RESOURCE KIT FOR KIDS COUNT PROJECTS by ghkgkyyt

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									                                  OF
   The Annie E. Casey Foundation embarked on the KIDS COUNT Initiative to




                                     F
  track the status of children and families in the United States. The Initiative was




                                       ERI
 designed to respond to the need for reliable data on the condition of children and to




                                           N G G
 enrich local, state, and national discussions concerning ways to secure better futures



                                                 UIDANCE AND I
    for children and families. Since 1990, the Foundation has produced the annual
                                               RESOURCE KIT
KIDS COUNT Data Book, which uses the best available data to measure the edu-

                                                            FOR
cational, social, economic and physical well-being of children and families state-by-
 state. The Foundation also produces special KIDS COUNT topics
                                                 KIDS COUNT data reports on

                                                     PROJECTS
                     reflecting the most pressing needs of today’s children and families.
                                                               DEAS




   In 1991, the Foundation began supporting state-level KIDS COUNT projects to
provide a more detailed picture of the condition of children and families. Currently,
                                                                    FOR YO




  there are KIDS COUNT projects in 49 states and the District of Columbia that
  raise awareness and accountability about the condition of children and families by
    (1) measuring and reporting on the status of children at the state and sub-state
                                                                           UR KIDS COUNT




   level, and (2) using that information creatively to inform the public debate and
 strengthen public action on behalf of children and families within the state. KIDS
  COUNT projects engage in a variety of public awareness activities, including the
publication of data-driven products that examine the status of children and families.

  KIDS COUNT has made important contributions to the field of child-well being
                                                                                         WOR




         and to the evolution of data-based advocacy. In 1994, the Annie E. Casey
                                                                                             K




  Foundation commissioned a retrospective study of KIDS COUNT to document the
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 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
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egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
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                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           TABLE OF CONTENTS
           Introduction

           I.     KIDS COUNT’s History and Mission

           II.    The KIDS COUNT Network
                         The KIDS COUNT Steering Committee

                         The Network Coordinator

                         Network Events and Resources

                         Network Working Groups and Services

           III.   Data Resources
                         Developing Indicators

                         General Statistical Issues

                         Data Sources

                         General Sources on Children and Families

           IV.    Communications Resources

           V.     Technology Resources

           Appendices
                  Appendix A – 2000-2001 KIDS COUNT Steering Committee

                  Appendix B –KIDS COUNT Staff

                  Appendix C –Technical Assistance for KIDS COUNT Projects

                  Appendix D – KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports




           Table of Contents
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 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
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egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
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                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Introduction:
           The Resource Kit for KIDS COUNT Projects is a compilation of information about various resources—
           ranging from organizations and networks to publications and Web sites—that can help you do your
           KIDS COUNT work.

           We hope that this Resource Kit will be useful both to new members of the KIDS COUNT Network and to
           KIDS COUNT veterans. If you are a new KIDS COUNT staff person, you can refer to the resources in this
           kit as a guide in producing your first data book and in formulating effective communication strategies. If you
           have been doing KIDS COUNT work for some time, these resources can make your work more efficient.

           The following are just a few examples of typical KIDS COUNT scenarios that might trigger a need for the
           resources in this kit:

           • You receive a request from a colleague who wants to know if there are any state-level indicators about
             hunger and food insecurity. You can find some sources of information in the Data section of the Resource
             Kit (under the subheadings “Developing Indicators” and “Data Sources”).

           • Your Executive Director wants your Web site upgraded so that people can better access KIDS COUNT
             data, and you need to find low-cost resources to help you do this. The Technology section of the
             Resource Kit can help you find many Web sites that are geared toward the technology needs of nonprofit
             organizations. This section also contains information about low-cost Web resources.

           • You have a big interview tomorrow with a major television station in your market, and you have very
             little experience being on television. Where can you find tips on what to wear and how to respond to
             questions? The Communications section of the Resource Kit lists books and Web sites that can help you
             prepare for television interviews.




           Introduction                                                                                                 1
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 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
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egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
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                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           WHAT’S INCLUDED IN THE RESOURCE KIT

           Each section of the Resource Kit contains a list of resources with a brief description of the content of each
           resource, how it might be useful, and how to access it (including a Web address if there is one).

           We have arranged the Resource Kit in five primary sections, some of which are further divided into
           sub-sections. The content of each of the sections is as follows:

           I.     KIDS COUNT’s History and Mission
                  This section outlines the mission of the KIDS COUNT initiative and its ten-year history.

           II.    The KIDS COUNT Network
                  Describes in some detail the various activities of the state-based KIDS COUNT Network. (We wel-
                  come your participation in these activities and services!)

           III.   Data Resources
                  This section is devoted to resources for collecting, analyzing, and reporting data on the condition
                  of children—which is, of course, the primary focus of KIDS COUNT. Since there are many possible
                  resources for doing data work on children and families, we have divided this section into four
                  sub-sections:

                  • Developing indicators – These resources describe how leading researchers in the field have
                     developed indicators of child and family well-being. You may want to use these resources as a
                     guide in deciding which indicators your KIDS COUNT project should track.

                  • General statistics sources – Here it is… our version of Statistics 101! This list of resources and
                     Web sites can help you with both basic and complex statistical issues. Some of your KIDS COUNT
                     colleagues keep these resources at their fingertips when they are producing their data books.

                  • Data sources –Even though state and county sources provide you with much of the data you will
                     use in your KIDS COUNT project, there are a number of national data sources that can add value
                     to your reports. Most of these important data resources are easily accessible on the Web.

                  • General sources on children and families – No reliable data exists in a vacuum. To give your data
                     a richer context, your KIDS COUNT project may want to refer to these general sources.




           Introduction                                                                                                    2
 22
 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
  15
                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
  12

                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           IV.    Communications Resources
                  The success of KIDS COUNT depends on how effectively KIDS COUNT projects communicate the
                  data to the media and policy makers. Yet it’s far from easy to communicate data so that people get
                  the message. There are a number of ways to go about communicating data, and we still have much
                  to learn about how to do it in the most effective ways. This section lists the communication tools and
                  resources that are most commonly used by your KIDS COUNT colleagues. Many of these resources
                  are available on the Web.

           V.     Technology Resources
                  The technology of the Worldwide Web is becoming part of our mainstream culture and our work.
                  Each year there’s an increase in the number of Web sites that are specifically geared toward nonprofit
                  organizations. This section is devoted to helping your KIDS COUNT project access the Web’s
                  resources.

           VI.    Appendices
                  There is never enough space in the body of a publication to include all the details that interest all our
                  readers. For your convenience, our kit contains four appendices:

                  • Appendix A: 2000-2001 KIDS COUNT Steering Committee

                  • Appendix B: KIDS COUNT Staff

                  • Appendix C: Technical Assistance for KIDS COUNT Projects

                  • Appendix D: KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports

           A DYNAMIC DOCUMENT
           The resources in this kit are meant as starting points in approaching the work associated with a
           KIDS COUNT project.

           Since we continuously learn about new resources and tools, we expect this kit to be a dynamic document.
           As we update the Resource Kit, we will periodically send you additional sections or revised sections to add
           to your binder. We hope that you will give us feedback about the resources and tools we have listed here,
           and that you will let us know about any resources you would like to add to the kit.




           Introduction                                                                                                   3
 22
 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
  15
                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
  12

                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
           The members of the KIDS COUNT Network’s Technical Assistance Working Group compiled the resources,
           reviewed the drafts, and designed this kit. We extend our thanks to the following participants:

           Diane Benjamin, Minnesota
           Debbie Benson, New York
           Carole Cochran, South Dakota
           Pam Hormuth, Texas
           Ed Hoy, Indiana
           Tonia Hunt, Oregon
           Dana Naimark, Arizona
           David Norris, Ohio
           Jennifer Baratz Gross, The Annie E. Casey Foundation
           Debbie Morgan, KIDS COUNT Network Coordinator

           We also wish to thank:

           Emily Berger, Designer
           Suzie Fitzhugh, Photographer (excluding cover photograph)
           Tammy Mitchell, Editor




           Introduction                                                                                         4
                       The Annie E. Casey Foundation embarked on




 A
      KIDS COUNT Initiative to track the status of




                                                                 History and Mission
   RESO




                                                                   KIDS COUNT’s
 dren and families in the United States. The Initi




       URCE
was designed to respond to the need for reliable dat
the condition of children and to enrich local, state,



            KIT FOR KIDS COUNT
    national discussions concerning ways to secure bett
            futures for children and families. Since 1990, th
Foundation has produced the annual KIDS COU
Data Book, which uses the best available data to m
ure the educational, social, economic and physical
           being of children and families state-by-state. T
                               PROJEC




 Foundation also produces special KIDS COUNT
             reports on topics reflecting the most pressing need
                                     TS offe




      today’s children and families. In 1991, the Found
              ring guidance and ideas for your K




         began supporting state-level KIDS COUNT pr
              to provide a more detailed picture of the conditi
                        children and families. Currently, there are KI
                       COUNT projects in 49 states and the Distric
                      Columbia that raise awareness and accountabil
                                                IDS COUN




                about the condition of children and families by
measuring and reporting on the status of children a
                                                        T work




state and sub-state level, and (2) using that info
 22
 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
  15
                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
  12

                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           KIDS COUNT's History and Mission


           T
                    he Annie E. Casey Foundation embarked upon           The vision of KIDS COUNT
                    the KIDS COUNT Initiative in 1990. “People
                    didn't know the poverty rate of kids in the          is to raise the nation's
           United States. They didn't know the graduation rate for
           children in the public school system. They didn't know        awareness and accountability
           the juvenile delinquency or the juvenile arrest rate,”
           recalls Douglas Nelson, the Foundation's President. “We
                                                                         about the condition of children
           realized that you'd have to know those things in order to     and families
           solve the problems.”

           Since 1990, the Foundation has produced the annual            and reporting on the status of children at the state and
           KIDS COUNT Data Book , using the best available data          local levels; and secondly, by using the data creatively to
           to measure the educational, social, economic, and physi-      inform the public debate and to strengthen public action
           cal well-being of children and families state by state. The   on behalf of children and families.
           Foundation also issues special KIDS COUNT data reports
                                                                         But KIDS COUNT is more than data. This initiative also
           on specific topics-such as the condition of kids and
                                                                         has made important contributions to the field of child-
           families in America's largest fifty cities, teen pregnancy
                                                                         well being and to the evolution of data-based advocacy.
           and minority children-which reflect some of the most
                                                                         Throughout the country, KIDS COUNT data are credited
           pressing needs of today's children and families. The
                                                                         with influencing significant policy decisions to improve
           KIDS COUNT Data Book has become the Foundation's
                                                                         the condition of kids and families. For example, the
           signature product, making a valuable contribution to
                                                                         availability of data about uninsured children helped
           local, state, and national discussions about how to create
                                                                         many states determine the extent and level of additional
           better futures for our children and families.
                                                                         state support for health coverage provided by the
           The Foundation quickly realized that presenting more          Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). On
           detailed state and sub-state statistics could prove even      numerous occasions, KIDS COUNT data have also been
           more useful to local and state policymakers than the state    used to shift the public debate from rhetoric to reality.
           data in the national book alone. So, in 1991, the             For example, in a state where a school shooting created
           Foundation began supporting state-level KIDS COUNT            an atmosphere of fear and retribution towards juvenile
           projects, and by 1996 there were KIDS COUNT projects          offenders, KIDS COUNT data that highlighted actual
           in 50 states and the District of Columbia. The Foundation     juvenile violent crime rates helped lessen the tension
           urged the state projects to form partnerships among           and redirect the policy debate towards more long-term
           academics, advocates, state and local agencies, policy-       solutions.
           makers, and other concerned parties.
                                                                         For more details about the history of KIDS COUNT,
           The vision of KIDS COUNT is to raise the nation's             contact the Foundation for a copy of The KIDS COUNT
           awareness and accountability about the condition of           Retrospective Study commissioned in 1994 to document
           children and families in two ways: first, by measuring        the project's history and development.


           KIDS COUNT’s History and Mission                                                                                          1
                       The Annie E. Casey Foundation embarked on




 A
      KIDS COUNT Initiative to track the status of




   RESO
 dren and families in the United States. The Initi




       URCE
was designed to respond to the need for reliable dat
the condition of children and to enrich local, state,



            KIT FOR KIDS COUNT




                                                                 The KIDS COUNT
    national discussions concerning ways to secure bett




                                                                     Network
            futures for children and families. Since 1990, th
Foundation has produced the annual KIDS COU
Data Book, which uses the best available data to m
ure the educational, social, economic and physical
           being of children and families state-by-state. T
                               PROJEC




 Foundation also produces special KIDS COUNT
             reports on topics reflecting the most pressing need
                                     TS offe




      today’s children and families. In 1991, the Found
              ring guidance and ideas for your K




         began supporting state-level KIDS COUNT pr
              to provide a more detailed picture of the conditi
                        children and families. Currently, there are KI
                       COUNT projects in 49 states and the Distric
                      Columbia that raise awareness and accountabil
                                                IDS COUN




                about the condition of children and families by
measuring and reporting on the status of children a
                                                        T work




state and sub-state level, and (2) using that info
 22
 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
  15
                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
  12

                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           The KIDS COUNT Network


           F
                     or many years, the KIDS COUNT Network was          By sharing knowledge and
                     an informal organization of individual KIDS
                     COUNT projects. Participants shared the com-       information, the Network is
           mon goal of using data to advance change on behalf of
           kids and families. Among the many informal networking        already advancing KIDS
           activities were discussions of ideas via telephone and
           email, a sharing of state data books, and an exchange of
                                                                        COUNT's mission of data-
           information and experiences at the annual meeting of         based accountability and
           KIDS COUNT grantees.

           The Foundation believed that the KIDS COUNT initiative
                                                                        advocacy, thus helping to
           could do even more on behalf of kids and families by
                                                                        produce better outcomes for
           promoting stronger connections among the state projects,
           between the state projects and the Foundation, and           children and families.
           between the state projects and the outside world.
           Stronger connections could simultaneously fortify state-     of the committee rotating each spring. The annual
           level efforts and gain visibility in the outside world for   rotation provides an opportunity for any member of the
           the collective work of KIDS COUNT. The more formal           Network to serve on the Steering Committee.
           Network has only just begun. Yet it is clear that by
                                                                        Members are self-nominated, and then screened by a
           sharing knowledge and information, the Network is
                                                                        Nominations Subcommittee that seeks to maintain a
           already advancing KIDS COUNT's mission of data-based
                                                                        balanced representation according to such factors as
           accountability and advocacy, thus helping to produce
                                                                        geography, gender, race, state and organization size,
           better outcomes for children and families.
                                                                        rural and urban populations, type of organization, and
           Working together, the Foundation and state KIDS              length of time with the KIDS COUNT project. (See
           COUNT projects decided upon two action steps to move         Appendix A for a list of current Steering Committee
           the Network effort forward: establishing a KIDS COUNT        members.)
           Steering Committee to serve as an advisory body to the
                                                                        THE NETWORK COORDINATOR
           Foundation, and hiring a Network Coordinator.
                                                                        In 1999, a KIDS COUNT Network Coordinator was hired
           THE KIDS COUNT STEERING COMMITTEE
                                                                        for the purpose of further increasing the Network's
           A Steering Committee of 11 representatives of state-level    capacity to share information and collaborate on relevant
           KIDS COUNT projects was formed in 1998. The                  projects. The Network Coordinator serves as a clearing-
           Committee serves a leadership and liaison function for       house of information on KIDS COUNT projects around
           the Foundation. Its members identify issues and concerns     the country and facilitates various networking activities.
           facing the Network, generate ideas for the Network           Each year, the Coordinator develops a Network Work
           Coordinator's annual work plan, and provide leadership       Plan in conjunction with the Steering Committee and the
           to the Network. Members serve two-year terms, with half      Foundation. The plan outlines the Network's current

           The KIDS COUNT Network                                                                                                    1
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 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
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egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
  15
                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
  12

                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           goals and objectives and the action steps that will             and summarizes them in the monthly newsletter. To
           accomplish them.                                                sign-up for the list serv, contact the Foundation's KIDS
                                                                           COUNT administrative assistant. If you are interested
           The Network Coordinator is housed at the National
                                                                           in finding out whether a dialogue about a specific
           Association of Child Advocates (NACA), an organization
                                                                           topic has already taken place, contact the KIDS
           whose members include 40 of the 51 KIDS COUNT
                                                                           COUNT Network Coordinator. (See Appendix B,
           projects. The Foundation staff, the Steering Committee,
                                                                           “KIDS COUNT Staff,” for contact information.)
           and NACA agreed that housing the Network Coordinator
           position at NACA would enhance networking opportuni-
                                                                         NETWORK WORKING GROUPS AND SERVICES
           ties by encouraging interaction with NACA activities and
           staff. (See Appendix B, “KIDS COUNT Staff,” for               Several Network working groups and services are open
           information about how to contact the current Network          to all KIDS COUNT project staff. By joining such a
           Coordinator.)                                                 group, you can actively collaborate with colleagues,
                                                                         make a valued contribution to the larger Network, and
           NETWORK EVENTS AND RESOURCES
                                                                         gain insight that can benefit your own KIDS COUNT
           A variety of ongoing Network activities and services are      project. For the past two years, three working groups
           open to KIDS COUNT project staff:                             have been active (Technical Assistance; Information
                                                                         Sharing; and Self-Assessment). In September 2000, the
           • Annual conference Each year, the Annie E. Casey
                                                                         Steering Committee decided to continue the Self-
             Foundation hosts a conference for the KIDS COUNT
                                                                         Assessment working group, merge the Information
             projects. The agenda is developed by the Foundation in
                                                                         Sharing and Technical Assistance working groups into
             conjunction with the Steering Committee and all
                                                                         one, and create a new working group on Message
             Network members. The conference serves a number of
                                                                         Development and Strategic Communications. Other
             purposes. It provides KIDS COUNT projects with
                                                                         groups will be created as the members' interests evolve
             information on a variety of relevant topics such as
                                                                         and change.
             data, policy, communications, and organizational
             development. The conference also offers opportunities       Technical Assistance and Peer Mentoring - The Annie E.
             for participants to receive targeted technical assistance   Casey Foundation offers Network members various types
             in such areas as creating a Web site, improving com-        of technical assistance to enhance the effectiveness of
             munication, and developing data. Most importantly,          their KIDS COUNT work. You can access assistance with
             perhaps, the conference promotes peer-to-peer               data issues, fund development, strategic communica-
             exchanges of knowledge and information, since this          tions, putting your state data on the Web, promising
             event is currently the only opportunity to bring all the    practices in child advocacy, diversity issues, and more.
             KIDS COUNT projects together.                               (See Appendix C for a list of the types and sources of
                                                                         technical assistance that are currently available.)
           • KIDS COUNT List Serv Network members are encour-
             aged to sign up for the KIDS COUNT list serv, an email      The Technical Assistance Working Group has developed
             mechanism that enables KIDS COUNT staff to share            a peer mentoring program for new KIDS COUNT staff.
             ideas and guidance with colleagues. The KIDS COUNT          Any interested new KIDS COUNT staff people can be
             Network Coordinator archives the list serv dialogues        paired with a colleague from within the Network who


           The KIDS COUNT Network                                                                                                     2
 22
 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
  15
                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
  12

                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           can help them get started in their work. The Technical      WE WELCOME YOUR PARTICIPATION
           Assistance Working Group has also compiled a roster of
                                                                       These are only a few of the many activities that are
           expert resources within the KIDS COUNT Network.
                                                                       currently under way in the KIDS COUNT Network.
           These colleagues can provide expert guidance to you in
                                                                       There are numerous ways to become involved with the
           specific areas such as developing new indicators and cre-
                                                                       Network and to benefit from interaction with your
           ating a KIDS COUNT curriculum and training program
                                                                       colleagues.
           for grassroots leaders.
                                                                       If you have any questions or suggestions about the
           Self-Assessment - The Self-Assessment Working Group
                                                                       Network and its activities, please feel free to contact the
           has been working with InnoNet, an evaluation consulting
                                                                       KIDS COUNT Network Coordinator. (See Appendix B,
           firm in Washington, D.C., to develop a tool and a
                                                                       “KIDS COUNT Staff,” for contact information.)
           process that enables KIDS COUNT projects to continu-
           ously assess and improve their work. The process will
           help KIDS COUNT projects evaluate their work using
           national standards; set project benchmarks and tailor
           them to their individual circumstances; and measure the
           impact of KIDS COUNT in their own states. Phase I of
           the Self-Assessment, which was rolled out to the full
           Network in February 2000, assesses the capacity and
           skills of KIDS COUNT work. Phase II will measure the
           impact that KIDS COUNT work is having on improving
           the lives of children and families.

           Information Sharing - This working group has established
           a small fund to enable KIDS COUNT staff to visit KIDS
           COUNT colleagues and learn about their innovative
           ideas and strategies. The working group also sponsors
           periodic conference calls on topics of common interest
           within the Network.




           The KIDS COUNT Network                                                                                                    3
                       The Annie E. Casey Foundation embarked on




 A
      KIDS COUNT Initiative to track the status of




   RESO
 dren and families in the United States. The Initi




       URCE
was designed to respond to the need for reliable dat
the condition of children and to enrich local, state,



            KIT FOR KIDS COUNT
    national discussions concerning ways to secure bett
            futures for children and families. Since 1990, th
Foundation has produced the annual KIDS COU
Data Book, which uses the best available data to m




                                                                 Resources
                                                                   Data
ure the educational, social, economic and physical
           being of children and families state-by-state. T
                               PROJEC




 Foundation also produces special KIDS COUNT
             reports on topics reflecting the most pressing need
                                     TS offe




      today’s children and families. In 1991, the Found
              ring guidance and ideas for your K




         began supporting state-level KIDS COUNT pr
              to provide a more detailed picture of the conditi
                        children and families. Currently, there are KI
                       COUNT projects in 49 states and the Distric
                      Columbia that raise awareness and accountabil
                                                IDS COUN




                about the condition of children and families by
measuring and reporting on the status of children a
                                                        T work




state and sub-state level, and (2) using that info
 22
 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
  15
                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
  12

                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Data Resources
           Because there are so many resources on the general topic of data, this section of the kit
           is divided into four subsections: developing indicators; general statistics; data sources; and
           general sources on children and families.

           DEVELOPING INDICATORS
           This section can provide you with information about how leading researchers in the field have developed indicators
           for child and family well-being. You may want to use these resources as a guide in determining the indicators for your
           KIDS COUNT project.

           America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being. Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics.
           Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
                   A comprehensive annual overview of national-level indicators on the well-being of children. Download the full
                   report in PDF format from http://childstats.gov; or order it for free by calling 703-356-1964.

           “Assessing the Condition of Children.” Nicholas Zill and Mary Jo Coiro. Child Trends, Inc. Children and Youth Services
           Review. Vol. 14: pp. 119-136, 1992.
                   An assessment of how to measure the condition of children and the functioning of families on the basis of the
                   developmental status of young children. To obtain a copy, you can call Child Trends, Inc., 202-362-5580; or
                   contact the KIDS COUNT Network Coordinator. (See Appendix B, “KIDS COUNT Staff,” for information
                   about how to contact the current Network Coordinator.)

           “The Case for Shifting to Results-Based Accountability: A Start-Up List of Outcome Measures with Annotations.”
           Commissioned paper by Lisbeth B. Schorr in collaboration with Frank Farrow, David Hornbeck, and Sara Watson.
           September 1994.
                   An analysis of outcome-based accountability and a review of the challenges associated with making a shift to
                   this strategy. For a copy, contact the KIDS COUNT Network Coordinator. (See Appendix B, “KIDS COUNT
                   Staff,” for information about how to contact the current Network Coordinator.)

           “Conceptual Issues in the Search for Social Indicators of Child Well-Being.” James Garbarino, The Center for the Study
           of Social Policy. Washington, D.C.: 1991.
                   This working paper analyzes the way we define the “well-being of children,” the pros and cons of integrating
                   child and family indicators, and the balance between simplicity and complexity in child well-being measures.
                   The paper makes some suggestions about setting standards and goals for identifying new indicators. For a copy,
                   contact the KIDS COUNT Network Coordinator. (See Appendix B, “KIDS COUNT Staff,” for information
                   about how to contact the current Network Coordinator.)

           Developmental Assets: A Synthesis of the Scientific Research on Adolescent Development. Search Institute.
           Minneapolis, MN: 1998.
                   This publication is a review of the current research supporting developmental asset indicators. For a copy,
                   call the Search Institute, 1-800-888-7828; or go to http://www.search-institute.org




           Data Resources                                                                                                           1
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Indicators of Child Well-Being. Eds. Robert M. Hauser, Brett V. Brown, William R. Prosser. Russell Sage Foundation,
           1997.
                   This book is an inquiry into current efforts to monitor children from the prenatal period through
                   adolescence. Working with the most up-to-date statistical sources, experts from many disciplines assess how
                   data on physical development, education, economic security, family and neighborhood conditions, and
                   social behavior are collected and analyzed. The experts also address the findings the data reveals, and suggest
                   improvements to create a more comprehensive and policy-relevant system of measurement.
                   The book is available for $75.00. For an abstract and information about ordering, go to
                   http://www.russellsage.org/publications/titles/indicators_children.htm

           Indicators of Child, Youth, and Family Well-Being: A Selected Inventory of Existing Projects. Child Trends, Inc.
           Washington, D.C., 1998.
                   This inventory profiles more than 80 indicator projects on the subject of child and family well-being. Includes a
                   description of each initiative and the organization, a listing of relevant publications, Web site links, and contact
                   information. You can purchase this publication online for $20 at http://www.childtrends.org

           “Indicators of Children’s Well-Being: A Conference.” Focus. University of Wisconsin—Madison: Institute for Research
           on Poverty. Vol. 16, No. 3, 1995.
                   Summarizes the proceedings of a 1995 conference that focused on some of the most pressing issues regarding
                   indicators for children’s well-being. The publication can be downloaded free from
                   http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/irp/pubs/ffocusold/foc163.html; or ordered by fax at 608-265-3119.

           “Selected Sources of County-Level Data of Interest to KIDS COUNT.” Handouts from KIDS COUNT Data Seminar,
           1998-1999.
                   Information about the Census Bureau’s county population estimates, small area income and poverty estimates,
                   juvenile crime arrest data via Easy Access, and the Child Welfare League of America’s (CWLA) National Data
                   Analysis System. For a copy, contact the KIDS COUNT Network Coordinator. (See Appendix B,
                   “KIDS COUNT Staff,” for information about how to contact the current Network Coordinator.)

           State Child Indicator Projects. State of Alaska.
                   This one-page Web site is a list of hyperlinks to the child indicator Internet pages of eight U.S. states.
                   http://www.gov.state.ak.us/children/states.htm

           Trends in the Well-Being of America’s Children and Youth. Child Trends, Inc. for the U.S. Department of Health and
           Human Services (HHS).
                   This report, in its third edition, presents the most recent and reliable data on more than 90 indicators of the
                   well-being of America's children and youth. You can request a copy of the report by faxing Lisa Franklin at
                   HHS, 202-690-5514. The cost of the report is $43. The full report is available electronically at
                   http://aspe.os.dhhs.gov/hsp/98trends/trends98.htm




           Data Resources                                                                                                            2
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egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
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  13
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           GENERAL STATISTICAL ISSUES
           Here it is… our version of Statistics 101! We have compiled a list of resources and Web sites that can help you with
           both basic and complex statistical issues. Some of your KIDS COUNT colleagues keep these resources at their fingertips
           when they are producing their data books.

           An Advocate’s Guide to Using Data. Children’s Defense Fund. Washington, D.C.: 1990.
                   A review of basic statistical practices. Includes an excellent chart converting percentages to proportions
                   (i.e., “11.1%” converts to “1 in 9”). For a copy, contact the KIDS COUNT Network Coordinator. (See
                   Appendix B, “KIDS COUNT Staff,” for information about how to contact the current Network Coordinator.)

           Finding the Data: A Start-Up List of Outcome Measures with Annotations. Center for the Study of Social Policy.
           Washington, D.C.: 1995.
                   Produced by the Improved Outcomes for Children Project (IOCP), this paper assists communities that are trying
                   to measure and improve outcomes for families and children. Information is provided on defining outcomes,
                   finding the data to measure outcomes, and analyzing the data to assess local performance. Available for $7.50
                   at http://www.cssp.org/pubs.html; or you can call 202-371-1565.

           Hyperstat Online
                   This is an on-line statistics book. KIDS COUNT colleagues have found it to be an excellent, comprehensive,
                   introductory-level statistics resource. Available at no cost at http://davidmlane.com/hyperstat/

           Information is Power! Voices for Illinois Children and Children’s Defense Fund—Minnesota.
                   First produced by the KIDS COUNT project at Voices for Illinois Children, this guide outlines basic statistical
                   practices for child advocates. Includes a discussion of racial and ethnic data. Children’s Defense Fund—
                   Minnesota later published their version of the same guide. Available on the CDF—Minnesota Web site at no
                   cost at http://www.cdf-mn.org/information_is_power.htm. For a printed copy, contact Voices for Illinois
                   Children at 312-456-0088.

           Population Handbook. Population Reference Bureau. 4th ed. Washington, D.C.: 1997.
                   This is a quick guide to population dynamics, including age and sex composition, households and families,
                   population change, migration, etc. Available for $10.00. To order a copy, contact the Population Reference
                   Bureau, 1-800-877-9881; or go to http://www.prb.org

           “Statistics Every Writer Should Know.” Journalism Web site, RobertNiles.com. Los Angeles, CA.
                   This Web resource is a simple layperson’s guide to basic statistical terms and usage. Good for reviewing how
                   to do the statistical analyses you need for your data book. http://robertniles.com/stats/

           “Using Excel for Basic Statistics.” Handout from KIDS COUNT Data Seminar, 2000.
                   An excellent overview of useful statistical functions in Excel. For a copy, contact the KIDS COUNT Network
                   Coordinator. (See Appendix B, “KIDS COUNT Staff,” for information about how to contact the current
                   Network Coordinator.)




           Data Resources                                                                                                            3
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
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      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           “When to Report Rates.” Handout from KIDS COUNT Data Seminar, 2000.
                    A very useful guide to “rules of thumb” for reporting rates and their consequences. For a copy, contact the
                    KIDS COUNT Network Coordinator. (See Appendix B, “KIDS COUNT Staff,” for information about how to
                    contact the current Network Coordinator.)

           DATA SOURCES
           Although state and county sources provide you with much of the data you will use in your KIDS COUNT project, there
           are a number of national data sources that can add value to your reports. Most of these resources are easily accessible
           on the Web.

           Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)
                    An independent national statistical agency that collects, processes, analyzes, and disseminates essential
                    statistical data to the American public, the U.S. Congress, other Federal agencies, state and local governments,
                    business, and labor. Also serves as a statistical resource to the Department of Labor. http://stats.bls.gov

           U.S. Census Bureau
                    A source for social, demographic, and economic information. Includes the current United States population
                    and the current economic indicators. http://www.census.gov

           FBI Uniform Crime Reporting
                    Collects information on crimes reported to law enforcement authorities. The crime data can be accessed easily
                    through tables and descriptive narratives. http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/crimeus/crimeus.htm

           Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics
                    On this Web site, you can access statistical reports, including America’s Children: Key National Indicators of
                    Well-Being. There are links to KIDS COUNT national and state data. http://www.childstats.gov

           Federal Statistics
                    Contains statistics from more than 70 federal agencies. http://www.fedstats.gov

           National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)
                    The primary Federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the U.S. and other nations.
                    The Web site allows you to access fast facts, data products and publications, and databases of statistics.
                    http://nces.ed.gov/

           National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Vital Statistics.
                    The Nation's official vital statistics — births, deaths, marriages, divorces, and fetal deaths. These vital statistics
                    are provided through state-operated registration systems. Data is available in both published and electronic
                    form. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss.htm

           National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect (NDACAN)
                    The mission of NDACAN is to facilitate the secondary analysis of research data that is relevant to the study of
                    child abuse and neglect. The Web site includes child abuse and neglect data sets, publications, information
                    about training institutes and workshops, a discussion group for child maltreatment researchers, and links to
                    other related sites. http://www.ndacan.cornell.edu

           Data Resources                                                                                                                    4
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 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           National Neighborhood Indicators Project (NNIP)
                   A project of the Urban Institute, the NNIP has created a national neighborhood data system that tracks
                   changing neighborhood conditions. http://www.urban.org/nnip

           The Urban Institute’s National Survey of American Families (NSAF)
                   This major effort of the Urban Institute’s Assessing the New Federalism Project, was designed to collect and
                   report on important aspects of the lives of adults and children in 13 case study states. The survey pays
                   particular attention to low-income families and provides a comprehensive look at the well-being of children
                   and families in the wake of welfare reform. The Web site includes the survey instruments, the methodology
                   used, the public data use files for independent research, as well as a TABULATOR, which allows you to
                   generate custom tables on select variables. http://newfederalism.urban.org/nsaf/

           GENERAL SOURCES ON CHILDREN AND FAMILIES
           To give your data a clearer context, your KIDS COUNT project may want to refer to these general sources.

           FedWorld Information Network
                   FedWorld offers a comprehensive central access point for searching, locating, ordering, and acquiring govern-
                   ment and business information. This site allows you to search or browse Federal government sites and access
                   their reports, information about funding, and databases. http://www.fedworld.gov

           Library of Congress
                   Founded in 1800, the Library of Congress, with a collection of 115 million items, is the nation's oldest Federal
                   cultural institution and the world's largest library. The Library’s Web site provides access to this vast collection.
                   http://lcweb.loc.gov

           National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care (NRC)
                   The NRC’s primary mission is to promote health and safety in out-of-home child care. Its Web site includes
                   individual states’ child care licensing regulations, frequently searched topics, and NRC server statistics.
                   http://nrc.uchsc.edu

           National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA)
                   NTIA, an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce, is the Executive Branch's principal voice on domestic
                   and international telecommunications and information technology issues. NTIA works to spur innovation,
                   encourage competition, help create jobs, and provide consumers with more choices and better quality
                   telecommunications products and services at lower prices. http://www.ntia.doc.gov

           THOMAS Legislative Information
                   Full-text access to current bills under consideration in the United States House of Representatives and the
                   Senate. http://Thomas.loc.gov

           U.S. Department of Education
                   Contains information on Department of Education programs and services, publications and products, staff
                   people and offices. Also links to other education-related sites. http://www.ed.gov



           Data Resources                                                                                                                  5
                       The Annie E. Casey Foundation embarked on




 A
      KIDS COUNT Initiative to track the status of




   RESO
 dren and families in the United States. The Initi




       URCE
was designed to respond to the need for reliable dat
the condition of children and to enrich local, state,



            KIT FOR KIDS COUNT
    national discussions concerning ways to secure bett
            futures for children and families. Since 1990, th
Foundation has produced the annual KIDS COU
Data Book, which uses the best available data to m
ure the educational, social, economic and physical
           being of children and families state-by-state. T
                               PROJEC




 Foundation also produces special KIDS COUNT




                                                                 Communications
                                                                   Resources
             reports on topics reflecting the most pressing need
                                     TS offe




      today’s children and families. In 1991, the Found
              ring guidance and ideas for your K




         began supporting state-level KIDS COUNT pr
              to provide a more detailed picture of the conditi
                        children and families. Currently, there are KI
                       COUNT projects in 49 states and the Distric
                      Columbia that raise awareness and accountabil
                                                IDS COUN




                about the condition of children and families by
measuring and reporting on the status of children a
                                                        T work




state and sub-state level, and (2) using that info
 22
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  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
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  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Communication Resources
           Communicating data is no easy task. There is still much we have to learn about how to do
           it in the most effective ways. This section lists the resources on communications that are
           most commonly used by your KIDS COUNT colleagues. Many of these resources are
           available on the Web.


           The Children’s Advocates Campaign Strategy Book. Coalition for America’s Children and the National Association of
           Children’s Hospitals and Related Institutions. Alexandria, VA: 1994.
                   This guide helps nonprofit organizations design strategies to win public support for children’s issues in their
                   communities. It includes coalition-building techniques, strategies for reaching candidates and public officials,
                   and approaches to working with the media. The guide is available for $15.00. To order, contact NACHRI,
                   Attn: Publications, 401 Wythe St., Alexandria, VA 22314; or go to http://www.childrenshospitals.net

           Commentary Papers and Communications Strategy Plan. Coalition for America’s Children. Washington, D.C.: 1999.
                   In this companion to the Effective Language for Communicating Children’s Issues report, three KIDS COUNT
                   colleagues provide commentary on how communications research can be applied in the daily work of KIDS
                   COUNT. The Strategy Plan helps make messages about children resonate with the public. The commentary
                   papers are available for $5.00. To order a copy, contact the Coalition for America’s Children, Marjorie Tharp,
                   202-347-8600; or mtharp@aap.org

           Effective Language for Communicating Children’s Issues. Coalition for America’s Children. Washington, D.C.: 1999.
                   This report compiles the results of communications research sponsored by the Coalition for America’s Children.
                   It gives non-profit organizations insight into how we can effectively communicate the issues affecting children.
                   The report is available for $12.50. To order a copy, contact the Coalition for America’s Children,
                   1-888-884-1200 or go to http://www.connectforkids.org

           The Jossey-Bass Guide to Strategic Public Relations for Non-Profits. Kathy Bonk, Henry Griggs, and Emily Tynes.
           San Francisco, CA: 1999.
                   This nuts-and-bolts workbook is a comprehensive tool kit on communications techniques. It includes sections
                   on constructing a solid strategic communications plan; selecting the most appropriate type of media for each
                   campaign; utilizing new media for increased publicity; developing top-quality written materials and releases;
                   handling media crises efficiently; and much more. The book is available for $28.95 from Jossey-Bass
                   Publishers, 1-888-378-2537; or http://www.josseybass.com

           KIDS COUNT Spokesperson Training Manual. KYS Communications, Inc. Oakland, CA: 1999.
                   This manual is a 12-page public relations training course that was presented at the 1999 annual KIDS COUNT
                   meeting in Baltimore. It includes sections on shaping your message, preparing for interviews, understanding the
                   media, and more. For a copy of the manual, contact KYS Communications, Inc. at 510-653-7061.




           Communication Resources                                                                                                    1
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Making the News: A Guide for Nonprofits and Activists. Jason Salzman. Center for Excellence in Nonprofits.
           San Jose, CA: 1998.
                   This book shows how to take a proactive stance in playing the media game. Contents include how to develop
                   a news strategy to win your campaign and how to make the news using media events and other means. It also
                   provides guidance on how to handle unsolicited media attention. Available for $17.95 from the Center for
                   Excellence in Nonprofits Web site at http://www.cen.org/rec_books.html

           PR Reporter. (Newsletter). PR Publishing Company, Inc. Execter, NH.
                   Although it’s not written exclusively for nonprofit organizations, this newsletter sometimes includes a gem that
                   can be used by KIDS COUNT projects. Past topics have included “Exposure! How to Market So Your Message
                   is Unavoidable” (08/97); “A Guide to Developing Effective Messages and Good Stories About Your Work”
                   (08/98); and “Examples of Press Kits that Cut Through the Clutter” (07/97). Annual subscription is $225. Can be
                   ordered online. For more information, contact PR Publishing, 603-778-0514 or go to http://www.prpublish-
                   ing.com

           Strategic Communications for Non-Profit Organizations: Seven Steps to Creating a Successful Plan. Janel M. Radtke.
           Center for Excellence in Nonprofits. San Jose, CA: 1998.
                   This “how to” guide helps nonprofit organizations streamline their communications efforts. It includes strategies
                   for reaching different audiences with complementary messages; and ideas for adapting the same basic message
                   for a variety of purposes, including fund-raising, publicity, public education, and advertising. This guide is
                   available for $39.96. To order, go to the Center for Excellence in Nonprofits Web site at
                   http://www.cen.org/rec_books.html

           http://www.drcharity.com Development Resource Center. Minneapolis, MN.
                   This Web site is sponsored by the Development Resource Center, which provides assistance and resources to
                   non-profit organizations. On the site, you will find some quick tips on getting your message across, including
                   some non-traditional ideas for communicating with reporters. It has a free newsletter and provides links to
                   other useful publications or Web sites. For more information, contact the Development Resource Center,
                   4744 10th Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN 55407.

           http://www.newsbureau.com/information/ Internet News Bureau. Bend, OR.
                   This Web site includes more than a dozen online communications articles, covering everything from press
                   release basics to electronic public relations and handling interviews. The best part is that it is written by public
                   relations professionals and journalists – the people who know what works. For more information, contact the
                   Internet News Bureau, 1-888-699-6939 or 541-318-8633.

           http://www.press-release-writing.com Accurate Online Solutions. Knoxville, TN.
                   For those new to writing press releases, or professionals who want to brush up on the basics, this site offers you
                   some simple tools of the trade, including content basics, samples, and templates. It also includes copies of past
                   e-newsletter articles that are quite useful to KIDS COUNT, such as “How to Cite Statistics and Research in
                   Press Releases” and “The Six Deadly Sins of Press Release Writing.” For more information, contact Accurate
                   Online Solutions, 865-671-8436.




           Communication Resources                                                                                                    2
                       The Annie E. Casey Foundation embarked on




 A
      KIDS COUNT Initiative to track the status of




   RESO
 dren and families in the United States. The Initi




       URCE
was designed to respond to the need for reliable dat
the condition of children and to enrich local, state,



            KIT FOR KIDS COUNT
    national discussions concerning ways to secure bett
            futures for children and families. Since 1990, th
Foundation has produced the annual KIDS COU
Data Book, which uses the best available data to m
ure the educational, social, economic and physical
           being of children and families state-by-state. T
                               PROJEC




 Foundation also produces special KIDS COUNT
             reports on topics reflecting the most pressing need
                                     TS offe




      today’s children and families. In 1991, the Found
              ring guidance and ideas for your K




         began supporting state-level KIDS COUNT pr
              to provide a more detailed picture of the conditi
                                                                 Technology
                                                                  Resources
                        children and families. Currently, there are KI
                       COUNT projects in 49 states and the Distric
                      Columbia that raise awareness and accountabil
                                                IDS COUN




                about the condition of children and families by
measuring and reporting on the status of children a
                                                        T work




state and sub-state level, and (2) using that info
 22
 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
  15
                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
  12

                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Technology Resources
           This section is devoted to helping your KIDS COUNT project access the Web’s resources.

           Best Practices Toolkit. The Benton Foundation. Washington, D.C.
                   This toolkit, part of the Benton Foundation’s Web site, includes a special section with some excellent leads on
                   getting technology funding for nonprofits. http://www.benton.org/Practice/Toolkit/

           Center for the Application of Information Technology. Washington University, St. Louis. School of Engineering and
           Applied Science. St. Louis, MO.
                   This Web site provides technical assistance with technology, as well as information about leadership programs
                   that can help you make the most of technology in your work. http://www.cait.wustl.edu/cait/

           The CompuMentor Project. San Francisco, CA.
                   This Web site provides low-cost, volunteer-based computer assistance to schools and nonprofits. It’s also an
                   excellent source for software at special rates for nonprofits. http://www.compumentor.org

           Consistent Computer Bargains. Racine, WI.
                   This group is a reseller of computers, computer equipment, and software. The Web site offers marketing,
                   quoting, securing, special pricing, selling, and shipping. Downloadable demos and freeware are available.
                   http://www.ccbnpts.com

           Coyote Communications. Austin, TX.
                   This Web site provides technology tip sheets on computer databases, software, online promotion of your
                   organization, and Web development. http://www.coyotecom.com/tips.html

           Internet Guides, Tutorials and Training Information. Library of Congress. Washington, D.C.
                   This section of the Library of Congress Web site includes links to tutorials, useful guides for Internet novices,
                   and catalogues of materials for Internet instructors. Library of Congress resource page,
                   http://www.lcweb.loc.gov/global/internet/training.html

           Internet Nonprofit Center. Evergreen State Society. Seattle, WA.
                   This site has a Nonprofit locator, Internet advice, tips on creating Web pages, and information about chat
                   rooms. The Web site also includes a “nonprofit FAQ,” which is a guide to organizational development for non-
                   profits. It focuses on nonprofit organizational startup concerns, setting policy for your nonprofit, operational
                   issues, marketing strategies, and volunteerism. http://www.nonprofits.org/

           LibertyNet. Philadelphia, PA.
                   This organization helps nonprofit organizations use technology and increase their Web usage.
                   http://www.libertynet.org




           Technology Resources                                                                                                        1
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Nonprofit.net.
                   This Web site provides links to other nonprofit online sites, guidance on HTML design, access to mailing lists,
                   and mail forwarding. http://www.nonprofit.net/info/service.html

           Philanthropy News Network. Raleigh, NC.
                   This organization hosts the well-regarded “Nonprofits and Technology” conferences throughout the country.
                   Their publication, Nonprofits & Technology, is an excellent source of practical technology applications for
                   nonprofits. It’s published in hard copy six times per year. Subscriptions are free and you can subscribe online.
                   For a free subscription, call 919-899-3753; or check out http://pnnonline.org

           Progressive Technology Project. Washington, D.C.
                   This project is a new collaboration that seeks to expand the technology resources that are available to
                   grassroots organizing groups working for progressive social change. http://www.progressivetech.org

           Resources for Nonprofits. Helping.org. The AOL Foundation. Dulles, VA.
                   This Web page, which is part of the AOL Foundation’s helping.org site, is a resource guide for nonprofit
                   organizations that are interested in Internet-related tools. http://www.helping.org/nonprofit/index.adp

           Technology Project. Rockefeller Family Fund. Philadelphia, PA.
                   This project, a supporting organization to the Rockefeller Family Fund, seeks to build the technological
                   capacity of nonprofit organizations using cutting-edge strategies. http://www.techproject.org

           TechSoup. The CompuMentor Project. San Francisco, CA.
                   This Web site is a recently launched nonprofit technology portal that enables you to access free monthly
                   e-newsletters, free downloads, and technology tools. Nonprofit discounts. http://www.techsoup.org

           Wired For Good: Technology Guidebook for Nonprofits. Center for Excellence in Nonprofits. San Jose, CA: 1998.
                   The ultimate “how-to” manual for using technology in nonprofit organizations. The guide is available for
                   $25.00. To order a copy, contact the Center for Excellence in Nonprofits, 1515 The Alameda, #302, San Jose,
                   CA 95126, (408) 294-2300; or go to http://www.wiredforgood.org/Guidebook.htm




           Technology Resources                                                                                                       2
                       The Annie E. Casey Foundation embarked on




 A
      KIDS COUNT Initiative to track the status of




   RESO
 dren and families in the United States. The Initi




       URCE
was designed to respond to the need for reliable dat
the condition of children and to enrich local, state,



            KIT FOR KIDS COUNT
    national discussions concerning ways to secure bett
            futures for children and families. Since 1990, th
Foundation has produced the annual KIDS COU
Data Book, which uses the best available data to m
ure the educational, social, economic and physical
           being of children and families state-by-state. T
                               PROJEC




 Foundation also produces special KIDS COUNT
             reports on topics reflecting the most pressing need
                                     TS offe




      today’s children and families. In 1991, the Found
              ring guidance and ideas for your K




         began supporting state-level KIDS COUNT pr
              to provide a more detailed picture of the conditi
                        children and families. Currently, there are KI
                       COUNT projects in 49 states and the Distric
                      Columbia that raise awareness and accountabil
                                                                  Appendices
                                                IDS COUN




                about the condition of children and families by
measuring and reporting on the status of children a
                                                        T work




state and sub-state level, and (2) using that info
 22
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  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
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                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Appendix A
           2000 – 2001 KIDS COUNT Steering Committee Contact List
           Diane Benjamin                      Pam Hormuth                           Linda O’Neal
           KIDS COUNT Director                 KIDS COUNT Project Director           Executive Director
           Children’s Defense Fund -           Center for Public Policy Priorities   Tennessee Commission on Children
           Minnesota                           900 Lydia St.                         & Youth
           550 Rice Street                     Austin, TX 78702                      710 James Robertson Parkway
           St. Paul, MN 55103                  (512) 320-0222                        A. Johnson Tower 9th Floor
           (651) 227-6121                      (512) 320-0227 FAX                    Nashville, TN 37243-0800
           (651) 227-2553 FAX                  hormuth@cppp.org                      (615) 741-2633
           benjamin@cdf-mn.org                                                       (615) 741-5956 FAX
                                               Carol Kamin                           loneal2@mail.state.tn.us
           Lynn Davey                          Executive Director
           KIDS COUNT Director                 Children’s Action Alliance            Terry Schooley
           Maine Children’s Alliance           4001 N. 3rd St., Suite 160            KIDS COUNT Project Director
           303 State St.                       Phoenix, AZ 85012                     University of Delaware
           Augusta, ME 04330                   (602) 266-0707                        298K Graham Hall
           (207) 623-1868                      (602) 263-8792 FAX                    Newark, DE 19716
           (207) 626-3302 FAX                  ckamin@azchildren.org                 (302) 831-4966
           ldavey@mekids.org                                                         (302) 831-4987 FAX
                                               Ann Lochner (CO-CHAIR)                terrys@diamond.net.udel.edu
           Paul Gionfriddo (CO-CHAIR)          Director
           Executive Director                  North Dakota KIDS COUNT               Linda Tilly
           Connecticut Association for Human   University of North Dakota-           Executive Director
           Services                            Gillette Hall, Room 3                 VOICES for Alabama’s Children
           110 Bartholomew Avenue,             Grand Forks, ND 58202-7090            P.O. Box 4576
           Suite 4030                          (701) 777-4086                        Montgomery, AL 36103
           Hartford, CT 06106                  (701) 777-4257 FAX                    (334) 213-2410
           (860) 951-2212                      ann_lochner@mail.und.nodak.edu        (334) 213-2413 FAX
           (860) 951-6511 FAX                                                        ltilly@alavoices.org
           pgionfriddo@cahs.org                Kathy Moore
                                               Executive Director
                                               Voices for Children in Nebraska
                                               7521 Main St., Suite 103
                                               Omaha, NE 68127
                                               (402) 597-3100
                                               (402) 597-2705 FAX
                                               voices@uswest.net




           Appendix A—2000-2001 KIDS COUNT Steering Committee
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  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
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                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Appendix B
           Important KIDS COUNT Contacts
           Jennifer Baratz Gross            Francine Brown
           KIDS COUNT Manager               KIDS COUNT Assistant
           Annie E. Casey Foundation        Annie E. Casey Foundation
           701 St. Paul Street              701 St. Paul Street
           Baltimore, MD 21202              Baltimore, MD 21202
           (410) 223-2950                   (410) 223-2954
           (410) 223-2927 FAX               (410) 223-2927 FAX
           jenb@aecf.org                    franb@aecf.org


           Bill O’Hare                      Debbie Morgan
           KIDS COUNT Coordinator           KIDS COUNT Network
           Annie E. Casey Foundation        Coordinator
           701 St. Paul Street              National Association of Child
           Baltimore, MD 21202              Advocates
           (410) 223-2949                   1522 K Street, NW, Suite 600
           (410) 223-2927 FAX               Washington, DC 20005
           billo@aecf.org                   (202) 289-0777, ext. 220
                                            (202) 289-0776 FAX
           Amy Ritualo                      morgan@childadvocacy.org
           KIDS COUNT Research Associate
           Annie E. Casey Foundation
           701 St. Paul Street
           Baltimore, MD 21202
           (410) 223-2975
           (410) 223-2927 FAX
           amyr@aecf.org




           Appendix B—KIDS COUNT Staff
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  21
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egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
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  18
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
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                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Appendix C
           Technical Assistance for KIDS COUNT Projects
           The Annie E. Casey Foundation continues to provide state KIDS COUNT projects with a broad range of technical
           assistance that, we hope, can enhance your capacity to track the status of children in your state. The Foundation has
           carefully selected the providers for this technical assistance, working with most of these individuals and organizations
           for several years to ensure that their assistance to you is of the highest quality.

           Listed below, you’ll find the technical assistance that is currently available to state Kids Count projects. We encourage
           you to take advantage of any assistance that meets your project’s needs. Assistance is provided in several different ways
           (depending upon the type of assistance and the aggregate needs of the KIDS COUNT network):

           • Personal interaction. This can be either one-on-one between a provider and the KIDS COUNT project, or it can be
             assistance for a group of KIDS COUNT projects.
           • Reports or research disseminated to KIDS COUNT projects.

            TYPE OF TECHNICAL               PROVIDER                          YEARS OFFERED                    CONTACT INFORMATION
            ASSISTANCE
            Fund Development                Management Assistance             1998-2000                        Robbie Ross Tisch
                                            Group                                                              202-238-7589
            Data Seminars                   Child Trends, Inc.                1998-2000                        Brett Brown
                                                                                                               202-362-5580
            National Survey of American     Child Trends, Inc.                1999- 2000                       Brett Brown
            Families Data Assistance                                                                           202-362-5580
            State-Specific Data             Child Trends, Inc.                1995-2000                        Brett Brown
            Assistance                                                                                         202-362-5580
            Diversity Issues                National Conference for           1999-2000                        Scott Marshall
                                            Community and Justice                                              212-545-1300
            KIDS COUNT                      InnoNet, Inc.                     1999-2000                        Carolyn Moore
            Self-Assessment                                                                                    617-232-1832 or
                                                                                                               202-728-0727
            Communications                  Frameworks Institute              1999-2000                        Susan Bales
                                                                                                               301-767-0636
            Web Site Development and        Velir                             1999-2000                        Mark Gregor
            Putting State Data on the Web                                                                      617-945-1895
                                                                                                               mark@velir.com
            State Budget and Fiscal         Center on Budget and Policy       1995-2000                        Liz McNichol
            Analysis                        Priorities                                                         202-408-1080
            Policy Analysis                 Center on Budget and Policy       1992–2000                        202-408-1080
                                            Priorities

            Promising Practices in Child    National Association of           1997 – 2000                      Lisa Macey Klevenz
            Advocacy                        Child Advocates                                                    202-289-0777, ext. 205


           For more information on KIDS COUNT technical assistance, or to inquire about your specific technical assistance needs, please
           contact the KIDS COUNT Network Coordinator. (See Appendix B, “KIDS COUNT Staff,” for information about how to contact the
           current Network Coordinator.)

           Appendix C—Technical Assistance for KIDS COUNT Projects
 22
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  21
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egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           KIDS COUNT Special Report Archive
           BUDGET/ECONOMIC ISSUES

           Boom or Bust: Family Income and Its Impact on North Dakota Children. North Dakota KIDS COUNT. July 2000:
           6 pages.
                   In this issue brief, the impact of income on North Dakota families is examined by looking at the most recent
                   available data on income, earned income tax credit, poverty rates, and programs based upon federal poverty
                   guidelines. For more information, contact North Dakota KIDS COUNT, Ann Lochner, (701) 777-4086 /
                   ann_lochner@mail.und.nodak.edu. This publication is not available on-line.

           Children’s Budget Watch: Investments in Our Future. Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children. January 1997: 40 pages.
                   This report takes a detailed look at public investments in children’s programs by Pennsylvania state government
                   and the federal government from 1990-1996. The report examines trends in spending since FY 1990 and
                   discusses children’s programs, including Early Care and Education, Child Welfare, Juvenile Justice, and
                   Child Nutrition. For more information, contact Pennsylvania KIDS COUNT, Diane Ollivier, (717) 236-5680 /
                   dollivier@papartnerships.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           Corporate Tax Credits Considered for Social Policy. Georgians for Children. September 1999: 6 pages.
                   This report explores the use of corporate tax credits to implement social policy at the state level, particularly
                   those tax credits that affect families and children. In Georgia, two family-related tax credits were considered by
                   the Georgia legislature — an income tax credit for employer provided or sponsored child care and a welfare-
                   to-work tax credit. The analysis provided in this report discusses the intended consequences and limitations of
                   each of the two tax credits, as well as alternative approaches. For a copy or more information, contact
                   Georgia KIDS COUNT, Ann Grace Marchetti, (404) 365-8949. This publication is not available on-line.

           The Economics of Pennsylvania Families: How Does it Add Up for Our Children? Pennsylvania Partnerships for
           Children. November 1998: 5 pages.
                   This report examines data on family income, family composition, employment, the cost of living for families
                   in Pennsylvania, and other key indicators of community economic well-being in order to determine how all of
                   these factors add up to benefit Pennsylvania’s children. The report also includes a comparison between the
                   Federal Poverty Income Guidelines and the W.A.W.A. Self-Sufficiency Standard. For more information,
                   contact Pennsylvania KIDS COUNT, Diane Ollivier, (717) 236-5680 / dollivier@papartnerships.org. This
                   publication can be ordered on-line at http://www.papartnerships.org/pubs.htm.

           Expanded Gambling in Kentucky: A Smart Bet for Our Kids? Kentucky Youth Advocates. September 1999: 8 pages.
                   This fiscal policy brief examines the issue of casino-style gambling in Kentucky and the impact of such an effort
                   on children living in poverty or near poverty. The report reviews the economic and social costs and benefits of
                   such a proposal, as well as an analysis of kids as gamblers or, as the victims of the gambling of others. For a
                   copy or more information, contact Kentucky KIDS COUNT, Douglas Hall, (502) 875-4865. This publication is
                   available at no cost on-line at http://www.kyyouth.org/taxandbudget.html.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                     1
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  18
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
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 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Expanding the Low Income Comprehensive Tax Rebate (LICTR): A Cost-Effective Strategy to Lift Children Out of Poverty
           in New Mexico. New Mexico Advocates for Children & Families. June 2000: 4 pages.
                   Given that one-third of New Mexico’s children live in poverty, this policy brief focuses on a cost-effective
                   solution to this severe problem. In this brief, existing tax policies are evaluated and others are recommended,
                   utilizing a cost-benefit analysis. For more information, contact New Mexico KIDS COUNT, Kelly O’Donnell,
                   (505) 244-9505 / kodonnel@uswest.net. This publication is not yet available on-line.

           The Family Impact of Iowa’s Tax System. Child and Family Policy Center. Iowa. 1998: 8 pages.
                   This report describes how Iowa taxes affect children and families. It summarizes research findings from a num-
                   ber of reports on Iowa’s tax policy and describes the subsequent implications for policy. For more information,
                   contact Iowa KIDS COUNT, Mike Crawford, (515) 280-9027 / mcrawford@cfpciowa.org. Publications are
                   available on-line at http://www.cfpciowa.org/publicat.htm.

           The Federal Budget and Pennsylvania’s Children. Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children. June 2000: 4 pages.
                   This brief is a guide to major federal programs affecting children, such as the Social Services Block Grant, the
                   Children’s Health Insurance Program, child care, Head Start, and the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
                   program. The report provides background on each program, as well as Internet resources for funding.
                   For more information, contact Pennsylvania KIDS COUNT, Diane Ollivier, (717) 236-5680 /
                   dollivier@papartnerships.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           “The Federal Budget Process.” Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children. June 2000: 2 pages.
                   This two-sided, one page flyer is an overview of the federal budget process and how presidential and
                   congressional proposals become the annual budget. For more information, contact Pennsylvania
                   KIDS COUNT, Diane Ollivier, (717) 236-5680 / dollivier@papartnerships.org. This publication is not
                   available on-line.

           Measuring the Economic Well-Being of Families and Children: 1999. Children’s Defense Fund-Minnesota.
           October 1999: 25 pages.
                   This report, a joint project of Children’s Defense Fund-Minnesota (CDF) and Congregations Concerned for
                   Children-Child Advocacy Network, focuses on the economic context in which children and families live. It
                   tracks indicators such as employment, wages, tax base, and government spending for Minnesota as a whole
                   and the 11 economic development regions. The publication is intended to serve as a resource for policy
                   makers at the city, county, and state levels, as well as for community advocates, parents and those who work
                   with children. Data for individual counties is available at http://www.cdf-mn.org. Copies of the book are
                   available for $5, plus $1 shipping and handling by calling 1-888-870-1402. For more information, contact
                   Minnesota KIDS COUNT, Diane Benjamin, (612) 227-6121 / benjamin@cdf-mn.org.

           “Missouri Earned Income Tax Credit.” Citizen’s For Missouri’s Children. April 1999: 3 pages.
                   This policy brief discusses the problem of working poor families in Missouri. The brief explains federal and
                   state EITC, addressing criticisms voiced by adversaries of EITC. For more information, contact Missouri KIDS
                   COUNT, Ruth Ehresman, (314) 647-2003) / ruth@fastrans.net. This publication is not available on-line. Other
                   publications are available at http://www.umsl.edu/~cmc/reports.htm.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                       2
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
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  14
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Tax Relief and Working Families: Is Arkansas Ready for a State Earned Income Tax Credit? Part of the Paycheck and
           Politics series. Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families. October 1999: 10 pages.
                   This issue brief focuses on whether Arkansas should adopt a state-level earned income tax credit (EITC). The
                   report first analyzes the need for tax relief on the part of low-income families and then examines the effective-
                   ness of the federal EITC for Arkansas families. The brief also presents how a state EITC could be structured and
                   what impact it would have on families in Arkansas. For more information contact Arkansas KIDS COUNT,
                   Rich Huddleston, (501) 371-9678 / rhuddleston@aristotle.net. This publication is available at no cost on-line
                   at http://www.aradvocates.org/SFTI/taxbrief3.pdf

           Taxing Pennsylvania: A Family-Focused Overview of Pennsylvania Taxes. Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children.
           October 1999: 20 pages.
                   This report is designed to provide an understanding of the state’s tax system and its impact on children and
                   their families. It examines the taxes paid by Pennsylvania families within the context of a broadly-structured
                   revenue system. Three family-friendly tax strategies are recommended to assist parents in devoting more
                   resources to their children’s growth and healthy development. For more information, contact Pennsylvania
                   KIDS COUNT, Diane Ollivier, (717) 236-5680 / dollivier@papartnerships.org. This publication is not
                   available on-line.

           Washington’s Child Protection Budget: How Much for Prevention? Human Services Policy Center. Seattle, WA.
           March 1999: 45 pages.
                   The report provides a detailed analysis of Washington State’s funding for the prevention of child abuse and neg-
                   lect. For more information, contact Washington KIDS COUNT, Laurel Feltz, (206) 685-7613. This publication is
                   not available on-line. Ordering information for other publications is available at
                   http://www.hspc.org/publications.html#other.

           Where Credit’s Due: What A State Earned Income Credit Means for California Children. Children Now. California.
           May 2000: 6 pages.
                   This report documents how a state supplement to the federal Earned Income Credit (EIC) would benefit children
                   in two million low-income working families in California. It examines the federal EIC, as well as the impact of
                   other state EICs. The report then makes projections about how California’s low-income working families could
                   be impacted by a state supplemental EIC. For more information, contact California KIDS COUNT, Amy
                   Dominguez-Arms, (510) 763-2444 / ada@childrennow.org. This publication is available at no cost on-line at
                   www.childrennow.org.

           Working Families in Minnesota. Children’s Defense Fund-Minnesota. June 2000: 8 pages.
                   This brief is part of a series analyzing the Urban Institute’s National Survey of American Families data about
                   Minnesota’s families. The report reviews family structure and work, as well as factors contributing to
                   challenges for working families. Data are provided to illustrate the stressors placed upon working families in
                   the state. For more information, contact Minnesota KIDS COUNT, Diane Benjamin, (612) 227-6121 /
                   benjamin@cdf-mn.org. This publication is available on-line at http://www.cdf-mn.org.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                        3
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  21
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egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
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                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           CHILD CARE

           The ABC’s of Early Childhood: Trends, Information, and Evidence for Use in Developing an Early Childhood System of
           Care. Child and Family Policy Center. Iowa. 1999: 31 pages.
                   This report is intended as a companion volume to the Community Empowerment Toolkit. The report discusses
                   reasons for developing an early childhood system of care and suggests several components that should be
                   present in a comprehensive early childhood care system. For more information, contact Iowa KIDS COUNT,
                   Michael Crawford, (515) 280-9027 / mcrawford@cfpciowa.org. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.cfpciowa.org/empower_toolkit.htm.

           Child Care: A County-by-County Factbook. Children’s Defense Fund-Ohio. 1998: 205 pages.
                   This first report in the “For Children For Ohio’s Future” series builds upon the new scientific research on brain
                   development in young children and explores the link between quality child care and healthy brain develop-
                   ment. County, state and national data on child care costs, need, assistance for low-income working families,
                   and the choices available to families are highlighted. For information or a copy of the report, contact Ohio
                   KIDS COUNT, David Norris, (614) 221-2244 / dnorris@cdfohio.org. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.cdfohio.org/ohiodata/Default.htm.

           Child Care and Education – Responding to the Changing Workforce. Child and Family Policy Center. Iowa. December
           1999: 10 pages.
                   This report provides information on Iowa’s performance in allocating resources to early care and education.
                   It provides trend data on the demand for child care in Iowa, an analysis of gaps and needs in its child care
                   system, and comparisons of Iowa’s public policies concerning child care with those of other states. For more
                   information, please contact Iowa KIDS COUNT, Michael Crawford, (515) 280-9027 /
                   mcrawford@cfpciowa.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           Child Care: Children Learning/ Families Learning. Children’s Defense Fund-Ohio. 1997: 36 pages.
                   This report is the second in a series of guides that provide basic information about programs affecting Ohio’s
                   children. This report was written at the time of both TANF implementation and the devolution of funding to
                   the states. The impact of these changes on the need for quality, accessible child care is highlighted in this
                   publication. For more information, contact Ohio KIDS COUNT, David Norris, (614) 221-2244 /
                   dnorris@cdfohio.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           Child Care in Florida: A Snapshot of Florida’s Children. Center for the Study of Children’s Futures. University of South
           Florida. 1997: 4 pages.
                   This flyer lists data concerning child care enrollment, requests, providers, and costs in 1997 (with some graphs
                   showing five-year trends). For more information, contact Florida KIDS COUNT, Susan Weitzel,
                   (813) 974-7411 / weitzel@hal.fmhi.usf.edu. This publication is not available on-line.

           Child Care in Michigan: 1997 Snapshot. Michigan League for Human Services. August 2000: 4 pages.
                   Based upon the Urban Institute’s analysis of the 1997 National Survey of America’s Families data, this brief
                   includes data regarding children who are in the care of someone other than a parent during the day. The brief
                   analyses numerous indicators related to child care, such as the hours in child care, age, family income, num-
                   ber of child care arrangements, and the kind of care. For more information, contact Michigan KIDS COUNT,
                   Jane Zehnder-Merrell, (517) 487-5436 / janez@mlan.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                        4
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egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
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  18
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
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                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Child Care in Rhode Island: Caring for Infants and Pre-School Children. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. October 1997:
           8 pages.
                   This issue brief discusses the ways in which quality early care and education is linked to healthy child
                   development, brain development, successful welfare reform, affordability, and adequate funding. The brief
                   describes types of early care and education programs, particularly focusing on Head Start. County-by-county
                   statistical data relating to Head Start enrollment and the Family Independence Plan (FIP) is provided.
                   For more information, contact Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Elizabeth Burke Bryant, (401) 351-9400 /
                   ebb@rikidscount.org. This publication is not available on-line. Other publications are available at
                   http://www.rikidscount.org/ridata.html.

           Critical Issues in Child Care: Affordability and Accessibility of Child Care. Action Alliance for Virginia’s Children &
           Youth. Vol. 2: 29 pages, 1999.
                   This white paper lays out the broad picture of the affordability and accessibility of child care, while at the same
                   time providing up-to-date, accurate and detailed dollar figures for actual funding. For more information,
                   contact Virginia KIDS COUNT, Lisa Wood, (804) 649-0184 / lisa@vakids.org. This publication is not available
                   on-line.

           Critical Issues in Child Care: Quality Child Care in Virginia. Action Alliance for Virginia’s Children & Youth. Vol. 1:
           20 pages, 1999.
                   This white paper advocates quality child care by providing research and data as well as and myths and facts
                   about child care. For more information, contact Virginia KIDS COUNT, Lisa Wood, (804) 649-0184 /
                   lisa@vakids.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           Early Learning: Dollars and Sense. Citizens for Missouri’s Children. April 1998: 36 pages.
                   This document reports on Missouri’s current investment in early child care. The report makes detailed
                   recommendations for improving child care and early education in Missouri through increasing capacity and
                   affordability, maximizing resources, and raising quality. For more information, contact Missouri KIDS COUNT,
                   Ruth Ehresman, (314) 647-2003 / ruth@fastrans.net. This publication is available at no cost on-line at
                   http://www.umsl.edu/~cmc/CBW98.html.

           Idaho Works if Child Care Works. Idaho KIDS COUNT. Mountain States Group. April 1998: 8 pages.
                   This issue brief focuses on conveying the importance of child care and early education through data and
                   statistics on funding, population of children needing child care, availability, and quality of care in Idaho.
                   Recommendations to improve the availability of quality child care in Idaho are also included. For more
                   information, contact Idaho KIDS COUNT, Linda Jensen, (208) 388-1014 / ljensen@mtnstatesgroup.org.
                   This publication is not available on-line.

           Subsidized Child Care in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children. May 1999: 5 pages.
                   This report explains Pennsylvania’s subsidized child care program and attempts to anticipate the next steps that
                   the state needs to take in order to address the child care needs of more low-income families. The report
                   includes statistics on the number of low-income Pennsylvania children eligible for child care versus the number
                   actually being served in the current child care system and the percentages of eligible children currently served
                   and potentially unserved according to age and program office. For more information, contact Pennsylvania
                   KIDS COUNT, Diane Ollivier, (717) 236-5680 / dollivier@papartnerships.org. This publication is not
                   available on-line.


           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                      5
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egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
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                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           What the New Brain Research Tells Us: Implications for Child Care in Maine. Maine Children’s Alliance. 4 pages.
                   This brief discusses how our knowledge about brain development enables us to determine the significance of
                   various types of child care. For more information, contact Maine KIDS COUNT, Lynn Davey, (207) 623-1868 /
                   ldavey@mekids.org. This publication is available at no cost on-line at http://www.mekids.org/web/issuepa-
                   pers/brain.htm.

           CHILD WELFARE

           Child Abuse and Neglect: Protecting Massachusetts Children. Massachusetts Citizens for Children. 1998: 11 pages.
                   This report provides statistical data on reported and confirmed cases of child maltreatment in Massachusetts
                   and recommends steps that the state must take in order to protect the children of Massachusetts.
                   For more information, contact Massachusetts KIDS COUNT, Barry Hock, (617) 742-8555 /
                   barryhock@insidehealthcare.com. This publication is not available on-line.

           Children’s Program Outcome Review Team 1998 Evaluation Results. Tennessee Commission on Children & Youth.
           July 1999: 97 pages.
                   This publication represents an ongoing evaluation process of children in state custody in Tennessee. It provides
                   data on the status of children and “tests” the service system’s performance in improving aspects of the lives of
                   children and families. For more information, contact Tennessee KIDS COUNT, Linda O’Neal, (615) 532-1571
                   / loneal2@mail.state.tn.us. This publication is not available on-line.

           Facts about Child Abuse and Neglect in Michigan: Trends in Complaints, Investigations and Substantiations. Michigan’s
           Children. January 2000: 5 pages.
                   This fact sheet examines the data regarding reports of suspected child abuse and neglect between 1991 and
                   1998 and some of the causes of any changes in reports during that time period. It also reviews the new system
                   for classifying child abuse and neglect cases in Michigan. For more information, contact Michigan KIDS
                   COUNT, Michele Corey, (517) 485-3500 / corey.michele@michiganschildren.org. This publication is not avail-
                   able on-line.

           From the Front Lines: Milwaukee’s Child Welfare Community Speaks Out. Wisconsin Council on Children & Families.
           January 2000: 63 pages.
                   This report is a qualitative analysis of the people who work in or with the Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare.
                   It focuses on their experiences and perspectives regarding the new child welfare system in Milwaukee during
                   that project’s first year. At the conclusion, recommendations are suggested for system improvement. For more
                   information, contact Wisconsin KIDS COUNT, Martha Cranley, (608) 284-0580 / mcranley@wccf.org. This
                   publication is not available on-line.

           “KIDS COUNT In Brief: Child Welfare.” Advocates for Children & Youth. Maryland. March 1998: 2 pages.
                   This brief, the third in a series, focuses on child welfare and the improvements needed to provide adequate
                   care to abused and neglected children. The publication examines the costs to society from abuse and neglect,
                   excessive caseloads, staffing problems and training needs. Solutions are offered to begin addressing these
                   concerns. For more information, contact Maryland KIDS COUNT, Jennean Everett-Reynolds, (410) 547-9200
                   / kidscount@acy.org. To order the publication on-line, go to http://www.acy.org/pub.htm.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                   6
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Missouri’s Child Protection System: Report to the Children’s Justice Task Force. Citizens for Missouri’s Children.
           December 1997: 13 pages.
                   This report, delivered to the Children’s Justice Task Force, contains summaries of the findings and recommenda-
                   tions of 19 studies focused on aspects of the Missouri Child Protection System as well as nationally-oriented
                   sources of information. The report also contains a table listing the frequency with which each finding/recom-
                   mendation was cited in the reviewed documents. For more information, contact Missouri KIDS COUNT,
                   Ruth Ehresman (314) 647-2003 / ruth@fastrans.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           “Nevada KIDS COUNT Action Guide: Supporting Children is Everyone’s Business.” Child Safety Section. 2 pages.
                   As part of the multi-subject Action Guide, this piece on Child Safety gives a brief topic overview, reports key
                   facts, and provides suggested action steps to improve outcomes for children. For more information, contact
                   Nevada KIDS COUNT, Marlys Morton, (702) 368-1533 / nvkidscnt@aol.com. This publication is not available
                   on-line.

           “Number of Adoptions Increase in State.” Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families. December 1999: 1 page.
                   This flyer presents data reflecting the increase in adoptions in Arkansas between 1997 and 1999. The flyer
                   presents an analysis of the the factors that contribute to this increase. Data demonstrating the number of
                   children awaiting adoption and the adoption of special needs children are also reported. For more
                   information, please contact Arkansas KIDS COUNT, Paul Kelly, (501) 371-9678 / pkelly@aristotle.net.
                   This publication is available on-line at http://www.aradvocates.org/kidscountbulletins/.

           Preventing Child Death: Strategies for the Prevention of Child Deaths by Poisoning, Firearms, Drowning and Fires.
           Texas KIDS COUNT. Center for Public Policy Priorities. Austin, TX. 1997: 27 pages.
                   This report focuses on four types of preventable death, examining causes and describing preventative
                   intervention or education strategies. The report looks at variations in mortality rates between different racial/
                   ethnic groups and different age groups, as well as seasonal and geographic variations in child mortality rates.
                   For more information, contact Texas KIDS COUNT, Pam Hormuth, (512) 320-0222 / hormuth@cppp.org.
                   This publication is available on-line at http://www.cppp.org/kidscount/publications.html.

           Privatization of Child Welfare Services in Kansas: A Child Advocacy Perspective. Kansas Action for Children. September
           1998: 39 pages.
                   This is a report intended to provide an overview of the Kansas privatization initiative and to summarize the
                   main schools of criticism surrounding the privatization of child welfare services. The report also makes a series
                   of “recommendations for mid-course corrections” and offers the “street-level perspective” of what the priva-
                   tized system is like in its second year. It uses anecdotal testimony, news accounts, and individual conversations
                   with both public and private participants in the privatized system. For more information, contact Kansas KIDS
                   COUNT, Gary Brunk, (785) 232-0550 / brunk@kac.org. This publication is available at no cost at
                   http://www.kac.org/privatization_of_child_welfare_s.htm.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                        7
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           COMMUNITY MOBILIZATION

           Promising New Directions: Building a Citizen Constituency for Children in Kansas. Kansas Action for Children.
           1998: 17 pages.
                   This report is the result of a discussion among members of the National Association of Child Advocates. The
                   report describes the proceedings and results of the discussion and provides an historical look at the child
                   advocacy movement as well as a look at the directions the effort may take in the future. For more information,
                   contact Kansas KIDS COUNT, Gary Brunk, (785) 232-0550 / brunk@kac.org. This publication is not available
                   on-line. Other publications can be found at http://www.kac.org.

           COMPREHENSIVE REPORTS ON CHILDREN & YOUTH

           2000 Campaign Addendum for Children and Youth. Vermont Children’s Forum. January 2000: 28 pages.
                   This report is a companion piece to the Campaign Agenda for Children and Youth, which was released in
                   January 1999. The Addendum and the Agenda are based upon input from citizens of Vermont. Public meetings
                   were held throughout the state to ascertain the issues regarding children and youth that are of importance for
                   Vermonters. The document outlines the five issues of interest (economic well-being, health, education, youth,
                   and child and family support) and identifies priorities to be addressed through the legislature. For more
                   information, please contact Vermont KIDS COUNT, Carlen Finn, (802) 229-6377 / vtcyf@together.net.
                   This publication is not available on-line.

           Children’s Agenda 2000. Children’s Alliance of New Hampshire. January 2000: 20 pages.
                   This publication is a child-centered plan of action to focus attention on the needs of children in New
                   Hampshire and to help support the creation of solutions to meet those needs. The Agenda is divided into
                   four sections: education, health and wellness, economic security and well-being, child safety and protection.
                   Each section includes a vision, long-term goals, and data describing the current status of children. For more
                   information, contact New Hampshire KIDS COUNT, Ellen Shemitz, (603) 225-2264 /
                   Eshemitz@ChildrenNH.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           DENTAL CARE

           A Maine Crisis: Access to Dental Care. Maine Children’s Alliance. 4 pages.
                   This report poses, and subsequently answers, several questions surrounding the increasingly limited access to
                   dental care in Maine, touching on repercussions of the “crisis” for very young children, families, health care
                   providers, and the State of Maine. The document also offers several possible solutions to the crisis in access to
                   dental care. For more information, contact Maine KIDS COUNT, Lynn Davey, (207) 623-1868 /
                   ldavey@mekids.org. This publication is available at no cost on-line at
                   http://www.mekids.org/web/issuepapers/dental.htm.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                        8
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Dental Care Counts: Medicaid Dental Services in Decay: A Crisis for St.Louis Children. Citizen’s for Missouri’s Children.
           July 2000: 34 pages.
                   The report focuses on low-income children’s lack of access to dental care. Results of a survey of Medicaid
                   managed care providers in the St. Louis area described in the report present a bleak picture for low-income
                   families. The report includes an analysis of factors contributing to the problem and recommendations for
                   policy change. For more information, contact Missouri KIDS COUNT, Joe Squillace, Health Policy Analyst,
                   (314) 647-2003 / squillace@fastrans.net. This publication will soon be available on-line at
                   http://www.mokids.org.

           DISABILITIES

           Characteristics and Challenges of Families Who Adopt Children with Special Needs: An Exploratory Study.
           KIDS COUNT Nevada. September 2000: 4 pages.
                   This brief highlights initial results of a collaborative study between the School of Social Work at the University
                   of Nevada, Las Vegas, and the Division of Child and Family Services (DCFS) on special needs adoption families
                   in Nevada. The research was intended to provide important baseline data on families adopting special needs
                   children, facilitate understanding of the unique issues and challenges faced by special needs adoptive families,
                   and identify the kinds of pre- and post-placement services that are most helpful to this population. For more
                   information, contact Nevada KIDS COUNT, Marlys Morton, (702) 895-3191 / kidscount@nevada.edu.
                   This publication is available on-line at http://kidscount.unlv.edu/#pubs.

           Special Children, Special Needs. Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families. June 2000: 5 pages.
                   This KIDS COUNT Bulletin draws attention to the vulnerable and isolated children in Arkansas with special-
                   ized health care needs. It describes the services currently available for these special children, as well as data
                   documenting the use of services by Arkansas families. For more information, contact Arkansas KIDS COUNT,
                   Amy Rossi, (501) 371-9678 / amyrossi@swbell.net. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.aradvocates.org/kidscount.

           Special Report on Children and Youth with Disabilities in Vermont. Vermont Children’s Forum. April 1999: 24 pages.
                   This report identifies some of the issues that need to be addressed in order to equalize social, educational, and
                   economic opportunities for all children and youth, including those with disabilities. The report discusses issues
                   relating to education, health care, and community participation, and makes selected policy recommendations.
                   For more information, contact Vermont KIDS COUNT, Carlen Finn, (802) 229-6377 / vtcyf@together.net.
                   This publication is not available on-line.

           Working & Poor in Wisconsin. People with Disabilities: Confronting Obstacles, Old and New. Wisconsin Council on
           Children and Families. Vol. 4: 4 pages, May 2000.
                   Changes in the welfare system are serving some populations better than others. Those parents whose ability to
                   work is limited by a disability, either their own or that of a family member requiring their care, is one such
                   group. This report reviews the state’s welfare policies impacting people with disabilities. Some personal
                   accounts are also highlighted. For more information, contact Wisconsin KIDS COUNT, Martha Cranley,
                   (608) 284-0580 / mcranley@wccf.org. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.wccf.org/welfare.html.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                     9
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 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           EARLY CHILD DEVELOPMENT

           ABCs of Early Childhood. Child and Family Policy Center. Iowa. August 1999: 41 pages.
                   This report is a compilation of baseline data on early childhood in Iowa, broken down into factors that have
                   led to a greater national interest in children starting school who are ready to learn. The four factors are:
                   workforce participation, trends in child well-being, brain development research, and cost-benefit analyses. In
                   addition, the report discusses the elements which need to be in place to ensure that children who start school
                   are ready to learn. These elements include: health care coverage, family support, preschool programs and child
                   care/education. For more information, contact Iowa KIDS COUNT, Jason Goldberg, (515) 280-9027 /
                   info@cfpciow.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           Brain Development and Early Childhood. Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families. March 2000: 20 pages.
                   Recent reports on brain development and the realities of poverty and work in Arkansas give an urgent tone to
                   the conversation about public support for early childhood programs. Over the years, researchers have discov-
                   ered many of the ways by which children learn and develop, as well as what is important in the early training
                   they receive. Recently, new scientific studies have documented what occurs in the brain during a child's first
                   years of life, and are now predicting what it is that can give a child the best chance of success in achieving an
                   independent quality of life. This report offers a snapshot of Arkansas' policies and programs geared toward its
                   youngest citizens. For more information, contact Arkansas KIDS COUNT, Julie Robbins,
                   (501) 371-9678 / julesrob@swbell.net. This publication is only available on-line at
                   http://www.aradvocates.org/kidscountbulletins/braindevelopweb.pdf.

           Brain Growth Versus Kansas Public Expenditures on Children Ages 0-18. Kansas Action for Children. 1998: 8 pages.
                   This report examines the gap between the latest findings on brain development and public dollars spent on
                   children in Kansas. The report also outlines suggestions for closing this gap. For more information, contact
                   Kansas KIDS COUNT, Gary Brunk, (785) 232-0550 / brunk@kac.org. This publication is available at no cost
                   at http://www.kac.org/braingrowth.htm.

           Brain Watch: Great Beginnings, The First Years Last Forever. “Critical Windows of Development.” Vol. 1, Issue 2:
           2 pages, January 1999.
                   This issue brief articulates the critical windows of development for young children and the policy implications
                   of this new knowledge about brain development. For more information, contact Wisconsin KIDS COUNT,
                   Martha Cranley, (608) 284-0580 / mcranley@wccf.org. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.wccf.org/brainsite.html.

           Building an Early Care and Education System in Rhode Island. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. December 1999: 72 pages.
                   This special report, which was developed through the Carnegie Corporation of New York’s Starting Points
                   initiative, serves as a blueprint for action and participation by policy makers and community leaders on how to
                   create a bold and innovative approach to high quality early care and education. The report identifies elements
                   of a high quality system, and highlights efforts within Rhode Island to improve child care affordability,
                   accessibility and quality. It describes model programs and strategies for public and private investment, as well
                   as opportunities for action. For more information, please contact Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Liz Tobin Tyler,
                   (401) 351-9400. This publication is not available on-line.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                   10
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      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           “Carnegie Starting Points: Recommendations in Brief.” Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. January 1999.
                   This issue brief lists excerpts from the Carnegie Task Force’s report Starting Points: Meeting the Needs of Our
                   Youngest Children. These excerpts include risk factors and recommendations on how to ameliorate the “quiet
                   crisis.” For more information contact Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Elizabeth Burke Bryant, (401) 351-9400 /
                   ebb@rikidscount.org. This publication is not available on-line. Other publications are available at
                   http://www.rikidscount.org/ridata.html.

           Cost-Benefit of Early Childhood Programs. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. December 1998.
                   This issue brief discusses recent research findings that show that the benefits of investing in early childhood
                   programs outweigh the costs. The High Scope/Perry Preschool Study and the 1998 Rand Study are both
                   spotlighted, and sidebars indicate education benefits and economic benefits. For more information, contact
                   Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Elizabeth Burke Bryant, (401) 351-9400 / ebb@rikidscount.org. This publication
                   is not available on-line. Other publications are available at http://www.rikidscount.org/ridata.html.

           Early Learning Counts: Using Data to Improve Early Care and Education in Missouri. Citizen’s for Missouri’s Children.
           October 1999: 23 pages.
                   This publication reviews the importance of early learning and what constitutes quality early learning, analyzes
                   the status of Missouri’s early learning system, and discusses how to use data to build an effective system for the
                   early care and education of Missouri’s children. In response to statewide need, a project called ELIOT (Early
                   Learning Information On-line Together) was started to collect data on early learning and to make it publicly
                   accessible. These data, in addition to real stories, are utilized to demonstrate how data can serve as a building
                   block for early learning. For a copy or for more information, contact Missouri KIDS COUNT, Ruth Ehresman
                   at (314) 647-2003 / ruth@fastrans.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           How Everyday Experiences Affect Children: What the New Brain Research Tells Us. Maine Children’s Alliance. 4 pages.
                   This brief summarizes the new brain research and how this new knowledge impacts what we know about child
                   abuse, neglect, child poverty, and child care. For more information contact Maine KIDS COUNT, Lynn Davey,
                   (207) 623-1868 / ldavey@mekids.org. This publication is available at no cost on-line at
                   http://www.mekids.org/web/default.htm.

           Improving Access to Early Care and Education: A CMC Policy Brief. Citizen’s for Missouri’s Children. August 1999:
           4 pages.
                   This policy brief, part of a series on early learning, reviews some of the research indicating that early learning
                   sets the stage for later success in life. There is discussion of some of the barriers to early care and the progress
                   in Missouri toward improving access and quality. For a copy or more information, contact Missouri KIDS
                   COUNT, Ruth Ehresman at (314) 647-2003 / ruth@fastrans.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           Indiana’s Children Deserve the Best: The Early Years. Indiana Youth Institute. Fall 1998: 7 pages.
                   This report summarizes recent scientific conclusions regarding early brain development and provides some
                   suggestions for application. Sections include discussions of the contributions made by nature and nurturing, the
                   impact of trauma and neglect, and some best practices of early childhood development. For more
                   information, contact Indiana KIDS COUNT, Judith Erickson, (317) 924-3657 / erickson@on-net.net.
                   This publication is not available on-line.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                       11
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      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Infancy and Early Childhood: Opportunities and Risks for Pennsylvania and Its Children. Pennsylvania Partnerships for
           Children. September 1998: 11 pages.
                   This report looks at the opportunities (“windows”) that are open for learning and development during infancy
                   and children’s early years, and describes the ways in which parents, educators, and policymakers can capitalize
                   on the opportunities to improve the well-being of children in their care. This document also describes some
                   findings of recent brain research and lists statistical data related to dropouts, juvenile delinquency, and teen
                   births in order to illustrate “missed opportunities for adolescents.” For more information, contact Pennsylvania
                   KIDS COUNT, Diane Ollivier, (717) 236-5680 / dollivier@papartnerships.org. Publication order information
                   is available at http://www.papartnerships.org/pubs.htm.

           Quality Early Learning: A CMC Policy Brief. Citizen’s for Missouri’s Children. September 1999: 8 pages.
                   This policy brief, part of a series on early learning, provides background on high quality care and an analysis of
                   the barriers to achieving that level of quality. The brief concludes by providing solutions and suggestions
                   toward improving quality. For a copy or more information, contact Missouri KIDS COUNT, Ruth Ehresman at
                   (314) 647-2003 / ruth@fastrans.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           The Right Start in Michigan’s Largest Communities. Michigan League for Human Services and Michigan’s Children.
           April 2000: 48 pages.
                   This review of maternal and infant well-being in Michigan’s 28 largest cities showed that overall, these urban
                   areas have higher risks than the rest of the state. Eight indicators were included in the report, measuring the
                   conditions for mothers and babies in Michigan’s urban areas. For more information, contact Michigan KIDS
                   COUNT, Jane Zehnder-Merrell, (517) 487-5436 / janez@mlan.net or Michele Corey, (517) 485-3500 /
                   corey.michele@michiganschildren.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           Starting Points for Rhode Island’s Youngest Children: Lessons Learned. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. May 2000:
           12 pages.
                   As a site for the Carnegie Corporation of New York’s Starting Points State and Community Partnerships for Young
                   Children, Rhode Island was engaged in an effort to put together comprehensive child care and health care
                   programs for young children and their families. This initiative brought together an unprecedented public/
                   private partnership within the state, coordinated by Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. This report is a summary of the
                   lessons learned from the Rhode Island initiative. For more information, contact Elizabeth Burke Bryant,
                   (401) 351-9400 / ebb@rikidscount.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           EDUCATION

           Are Educational Opportunities Available to Homeless Children? Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families. July 2000:
           4 pages.
                   This special report focuses on the education of homeless children. The Stewart B. McKinney Act of 1987 made
                   federal funding available to ensure that homeless children and youth are provided with equal access to public
                   education. And yet, many homeless children face obstacles to enrollment, attendance and success in school
                   that other children do not face. For more information, contact Arkansas KIDS COUNT, Paul Kelly,
                   (501) 371-9678 / pkelly@aristotle.net. This publication is not yet available on-line.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                      12
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 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Calling the Roll: Study Circles for Better Schools, Education Resource Guide. Arkansas Advocates for Children &
           Families. September 1998: 39 pages.
                   Designed to be a resource for participants in the “Calling the Roll” program, this guide includes four sections
                   that provide basic information about students, families, schools, and teachers in Arkansas; a glossary of terms
                   frequently used in education to facilitate discussion between community members and educators; information-
                   finding and research tips for community members; and, contact information for selected sources of state-
                   specific and general education information. For more information, contact Arkansas KIDS COUNT, Amy Rossi,
                   (501) 371-9678 / amyrossi@swbell.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           Helping Children Learn: 1999-2000 A County-by-County Factbook. Children’s Defense Fund – Ohio. September 1999:
           206 pages.
                   This factbook highlights key indicators that affect the educational success of the nearly three million
                   children in Ohio. Each Ohio county is reviewed on the same set of indicators, which includes not only
                   standard educational indicators, but also health and economic factors that contribute to educational success.
                   For more information, contact Ohio KIDS COUNT, David Norris, (614) 221-2244 / dnorris@cdfohio.org.
                   The publication is available on-line at http://www.cdfohio.org/ohiodata/Default.htm.

           “Ideas That Work! Summer and Year-Round Meal Programs.” Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. August 2000: 2 pages.
                   This piece focuses on the federal sponsored Summer Food Service Program and community-based meal pro-
                   grams which provide nutritious, balanced meals to insure that low-income children’s nutritional needs continue
                   to be met when school is out of session. (See end of this section for contact and location information for the
                   “Ideas That Work” series.)

           “Ideas That Work! Neighborhood-Based Summer Programs.” Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. July 2000: 2 pages.
                   This piece draws attention to the success of neighborhood-based summer programs that provide structured
                   activities, academic enrichment, and community service opportunities for children during the summer months.

           “Ideas That Work! To achieve school readiness and student success – Lead Poisoning Treatment Services.” Rhode Island
           KIDS COUNT. June 2000: 2 pages.
                   This piece examines the effects of lead on the child’s physical and behavioral health. The strong link between
                   low level lead exposure in early childhood and later decreased academic performance is discussed.

           “Ideas That Work! To achieve school readiness and student success – Family Preservation and Support Programs.”
           Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. May 2000: 2 pages.
                   This piece addresses the voluntary, community-based services designed to strengthen families that may be
                   at-risk for child abuse and neglect and the impact that schools can have on the success of such programs.

           “Ideas That Work! To achieve school readiness and student success – Two-Way Bilingual Programs.” Rhode Island
           KIDS COUNT. April 2000: 2 pages.
                   This piece provides background information on two-way, bilingual programs and describes what is working.
                   It highlights specific Rhode Island programs, lessons learned, and resources to contact for more information.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                     13
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           “Ideas That Work! To achieve school readiness and student success – School-based Dental Services.” Rhode Island KIDS
           COUNT. March 2000: 2 pages.
                   This piece focuses on a proven strategy of reaching children at risk for poor dental health. It highlights specific
                   Rhode Island school-based dental programs, lessons learned, and resources to contact for more information.

           “Ideas That Work! To achieve school readiness and student success – School Attendance.” Rhode Island KIDS COUNT.
           February 2000: 2 pages.
                   This piece addresses strategies to motivate children to attend school regularly and outlines the negative out-
                   comes associated with failure to attend school. It highlights specific Rhode Island programs to improve school
                   attendance, lessons learned, and resources to contact for more information.

           “Ideas That Work! To achieve school readiness and student success – Meeting the Special Education Needs of Children
           in the Child Welfare System.” Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. January 2000: 2 pages.
                   This piece examines the special educational needs of children with disabilities and children who are in the
                   care of the Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families. It provides background on the current
                   state requirements to address the needs of these children and highlights specific Rhode Island programs, les-
                   sons learned, and resources to contact for more information.

           “Ideas That Work! To achieve school readiness and student success – Early Literacy Development.” Rhode Island
           KIDS COUNT. November 1999: 2 pages.
                   This piece addresses the widely recognized belief that reading books to children is critical to a child’s develop-
                   ment. It highlights specific Rhode Island early literacy programs, lessons learned, and resources to contact for
                   more information.

           “Ideas That Work! To achieve school readiness and student success – Meeting the Mental Health Needs of Young
           Children.” Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. October 1999: 2 pages.
                   This piece provides information on the how the emotional state of a child can affect his/her ability to achieve
                   the level of social and cognitive competence necessary to learn. It highlights specific Rhode Island comprehen-
                   sive programs to support the family, lessons learned, and resources to contact for more information.

           “Ideas That Work! To achieve school readiness and student success – Full-Day Kindergarten.” September 1999: 2 pages.
                   This piece focuses on the research and background information that have led to the creation of many full-day
                   kindergarten programs. It highlights specific Rhode Island programs, lessons learned, and resources to contact
                   for more information.
                   For more information about the Ideas That Work series, please contact Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Elizabeth
                   Burke Bryant, 401-351-9400 / ebb@rikidscount.org. These publications are available on-line at
                   http://www.rikidscount.org.

           Learning to Learn: Full-Day Kindergarten for At-Risk Kids. Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children. July 1999: 5 pages.
                   This report discusses the benefits of full-day kindergarten and describes some of the obstacles preventing
                   implementation of full-day kindergarten in Pennsylvania. The report also includes recommendations of ways in
                   which the state could extend full-day kindergarten programs to more at-risk kids. For more information,
                   contact Pennsylvania KIDS COUNT, Diane Ollivier, (717) 236-5680 / dollivier@papartnerships.org. This
                   publication is not available on-line.


           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                     14
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      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Measuring Up: The State of Texas Education – Overview. Center for Public Policy Priorities. Texas. September 1998:
           21 pages.
                   The first in a series of reports, this overview profiles Texas students and summarizes certain challenges faced
                   by these schoolchildren. Challenges faced by Texas schools are also addressed, as is a description of major
                   education reform efforts being discussed. (See end of this section for contact and location information on the
                   “Measuring Up” series.)

           Measuring Up: The State of Texas Education — The Debate Over Dropouts: How Many Are There? Center for Public
           Policy Priorities. Texas. 1998: 7 pages.
                   This report focuses on the problem of school-age children dropping out of school. The report includes a defini-
                   tion of a dropout, statistical data on Texas school completion rates, recommendations for dropout prevention,
                   and a success story.

           Measuring Up: The State of Texas Education — Student Assessment and Performance. Center for Public Policy Priorities.
           Texas. 1998: 7 pages.
                   This report focuses on standards and tests used by Texas schools to measure the performance of students and
                   schools

           Measuring Up: The State of Texas Education — School Finance in Texas. Center for Public Policy Priorities. Texas. 1998:
           4 pages.
                   This report discusses equity in school finance, particularly in reference to the state’s inequity in per-student
                   expenditures. A history of school finance in Texas also appears in the report.

           Measuring Up: The State of Texas Education – Violence and Weapons in Texas Schools. 1999: 7 pages.
                   This report examines data on juvenile violent crimes in Texas as well as the recent trend toward school
                   violence. County-by-county data relating to school violence is included.

           Measuring Up: The State of Texas Education – Parental Involvement in Education. 1999: 8 pages.
                   This report explores the variety of ways in which parents can be involved in their children’s education. The
                   report highlights the importance of parental involvement and details some barriers parents may face when
                   trying to become involved. The report describes a model program that illustrates how parents and schools can
                   increase parental involvement.

           Measuring Up: The State of Education in Texas – Early Childhood Education. 1999: 6 pages.
                   This report focuses on the importance of quality early care and education, emphasizing low-income children.
                   This report details the benefits of early child care and preschool education programs, defining what constitutes
                   ECE, and outlining its availability. The report spotlights a model early parenting program as well.
                   For more information about the Measuring Up series contact Texas KIDS COUNT, Pam Hormuth,
                   (512) 320-0222 / hormuth@cppp.org. These publications are available on-line at
                   http://www.cppp.org/kidscount/education/index.html.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                       15
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      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           “Nevada KIDS COUNT Action Guide: Supporting Children Is Everyone’s Business — Education Section.” Nevada KIDS
           COUNT. 3 pages.
                   As part of the larger Action Guide, this section on Education includes a general topic overview, key facts, and
                   an extensive chart which lists “issues in early care and education” and details “what’s happening and what
                   needs to happen.” For more information, contact Nevada KIDS COUNT, Marlys Morton,
                   (702) 368-1533 / nvkidscnt@aol.com. This publication is not available on-line.

           Ohio’s Fourth Grade Reading Guarantee: Helping Our “Hidden” Children Succeed. Children’s Defense Fund – Ohio.
           May 2000: 14 pages.
                   This report, the third in the New Faces series, examines the trend of Ohio fourth-graders who are failing their
                   reading proficiency tests by large margins. The publication couples solid data with engaging profiles of children
                   to demonstrate the lack of attention paid to the skill deficits. In Ohio, 20,000 fourth-grade children were
                   unable to read a few paragraphs and then write about what they had read. Another 30,000 fourth-graders who
                   failed the test by a smaller margin likely could have passed with some additional help. This leads to the “fourth
                   grade reading guarantee” — a commitment by Ohio leaders to provide the help that children need to read at
                   grade level by fourth grade – and emphasizes the need to identify and help the hidden youngsters while ensur-
                   ing that schools provide effective reading instruction for all children. For more information, contact Ohio KIDS
                   COUNT, David Norris, (614) 221-2244 / dnorris@cdfohio.org. The publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.cdfohio.org/New_Faces/4th_Grade_Reading/Default.htm.

           Rural & Urban Utah: A Public Education Statistical Guide. Utah Children. August 1997: 8 pages.
                   This statistical brief provides a few indicators which reflect the status of public education in rural and urban
                   Utah against comparable national figures. The brief provides statistical information on relative enrollment, per
                   pupil expenditures, income, poverty, and educational attainment, national school meals programs participation,
                   test scores, and dropouts. For more information, contact Utah KIDS COUNT, Terry Haven,
                   (801) 364-1182 / terryh@utahchildren.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           HEALTH CARE

           Childhood Lead Poisoning. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. February 1997: 7 pages.
                   This issue brief looks at the problem of childhood lead poisoning in Rhode Island. The piece provides data on
                   who is being exposed to lead, discusses ways of addressing the needs of children exposed to lead, describes
                   elements of a comprehensive strategy to reduce childhood lead poisoning, and outlines promising strategies
                   that Rhode Island is using to prevent lead poisoning. For more information, contact Rhode Island KIDS
                   COUNT, Elizabeth Burke Bryant, (401) 351-9400 / ebb@rikidscount.org. This publication is not available
                   on-line. Other publications are available at http://www.rikidscount.org/ridata.html.

           Children & Health: Adequate Health Care for North Dakota Children. North Dakota KIDS COUNT. July 2000: 6 pages.
                   This issue brief focuses on health care for children in North Dakota, including the number of uninsured chil-
                   dren, the cost of care, health care options for children, and how lack of care impacts kids. A special section on
                   Native American children and health care is presented to demonstrate the differences in services provided to
                   Native Americans in the state. For more information, contact North Dakota KIDS COUNT, Ann Lochner,
                   (701) 777-4086 / ann_lochner@mail.und.nodak.edu. This publication is not available on-line.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                   16
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      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Douglas County: Child Health Check. Voices for Children in Nebraska. October 1999: 21 pages.
                   This report offers a snapshot of the health of Douglas County, Nebraska children and youth, using indicators
                   critical to child health promotion. The report was prepared for Nebraska’s Child Health Clinics, which observe
                   child health problems in its clinics and assist in identifying emerging conditions or issues that require further
                   study. The report also raises awareness about the need for local data to assist communities in the appropriate
                   and timely analysis of child health problems for planning purposes. For more information, contact Nebraska
                   KIDS COUNT, Kathy Bigsby Moore, (402) 597-3100 / voices@uswest.net. This publication is not available
                   on-line.

           Health Care Access: The Right of All Maine Children. Maine Children’s Alliance. 4 pages.
                   This report combines vignettes spotlighting individual cases of uninsured children with a statistically supported
                   essay detailing problems with national and state-specific health care access. The report also provides some
                   suggestions for policies to expand coverage. For more information contact Maine KIDS COUNT, Lynn Davey,
                   (207) 623-1868 / ldavey@mekids.org. This publication is available at no cost on-line at
                   http://www.mekids.org/web/issuepapers/white.htm.

           Health Care Counts: Barriers to MC+ Coverage for St. Louis Children. Citizen’s for Missouri’s Children. 1999: 18 pages.
                   This report details the barriers families face in enrolling children in MC+, Missouri’s publicly funded health
                   insurance program for children. It identifies the ways in which the local community outreach and enrollment
                   efforts can mobilize to increase the number of children in St. Louis with health insurance. The publication also
                   examines state policies that are barriers to enrollment, and suggests solutions for policy. For more information,
                   please contact Missouri KIDS COUNT, Ruth Ehresman, (314) 644-2003 / ruth@fastrans.net. This publication
                   is not available on-line.

           KIDS COUNT In Brief: Issues Affecting Children and Families – The Issue: Uninsured Children. Advocates for Children
           and Youth. Maryland. December 1997.
                   This issue brief discusses the problem of children without health insurance in Maryland. The brief discusses the
                   impact on the community, reviews potential solutions, and reports on recent legislative action. For more
                   information, contact Maryland KIDS COUNT, Jennean Everett-Reynolds, (410) 547-9200 / kidscount@acy.org.
                   This publication is not available on-line.

           Mail-In Medicaid Enrollment: Reducing Barriers to Health Insurance for New Mexico’s Low-Income Children. New
           Mexico Advocates for Children and Families. August 2000: 4 pages.
                   This policy brief examines the variation in Medicaid enrollment across New Mexico’s counties as compared
                   with the eligibility by county and income level. Given the vast number of eligible children that remain
                   unenrolled in Medicaid, a mail-in Medicaid enrollment is recommended and analyzed for its fiscal benefits
                   and ease of operation. For more information, contact New Mexico KIDS COUNT, Kelly O’Donnell,
                   (505) 244-9505 / kodonnel@uswest.net. This publication is not available on-line.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                   17
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           Make Kids Count: Closing the Gap in Children’s Health Coverage. Children’s Action Alliance. Arizona. May 2000:
           46 pages.
                   This report discusses two inter-related trends affecting children’s health coverage in Arizona: a decrease in
                   coverage through private health insurance and an increase in eligibility for publicly funded coverage. Although
                   KidsCare, Arizona’s child health insurance program, has created opportunities for thousands more children to
                   obtain coverage, more than 300,000 Arizona children remain uninsured. For more information, contact
                   Arizona KIDS COUNT, Dana Naimark, (602) 263-0707 / dnaimark@azchildren.org. This publication is
                   available on-line at http://www.azchildren.org/.

           “Nevada KIDS COUNT Action Guide: Supporting Children is Everyone’s Business — Health Section.” Nevada KIDS
           COUNT. 2 pages.
                   As part of the larger Action Guide, this piece on health provides a topic overview, Nevada facts about
                   children’s health and health care coverage, and a section entitled “What’s Happening and What Needs to Be?”
                   For more information, contact Nevada KIDS COUNT, Marlys Morton, (702) 368-1533 / nvkidscnt@aol.com.
                   This publication is not available on-line.

           New Faces, Working Families: Child Health Insurance Works for Ohio Families. Children’s Defense Fund-Ohio.
           January 2000.
                   This report praises Ohio's success in enrolling more than 150,000 children in Healthy Start/Medicaid over
                   the past two years, but points to a dated and cumbersome application system as an unnecessary barrier to
                   enrollment. The report also details recommendations to improve the enrollment process. Profiles of four Ohio
                   working families whose children are enrolled in Healthy Start/Medicaid bring the successes and frustrations of
                   the program to life. For more information, contact Ohio KIDS COUNT, David Norris, (614)221-2244 /
                   dnorris@cdfohio.org. The publication and supplemental information including county enrollment figures and
                   projections are available on-line at http://www.cdfohio.org/new_faces/CHIP_2000/default.htm.

           Uninsured Children in Arkansas. Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families. July 2000: 4 pages.
                   This special report examines growth in Medicaid and ARKids First, the state-sponsored Medicaid expansion
                   program for Arkansas. Data are provided to illustrate the categories of eligibility and poverty guidelines for
                   Arkansas Medicaid, the breakdown of uninsured children by poverty status and the number of Arkansas
                   children by insured status within poverty groups. For more information, contact Arkansas KIDS COUNT
                   Amy Rossi, (501) 371-9678 / amyrossi@swbell.net. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.aradvocates.org/kidscount.

           Uninsured Children in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children. March 2000: 8 pages.
                   This special report documents Pennsylvania’s children who do not have health insurance, plus those who are
                   enrolled in the two publicly-funded health programs, CHIP and Medicaid. The report reveals that 258,000
                   Pennsylvania children do not have health insurance. Data is provided to demonstrate health insurance by
                   poverty status, the number of children with employer-based health coverage, total program enrollment,
                   and the number of uninsured children by program eligibility. For more information, contact Pennsylvania
                   KIDS COUNT, Diane Ollivier, (717) 236-5680 / dollivier@papartnerships.org. This publication is not
                   available on-line.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                     18
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      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Uninsured Children in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children. January 1998: 5 pages.
                   This report provides statistical data on Pennsylvania children without health insurance, including cuts by
                   poverty level and trends in coverage over time. The report also looks ahead by asking “What Next for
                   Pennsylvania’s Children.” For more information, contact Pennsylvania KIDS COUNT, Diane Ollivier,
                   (717) 236-5680 / dollivier@papartnerships.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           Uninsured Children: Working Poor Can’t Afford Basic Healthcare. VOICES for Alabama’s Children. December 1997.
                   This issue brief supplies numerical data on the number of uninsured children in Alabama and looks at who
                   these children are. The issue brief also discusses the consequences that lack of health insurance has for
                   children relative to routine care, preventative and basic care, and critical care. Florida’s child health plan,
                   Healthy Kids, is highlighted in the brief as well. For more information, contact Alabama KIDS COUNT,
                   Linda Tilly, (334) 213-2410/ vfac@mindspring.com. This publication is not available on-line.

           HUNGER

           Arkansas Ahead of Nation in Feeding Hungry. Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families. November 1999: 4 pages.
                   This brief analysis of food insecurity and hunger in Arkansas reports data on school feeding and food stamp
                   programs, as well as hunger statistics by race, ethnicity, household income, and composition of household. The
                   report also reviews the impact of food stamp participation after welfare reform. For more information, contact
                   Arkansas KIDS COUNT, Rich Huddleston, (501) 371-9678 / rhuddleston@aristotle.net. This
                   publication is not available on-line.

           Report on Child Hunger in Vermont: A Handbook for Action. Vermont Children’s Forum. June 1997: 21 pages.
                   This report attempts to define hunger, provide a description of its effects and extent, and to list resources that
                   provide supplemental food and nutrition for children and families. The report also contains a section entitled
                   “What You Can Do,” as well as a list of Vermont hunger-related organizations. For more information, contact
                   Vermont KIDS COUNT, Carlen Finn, (802) 229-6377 / vtcyf@together.net. This publication is not available
                   on-line.

           JUVENILE JUSTICE / JUVENILE CRIME

           Juvenile Violent Crime: How Bad Is It? VOICES for Alabama’s Children. April 1997.
                   This issue brief addresses state policymakers’ failed attempt to reduce juvenile violent crime by increasing the
                   number of juveniles transferred to the adult court system. By providing statistics about juvenile violent crime in
                   Alabama and highlighting successful strategies to reduce occurrence, this document attempts to discuss why
                   policy makers’ attempts to effect change have failed. For more information, contact Alabama KIDS COUNT,
                   Linda Tilly, (334) 213-2410/ vfac@mindspring.com. This publication is not available on-line.

           Kids and Guns: A Deadly Combination. New Mexico Advocates for Children & Families. February 2000: 4 pages.
                   This brief examines child deaths as a result of firearm injury in New Mexico. New Mexico has one of the high-
                   est child and teen death rates in the country, as well as one of the highest firearm death rates in the nation for
                   children under age 19. For more information, contact New Mexico KIDS COUNT, Kelly O’Donnell,
                   (505) 244-9505 / kodonnel@uswest.net. This publication is not available on-line.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                      19
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           “Nevada KIDS COUNT Action Guide: Supporting Children is Everyone’s Business — Juvenile Justice Section.” Nevada
           KIDS COUNT. 2 pages.
                   As part of the larger Action Guide, this section on juvenile justice includes a topic overview focusing on the
                   issue of juvenile violence, key facts about juvenile crime, and sections on “what’s happening and what needs
                   to be done” and “four effective strategies for stopping juvenile violence.” For more information, contact
                   Marlys Morton, (702) 368-1533 / nvkidscnt@aol.com. This publication is not available on-line.

           Safe School Push-Outs: The Impact of the Safe and Drug-Free Schools Act on Youth, Families, and Public Safety. Utah
           Children. February 1997: 8 pages.
                   This issue brief examines how children, particularly minorities and those from low-income families, are faring
                   under the Safe and Drug-Free Schools Act, which gives administrators the power to remove potentially threat-
                   ening students. The brief provides statistical information on which children are being expelled, discusses the
                   long-term impact of expulsion, and suggests possible solutions. For more information, contact Utah KIDS
                   COUNT, Terry Haven, (801) 364-1182 / terryh@utahchildren.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           Troubled and Troubling Youth. Child and Family Policy Center. Iowa. April 1997: 9 pages.
                   This report examines recent trends in the Iowa juvenile justice system. It reviews juvenile justice programs for
                   youth and discusses policy options available to Iowa’s lawmakers. For more information, contact Iowa
                   KIDS COUNT, Mike Crawford, (515) 280-9027 / mcrawford@cfpciowa.org. To order publications, go to
                   http://www.cfpciowa.org/kc_publications.htm.

           A Unified Family Law System for Utah. Utah Children. April 1999: 11 pages.
                   This issue brief analyzes whether or not Utah should create a family court system and what its impact would
                   be on children and families within the state. In this report, the current structure for family law in Utah is
                   compared with the way in which a family court system would function. In addition, the recommendations of
                   the Utah Judicial Council are reviewed. For more information, please contact Utah KIDS COUNT,
                   Terry Haven, (801) 364-1182 / terryh@utahchildren.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           MENTAL HEALTH

           Children’s Mental Health in Utah. Utah Children. November 1999: 16 pages.
                   This issue brief provides an overview of the mental health problems of children and adolescents in Utah, some
                   recommendations for coordinating services and systems of care, and a review of the barriers to improving
                   mental health in Utah. The report then articulates a set of action steps that stakeholders can take to improve
                   children’s mental health. For more information, please contact Utah KIDS COUNT, Terry Haven,
                   (801) 364-1182 / terryh@utahchildren.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           Emotional and Behavioral Problems Among Washington’s Children. Human Services Policy Center. Washington.
           August 2000: 4 pages.
                   Using data from the Urban Institute’s National Survey of America’s Families, Washington KIDS COUNT
                   produced this report on symptoms of serious emotional and behavioral problems exhibited by the children of
                   surveyed parents. A multivariate statistical analysis of the NSAF data produced an examination of the factors of
                   internal and external distress relative to the emotional well-being of Washington’s children. For more
                   information, contact Washington KIDS COUNT, Hoai Tran, (206) 221-3370 / hhtran@u.washington.edu.
                   This publication is available on-line at http://www.hspc.org.

           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                    20
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      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           MINORITIES AND ISSUES OF DIVERSITY

           African-American Children in Texas. Center for Public Policy Priorities. June 1997: 112 pages.
                   This report profiles the status of African-American children in Texas through statistical and interview-generated
                   data. Issues relating to the health, education, economic status, and social well-being of African American
                   children are discussed, and policy recommendations which could potentially improve the status of
                   African-American children in these areas are made. For more information, contact Texas KIDS COUNT,
                   Pam Hormuth, (512) 320-0222 / hormuth@cppp.org. Publication is available at no cost on-line at
                   http://www.cppp.org/kidscount/publications.html.

           Data on Diversity: What to Do About the Numbers? Child and Family Policy Center. Iowa. March 2000: 11 pages.
                   This special report focuses on the issue of racial diversity in Iowa as it relates to child and family well-being.
                   In recent years, ethnicity has taken on a greater significance in describing the state’s challenges and opportuni-
                   ties. By examining indicators of child well-being by race and ethnicity, these data will contribute to increased
                   dialogues on diversity and how the State can respond to ensure the well-being of all Iowa’s children. For more
                   information, contact Michael Crawford, Iowa KIDS COUNT, at (515) 280-9027 / mcrawford@cfpciowa.org.
                   To order publications, go to http://www.cfpciowa.org/kc_publications.htm.

           The Facts of Life for Children of Color in Washington State. Human Services Policy Center. Washington. April 2000:
           52 pages.
                   Washington KIDS COUNT and the Children's Alliance, a statewide children's advocacy organization, released
                   this report to draw attention to how Washington and its communities are failing to meet the needs of children
                   of color. While most are healthy and succeeding, far too many lag in academic achievement, live in dangerous
                   neighborhoods, and lack economic support. The report dispels common myths about children and families of
                   color and offers effective ways to pinpoint problems and meet needs while building on community assets.
                   To view a copy of the full report, go to http://www.hspc.org and click on “HSPC publications” to order a
                   copy. For more information, contact Washington KIDS COUNT, (206) 685-7613.

           One in Three: Trends, Challenges, and Opportunities Facing Hispanic Families in Arizona. Children’s Action Alliance.
           Arizona. January 1999: 40 pages.
                   This report combines demographic data, an analysis of Hispanics and employment, and a review of the servic-
                   es that would benefit Hispanic families in Arizona. For more information, contact Arizona KIDS COUNT,
                   Dana Naimark, (602) 266-0707 / dnaimark@azchildren.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           PREVENTION

           Preventive Factors: Promising and Proven Practices. Center for Business and Economic Research. University of Nevada,
           Las Vegas. September 2000: 2 pages.
                   This brief includes a set of recommendations for prevention, based upon research and promising practices.
                   The indicators highlighted include: low birth weight, infant mortality, poverty, teen pregnancy, high school
                   dropouts, child deaths, child abuse and neglect, juvenile violent crime, teen deaths, and teen suicide. For more
                   information, contact Nevada KIDS COUNT, Marlys Morton, (702) 895-3191 / kidscount@nevada.edu.
                   This publication is available on-line at http://kidscount.unlv.edu/#pubs.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                    21
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           POVERTY

           Alabama KIDS COUNT Issue Brief: Children in Poverty. VOICES for Alabama’s Children. February 1998.
                   This issue brief examines some causes and effects of child poverty and suggests potential solutions to the
                   problems of poor children. Also included is a county-by-county estimate of the number and percent of poor
                   both for total population and children aged 5 to 17. For more information, contact Alabama KIDS COUNT,
                   Linda Tilly, (334) 213-2410/ vfac@mindspring.com. This publication is not available on-line.

           Barely Getting By: Wisconsin’s Working Poor Families. Joint Report of the Center on Wisconsin Strategy, the Institute for
           Wisconsin’s Future, and the Wisconsin Council on Children and Families. July 2000: 24 pages.
                   This report documents key factors affecting the largely invisible segment of Wisconsin’s workforce – the work-
                   ing poor. Using labor market and wage data, as well as profiles of families, this report documents the surge in
                   poverty-wage jobs in Wisconsin over the past 20 years, and its impact on workers and their families. For more
                   information, contact Wisconsin KIDS COUNT, Martha Cranley, (608) 284-0580 / mcranley@wccf.org.
                   This publication is not yet available on-line.

           Childhood Poverty in Rhode Island: A Statistical Profile. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. November 1999: 6 pages.
                   This issue brief provides a statistical profile of poor children in Rhode Island by presenting answers to
                   commonly asked questions about childhood poverty. Charts and graphs are presented to illustrate key facts
                   about poor children in the state. For more information contact Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Elizabeth Burke
                   Bryant, (401) 351-9400 / ebb@rikidscount.org. This publication is not yet available on-line.

           Expanding the Low Income Comprehensive Tax Rebate (LICTR): A Cost-Effective Strategy to Lift Children Out of Poverty
           in New Mexico. New Mexico Advocates for Children and Families. June 2000: 4 pages.
                   Given that one-third of New Mexico’s children live in poverty, this policy brief focuses on a cost-effective
                   solution to this severe problem. In this brief, existing tax policies are evaluated and others are recommended,
                   utilizing a cost-benefit analysis. For more information, contact New Mexico KIDS COUNT, Kelly O’Donnell,
                   (505) 244-9505 / kodonnel@uswest.net. This publication is not yet available on-line.

           Kansas Families: Poverty Despite Work. Kansas Action for Children. 1998: 13 pages.
                   This report discusses child poverty and the working poor and evaluates the success of welfare reform in Kansas.
                   Sections of the report describe characteristics of working poor families with children, economic trends con-
                   tributing to poverty among the working poor, and policy options designed to alleviate child poverty and assist
                   working poor families. For more information, contact Kansas KIDS COUNT, Gary Brunk, (785) 232-0550 /
                   brunk@kac.org. This publication is not available on-line. Other publications can be found at
                   http://www.kac.org.

           KIDS COUNT Today: Children in Poverty. KIDS COUNT in Delaware. April 2000: 4 pages.
                   This news brief addresses one of the most challenging issues regarding children — the high rate of child pover-
                   ty. In an effort to help Delaware address this issue, the report focuses on the causes of poverty and what actions
                   some states have taken to help reduce their child poverty rates. For more information, contact KIDS COUNT
                   in Delaware, Terry Schooley, (302) 831-4966 / terrys@udel.edu. This publication is not available on-line.
                   Other publications are available at http://www.dekidscount.org/.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                   22
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           “Nevada KIDS COUNT Action Guide: Supporting Children Is Everyone’s Business — Economic Well-Being Section.”
           Nevada KIDS COUNT. 2 pages.
                   As part of the larger Action Guide, this piece provides a general topic overview on poverty, including indicators
                   that put children at risk for poor outcomes. The document lists model programs and action ideas aimed at
                   improving the economic well-being of the state’s children. For more information, contact Nevada KIDS
                   COUNT, Marlys Morton, (702) 368-1533 / nvkidscnt@aol.com. This publication is not available on-line.

           Poverty and Poetry: The Voices of New Mexico’s Children and Youth. New Mexico Advocates for Children and Families.
           May 1996: 114 pages.
                   This book grew out of a state-wide poetry and essay contest conducted by New Mexico Advocates for Children
                   and Families, in which students in grades kindergarten through twelve were encouraged to voice their concerns
                   about and impressions of poverty in New Mexico. The resulting publication contains over 120 entries from
                   poets in grades two through twelve. For more information, contact New Mexico KIDS COUNT, Kelly
                   O’Donnell, (505) 244-9505 / kodonnel@uswest.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           Poverty Despite Work in Kentucky. Kentucky Youth Advocates. April 1999: 35 pages.
                   This report, produced in collaboration with the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, discusses the plight of
                   the working poor in Kentucky. The report highlights several policies that Kentucky can establish to reduce
                   poverty among working families with children. For more information, contact Kentucky KIDS COUNT,
                   Debra Miller, (502) 875-4865 / dmiller@kyyouth.org. This publication is available at no cost on-line at
                   http://www.cbpp.org/4-7-99sfp.htm.

           Working – But Still Poor in New Jersey. Association for Children of New Jersey. September 1999: 17 pages.
                   Even in the best economic times New Jersey has ever seen, too many children live in poverty. This special
                   report examines why so many children continue to live in poverty, even as more parents move off welfare rolls
                   and as unemployment is at an all-time low. The report provides critical information about what it means to be
                   working but poor and how federal and state policies are attempting to assist this group of working poor
                   families. For more information, contact New Jersey KIDS COUNT, Eloisa Hernandez, (973) 643-3876 /
                   eloisa@acnj.org. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.acnj.org/Information_Data.htm#Working_But_Poor.

           Working Families: The New Face of Child Poverty in Ohio. Children’s Defense Fund-Ohio. September 1999: 14 pages.
                   Although most poor children in Ohio live in a household with one working parent, there are numerous
                   struggles that those parents face which impact the economic stability of the children. This report focuses on the
                   fact that many working parents are in jobs that pay too much for them to qualify for basic social services, but
                   not enough for them to pay for housing, food, health care, and child care. For more information, contact
                   Ohio KIDS COUNT, David Norris, (614) 221-2244 / dnorris@cdfohio.org. This publication is available
                   on-line at http://www.cdfohio.org/new_faces/Default.htm.

           “Working Poor.” Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families. March 1999: 1 page.
                   This edition of “State’s Families Still Struggling Despite Work” reports findings of the U.S. Census Bureau’s
                   Current Population Survey, focusing on data, statistics, and trends concerning poor families and children.
                   For more information, contact Arkansas KIDS COUNT, Amy Rossi, (501) 371-9678 / amyrossi@swbell.net.
                   This publication is available at no cost on-line at http://www.aradvocates.org. Click on “hot issues” and
                   then “state fiscal tax initiative.”


           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                      23
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egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
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verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
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hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           PROGRAM RESOURCES AND DATA GUIDES

           A Directory of Information Sources About Children and Families. Action Alliance for Virginia’s Children and Youth.
           2000: 16 pages.
                   This directory is intended as a resource for accessing information on children and families in Virginia. Each of
                   the listings has been researched in order to provide users with a summary of the type of information available
                   from each source, contact information, and any schedule or fee conditions associated with accessing the
                   information. For more information, contact Virginia KIDS COUNT, Lisa Wood, (804) 649-0184 /
                   lisa@vakids.org. This publication is available on-line at http://www.vakids.org.

           A Guide to Using Data for Effective Advocacy. Action Alliance for Virginia’s Children and Youth. 2000: 8 pages.
                   This guide was created to help those interested in child well-being to use data and information responsibly and
                   with the best possible outcome. The guide includes a glossary of data terms, information on how to find and
                   request data, as well as what to do with the data, and some tips on “things to keep in mind when using data.”
                   For more information, contact Virginia KIDS COUNT, Lisa Wood, (804) 649-0184 / lisa@vakids.org. This
                   publication is available on-line at http://www.vakids.org.

           New Mexico Advocates for Children and Families: Family of Projects. New Mexico Advocates for Children and
           Families. 11 pages.
                   This guide gives a brief one-page description of a variety of organizational programs which advocate for chil-
                   dren and families in New Mexico. All of the 11 community projects are described, including their purpose,
                   goals, methodology, history, funding source, and director. For more information, contact New Mexico KIDS
                   COUNT, Kelly O’Donnell, (505) 244-9505 / kodonnel@uswest.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           Programs That Help People in Connecticut. Connecticut Association for Human Services. October 1998: 52 pages.
                   A guide which attempts to give Connecticut residents an overview of federal, state, and local programs which
                   provide assistance to people throughout the state. Subjects covered include advocacy and information,
                   criminal justice, food and nutrition, health, housing, and income assistance programs. For more information,
                   contact Connecticut KIDS COUNT, Amy Sampson, (860) 951-2212 / amy.sampson@cahs.org. This publication
                   is available at no cost on-line at http://www.cahs.org/publications/orderform.html.

           School-Linked Services: Child Opportunity Zone (COZ) Family Centers. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. 28 pages.
                   This report, produced in partnership with the Education LAB at Brown University, is the first in a series of
                   reports focused on school-linked services, family support programs, and school/family/community partnerships
                   in Rhode Island. This report advocates school-linked services as a means to improve outcomes for children,
                   describes Rhode Island’s COZ Family Center initiative, and presents the current status of the initiative by
                   profiling programs. For more information, contact Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Elizabeth Burke Bryant,
                   (401) 351-9400 / ebb@rikidscount.org. This publication is not available on-line. Other publications are
                   available at http://www.rikidscount.org/ridata.html.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                     24
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                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           REGIONAL ISSUES

           Ending the Southern Deficit: Designing a Future for the South’s Children. March 1997: 74 pages.
                   Kentucky Youth Advocates and nine other southern KIDS COUNT partners collaborated on this report, which
                   documents the condition of Southern children. The report provides some explanations for the presence of a
                   “southern deficit,” and recommends steps that southern states can take to alleviate the poverty and neglect
                   which has consistently plagued the South’s children. For information, contact Kentucky Youth Advocates,
                   (502) 875-4865. This publication is not available on-line.

           SAFETY

           Teens and Motor Vehicle Crashes: Facts on Kids in South Dakota. Business Research Bureau. University of South
           Dakota. January 2000: 4 pages.
                   This issue brief takes an in-depth look at the indicator of teens and motor vehicle crashes, which is the major
                   cause of death for children and teens in South Dakota. South Dakota has implemented a new licensing law
                   which provides stricter levels of licensing than had ever existed before. Until recently, 14-year-olds were able
                   to drive under restricted hour conditions and without another licensed driver present or without the benefit of
                   driver education or instruction. For more information, please contact South Dakota KIDS COUNT, Carole
                   Cochran, (605) 677-5287 / ccochran@usd.edu. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.usd.edu/brbinfo/new_page_6.htm.

           Use of Child Restraint Systems & Adolescent Safety Belt Use. Business Research Bureau. University of South Dakota.
           August 2000: 4 pages.
                   This is the third in a series on Facts and Kids in South Dakota, focusing on the use of child restraint systems
                   and adolescent safety belts in the state. Using data and information from the S. Dakota Department of
                   Transportation, the S. Dakota CODES Project and the S. Dakota Coalition for Children, this brief outlines an
                   often overlooked cause of injury and death among children and teens. For more information, contact For
                   information, contact South Dakota KIDS COUNT, Carole Cochran (605) 677-5287 / ccochran@usd.edu.
                   This publication is available on-line at http://www.usd.edu/brbinfo/new_page_6.htm.

           SUBSTANCE ABUSE & TOBACCO

           Alcohol, Tobacco and Substance Abuse and Washington Children. Human Services Policy Center. January 1999:
           8 pages.
                   This report, prepared for the Washington Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse, presents data showing that
                   alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs pervade the lives of Washington’s parents and children at all ages. The data
                   indicates that the problem is so severe “as to set an expectation for children that substance abuse is part of the
                   normal routine of life.” However, the report also presents data showing the impact of preventing and treating
                   substance abuse. For more information, contact Washington KIDS COUNT, Richard Brandon at
                   (206) 685-7613 / brandon@u.washington.edu. The publication is available at no cost on-line at
                   http://hspc.org/publications.html.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                      25
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      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           “KIDS COUNT In Brief: Parental Substance Abuse.” Advocates for Children and Youth. Maryland. November 1999:
           2 pages.
                   This brief, the fourth in the series, focuses on promoting family preservation through treatment for parental
                   substance abuse. The publication examines data regarding children with substance abusing parents, the
                   number of children in out-of-home care, and whether substance abuse treatment works. Solutions are offered
                   to begin addressing these issues. For more information, contact Maryland KIDS COUNT, Jennean Everett-
                   Reynolds, (410) 547-9200 / kidscount@acy.org. To order the publication on-line, go to
                   http://www.acy.org/pub.htm.

           Kids Voices Count: Listening to Delaware’s Children Talk about Tobacco. KIDS COUNT in Delaware. 1998: 17 pages.
                   This report provides insight into the teen perspective on the subject of youth smoking and the use of tobacco
                   products by providing transcriptions and descriptions of interviews with high school and middle school
                   students by a high school journalism class. Anti-tobacco statistics and fact-briefs also appear throughout the
                   report. For more information, contact Delaware KIDS COUNT, Terry Schooley, (302) 831-4966 /
                   terrys@udel.edu. This publication is available on-line at http://www.dekidscount.org/KVCsmoking.html.

           No More Smoke Screens. Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families. May 1999: 1 page.
                   This bulletin describes the Arkansas Center for Health Improvement (ACHI) and Arkansas Department of Health
                   (ADH)’s tobacco prevention program proposals, which would be funded by the state’s 1998 lawsuit settlement
                   with the U.S. tobacco industry. The bulletin also includes statistical data on the health costs of tobacco use and
                   facts about kids and tobacco. For more information, contact Arkansas KIDS COUNT, Amy Rossi,
                   (501) 371-9678 / amyrossi@swbell.net. This publication is available at no cost on-line at
                   www.aradvocates.org. Click on “hot issues” and then “KIDS COUNT Bulletins.”

           Policies to Assist At-Risk or Runaway, Chemically Dependent Youth. Human Services Policy Center. Washington.
           October 1999: 12 pages.
                   This publication focuses on the enacted “Becca Bill,” which created special procedures to admit certain
                   chemically-dependent youth to residential treatment facilities. The report examines the initial experiences with
                   intensive residential care and considers implications for public policy. For more information, contact
                   Washington KIDS COUNT, Richard Brandon at (206) 685-7613 / brandon@u.washington.edu. The
                   publication is not available on-line.

           Teens and Smoking: Facts on Kids in South Dakota. Business Research Bureau. University of South Dakota. April 2000:
           4 pages.
                   This second brief in the series Facts on Kids in South Dakota examines data from the South Dakota Youth
                   Tobacco Survey Report 1999, the South Dakota Youth Risk Behavior Survey Report 1999, and the South Dakota
                   Tobacco-Free Network. The report provides information on tobacco addiction by teens in the state, the costs
                   associated with such addictions, profiles of middle and high school students, and judicial and legislative
                   actions taken to address the problem. For more information, please contact South Dakota KIDS COUNT,
                   Carole Cochran, (605) 677-5287 / ccochran@usd.edu. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.usd.edu/brbinfo/new_page_6.htm.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                     26
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       1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           “Tobacco Settlement Notes.” Citizen’s for Missouri’s Children. 1999: 1 page each.
                   This series of four fact sheets provides information on the Master Tobacco Settlement Agreement of which
                   Missouri is a part — and the attempt to settle the states’ claims against the tobacco industry. Each fact sheet
                   focuses on a different aspect of the settlement’s progress within Missouri, with particular attention given to how
                   children’s programs could benefit from the settlement. “Tobacco Settlement at a Glance,” “Missouri Expected to
                   Receive $6.7 billion,” “Overview of State Proposals,” and “Tobacco Settlement – Update on Finalized Plans”
                   are among the titles. For more information, please contact Missouri KIDS COUNT, Beth Griffin, (314) 647-
                   2003 / mbgrif@fastrans.net. These publications are not available on-line.

           TRENDS

           County, State and Nation: Trends in the Well-Being of Iowa Children, 1997-1998. Child and Family Policy Center. Iowa.
           April 2000: 19 pages.
                   This report is intended to be a supplement to a report by the same name, published in 1999, marking trends in
                   child well-being from 1980-1996. Included in this report are national, state and county trend data from
                   1997-1998 on key health, education and welfare indicators. Several indicators showed improvement, including
                   infant mortality, births to 16-17 year olds, teen unmarried births, child abuse and neglect, high school gradua-
                   tion, child deaths, and teen violent deaths. For more information, please contact Iowa KIDS COUNT, Mike
                   Crawford at (515) 280-9027 / mcrawford@cfpciowa.org. The full 19-year trend data, on a county-by-county
                   basis, are available on-line at http://www.cfpciowa.org.

           South Dakota KIDS COUNT Trend Report. Business Research Bureau. University of South Dakota. Summer 1999:
           37 pages.
                   This trend report provides a picture of national data, comparing the US to South Dakota as well as South
                   Dakota to its bordering states using national indicators of child well-being. The report includes information on
                   trends in the national composite rank for South Dakota from 1990-1999 as well as data on five-year intervals
                   for the state of South Dakota and individual counties. For information, contact South Dakota KIDS COUNT,
                   Carole Cochran (605) 677-5287 / ccochran@usd.edu. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.usd.edu/brbinfo/brb/kc.

           VIOLENCE

           An Overview: Children and Violence. Action Alliance for Virginia’s Children and Youth. December 1999: 8 pages.
                   This brief report examines the lives of young people as they are affected by violence, particularly violence by
                   other youth. It outlines key risk factors for violence, and reviews data and solutions on violence-related topics
                   such as bullying, violence in schools, guns, violence in the media, family violence, gangs, and substance
                   abuse. For more information, contact Virginia KIDS COUNT, Lisa Wood, (804) 649-0184 / lisa@vakids.org.
                   This publication is available on-line at http://www.vakids.org.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                    27
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      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Violence and Verse: The Voices of New Mexico’s Children and Youth. New Mexico Advocates for Children and
           Families. June 1997: 130 pages.
                   Growing out of the idea that children’s voices can speak honestly about pressing issues (first documented in
                   New Mexico’s publication entitled Poetry and Poverty), this book compiles entries from over 120 children in
                   elementary school through high school. Divided into sections on Youth Violence, Child Abuse and Domestic
                   Violence, Racism and Hate Violence, and Violence and Fear, this book also provides some statistical data and
                   other information surrounding the topic of violence. For information, contact New Mexico KIDS COUNT,
                   Kelly O’Donnell, (505) 244-9505 / kodonnel@uswest.net. This publication is not available on-line.

           VOTER EDUCATION

           1998 Electoral Activities: A Toolkit for Action. Citizen’s for Missouri’s Children. 1998: 30 pages.
                   This toolkit provides information for organizations on how to arrange editorial board meetings, write op-eds,
                   and canvass kids to strengthen their electoral activities. The report also spotlights success stories. For more
                   information, contact Missouri KIDS COUNT, Ruth Ehresman, (314) 647-2003 / ruth@fastrans.net. This
                   publication is not available on-line.

           Children ’98: Be Informed. North Dakota KIDS COUNT. 1998: 8 pages.
                   Designed to help citizens talk with candidates and decision-makers about children’s issues, this issue brief
                   highlights circumstances that directly affect North Dakota children and families. The report lists statistical facts
                   about North Dakota children, and provides voters with potential questions, visions, and messages to convey to
                   candidates on the issues of health, education, abuse/neglect, child care, at-risk youth, poverty, and economic
                   development. For more information, contact North Dakota KIDS COUNT, Ann Lochner, (701) 777-4086 /
                   ann_lochner@mail.und.nodak.edu. This publication is not available on-line.

           WELFARE

           Breaking the Cycle. Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families. July 1999: 42 pages.
                   Arkansas KIDS COUNT’s look at welfare reform, offering information about the state’s Transitional Employment
                   Assistance (TEA) program through data and true-life stories of recipients. For information or a copy, contact
                   Arkansas KIDS COUNT, Julie C. Robbins, (501) 371-9678 / jrobbins@aristotle.net. This publication is
                   available at no cost on-line at http://www.aradvocates.org/welfarereform.

           Children of Welfare Reform: Is There a Safety Net? Kansas Action for Children. October 1998: 9 pages.
                   This report examines how Kansas is faring two years after welfare reform, particularly in terms of child poverty
                   indicators. The report discusses the lack of available data regarding welfare leavers and makes recommen-
                   dations for strengthening the safety net intended to protect Kansas’ children from extreme poverty. For more
                   information, contact Kansas KIDS COUNT, Gary Brunk, (785) 232-0550 / brunk@kac.org. This publication is
                   available at no cost at http://www.kac.org/safetynet.htm.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                      28
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      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           KIDS COUNT In Brief: Issues Affecting Children and Families in Maryland – The Issue: Welfare to Work. Advocates for
           Children and Youth. Maryland. January 1998.
                   This issue brief focuses on welfare reform — reporting on the current status of welfare reform in Maryland,
                   discussing Maryland’s employment growth and job opportunities, and offering recommendations for a solution.
                   For more information, contact Maryland KIDS COUNT, Jennean Everett-Reynolds, (410) 547-9200 /
                   kidscount@acy.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           Postsecondary Education: Wisconsin Tells Parents in Poverty: “You Don’t Need No Book Larnin’.” Wisconsin Council on
           Children and Families. January 2000: 4 pages.
                   This issue brief, the third in the Working and Poor in Wisconsin series, focuses on the importance of restoring
                   access to post-secondary education to welfare recipients. In Wisconsin, the new welfare program, W-2, places
                   much greater emphasis on work than on education, yet research has shown that the most effective welfare-to-
                   work programs are those with a flexible, individualized approach mixing job search skills, education, job
                   training, and work in support of a specific employment goal. For more information, contact Wisconsin KIDS
                   COUNT, Martha Cranley, (608) 284-0580 / mcranley@wccf.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           Reality Check: How Children Are Faring Under Welfare Reform in Kentucky. Kentucky Youth Advocates. April 1999:
           25 pages.
                   This report serves as a layperson’s guide to welfare reform in Kentucky, with different sections explaining the
                   components of Kentucky Transitional Assistance (K-TAP) law, a policy and implementation analysis, and
                   recommendations. Also included is AA Reality Check: An Insider’s Point of View,” a compilation of stories
                   collected from low-income workers and families in Kentucky. For more information, contact Kentucky KIDS
                   COUNT, Valerie Salley, (502) 895-8167 / vsalley@kyyouth.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           Struggle for Self-Sufficiency: Impact of Welfare Reform on Families with Children in Kansas. Kansas Action for Children.
           September 2000: 33 pages.
                   This report, the result of a two-year collaboration between Kansas Action for Children and United Way
                   Association of Kansas, seeks to paint the picture of the impact of welfare reform on children and families. For
                   the first time, data from national and state studies are combined with survey results conducted by United Way
                   and United Community Services of Johnson County. For more information, contact Kansas KIDS COUNT,
                   Gary Brunk, (785) 232-0550 / brunk@kac.org. This publication is not available on-line.

           Watching Welfare: A Special Report Series on Implementing Reform. Children’s Defense Fund-Minnesota. Winter 2000:
           4 pages.
                   This special report on welfare is derived from in-depth interviews with staff of human service organizations in
                   Minnesota. The report focuses on the front-line work of welfare reform, reflecting workers’ experience in assist-
                   ing clients with housing, jobs, child care, family violence, health care, transportation, and immigration. Survey
                   respondents answered questions about the implementation of the Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP
                   - Minnesota’s welfare reform law) and how the program is and is not working for the people it serves. For more
                   information, contact Minnesota KIDS COUNT, Diane Benjamin, (612) 870-3670 /
                   benjamin@cdf-mn.org. This publication is available on-line at http://www.cdf-mn.org.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                      29
 22
 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
  15
                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
  12

                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           “Welfare Reform and SSI: The Effects.” Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families. September 1999: 2 pages.
                   This brief report focuses on the increased number of Arkansas children receiving Supplemental Security Income
                   (SSI), cash benefits to low-income families who have children with disabilities, in the wake of welfare reform.
                   After Arkansas became the focus of national attention for its significant increases in the number of children
                   receiving SSI in 1995, a national effort was launched to alter how children qualified for SSI benefits. This report
                   documents the changes that resulted in SSI and the potential causes of the increased number of Arkansas
                   children receiving these benefits. For more information contact Arkansas KIDS COUNT, Paul Kelly,
                   (501) 371-9678 / pkelly@aristotle.net. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.aradvocates.org/welfarereform.

           Welfare Reform in Kansas: Snapshots of Children and Their Families. Kansas Action for Children. March 1999:
           17 pages.
                   This report takes a behind-the-scenes look at early evidence of child and family well-being under the
                   Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Act. The report provides background information on TANF,
                   as well as information on poverty’s impact on children. For more information, contact Kansas KIDS COUNT,
                   Gary Brunk, (785) 232-0550 / brunk@kac.org. This publication is available at no cost at
                   http://www.kac.org/snapshot.htm.

           Welfare Reform in Wyoming B Is it Working? Part I: “The Face of Wyoming’s Welfare Reform.” Wyoming Children’s
           Action Alliance. September 1998: 12 pages.
                   In this report, the changes in caseloads, child protection rates, the number of public assistance applications,
                   and child protection services are examined in light of welfare reform in Wyoming. For more information,
                   contact Wyoming KIDS COUNT, Kathy Emmons, (307) 635-2272 / kemmons@trib.com. This publication is
                   not available on-line.

           Welfare Reform: Options for Change. Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families. December 1998: 15 pages.
                   This report lists the major recommendations developed by six subcommittees of the Welfare Reform Working
                   Group after their examination and evaluation of various welfare reform elements in Arkansas. The report aims
                   “to identify positive policy options to improve the ability of the [Transitional Employment Assistance] program
                   to serve low-income families...and help them achieve long-term economic self-sufficiency.” For more informa-
                   tion, contact Arkansas KIDS COUNT, Amy Rossi, (501) 371-9678 / amyrossi@swbell.net. This publication is
                   available at no cost on-line at http://www.aradvocates.org. Click on “hot issues” and then “welfare reform.”

           WELL-BEING

           How Are the Children?: Measures of Child Well-Being in Utah, 2000. Utah Children. January 2000: 45 pages.
                   This report examines measures of child well-being in Utah based upon five overarching goals for children.
                   The goals, defined jointly by Utah Children, the Utah Department of Health Child Indicators Project and the
                   F.A.C.T. (Families, Agencies, and Communities Together) Data Committee, focus on the health, safety,
                   education, and economic security of children’s lives. For more information, please contact Utah KIDS
                   COUNT, Terry Haven, (801) 364-1182 / terryh@utahchildren.net. This publication is not available on-line.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                      30
 22
 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
  15
                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
  12

                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Issues Affecting the Well-Being of Rhode Island’s Youngest Children. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT. December 1998.
                   This issue brief summarizes statistical data on ten issues affecting children under the age of six in Rhode Island.
                   The issue brief also includes a sidebar on child poverty in Rhode Island. For more information, contact Rhode
                   Island KIDS COUNT, Elizabeth Burke Bryant, (401) 351-9400 / ebb@rikidscount.org. This publication is not
                   available on-line. Other publications are available at http://www.rikidscount.org/ridata.html.

           Kids Voices Count: Listening to Delaware’s Children Talk About Factors for Success. KIDS COUNT in Delaware. 1999:
           18 pages.
                   This report provides insight into the teen perspective on success. High school journalism students conducted
                   interviews and wrote the articles which appear in this booklet. Information on “internal” and “external” assets
                   appears as sidebars throughout the booklet. For more information, contact Delaware KIDS COUNT, Terry
                   Schooley, (302) 831-4966 / terrys@udel.edu. This publication is not available on-line. Other publications are
                   available at http://www.dekidscount.org/.

           Looking Beyond the Numbers: Kansas Children’s Report Card and Briefing Book. Kansas Action for Children. 1998:
           32 pages.
                   This report is intended as a “user-friendly evaluation of child well-being that helps…look beyond the numbers.”
                   This report rates Kansas according to its performance on matters such as safety and security, health, education,
                   the teen years, and child care. Comprehensive data around these benchmarks is included in the report.
                   For more information, contact Kansas KIDS COUNT, Gary Brunk, (785) 232-0550 / brunk@kac.org.
                   This publication is not available on-line. Other publications can be found at http://www.kac.org.

           Trends in Child Well-Being: Michigan and the U.S. 1985-1995. Michigan League for Human Services. 1998.
                   This brochure summarizes annual trends of selected statistical data for the state’s infants, children and teens
                   from the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s. For information, contact Michigan KIDS COUNT, Jane Zehnder-
                   Merrell, (517) 487-5436 / zehnder3@pilot.msu.edu. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.milhs.org/publica.htm.

           The Well-Being of Children and Youth is Everyone’s Business. Nevada KIDS COUNT. Center for Business and Economic
           Research. University of Nevada, Las Vegas. August 2000: 4 pages.
                   This brief guide is designed to help citizens become familiar with the information provided by the Nevada
                   KIDS COUNT project and how it can help formulate questions about how children’s issues are being
                   addressed. For more information, contact Nevada KIDS COUNT, Marlys Morton, (702) 895-3191 /
                   kidscount@nevada.edu. This publication is available on-line at http://kidscount.unlv.edu/#pubs.

           YOUNG ADULTS

           “Florida’s Teen Mothers: 1996 Data.” Center for the Study of Children’s Futures. University of South Florida. 1996:
           1 page.
                   This flyer, produced and distributed with the national KIDS COUNT Special Report, When Teens Have Sex:
                   Issues and Trends, reports data such as age-specific birth indicators by county, female fertility rates, and both
                   total births and unwed teen births. For more information, contact Florida KIDS COUNT, Susan Weitzel,
                   (813) 974-7411 / weitzel@hal.fmhi.usf.edu. This publication is not available on-line.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                        31
 22
 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
  15
                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
  12

                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           The Kansas Teen Report. Kansas Action for Children. September 1999: 24 pages.
                   This publication reports on the educational, economic, safety and health-related issues pertaining specifically
                   to adolescents in Kansas. It reviews how teens are meeting the challenges they face and contains some positive
                   findings about the direction in which Kansas youth are heading. For more information, contact Gary Brunk,
                   (785) 232-0550 / brunk@kac.org. The publication is not yet available on-line. Other publications can be
                   found at http://www.kac.org.

           Kids Voices Count: Delaware Teenagers Talk to Each Other about Sex and Teen Pregnancy. KIDS COUNT in Delaware.
           1997: 13 pages.
                   This report offers the teen perspective on sex and teenage pregnancy by including the results of peer interviews
                   conducted by high school journalism students. Facts on different aspects of teen sex and pregnancy also appear
                   throughout the booklet. For more information, contact Delaware KIDS COUNT, Terry Schooley,
                   (302) 831-4966 / terrys@udel.edu. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.dekidscount.org/KVCsex.html.

           Teens and Motor Vehicle Crashes: Facts on Kids in South Dakota. Business Research Bureau. University of South
           Dakota. January 2000: 4 pages.
                   This issue brief takes an in-depth look at the indicator of teens and motor vehicle crashes, which is the major
                   cause of death for children and teens in South Dakota. South Dakota has implemented a new licensing law
                   which provides stricter levels of licensing than had ever existed before. Until recently, 14-year-olds were able
                   to drive under restricted hour conditions and without another licensed driver present or without the benefit of
                   driver education or instruction. For more information, please contact South Dakota KIDS COUNT,
                   Carole Cochran, (605) 677-5287 / ccochran@usd.edu. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.usd.edu/brbinfo/new_page_6.htm.

           Teens and Smoking: Facts on Kids in South Dakota. Business Research Bureau. University of South Dakota. April 2000:
           4 pages.
                   This second brief in the series Facts on Kids in South Dakota examines data from the South Dakota Youth
                   Tobacco Survey Report 1999, the South Dakota Youth Risk Behavior Survey Report 1999, and the South Dakota
                   Tobacco-Free Network. The report provides information on tobacco addiction by teens in the state, the costs
                   associated with such addictions, profiles of middle and high school students, and judicial and legislative
                   actions taken to address the problem. For more information, please contact South Dakota KIDS COUNT,
                   Carole Cochran, (605) 677-5287 / ccochran@usd.edu. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.usd.edu/brbinfo/new_page_6.htm.

           Teen Births: A County-By-County Factbook. Children’s Defense Fund-Ohio. 1998: 102 pages.
                   This report, the second in the For Children For Ohio’s Future series, provides the most recently available data
                   (from 1996) on teen births in Ohio. Data on teen births is broken down into 12 indicators which can serve as
                   benchmarks for future data comparison. For information or a copy, contact Ohio KIDS COUNT,
                   David Norris, (614) 221-2244 / dnorris@cdfohio.org. The publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.cdfohio.org/ohiodata/Default.htm.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                   32
 22
 ean median mode percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcomes multivariate analys
  21
  20

egression standard deviation standard error confidence interval public accountability trends 3-year averages 5-yea
  19
  18
  17
verages strategic communications univariate bivariate media campaigns sampling chi-square correlation bar graph
  16
  15
                                                                               A KIDS COUNT NETWORK PUBLICATION
  14
hart mapping data distribution framing scatterplot estimate ratio public opinion significance level t-test z-scor
  13
  12

                               median mode 1994 1995 1996
 essage development mean 1990 1991 1992 1993 percent public awareness rate frequency cross-tabulation positive outcome
      1985 1986 1987 1988 1989




           Teen Childbearing, Single Parenting and Society’s Future. Child and Family Policy Center. Iowa. Winter 1995: 7 pages.
                   This report examines the trends and consequences of teen childbearing, especially in light of the rise in births
                   to non-married women. The report also names a number of intervention strategies which have been designed to
                   reduce or prevent teen pregnancy. For more information, contact Iowa KIDS COUNT, Mike Crawford,
                   (515) 280-9027 / mcrawford@cfpciowa.org. This publication is available on-line at
                   http://www.cfpciowa.org/publicat.htm.

           Young Adults in South Carolina: A Comprehensive Report on the Lives of South Carolinians Ages 18 to 29. South
           Carolina Budget and Control Board. January 2000: 65 pages.
                   This first edition report on young adults in South Carolina reports on their condition in terms of economics,
                   family, education, crime and health. Designed to be used as a background document, this unique report
                   provides a comprehensive examination of the essential elements of a transition from youth to adulthood. In the
                   spring of 2000, county reports will be produced to show indicators of the condition of young adults. The
                   county reports will be available at http://www.ors.state.sc.us. For more information, contact South Carolina
                   KIDS COUNT, S. Baron Holmes, (803) 734-2291 / bholmes@ogc.state.sc.us. This publication is not available
                   on-line.

           Youth Suicide. Center for the Study of Children’s Futures. University of South Florida. July 2000: 7 pages.
                   This brief focuses on suicide among Florida’s youth. It includes recent data and findings from the National
                   Institute of Mental Health, the National Center for Disease Control, the Florida Office of Vital Statistics, the
                   Florida Department of Education, the 1999 Florida Youth Suicide Prevention Study, and the National Survey of
                   America’s Families. For more information, contact Susan Weitzel, (813) 974-7411 / weitzel@hal.fmhi.usf.edu.
                   This publication is not available on-line.




           Appendix D—The KIDS COUNT Archive of Special Reports                                                                  33

								
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