credit                   5/10                        Year

Building on Russian I, this course continues the study of the fundamentals of the Russian language system and the
acquisition of vocabulary. The ability of students to communicate in Russian is stressed. Films, recordings, fiction
stories, poetry and some articles from current newspapers and magazines are also included in the course.

Russian III                                   1 credit                   6/10                        Year

Russian III reinforces the mastery of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing with a
continued emphasis on everyday spoken Russian. Short sight readings based on cultural material and modern reality
foster a greater understanding of the changing world of Russia of today.

Prototype AP Russian                          1 credit                   6/10                        Year

The Prototype AP course seeks to refine all the language skills-listening and reading comprehension, speaking and
writing. It develops proficiency in Russian with a special emphasis on conversation and composition. A thorough
grammar review includes the specifics of the usage of verb tenses and declension. Students integrate their language
skills with a broader knowledge of Russian culture through masterpieces of literature and cinema. The Practice
Prototype AP exam in February helps to prepare students for the three hours Internet based written Prototype AP
examination that the students sit for in the spring. The examination is designed to provide a set of measurements of
functional proficiency in Russian for use as a predictive assessment and placement tool by American colleges and
universities. The oral part of the Prototype AP examination is a telephone interview.


                                                   CHINESE
Chinese I                                     1 credit                   5/10                        Year

The objective of this course is to enable students to use simple Chinese in common daily settings through studying
the fundamentals of Mandarin pronunciation, grammar and character writing. Cultural knowledge related to lessons
will be introduced to enrich understanding and generate interest in learning this language.

Chinese II                                    1 credit                   5/10                        Year

This course aims to reinforce the fundamental elements that students have learned and to extend the student‘s ability
to communicate using a variety of language structures. Culture related learning activities include Chinese
calligraphy, painting, chess and cuisine.

Chinese III                                   1 credit                   6/10                        Year

This course emphasizes native Chinese language features, more sophisticated structural and grammatical concepts
and idioms. Representative classic and modern readings and poetries from Tang dynasty will be introduced along
with cultural recognition.

AP Chinese                                   1 credit                    7/10                        Year

This AP course in Mandarin Chinese deepens students‘ immersion into the language and culture of the Chinese-
speaking world. The AP course prepares students to demonstrate their level of Chinese proficiency across three
communicative modes (interpersonal, interpretive and presentational) and the five goal areas (communication,
cultures, connections, comparisons and communities). Its aim is to provide students with ongoing and varied
opportunities to further develop their proficiencies across the full range of language skills within a cultural frame of
reference reflective to the richness of Chinese Language and culture.




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                                                      ARABIC
Arabic I                                   1 credit                      5/10                       Year

Students in Arabic 1 develop a strong command of the Arabic script, mastering reading and writing the Arabic
letters. Simultaneously, students build a basic conversational competence in spoken Levantine Arabic, practicing
their skills by watching videos and through daily conversations and skits with their classmates. Students develop
comprehensive language skills (reading, listening, writing and speaking) through a variety of assignments and
hands-on projects that draw on authentic material, introducing students to the richness and diversity of Arab culture.
By the end of the year, students are able to express themselves confidently about a variety of topics related to their
daily lives.

Arabic II                                   1 credit                      5/10                        Year

In Arabic 2 students build upon their skills from Arabic 1 so that they can more fluently speak and write about
themselves and their daily lives. Students develop the depth and breadth of their vocabulary through daily
conversation practice and hands-on projects based on culturally authentic Arabic materials. As their exposure to
Arabic texts expands, students begin to familiarize themselves with the vocabulary and grammar of formal Arabic,
exploring the commonalities and differences between written and spoken varieties of the language. Students also
expand their knowledge of the Arabic root system, using this knowledge to guess new vocabulary and use the
Arabic dictionary.

Arabic III                                  1 credit                     6/10                          Year

In Arabic 3, students continue developing their formal Arabic skills through reading authentic texts and writing
journal entries and essays. An in-depth look at finer points of Arabic grammar allows the class to approach more
and more difficult texts, including stories and poems. Students continue to engage in classroom speaking activities
that remain essential for practicing and developing a wider range of vocabulary; these encompass debates, formal
presentations and casual conversation. Students watch music videos, TV serials, and news reports in order to
improve their skills listening to a variety of registers of Arabic and to expand their exposure to Arab culture.

Arabic IV H                                  1 credit                      6/10                          Year

Arabic 4 students continue to develop the full range of language skills at a more advanced level, expanding the
variety and difficulty of texts and audio-visual materials they encounter. Now that students have mastered the basic
skills necessary to write essays and letters, they work on writing in an idiomatic Arabic style using good connectors.
They are able to discuss a variety of topics, even unfamiliar ones, expressing and justifying their opinions. Students‘
understanding of the distinction between formal and colloquial Arabic is further refined; they are able to switch as
necessary between the two idioms with minimal mixing. The thematic focus of the course is now driven by the
curiosity and interest of the students themselves as they take ownership of their language skills. Students must
interact with native Arabic speakers outside of the school community, in person or through the internet, bringing
their skills from the classroom into the real world.



                              GILMAN LANGUAGE ELECTIVES
Introductory Latin I                         1 credit                      5/10                          Year

Intended for students who start with Latin in the 9th Grade. Introductory Latin is planned as a sequential program,
with the emphasis evenly distributed among three areas: development of a basic vocabulary, knowledge of
inflection, and understanding of syntax.

Latin II – Caesar Regular                    1 credit                    5/10                       Year

Intended for students who have completed the Latin program in the Middle School or have completed CL01; this


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course is the normal sequel to the introductory program. After the student has mastered the spectrum of inflection
and syntax required for translations, he is introduced to Books I and VII of Caesar's narrative on the conquest of
Gaul. Requirements in the course include a research paper on some facet of Roman civilization in the first century
B.C.E. and a special, three-dimensional project.

Latin II – Caesar Honors                      1 credit                    5/10                         Year

This course provides an accelerated program for a selected group of highly motivated second-year pupils. The
material of the course is essentially similar to that outlined for Latin II – Caesar Regular but is presented at a more
rapid pace.

Latin III – Cicero Regular                    1 credit                    6/10                         Year

This course is the sequel to Latin II - Regular. Students read selected speeches by Cicero and study his style and the
politics of late Roman Republic.

Latin III – Cicero Honors                     1 credit                    6/10                         Year

Cicero continues to be a mainstay of Gilman's Latin program. Cicero's preeminence as a writer of prose makes
essential a thorough knowledge of his style, as well as his politics. Detailed study of Roman jurisprudence and
oratory complement the reading of selected speeches, including the First Catilinarian Oration and the Manilian Bill.

Students who wish to take the College Board Achievement Test in Latin may do so after they complete this course.
Preparation for this test through extensive practice in sight-translations and in comprehension exercises, therefore, is
an important aspect of the course.

Latin IV – Vergil AP                          1 credit                    7/10                         Year
Department Permission Required

The course material parallels but does not follow strictly the syllabus for the Advanced Placement examination on
Vergil. Scansion of dactylic hexameter, reading the complete Aeneid in English, and translating four books (I, II,
IV, & VI) are the minimal requirements. In addition, frequent research papers are assigned on the epic tradition,
character delineation in the Aeneid, and the Roman literary heritage.

Latin IV-V                                    1 credit                    6/10                         Year

The vast variety of writings left by authors of both the Golden and Silver Ages of Latin literature provide unlimited
material for study. This course will focus on three or four examples each year that are representative of the classics
as the literary ancestors and models of modern European and English literature. Students will be asked not only to
extract the essence of thought contained in each chosen Latin masterpiece but also to appreciate the artistic qualities
which make it a work of enduring worth and a source of enjoyment. Since the authors taught will vary annually, this
course may be repeated for credit.


Latin Lyric H                                 1 credit                    6/10                         Year

Selected poems of Catullus and Horace are translated with special emphasis placed on creative interpretations and
critical analysis. In addition, the student learns the scansion of such meters as hendecasyllabic, Alcaic, Sapphic, and
Asclepiadean with particular attention to the oral reading of these meters. Students frequently are required to write
structural and comparative analyses of poems to insure their understanding of the lyric genre as exemplified by
Catullus and Horace. Research assignments on the Stoic and Epicurean philosophies and the development of the
Latin literary tradition in lyric poetry, the elegy, and the epigram are integral parts of the course.




                                                           23
Ancient Greek I                               1 credit                   5/10                        Year

Beginning with the Greek alphabet, the student gradually gains sufficient fluency to translate first sentences, then
paragraphs of Greek prose. Grammar, inflection and vocabulary are emphasized to provide a secure base for
reading passages from Plato and Xenophon.

Ancient Greek II                              1 credit                   5/10                        Year

After an intensive review of first year material, the student proceeds to the translation of Xenophon and/or Plato,
with extensive practice in sight readings from other authors. Lectures on Hellenic literature and civilization are
interwoven into the course to provide a background for the student.

Ancient Greek III                             1 credit                   6/10                        Year
Ancient Greek IV H                            1 credit                   6/10                        Year

In successive years either Book I of the Iliad with selected passages from the remaining books or Euripides' Medea
provides insight into the nature of epic and dramatic poetry. Related lectures on archaeology, mythology, and
scansion help the student explore the wide spectrum of our classical heritage.

French Honors Seminar:
French Culture Through Literature and Film 1credit                         6/10                           Year

Prerequisites: AP French Language or French V with a minimum of 88 & teacher recommendation

This course offers a view of French culture through its literature & films. We read representative works of French
literature through the ages and watch some cinematic adaptations of such works. We will also perform sketches
from select plays. Course expectations will include daily reading, periodic in-class presentations & quarterly short
papers. The emphasis will be on the dual nature of literature and films as both a window onto society and also as a
hammer with which to shape it. This course is also oriented towards improving conversational and writing skills in
French. Required Summer Reading.

Spanish IV Hispanic Civilization              1 credit                   6/10                        Year

This course offers a film-oriented study of the diverse cultures that form the Hispanic world. Spain and its peoples
are studied in the 1st semester, Latin America and its peoples are studied in the 2nd.

Spanish V Conversation                        1 credit                   6/10                        Year

This senior course focuses on the development of conversational skills in Spanish. The conversations will be based
on short stories, movies and a short novel that the students will read. This course is a sequel to the Hispanic
Civilization or an AP Language course.

AP Spanish Literature                         1 credit                   6/10                        Year

This course includes the study of Borges, Matute, Lorca, Marquez, and Unamuno, and introduction of more difficult
authors. The course continues development of analysis and expression. A term paper or vacation reading project is
required. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement exam in Spanish Literature. NOTE: Summer
Reading counts for 20% of the first marking period grade.




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                          BRYN MAWR LANGUAGE ELECTIVES
German II                                    1 credit                   5/10                        Year

This class continues its study of the fundamentals of German grammar and the acquisition of vocabulary. The
ability of students to converse in German is stressed. The course includes films, recordings and short sight readings
from current newspapers and magazines.

German III                                   1 credit                   6/10                        Year

In this intermediate level course, the goal is to develop fluency in spoken and written German. Emphasis is also
placed on reading comprehension and on the continued acquisition of vocabulary, both idiomatic and literary. There
is a general review of grammar. Assorted short stories are read. Films, recordings and some articles from current
newspapers and magazines are also included in the course.

German IV H                                1 credit                6/10                             Year
Prerequisites: German III with an 84% or higher and teacher recommendation

German 4H is intended to develop proficiency in German without emphasis on knowledge of literature. Students in
this class should already have a good command of grammar and considerable competence in listening, reading,
speaking, and writing. This course seeks to develop useful language skills that can be applied to various activities
and disciplines. Equal emphasis is placed on written expression, oral expression, listening comprehension, reading
comprehension, and grammar. This is a year-long course and may not be dropped at the end of the first semester.
Required Summer Assignment


Spanish Honors Seminar:
Modern Spain through Film and Theatre             1 or ½ credit           Year or Semester I
(Prerequisites: AP Spanish Language or Spanish V with a minimum of 88% and teacher recommendation)

The course offers a view of modern-day Spain through some of its greatest films, plays, TV shows and music
videos. We read and perform excerpts from playwrights Antonio Buero Vallejo and Federico García Lorca and
view films by a variety of Spanish directors (many of which have been nominated for awards) as well as the hit
series, Cuéntame. During the first semester, we will use these mediums to get an idea of what Spain was like after
the fall of its great empire, during its civil war and the 36-year dictatorship that fell in 1975. The second semester
will include many modern day Spanish ―Blockbusters‖ that will help us see Spain post Francisco Franco, a liberated
and liberal country which has risen to become a cultural and economic stronghold in the world today. This course is
oriented towards improving conversational and writing skills in Spanish. Required Summer Assignment



                                                   HEALTH
Issues                                       no credit         Pass/Fail         1/10               Year
Required Grade 10

The main goal of the 10th grade Issues Program is to promote physical, emotional and social wellness by providing
opportunities for open discussions on topics important to teenagers. These topics include decision making,
communication and relationship skills, human sexuality, drugs and alcohol, nutrition and body image, gender issues
and career development. The course utilizes small and large group discussions, journal writing, videos and relevant
literature.




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                                                  HISTORY
Interdisciplinary Humanities Core, Grades 9 & 10
In a two year sequence, this humanities curriculum presents a comprehensive view of defining aspects of several of
the world‘s great civilizations. Students will explore each civilization‘s history, religion, art, music, dance and
literature to discover avenues for understanding and comparing cultures.

While the 9th grade component will be primarily non-western in focus, the 10th grade course will trace these themes
in the European tradition. Thus the 9th grade course will be largely thematic while the 10th grade course will be
organized chronologically. The program seeks to strengthen skills of critical thinking and written and oral
expression. Students will undertake short and long term independent projects which will utilize the full range of
research tools, including traditional print and non-print sources as well as CD-ROM and the Internet. In addition, a
museum trip or off-campus field trip will be part of each major unit to acquaint students with the rich cultural
resources of the Baltimore-Washington area. Guest speakers, music and dance performances, and visual artists will
be invited to campus to enhance the program.

Grade 9
Medieval World History                           1 credit                 6/10                     Year
(Regular/Honors)

9th grade regular & honors - This course will trace the economic, political, religious, and cultural development of
Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas from A.D. 300 to approximately 1500. The study of specific regional
civilizations will give ninth grade students a firm foundation of world history after the fall of the Roman Empire and
lead them directly into the tenth grade course, which begins with the Renaissance in Europe. Specific units will
include MesoAmerica, Africa, Medieval India and China, Byzantium, the Islamic Empire, and Medieval Europe.

Grade 10
European History                                 1 credit                 6/10                     Year
(Regular)

In this course, students study the roots of modernization in European history and its impact on our world today. Our
emphasis will be the transition from the feudal and manorial societies of the middle ages to the industrial urban
nation states of the twentieth century. Each unit will focus on a key turning point or development in this
transformation and will highlight its relevant political, economic, social, and cultural aspects. These units will
include the Renaissance, Reformation, Rise of Nation States & the Commercial Revolution, Scientific Revolution &
Enlightenment, French Revolution & Napoleonic Era, Industrial Revolution, Modern Political, Economic, &
Cultural Spectrum, and World Wars. Moreover, where applicable, these units will also include an in-depth study of
the evolution of Western art and music. Throughout the course students will continue to engage in the process of
historical inquiry and the related skills of critical reading, research, and writing with an emphasis on the use of
primary documents.

AP European History                          1 credit                    7/10                      Year

This course examines the political, cultural, religious and social evolution of Europe from the Renaissance to World
War II. Major periods to be considered include: the Renaissance, the Reformation and Age of Religious Wars, the
Age of New Monarchies, the Age of Absolutism and Constitutionalism, the Scientific Revolution and the
Enlightenment, the French Revolution and Napoleonic Era, the Industrial Revolution, the Age of Nationalism and
Romanticism, the First World War, the Interwar Years and the Rise of Totalitarianism, the Second World War, and
the Cold War. These units will include an in-depth study of the evolution of Western art and music. Students take
the AP examination in early May and the year concludes with an enrichment activity.




                                                            26
United States History Survey                  1 credit                    6/10                        Year
RPCS/GILMAN

This course surveys the history of the United States from colonial times to the post-Cold War II era. While readings
and specific assignments vary from teacher to teacher, all require analytical papers, essay tests and extensive
reading, including primary sources.

AP United States History                      1 credit                    6/10                        Year

Advanced Placement United States History presents a fast-paced and broad survey of the major themes and issues in
American history from the early colonial period through the late twentieth century. Students strive to understand
continuity and change in American History, examining the many factors which have shaped the American people.
The course integrates political and social history in exploring the experiences of the many groups which comprise
our nation. In addition to the textbook, students will utilize a wide range of resources, including scholarly articles
and primary source documents. The course emphasizes analytical writing and students are expected to produce a
number of analytical essays throughout the year. In addition, students will pursue a major research paper which will
support their understanding of an important issue in American History. The course is geared to help students
prepare for the AP US History Examination in May.


                                    RPCS HISTORY ELECTIVES
AP United States                              1 credit                    6/10                        Year
Government & Politics
Prerequisite: U.S. History

Every fourth year, Americans are thrilled, entertained, or alienated by the process of selecting the person who will
occupy the central position of leadership in our nation. While most Americans today seem apathetic about their
government, there still exists a certain magnetism to what goes on in Washington. The study of government and
politics is the study of power – who has it, how to get it, and how it is used. Such a study necessitates a closer look
at our institutions, the people who govern them, and the policies they institute. In preparation for the AP exam,
topics covered include a review of the constitutional underpinnings, especially civil liberties; the role of the media,
parties, and lobbyists in our political system; how Congress and the Courts work; and the power of the Presidency.
Our focus will be mainly contemporary, emphasizing the policies of the current administration. Finally, there will
be a summer reading component.

Fear: Freedom, Civil
Liberties and National Security                ½ credit                   6/10                      Semester 1

What happens when fear grips a nation? How does fear compromise the fundamental liberties on which our nation
is founded? How can our government best promote the general welfare, provide for a common defense and secure
the blessings of liberty for all people when the public perceives a threat to its security? Throughout our history
Americans have struggled with these questions. This course will examine several episodes in our history in which
public fear have seriously compromised fundamental freedoms of our people. Among the topics to be explored are
the Salem Witch Trials, Japanese Interment during WWII, McCarthyism/Red Scare and Islamophobia in the wake of
9/11.

International Relations                       ½ credit                  6/10                          Semester 1

This course will examine the underlying dynamics behind international relations in recent world history. We will
focus on regional issues such as: the U.S. relationship with Japan and Taiwan, Cambodia and the Khmer Rouge, the
Middle East from the formation of contemporary states to the current crises; Africa from decolonization to present



                                                           27
concerns including the end of Apartheid, AIDS, civil war and genocides; Latin America‘s struggle for political and
economic stability. The course will also examine global issues such as terrorism, arms deals, landmines, population
and food crises and refugee crises. Subject matter will be presented using a variety of materials including
simulations, current periodicals, film and online sources.


The History of Anti-Semitism                   ½ credit                 6/10                          Semester 2

Why is there prejudice and hatred in the world? Why has so much of it focused on the Jews? Why have a group of
people been discriminated against as long as history has been recorded? These are just some of the questions that
will be discussed in this course. We will trace the history of Anti-Semitism from the time of the Roman Empire to
today. Specific topics will include the Roman period, the Early Christian Church and the Jews, Jews in the Middle
Ages, Martin Luther and the Jews, the rise of Political Anti-Semitism in the 1800s, and Anti-Semitism in the 20th
Century including an examination of Post-Holocaust Anti-Semitism.

Peace, Social Justice                         ½ credit                 6/10                           Semester 2
and the American Way

―With liberty and justice for all‖ –so ends our nation‘s Pledge of Allegiance. How have Americans worked to bring
this great promise to build a more just and equitable society? What does it take to move the conscience of a nation?
Those interested in promoting peace as an alternative to war and non-violent social change has often faced
tremendous obstacles. Yet the desire to create a more just society runs deep in the American tradition. This course
will examine peace and social justice activism during the last century and in our time. As they prepare to take on
the responsibilities of full citizenship, students will explore how Americans as diverse as Andrew Carnegie, Jane
Addams, Martin Luther King and Cindy Sheehan have sought to affect positive social change and speak out against
war. In addition, seniors will have unique opportunities to discuss the first hand the ideas, goals and methods of
local activists.

AP History of Art                             1 credit                    7/10                        Year

This course is a chronological survey of the history of western art from Egypt to the present, including units
dedicated to other great cultures (Islam, India), based on the all-inclusive Gardner‘s Art Through the Ages, with its
topical emphasis on great cities (Athens, Florence), major artists (Michelangelo, Picasso), and seminal stylistic
movements (Renaissance, Impressionism). The student begins to understand that art is a reflection of religious,
political and social conditions, and that there is a logical stylistic development in art. Slides to accompany the test
are studied and compared daily. The class sees art objects first hand and meets with curators and museum
professionals regularly, as trips to the Walters Art Gallery and Baltimore Museum of Art are built into the schedule.
In addition, there is a one day trip to Washington, D.C., and a one day trip to New York City when possible.


                                 GILMAN HISTORY ELECTIVES
U. S. History Since 1945 (Honors)             1 credit                    6/10                        Year

This senior elective course covers the history of the United States from 1945 to the present by investigating the
forces of the last fifty years which have shaped the present. Special attention is paid to politics, civil rights and the
Vietnam War.

Ancient Greece                         ½ credit                           6/10                        Semester 1
Greek History from the
Bronze Age through the Death of Alexander

It is customary to divide Greek history into the prehistoric and historic periods with the break coming at 776 BCE,
the date of the first Olympic Games and the era immediately following the writing of the Homeric epics. The course
initially will focus on the former period with a concentration on the Mycenean and Minoan cultures. The latter



                                                           28
period will include as its nucleus characters and events whose presence contributed to both the Golden Age of
Greece and the Hellenistic period culminating in the death of Alexander the Great.

Holocaust Studies                              ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 1
Interdisciplinary

This course will guide students‘ investigation of the events surrounding the Nazi destruction of European Jewry
during World War II. As students study the evolution of the ‗Final Solution,‘ they will consider the history of anti-
Semitism in Europe, the role of anti-Semitism in the nature of the Nazi regime, and the contingencies which shaped
Nazi anti-Jewish policies. At the heart of this analysis will be a close study of the key events which transformed
persecution into genocide during World War II. The Holocaust Museum will be an important resource during this
process.
During the final section of the course, students will explore the difficulties of finding meaning in the memory of the
Holocaust by encountering memoir, fiction, essays and films with Holocaust themes.
This course is offered for either History or English credit.

Russian Studies I                              ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 1
Interdisciplinary

What is to be done about Russia? Russian philosophers, writers and political activists have struggled with that
question for nearly two hundred years now, and the answers seem no clearer today than they were in 1815. Even
after the fall of the Soviet Union in 1990, even after the institution of western economic and political reforms,
Russia still struggles to right itself amidst a continuing succession of crises. Can a civil society, be it authoritarian or
democratic, be it socialist or capitalist, be established in this country? This course examines the current events in
Russia today through the lens of Russian literature from the 19th century. Course Texts include The Overcoat and
Other Stories by Nikolai Gogol, Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev, Crime and Punishment by Fyodor
Dostoevsky, The Deeath of Ivan Ilych by Leo Tolstoy and Five Great Stories by Anton Chekhov.

This course may be taken either for English or History credit.

China and Modern East Asia                     ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 1
Interdisciplinary

China is the most populous country on earth, enjoying both rich cultural traditions and modern dynamic growth. Its
contact with the United States through trade and the presence of cultural icons like Yao Ming expands daily, but is
the developing relationship destined to be based on friendship, or rivalry? China is at the forefront of a region which
has undergone a remarkable transformation in recent decades, leading many to consider whether there is an ―Asian
way‖ of development which provides an alternate model to that of the West. This course will introduce students to
the societies of China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. After examining some of the major cultural traditions of
the region, such as Confucianism and Daoism, we will focus our attention on the twentieth century. In addition to
historical texts, we will make extensive use of modern fiction and film to examine the evolution of these societies.
(This course may be taken for English or history credit.)

Contemporary Public Policy                     ½ credit                 6/10                            Semester 1
This course will explore in some depth the major public policy issues that emerge in the fall of 2007. By examining
specific issues and opposing viewpoints that currently engage our attention, students should be better able in the
future to exercise their duties and rights as fully informed and engaged citizens. Daily and careful reading of print
media, class discussion and a series of analytical papers will be the principal activities of the class.

African-American History                       ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 2
Encounter Option available

This course will focus on and then attempt to synthesize three different types of investigation. One will be
experiential – off campus and in Baltimore City. A second will survey the ideas of prominent black leaders of the



                                                            29
20th century. The third will engage students in controversial topics facing our society today. Students should expect
to involve themselves fully in all activities – interaction with people outside our school community, reading,
discussion and writing.

Global Environmental Issues                    ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 2

This course will examine the causes and consequences of the world‘s most pressing environmental issues and the
political, social, and economic implications that surround them. Central topics will include climate change,
biodiversity, acid rain, pollution of the oceans, depletion of soil and fresh water, and deforestation. Students will
explore the historical roots of environmental problems including expanding population, increasing industrialization,
accelerating urbanization, public policy decisions, growing energy consumption, poverty, and modernization. At its
core, this course investigates the relationship between human beings and their environment. The interdisciplinary
approach incorporates elements of humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. The course culminates in
individual service learning projects related to local environmental issues that may be extended into the year-end
Senior (Encounter) Project. (This course may be taken either for English or History credit.)


Roman Republic                               ½ credit                       6/10                        Semester 2

This course explores the Roman Republic from its origin in 753 B.C.E. through the rise of Augustus. Particular
attention is paid to the foundation myth, the republican constitution and political system, Roman conquest and
imperialism, the civil war, and the Augustan political settlement.

Russian Studies II                             ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 2
Interdisciplinary

What is to be done about Russia? Russian philosophers, writers and political activists have struggled with that
question for nearly two hundred years now, and the answers seem no clearer today than they were in 1815. Even
after the fall of the Soviet Union in 1990, even after the institution of western economic and political reforms,
Russia still struggles to right itself amidst a continuing succession of crises. Can a civil society, be it authoritarian or
democratic, be it socialist or capitalist, be established in this country? This course examines the current events in
Russia today through the lens of Russian literature from the 20 th century. Course Texts include ―The Twelve‖ by
Alexander Blok, Heart of a Dog by Mikhail Bulgakov, ―Requiem‖ by Anna Akhmatova, Life and Fate by Vasily
Grossman, and One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisiovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn.

This course may be taken either for English or History credit.

World War I                                    ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 2

This course will determine the Great War from an American perspective. We will delve into the diplomatic,
political, social, and cultural ramifications of American actions during this period. Students will be expected to
study and understand the personalities that shaped the events and the ultimate outcome of this epic struggle as well
as the actions and reactions of the American people. This information should give the student a working
understanding of the basic history of the war and how it helped set the stage for the next tragic global conflict.

World War II: A Global History                 ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester 2

World War II maintains its fascination even though more than sixty years have passed since its conclusion. In this
course we will examine the war from a global perspective, to help students comprehend fully the magnitude of the
conflict. Class materials will incorporate extensively memoirs, documentaries, and feature films, in order to
examine how the war is perceived worldwide today.




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                            BRYN MAWR HISTORY ELECTIVES
AP Economics                              1 credit                      7/10                       Year
History Department permission is required

This full-year course examines economic theory in preparation for the Advanced Placement Microeconomic and
Macroeconomic Exams. Microeconomic topics include product and factor markets and the role of the government
in promoting efficiency and equity in the economy. Macroeconomic study emphasizes measurement of national
income, the public sector, economic growth and international finance and trade. Research stresses the application of
economic theory to contemporary issues. Students are required to do summer reading preceding the course and
must take the Advanced Placement Examination in the spring. This is a year-long course and may not be dropped at
the end of the first semester.

America in the World (Honors)                ½ credit                   6/10                       Semester I

This course examines how the United States has interacted with the rest of the world since the beginning of the
twentieth century, focusing both on American influences abroad and the influences of other countries and groups on
the United States. Topics will include the impact of international conflicts, cultural movements, economic changes
and immigration/migration on the United States and its culture and policies; how the United States has defined and
pursued its international interests; and how this has affected the American image abroad. Departmental approval
required.

Charm City: Down to The Wire                 1/2 credit                 6/10                       Semester I

In 2006, crime statistics ranked Baltimore with the second highest homicide rate in the nation. Inadequate public
education has plagued the city for decades. The illegal drug trade has created a cycle of poverty drowning some of
Baltimore‘s best neighborhoods. Focusing upon the Baltimore Riots of 1968, school busing and desegregation,
poverty, crime, and the influence of illegal drugs, students will examine the impact of these issues and how they
have changed the city of Baltimore in the past fifty years. Through readings, discussions, projects, research, and
guest speakers students will explore the recent history of Baltimore and its potential for change.

Law and Order: Comparative                   ½ credit                  6/10                         Semester 1
Legal Systems

How do countries with different types of governments, cultures, and social norms handle thorny legal problems?
Does Saudi Arabic treat divorce cases differently than Great Britain? Are you as likely to be arrested and held
without charges in Japan as you are in Russia? This course explores the ways in which various representative
countries throughout the world handle certain types of legal cases, from criminal to civil liberties, women‘s rights,
animal rights, treatment of foreigners, and so on. We will explore the laws and rulings in these nations through case
studies, films, articles, research, guest speakers, and discussion. The countries we will be studying may include the
following: Saudi Arabia, Great Britain, South Africa, Russia, Japan and the United States.

Native American Studies                      ½ credit                    6/10                      Semester 1
Interdisciplinary

This course is an interdisciplinary study of Native American culture focusing on the history, literature, and
anthropology of North American Indians. Among other writing assignments, students keep a journal of the readings
and write a short research paper. Readings may include Black Elk Speaks, First Peoples and Ceremony. Students
may elect this course as either an History or English credit.

The Vietnam War: Hearts and Minds            ½ credit                   6/10                       Semester 2

The legacy of the Vietnam War continues today. This course examines the conflict from both the American and
Vietnamese perspectives. We use memoirs, film, music and other media to understand the cultural and political



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aspects of the war.

Advanced Placement                           ½ credit                    7/10                       Semester 2
Comparative Government and Politics

This course will provide an introduction to major theoretical approaches to comparative politics and examine case
studies of the political systems and processes of the following countries: China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria,
and Russia. The goal of studying these nations will be to allow students to compare and contrast political institutions
across nations and draw generalizations on the basis of these case studies. Students taking this course are required to
take the Advanced Placement Comparative Government and Politics Exam. Departmental approval required.

The Modern Middle East:                        ½ credit                6/10                         Semester 2
Diplomacy Lab

How are diplomatic relations conducted? Who are the actors in the Middle East and how do they manage routine
and crisis situations? This class ―plays‖ the role of a country in the Middle East diplomatic arena, and the students,
as diplomats for this country, interact via e-mail with students across the country taking similar roles for other
countries. As actors in the Middle East we learn to appreciate the region‘s complexity by formulating policy for our
assigned country. The scenario is created and moderated by the University of Michigan.

Reality and the News                         ½ credit                  6/10                         Semester 2
in the Information Age

This course takes a historical perspective as it attempts to answer the questions: What is news? How does its
presentation affect our culture? Does the news media manipulate the public, or it is manipulated by other forces?
We pay attention to the evolution of the press in the United States and the way it is seen by the public today. Our
investigation covers a variety of media outlets (newspaper, radio, TV), and their coverage of specific events from
the mundane to the earth-shattering.


                                             MATHEMATICS
Introduction to Integrated Math                1 credit                  6/10                       Year
(Regular)

This course is designed for students who have not previously had opportunities for success in Algebra I, who have
weak computational skills, and/or no background in an investigation-driven, integrated curriculum. The course will
provide opportunities to master traditional Algebra I skills, and an introduction to topics in Geometry, probability &
data analysis, as well as extensive experience in critical thinking, problem solving, writing, and the use of
technology in a math classroom. These attributes will be essential as students enter the regular integrated math
sequence as sophomores. Students are assigned to the course based on teacher recommendations, information from
transcripts, and placement test results. Students receive one credit upon successful completion of the class, but the
course does not count toward the three year sequence of classes required for graduation.

Algebra II-Geometry, Part I                      1 credit                6/10                       Year
(Regular/Accelerated)
Prerequisite: Mathematics through Algebra I

This course begins a three year integrated math program of Algebra II, Geometry, Probability, Statistics and Pre-
Calculus topics. The students learn to reason deductively, to model solutions to problems using a variety of
techniques (including matrices, linear regression, and patterns of association) and investigate topics in Euclidean and
transformational geometry. In addition, the study of coordinate geometry, graphing, linear and quadratic functions,
ratio and proportion, and trigonometry of the right triangle is pursued in-depth. Investigations with graphing
calculators and computer software enrich the students‘ understanding of new concepts, and are an integral part of
this course. There is a strong skills review & mastery component to the course. The Accelerated section moves at a


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faster pace than the Regular, and students are assigned to each section based on performance on a placement test and
teacher recommendations, among other factors. Students in the Accelerated section are expected to maintain a ―B‖
average.

Algebra II-Geometry (Honors)                  1 credit                6/10                          Year
Prerequisite: Mathematics through Algebra I and permission of the Department

This course begins a three year integrated math program of Algebra II, Geometry, Probability, Statistics and Pre-
Calculus topics. The students learn to reason deductively, to model solutions to problems using a variety of
techniques (including matrices, linear regression, and patterns of association) and investigate topics in Euclidean and
transformational geometry. In addition, the study of coordinate geometry, graphing, linear, quadratic and
trigonometric functions, ratio and proportion, and is pursued in-depth. Investigations with graphing calculators and
computer software enrich the students‘ understanding of new concepts, and are an integral part of this course. The
Honors section moves very quickly, and students must have demonstrated solid algebraic and arithmetic skills, as
well as an ability to think abstractly to be considered for placement in this section. Students in the Honors section
are expected to maintain a ―B‖ average.

Algebra II-Geometry, Part II               1 credit                 6/10                            Year
Prerequisite: A minimum score 70% in Algebra II- Geometry, Part I (Regular)

This course is a continuation of the integrated course, Algebra II/Geometry Part I (Regular). The development of
geometric theorems and proof continues through the study of congruent and similar triangles and circles. The study
of functions is continued with an investigation of polynomials and functional notation, including a very complete
treatment of quadratic functions. The study of trigonometry is continued with the derivation and applications of
both the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines. Students solve increasingly sophisticated problems using linear
programming, and modeling with linear and quadratic inequalities. Additional work includes the study of sampling
techniques, the Normal model and random numbers. There is a strong skills review and mastery component to the
course. Investigations with graphing calculators and computer software enrich the students‘ understanding of new
concepts and are an integral part of this course.

Algebra II-Geometry, Part II (Accelerated)    1 credit               6/10                           Year
Prerequisite: A minimum score of 80% in Algebra II- Geometry, Part I (Accelerated)

This course is a continuation of the integrated course, Algebra II/Geometry Part I (Accelerated). The development
of geometric theorems and proof continues through the study of congruent and similar triangles and circles. The
study of functions is continued with an investigation of polynomials and functional notation, including a very
complete treatment of quadratic functions. The study of trigonometry is continued with the derivation and
applications of both the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines. Students solve increasingly sophisticated problems
using linear programming, and modeling with linear and quadratic inequalities. Additional work includes the study
of sampling techniques, the Normal model and random numbers. Investigations with graphing calculators and
computer software enrich the students‘ understanding of new concepts and are an integral part of this course.
Students in the Accelerated section are expected to maintain a ―B‖ average.

Advanced Algebra-Geometry(Honors)                 1 credit          6/10                            Year
Prerequisite: A minimum score of 80% in Algebra II- Geometry, Part I (Honors)

This course follows Algebra II-Geometry H and continues the integrated program. The development of geometric
theorems and proof continues through the study of congruent and similar triangles and circles, including an in-depth
study of reasoning, argument, and mathematical writing. The study of functions is continued with an investigation
of polynomials and functional notation, including a very complete treatment of quadratic functions. The study of
trigonometry includes the derivation and applications of both the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines. Students
solve increasingly sophisticated problems using linear programming, and modeling with linear and quadratic
inequalities. Sequences, series, recursion and iterative techniques are introduced. Additional work includes the
study of sampling techniques, the Normal model and random numbers. Investigations with graphing calculators and
computer software enrich the students‘ understanding of new concepts and are an integral part of this course.
Students in the Honors section are expected to maintain a ―B‖ average.



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Advanced Algebra-Trigonometry                     1 credit          6/10                           Year
Prerequisite: A minimum score of 70% in Algebra II- Geometry, Part II (Regular)

This course follows Algebra II-Geometry, Part II (Regular) and completes the integrated program. The course
includes an in-depth study of functions. The transcendental functions are introduced with a study of the
trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. The study of sequences and series, probability and statistics,
polar coordinates, and translations broaden the interpretation of functions. The use of graphing calculators and
computer software is an integral part of this course.


Pre-Calculus (Accelerated)                         1 credit           6/10                         Year
Prerequisite: A score of 80% in Algebra II- Geometry, Part II (Accelerated)

This course follows Algebra II-Geometry, Part II A and completes the integrated program. The course includes an
in depth study of functions including trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions. An emphasis is placed
on applications of the transcendental functions. In addition, polar coordinates, vectors, and statistics are studied.
The use of graphing calculators and computer software is an integral part of this course. Students in the Accelerated
section are expected to maintain a ―B‖ average.

Trigonometry-Calculus (Honors)                    1 credit          6/10                           Year
Prerequisite: A minimum score of 80% in Algebra II- Geometry, Part I (Honors)

This course completes the integrated honors program. Before beginning the study of calculus in the spring, students
extend their investigations of functions and their applications. Applications of polynomial, rational, logarithmic,
exponential and trigonometric functions are studied in depth through a variety of approaches including calculator
work, labs, projects, modeling, data analysis, and writing. Second semester this approach continues with the study of
concepts in differential calculus and an introduction to Riemann sums, according to the beginning of the Advanced
Placement program guidelines for BC Calculus. Students in the Honors section are expected to maintain a ―B‖
average.

                                  MATHEMATICS ELECTIVES

Open to seniors, juniors and sophomores with the permission of the department unless otherwise indicated.
Specific criterion for permission is available from the Department.

AP Calculus BC                                       1 credit           7/10                       Year
Prerequisite: Trigonometry-Calculus H
Department approval required.
RPCS/GILMAN/BMS

This course completes the study of the BC Advanced Placement syllabus begun in the 11 th grade Honors program.
The course begins with a review of the derivative and its applications. Additional applications of differential
calculus, the introduction of the definite integral and its applications are then covered. The course continues with
computing antiderivatives, series, Taylor‘s formula and some work on solving simple differential equations.
Students are expected to make a considerable commitment of time to this course. All students are expected to take
the Advanced Placement Examination.

AP Calculus AB                                       1 credit           7/10                       Year
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus, A
Department approval required.
RPCS/GILMAN/BMS

The syllabus follows the guidelines of the Advanced Placement Examination in AB Calculus. In addition to the
study of limits and continuity, the focus of the course is the introduction of differential and integral calculus.



                                                         34
Concepts of calculus and their applications are investigated through a variety of approaches including calculator
work, labs, projects, modeling and writing. Students are expected to make a considerable commitment of time to
this course. All students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Examination.

AP Statistics                                       1 credit               7/10                        Year
Department approval required (priority given to seniors.)
RPCS/GILMAN/BMS

Designed for students who will be pursuing a variety of college majors, statistics is a branch of mathematics that
almost all students will find to be very useful. Topics in both descriptive and inferential statistics are covered, as
well as ideas concerning probability. Some of the data needed is collected by students, and other information may
be gathered from newspapers, government databases, medical data, political and environmental surveys and other
sources. Some simulations and many uses of computer software and graphing calculator applications are included.
There is emphasis on the interpretation of statistical results as well as the predictive power of statistics. Students are
expected to make a considerable commitment of time to this course. All students are expected to take the Advanced
Placement Examination.

Calculus                                      ½ or 1 credit                6/10                        Semester 1/Year
GILMAN/BMS

The emphasis of this course is for students to be able to select and apply Calculus concepts in the context of
problem-solving. The course will strengthen the algebraic underpinnings of Calculus and re-examine advanced Pre-
Calculus skills as it explores such Calculus topics as limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration.

Graph Theory and Game Theory                  ½ credit                     6/10                        Semester I
RPCS

Graph Theory and Game Theory is a topics course designed to extend students‘ problem-solving skills by exposing
them to a vast array of mathematical ideas. Students will explore the power of mathematics beyond and outside of
the traditional pre-calculus/calculus sequence. Students will study a variety of standard networking applications
such as Euler circuits, Hamilton circuits and traveling salesman problems, and scheduling using critical
paths. Additional course topics include: matrix applications, probability and odds, permutations and combinations,
and a selection of problems and strategies from traditional game theory.

Introduction to Multivariable Calculus ½ credit                      6/10                              Semester 1
BMS
Prerequisite: Successful completion of BC Calculus & permission of the department

This course is a continuation of the study of functions begun in the B and C Semesters of Advanced Placement
Calculus. The course focuses on applications and extensions of topics covered in B.C. Calculus, and are designed to
provide closure to some of those topics while, at the same time, preparing students for their uses and applications in
both the theoretical and applied mathematics the students will see in college. Topics include the mathematics of
vectors with dot and cross products, graphing functions in three dimensions, partial derivatives, and methods to
locate extrema and saddle points on surfaces. If time permits, there will be an investigation of multiple integrals to
calculate area, volume, surface area, and arc length in three dimensions.

Statistics and Probability                     ½ credit                      6/10                      Semester 1
GILMAN

This semester course in applied statistics is designed to give the students a thorough knowledge of the nature of data,
descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions. This course will focus on methods for planning
experiments, obtaining data and then organizing, summarizing, presenting, analyzing, interpreting, and drawing
conclusions based on the data. Graphing calculators and computer spreadsheets are used extensively in all aspects
of the course to model and interpret data from real world situations. Graphing calculators and computer software are
used extensively throughout this course.



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Advanced Pre-Calculus & Functions              ½ Credit                     6/10                      Semester 1
RPCS

This course extends the work students have done in Advanced Algebra, Trigonometry, and Pre-Calculus topics
during the regular three-year series, with the goal of preparing for a serious study of calculus at the university level.
Students will work extensively with transcendental functions, polynomials and rationals in order to perfect the use
and manipulation of these functions over the Real and Complex numbers. Students will explore topics numerically,
graphically, verbally and analytically; with a heavy emphasis placed on the development of a fluid sense of
symbolic reasoning.

Calculus A                                    ½ Credit                       6/10                    Semester 2
RPCS
Department Permission required

This course provides a rigorous analytical introduction to the techniques and concepts of Differential Calculus. The
use of the limit to define a derivative is developed, along with techniques of differentiation and applications of the
rate-of-change. In addition, the geometrical interpretation of the derivative will be explored. Students will explore
topics via the use of technology and writing, and the use of symbolic reasoning will be heavily emphasized. The
combination of Advanced Pre-Calculus & Functions and Calculus A is designed to prepare students for success in a
rigorous, theoretical college level Calculus course upon completion.

The Mathematics of Finance                             ½ credit           6/10                        Semester 2

Prerequisites: Although not required, completion of pre-calculus would be beneficial. This course can be paired
with a first semester of Calculus.

Want to learn something that you can start using right away and continue using the rest of your life? Then learn the
fundamental language and framework of personal financial decision making and gain the tools necessary to
approach any situation involving economics and money. Topics include the compounding and discounting of
interest rates and their applications, such as mortgages, credit cards, college saving and retirement planning; the
analysis of financial statements, both of public and non-profit entities; and the attributes of financial instruments,
both debt and equity related. In addition, students investigate the risk vs. reward relationship inherent in any
financial transaction. Mathematical tools, such as exponential growth and decay, logarithms, ratio analysis and
statistics are used to help make financial decisions and understand the foundational concepts of economics. Please
note that the course is not about investing. Class materials include a text, various articles from the business press,
internet sources and corporate filings. Outside speakers are invited on a regular basis.

Statistical Applications
and Data Analysis                          ½ credit                   6/10                            Semester 2
BMS
Prerequisites: Although not required, completion of precalculus would be beneficial.

Have you ever wondered about the quality control and variability when you purchase a cup of coffee from a vending
machine? What about the normal limits of blood pressure or the birth weights of babies? Why do some people have
a good idea about whether their poker hand can be a winner? Should you play the lottery? When a political poll is
taken, sometimes it successfully predicts the outcome of an election, and sometimes it is wrong. Why? This class is
a project based inquiry into the applications of statistics to the sciences and social sciences. A goal is to help
students understand the statistics that they read about in the newspapers and magazines, be wise in interpreting the
barrage of data that they hear about on the evening news, and appreciate how quality control, marketing, advertising,
polling, environmental testing, lottery winnings, and card games work with data and prediction through statistics.




                                                           36
Advanced Problem Solving                      ½ credit                    6/10                        Semester 2
GILMAN

Project-oriented course focused on exploring non-core curriculum Mathematics ideas. Topics and areas of study
include topology, finite math, curve fitting, fractals, advanced counting/probability, to name a few. Students of all
Math abilities are welcomed.


Topics in College Mathematics               ½ credit                                              Semester 2
BMS
Prerequisite: Completion of at least one semester of AP Calculus, 85% or better at the semester, and permission of
the department

This course is designed to enable students with significant interest, ability and preparation in mathematics to
investigate some of the subject‘s elegant theoretical underpinnings. Topics may vary from semester to semester but
can include Combinatorics; Graph Theory; Non-Euclidean and Finite Geometries; Boolean Algebras, Symbolic
Logic, and Circuit Theory; Matrices and Markov Processes; and n-Dimensional Linear Algebras. These topics are
treated with a thoroughness and rigor matching that of a University level Mathematics major, and the course should
provide a glimpse of the world of the working mathematician. Students will complete an individual project on a
topic that has not been included in the curriculum to research and present to the class. This course may be repeated
with permission of the Department.



                                       PHYSICAL EDUCATION
The goals of the Physical Education Department include learning how to maintain an appropriate level of fitness, as
well as being exposed to a variety of recreational and lifetime sports, thus promoting the concept of lifetime fitness.
Students in the 9th and 10th grades are enrolled in Physical Education classes during the school day. Juniors and
Seniors meet their requirement by choosing one of several options, thus providing choice while still encouraging the
development of an active lifestyle. Those students who wish to pursue sports after school are currently able to
choose from badminton, basketball, crew, cross country, field hockey, golf, lacrosse, soccer, softball, squash,
swimming, tennis, track and volleyball.

A student who is heavily involved in an organized sport or dance outside of school may apply for an exemption
from 9th and 10th grade Physical Education activity classes. The requirements for exemption are as follows: the
student must (1) be able to verify the activity she is participating in, (2) demonstrate that the time commitment of the
involved activity must exceed that of a Varsity sport plus P.E. class, (3) be involved for the length of the school
year, (4) submit her written application to the Head of the Upper School as well as the Athletic Director.

This exemption is intended for those rare students who are already competing at an advanced level prior to
reaching the 9th or 10th grade and whose schedule of practice and competition leaves very limited study time.
A quarterly log of hours must be kept and will be checked by the assigned P.E. teacher. Participating on recreational
and/or club teams does not fall in this category.

Grades 9 & 10
Physical Education                            ½ credit                    3/10                        Year

This is a two year curriculum in which the 9th & 10th grades will meet in combined classes. Activities that will be
included over the course of two years are badminton, golf, nutrition, personal fitness, physical fitness testing,
Pilates, recreational games (including by not limited to flag football, floor hockey, soccer, team handball, tennis),
squash, volleyball, and yoga.




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Grades 11 & 12
Physical Education                           ½ credit                                              Year

Juniors and Seniors can fulfill their P.E. requirements in a number of ways: (1) play on two or more RPCS athletic
teams per school year, (2) play on one RPCS team and fulfill one semester of an individual personal fitness program
(see #3), (3) participate in an individual personal fitness program – in the RPCS fitness room, or in a verifiable
alternative activity off campus, 2 semesters, 30 sessions per semester, (4) be enrolled in Roses, or a yearlong dance
class at RPCS.

                                    PSAT/SAT PREPARATION
SAT Prep 9, 10, 11                           no credit                  1/10                       Year

This required course in grades 9, 10, and 11 prepares students for the Standardized PSAT and SAT tests by teaching
test-taking strategies and reinforcing verbal and math skills. Two required practice exams are scheduled on
Saturday mornings.




                                          PUBLIC SPEAKING
Public Speaking                              ¼ credit                   2/10                       Semester
Required Grade 11

This junior year course develops the techniques of forensics, extemporaneous speaking and oral interpretation and
basic principles of argumentation. Successful interviewing skills are also addressed.

                                                  SCIENCE
Biology (Regular/Honors)                     1 credit                   6/10                       Year

This 9th grade course provides the student with a foundation in the biological sciences. Laboratory work is an
important part of the course, with student-designed investigations playing an instrumental role. Topics covered
include cellular studies, genetics, botany, zoology, human physiology, evolution and ecology. Students will be
considered for the Honors sections based on the recommendations of their 8 th grade science and math teachers.

AP Biology                                   1 credit                   7/10                       Year
Department permission required
Prerequisite: Chemistry

This course offers the opportunity to complete college level work in the biological sciences. During the year,
students will study six major themes: molecular biology, evolution, organisms, anatomy & physiology, botany and
ecology. They will also participate in regular laboratory exercises and learn experimental design. All students
enrolled are expected to take the AP biology exam in the spring.

Physics (Regular/Honors)                     1 credit                   6/10                       Year

Normally open to students in the 10th grade, this introductory physics course provides students with a
comprehensive study of the processes by which we have attempted to describe the physical phenomena of our
universe. Though emphasis is placed upon classical physics (which includes mechanics, light, and electricity), the
theories of Einstein and other contemporary physicists are discussed and contrasted. Mathematical, scientific and
logical-thinking processes are stressed through this laboratory oriented course. Departmental permission required for
admittance to Honors sections.




                                                         38
Chemistry (Regular/Honors)                   1 credit                    6/10                       Year

Normally open to students in the 11th grade, this introductory chemistry course deals with theoretical models, their
development and implementation. The structure of the atom, periodicity, chemical bonding, the nature of chemical
reactions, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium, molecular kinetic theory, states of matter and elementary
thermodynamics are emphasized through the use of a laboratory-inquiry approach. Departmental permission
required for admittance to Honors sections.

AP Chemistry                                 1 credit                    7/10                       Year
Department permission required
Prerequisite: Chemistry

This course offers the opportunity to complete and receive credit for college level work in chemistry. It integrates
the three aspects of a college level course: development of theoretical concepts, construction of problem solving
techniques, and participation in a laboratory program. Topics that will be explored include chemical equilibrium,
kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, acid-based chemistry, nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. All
students enrolled are expected to take the AP Chemistry exam in the spring.

AP Psychology                                1 credit                    6/10                       Year
Department Approval Required
Prerequisite: 85% Science Average

This course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human
beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and methods associated with
each of the major subfields within psychology. The course emphasizes the history of psychology as a science, the
different theoretical approaches that underline explanation of behavior, and the contemporary research methods used
by psychologists. A college level text is used and student assignments and grades are based on college level
expectations. This course prepares students for the AP Examination.



                                     Semester SCIENCE Electives

These courses are open to seniors who have completed introductory courses in biology, chemistry and physics.

Applied Chemistry                            ½ credit                    6/10                       Semester 1
Prerequisite: Chemistry

This course will provide the chance to apply concepts learned in a first year chemistry course to ‗real world‖
problems. Following a review of basic chemical concepts, students will be introduced to applications and
explorations of 2-dimensional art, the food industry, consumer products, and the production of common
pharmaceuticals such as aspirin. Students will also have the opportunity to gain an understanding of how flavors
and fragrances are created through an introduction to the analysis and practical uses of organic compounds. Topics
covered will differ in each semester allowing students to enroll in either or both semesters.

Genetics/Biotechnology                     ½ credit                   6/10                          Semester 1
Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry; students may not enroll in AP Biology concurrently.

This course provides the opportunity to complete advanced work in genetics. Topics covered include Mendelian
inheritance, molecular biology, genetic engineering, population genetics, and evolution. The uses of biotechnology
are a significant part of the course, along with regular study of the social, ethical, and legal implications of
recombinant DNA.




                                                          39
Geology and Ecology                         ½ credit                 6/10                            Semester 1
of the Chesapeake Bay
Prerequisite: Students may not enroll in AP Environmental Science concurrently

This course provides a comprehensive survey OF the ecological and geological processes that govern the
Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. Regular field studies occur in the local watershed of the RPCS stream and the
Stony Run stream on the Gilman campus. Having gained an understanding of current conditions and their impact on
the Bay, students will focus on environmental policy and propose ways to improve the Bay by governing human use
of the local watershed and the Bay itself.

Introduction to Archeology                    ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 1

Archaeology is the scientific study of human past and this course will be a survey of the history, theories and
methods of the discipline. Students will learn about the beginnings of archaeology, the ―big digs‖ such as Troy,
modern theory debates, current political and ethical concerns, field methods and the uses of archaeological analysis.
Related fields, including paleontology, geology, art history, anthropology and epigraphy, will be discussed in the
context of archaeology. The final assessment will be a research project and presentation.

Planetary Science                             ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 2

In this course students are introduced to concepts in planetary science and planetary exploration with an emphasis on
the origin and evolution of planets. The size, shapes, masses, internal structures and mechanism of heat generation
and heat loss of Earth and other solid planets in the solar system are reviewed in detail. Missions to explore the
planets, as well as current and future exploration missions will be discussed. Topics covered include but are not
limited to: volcanism, tectonics, gravity, magnetic fields, seismology, and impact cratering records.


Anatomy & Physiology                       ½ credit                  6/10                            Semester 2
Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry; students may not enroll in AP Biology concurrently.

This course provides a survey of various systems of the human body with an emphasis on their physiology. The
workings of the various organs and their interactions will be examined, and extensive laboratory work which may
include dissections.

Botany                                        ½ credit                   6/10                        Semester 2
Prerequisite: Biology

This course will provide students with an introduction to botany, the study of plants. The material covered will
include evolutionary relationships and trends, plant diversity and classification, plant anatomy, cellular processes
and the varied uses that humans have found for plants. We will make use of the RPCS Backwoods for labs and
species identification activities. The final assessment will be an exam with a lab component.

Sustainable Design and Engineering            ½ credit                    6/10                        Semester 2

The goal of sustainable design is to produce products, processes, and services in a way that reduces use of non-
renewable resources, minimizes environmental impact, and connects people with the natural environment.
Engineering is the interface between science, technology, and business. Economic considerations have always been
an integral part of engineering design, and sustainable design incorporates environmental considerations into the
equation. In this course, students will learn about sustainable design concepts such as Life Cycle Assessment – a
technique to assess the environmental aspects and potential impacts associated with a product, process, or service by
compiling an inventory of energy and material inputs and environmental releases. Projects may include designing a
home for maximum efficiency and minimum environmental impact and redesigning an everyday appliance to run
off of an alternative fuel source. Projects may include designing model solar cars, wind turbines, and/or other
alternative energy devices. Students will also focus on ways to make the RPCS campus a learning tool for the entire
community.




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                            BRYN MAWR SCIENCE ELECTIVES
Enrollment in the following semester length science courses at Gilman and Bryn Mawr is open to any senior who
has fulfilled the science requirements.

AP Biology                                  1 credit              7/10                     Year
Prerequisites: Physics, Biology, Chemistry, PreCalculus.
Science Department permission required.
AP Environmental Science, Anatomy and Physiology, Ecology of the Chesapeake Bay, Ecology, and/or Genetics
may not be taken concurrently.

This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college freshman biology course. Topics in cell structure,
biochemistry, genetics, evolution, animal behavior, plant and animal anatomy and physiology are studied. Students
are expected to learn some material independently and are required to do reading over the summer preceding the
course. All students must take the Advanced Placement Biology examination in the spring. This is a year-long
course and may not be dropped at the end of first semester. Only open to seniors.

AP Physics                                  1 credit                7/10                      Year
Department permission required
Prerequisites: Physics, Biology, Chemistry, and PreCalculus AB or BC Concurrent enrollment in AB or BC
Calculus is required.

Students are required to do reading over the summer preceding the course, and must take the Advanced Placement
Physics B examination in the spring. Science Department permission required. This course is designed to be the
equivalent of a college freshman Physics course. Topics to be studied through lecture, demonstration, and
experimentation include: kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws, rotational dynamics, kinetic theory and
thermodynamics, wave mechanics, optics, electromagnetism, and modern Physics. Students are expected to learn
some material independently, and are required to do reading over the summer preceding the course. All students
must take the Advanced Placement Physics B exam in the spring. This is a year-long course and may not be
dropped at the end of first semester. Only open to seniors.

AP Environmental Science                           Year                    1 credit
 (Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry. AP Biology, Ecology, or Ecology of the Chesapeake Bay may not be taken
concurrently. Science Department permission required.)

This course is designed to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to
understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural
and man-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for
resolving and/or preventing them. Field and laboratory studies, experimental design and data analysis are essential
components of the course. Students are expected to learn some material independently. Basic algebraic calculations,
dimensional analysis and scientific notation skills to help solve problems will be required. The summer reading
required for this course will be announced prior to the end of the current school year. All students must take the
Advanced Placement Environmental Science Examination in the spring. This is a year-long course and may not be
dropped at the end of first semester. Only open to seniors.

Principles of Engineering 1                           ½ credit                                     Semester 1
Prerequisite: Physics or Physical Science

This course explores topics in electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, and computer science in depth with an
emphasis on projects and cooperative learning. Digital logic circuits, basic computer programming, simple
machines, motors, and engines will all be discussed. Students will develop a quantitative understanding of



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engineering principles whenever possible. Students may take this course with or without taking Principles of
Engineering: Semester 2.

Principles of Engineering 1                             ½ credit                                   Semester 2
Prerequisite: Physics or Physical Science

This course explores topics in environmental engineering, materials science, and structural engineering in depth with
an emphasis on projects and cooperative learning. The study of environmental engineering will focus on the
characterization of environmental contaminants in a variety of media, techniques for tracking and remediating
pollution, and the relevant legal framework. The study of materials science and structural engineering will culminate
in a bridge design project. Students will develop a quantitative understanding of engineering principles whenever
possible. Students may take this course with or without taking Principles of Engineering: Semester 1.




                                SENIOR INDEPENDENT STUDY
Senior Independent Project                   ½ credit                                              Semester 2
Elective

This course is designed to provide extended educational opportunities, combining academic learning with practical
experience in an area which meets both the individual student‘s interest and the approval of the faculty in each
instance. A paper is required, and successful completion of the work receives the same amount of academic credit
as is given to all other major semester electives.


                                   ACADEMIC TECHNOLOGY
AP Computer Science (JAVA)                   1 credit                   7/10                       Year
RPCS/BMS

This year long course in computer science introduces students to computer programming methodology, fundamental
data structures, program flow, and basic object-oriented data organization and management. Students develop
problem-solving skills through application design, debugging, and altering code from existing applications. No
computer programming background is required. Students take the AP Computer Science exam in May. This is a
year-long course and may not be dropped at the end of the first semester. Preference is given to Seniors.

Introduction to Computer Science:              ¼ credit                 3/10                       Semester 1,2
Games and Graphics
RPCS

In this course, students will explore the basic principles of Object-Oriented Programming through the creation of
games, graphics, and animations using such learning tools as Scratch, Greenfoot, and Alice. Students will gain an
understanding of programming logic, algorithms, data flow, and data structures. Topics covered include loops,
decision statements, the use of variables and constants, classes and objects, and one-dimensional arrays. Special
emphasis will be placed on connecting programming knowledge to current applications in society as well as
exploring resources for young women interested in pursuing information technology careers.

This course is appropriate for freshmen and sophomores interested in exploring Computer Science before
committing to the AP Java class, or for upper-level students who would like an introduction to computer science
without pursuing the AP program.




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MATLAB                                           ½ credit              6/10                         Semester 2
Prerequisite: Jrs/Srs with strong math/science background
RPCS

MATLAB is a technical programming language and development environment currently adopted by more than 3500
universities around the world and widely used in industry. MATLAB allows students to perform numeric
computations, develop algorithms, and create their own data visualizations, enhancing their proficiency in problem
analysis, problem solving, and solution design. Students interested in majoring in science, math, and engineering
fields in college should consider learning MATLAB now to help ease the freshman year transition. In this course,
we will create games, models, and simulations to accelerate students‘ mastery of MATLAB. Potential projects
include: Pong, Asteroids, traffic engineering, surviving tsunamis, preventing shore erosion, and the physics of
bouncing balls.

No prior computer programming experience is required. Former AP Computer Science students, however, are also
welcome. Software Required: MATLAB and Simulink Student Version; instructions for how to purchase will be
provided.

The Silver Screen:                          ½ credit                   6/10                       Semester 1
Understanding and Making Movies
BMS

This tri-school senior elective will provide each student with the tools and understanding to craft a polished short
narrative or documentary video production as a final project. After viewing a successful commercial film for study,
the students will be introduced to the basic concepts of photography and videography, the elements of film and
sound technique and aesthetics, screenwriting rules and formatting with Final Draft software, and digital editing
with Apple‘s Final Cut software.

Programming iPhone Apps                     ½ credit                   5/10                       Semester 1
BMS

This semester course will give students a foundation for programming apps on iOS devices: iPhone, iPod Touch,
and the iPad. Through the use of Xcode, Interface Builder, and other Mac programming tools, students will learn a
wide range of programming techniques and the foundations of Object Oriented Programming. This course does
NOT require the students to have an iPhone, iPod Touch, or an iPad. This course assumes no background in
computer programming.

Graphic Design                              ½ credit                   6/10                       Semester 1
BMS

This semester course teaches students the basics of graphic design, including visual cohesiveness, layout, and color
usage. Students will use these design concepts to create projects using the software applications Adobe Photoshop,
Illustrator and InDesign. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a portfolio of pieces ranging from a
book cover to a logo design to a magazine. This course will also cover basic advertising principles and teach
students how to analyze print design. No previous art or computer knowledge is required.

Animation & Interactive Design              ½ credit                   6/10                       Semester 2
BMS

This semester course introduces students to interactive design using the Adobe Flash program. This first half of the
semester will be devoted to animation; students will learn the history of animation and create 30-second digital
animations of their own. In the second half of the course, students will focus on using Flash and the animation
techniques learned to develop interactive web content, such as online advertisements, games and websites.
Students‘ work will be showcased in an interactive web portfolio at the end of the course. No previous art or
computer knowledge is required.



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