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									           Revue de presse quotidienne Société Santé en Français
                                                     2011-12-13


Contents
  La nouvelle du jour : .............................................................................................. 2
  Terence Corcoran: The crisis no leader is talking about                                                                   2
  En campagne - Jour 12                                                                                                     5
  Tories hold 9-point national lead, but support softens in B.C.                                                            8
Section 3 : Santé......................................................................................................... 11
  APRIL 7TH IS WORLD HEALTH DAY 2011: "NO ACTION TODAY, NO 11
  CURE TOMORROW"
  Le Tamiflu au coeur d'une polémique                                                                                     13
  Apps Canadian-made app gives a voice to users who have difficulty speaking 16
Section 5 : Régions .................................................................................................... 19
 Ontario: les optométristes pourront prescrire des médicaments                                                            19
CHEO: Michel Bilodeau prendra sa retraite en novembre                                                                     20
Vibrant and equitable communities provide the foundation for good health,                                                 21
nurses say




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La nouvelle du jour :
Terence Corcoran: The crisis no leader is talking about
Terence Corcoran Apr 6, 2011 – 10:53 PM ET | Last Updated: Apr 6, 2011 10:55 PM
ET

Into the vacuous open pit of policy trivialities that has become this election, David
Dodge, former governor of the Bank of Canada, has just dropped a ticking time bomb.
The Canadian universal health care model, with governments as the major funders of
service, is fiscally unsustainable.

If the election platforms of the major parties are an indication, no Liberal or Conservative
bomb squads will be available to neutralize Mr. Dodge’s device — a tidy bit of
forecasting titled Chronic Healthcare Spending Disease.
Mr. Dodge reports that health-care spending in Canada could rise to take up almost 19%
of the national economy within 20 years, up from about 12% today.

In dollar terms, that works out to an increase from about $5,000 today to $10,700 by
2031 in constant dollars for every person in Canada. If Election 2011 is being fought over
family values, how’s this for dinner-table political chat: Health-care costs for a family of
four will jump 50% to $42,800 within 20 years.

The political question from Mr. Dodge is: How are Canadian families going to pay for
these rising costs? He said Canadians cannot “sleepwalk” into the looming policy crisis
on the assumption that no changes will be needed to the health-care model they hold so
dear — a model that our electioneering politicians refuse to talk about beyond empty
platitudes. “We’ll strengthen universally accessible health care,” says Liberal leader
Michael Ignatieff in a platform that contains nothing on how that might be done. Same
for Stephen Harper’s Conservatives.

In Mr. Dodge’s analysis, such evasions mask what is an impossible and unsustainable
funding regime.

Speaking at a Toronto luncheon for the C.D. Howe Institute, which published the report
— coauthored with former Bank of Canada economist Richard Dion as a part of a new
health care initiative — Mr. Dodge said the politicians elected on May 2 “are going to
have to face this issue.”

Mr. Dodge makes it easy to understand what the politicians are avoiding. Universal care
as Canadians now experience it cannot be maintained at current levels without major
increases in taxes or cuts in service — or dramatic cuts in other government services.


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More controversially, in his comments at the C.D. Howe luncheon attended by institute
members and key figures in Canada’s health-care community, Mr. Dodge also mentioned
the unmentionables of health care. These options include imposing some form of co-
payment by individuals for the health- care services that are currently paid by the
provinces. Another would de-list services that would then have to be paid by consumers
or private insurance suppliers.

A final option would be “development of a privately funded system to provide better
quality care for those willing to pay for it.” Such a two-tier system, he said, should be
part of the policy debate. During a question-and-answer session, Mr. Dodge was asked
about issues of equity in any universal care system. “We have met the equity test be
denying people the right to superior services.”

Mr. Dodge — a lifetime Canadian bureaucrat and deputy minister of health who has
rarely shied from expanding the role of government — did not endorsed any particular
option. “None of these options is appealing,” he said, a claim that would certainly be
contested by Canadians who would welcome moves to greater private choice and funding
of health care. More private delivery of services, new private funding options, including
medical savings accounts as exist in Singapore, have great appeal both to improve service
and bring some individual choice and discipline to health-care costs.

One key element of the Dodge analysis is that the looming cost increases for health care
are not insurmountable. The emphasis — rightly — is on the idea that increasing total
Canadian spending on health care from 12% to as much as 18.5% of GDP, or $42,000 per
family, is “not undesirable or unsustainable.”

Maybe 18.5% of GDP or $42,000 per family is the right level of spending, especially in a
growing and wealthier economy. A more optimistic assessment of health-care spending
by 2031 is about 16% of GDP. Whatever the number, the point of Chronic Healthcare
Spending Disease is that the spending projections cannot be met under current health care
laws and funding arrangements. Something has to give in the hearts and minds of
Canadians about how health care is paid for and provided.

One thing we do know, said Mr. Dodge, is the old way of controlling health-care
spending — raw cutbacks in spending and service — will not work. “The Canadian
public will not live with denial of service. We cannot do that again.”

But are Canadian voters ready to take up Mr. Dodge’s call for an open debate over
possible radical reform of the health-care payment system? A recent Ipsos-Read poll
showed that 40% of Atlantic Canadians put health care ahead of the economy and jobs as


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election issues. This campaign is also likely the last chance to debate health-care funding
before the federal-provincial health-care accord expires in 2014.

The last chance is being met with silence. Is it too much to ask that the major party
leaders make health care an election issue? Probably.

At the luncheon where Mr. Dodge reviewed the options, the health-care players in the
audience seemed powerfully resistant to radical options. They asked about other options
to curb spending, including health prevention and promotion. “Why don’t we tax Tim
Hortons?” asked one. The dean of a university health faculty also wanted to focus on
ways to improve the health of Canadians. Somebody else wanted to go after Big
Pharma’s drug costs.

If some of the leading figures in health-care services don’t seem ready to tackle the
funding reforms raised by Mr. Dodge and the C.D. Howe Institute, and since the
electioneering politicians will continue to dodge the issue until the crisis lands, that
means the leadership role on health care will have to be taken up by others. Voters,
maybe.

National Post
tcorcoran@nationalpost.com

.




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Section 1 : campagne électorale
En campagne - Jour 12
Le Devoir 7 avril 2011
Élections 2011 Hier, mercredi 6 avril 2011:

•9h05 En Gaspésie, Gilles Duceppe promet de défendre les intérêts des pêcheurs. «Les
libéraux et les conservateurs ont fortement nui aux pêcheurs gaspésiens et des Îles en
favorisant systématiquement Terre-Neuve au détriment du Québec. Les parts historiques
du Québec n'ont pas été respectées, ni d'ailleurs les principes d'exploitation durable», a-t-
il dit.




•9h30 Stephen Harper, de passage en Ontario, refuse de s'excuser auprès des citoyens du
fait que la campagne conservatrice continue d'exclure des rassemblements s'ils ne sont
pas des partisans du parti. «Ma préférence, c'est d'avoir des gens qui veulent écouter notre
message», a-t-il déclaré, ajoutant avec le sourire: «Je crois que c'est mieux de refuser des
gens que d'avoir de la difficulté à en attirer.»

•9h55 Le NPD rend publiques d'anciennes déclarations du candidat libéral dans
Manicouagan, André Forbes. « J'ai travaillé pendant plusieurs années pour la compagnie
Gulf Paper de Clarke City et il y avait plusieurs Montagnais parmi les employés. Je ne
me souviens que d'un seul qui faisait son travail correctement. Il devait certainement y en
avoir d'autres qui étaient vaillants, mais je n'ai pas de nom en tête», a-t-il dit en 2002.

•10h05 Stephen Harper annonce une mesure contenue dans son dernier budget, soit une
somme de 6 millions de dollars pour aider à la reconnaissance des diplômes des
immigrants.

•10h35 Michael Ignatieff affirme qu'il enquêtera sur les propos de son candidat André
Forbes.

•12h26 En Colombie-Britannique, le NPD s'engage à établir un programme national de
soins à domicile et à augmenter le financement pour les soins aux aînés.

•15h Déclaration du chef libéral: «Suite à cette enquête, M. Forbes a été informé qu'il
n'était plus candidat pour le Parti libéral du Canada. Les propos tenus par M. Forbes n'ont
aucune place au sein du Parti libéral du Canada.»

•15h45 La GRC diffuse un communiqué où elle s'excuse d'avoir suivi les demandes des
organisateurs conservateurs afin d'expulser des citoyens de certains rassemblements. «Ce



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n'était pas en concordance avec le mandat de la GRC, et les membres de la GRC ont eu
un rappel de leurs responsabilités», peut-on lire.

•19h30 Dans un rassemblement partisan à Brossard, Michael Ignatieff promet un
nouveau lien routier pour remplacer le pont Champlain «bien avant 10 ans» si un
gouvernement libéral est élu.



Aujourd'hui



Jack Layton



•8h Annonce à Surrey, en Colombie-Britannique

•15h45 Arrêt à Nanaimo, C.-B.

•18h30 Rassemblement à Esquimalt, C.-B.



Gilles Duceppe



•9h45 Rencontre avec la Coalition des Sans-Chemise, Baie-Comeau

•En soirée, enregistrement de l'émission Tout le monde en parle dans les studios de
Radio-Canada à Montréal

Michael Ignatieff



•10h Forum public avec des aînés à Laval

•19h30 Forum public à Hamilton, Ont.

Stephen Harper



•9h45 Événement à Vaughan, Ont.




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•18h Rassemblement à Hamilton, Ont.

Elizabeth May



•10h Dévoilement du programme électoral du Parti vert à Toronto

•17h30 Rassemblement partisan à Toronto




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Nanos Poll

Tories hold 9-point national lead, but support softens in
B.C.
OLIVER MOORE

Globe and Mail Update

Posted on Thursday, April 7, 2011 7:43AM EDT


Conservative support in British Columbia appears to be sagging even as the party
maintains a healthy nine-point national lead.

A rolling three-day tracking poll by Nanos Research, conducted for The Globe and Mail
and CTV, on Thursday had the leading parties statistically unchanged in the national
race.

Download this media file

PDF Document

Nanos national and regional poll, April 7, 2010

Download this file (.pdf)

The national numbers have the Tories down 0.1 percentage points to 39.1 per cent from
the previous poll and the Liberals up 0.5 points to 30.4 per cent. The NDP are down 0.2
points, to 17.2 per cent These numbers have been bouncing in a narrow range, well
within the poll’s margin of error, since the Liberals released their platform. The stability
suggests this week’s campaign-access controversy has not had an effect on the front-
running Tories. It could also indicate that the lift the Grits received from their platform is
now entrenched.

Results in the regions paint a more variable picture. Although a larger margin of error due
to smaller sample sizes makes evidence of change less reliable, trends have emerged.

In British Columbia, indications Wednesday of a sudden plunge in Tory support – which
pollster Nik Nanos cautioned then had to treated as a “potential drop” – have continued.
In two days, the polling indicates, the party’s support in the province has dropped from
48.4 per cent to 39.3 per cent.




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“It shows that things are going to be a little more dynamic in British Columbia,” Mr.
Nanos said. “As support for the Conservatives goes down, support for the Liberals and
NDP has gone up. That could speak to some interesting vote splits.”

The Tory decline, which still leaves the party 10 points ahead of the Grits and 15 points
ahead of the NDP in the province, exceeds the poll’s 8.1 per cent margin of error in that
region.

The Conservatives remain rock-solid on the Prairies. They lead in Ontario and Atlantic
Canada, though the latter gap is within the poll’s margin of error. The three federalist
parties are essentially tied in Quebec, polling in the 19-22 per cent range and trailing far
behind the Bloc, which has 35.8 per cent support.

“In the last six days, since the Churchill announcement, Conservative support has
softened,” Mr. Nanos noted.

The three-day tracking poll uses a rolling sample of 400 people a day, for a combined
survey of 1,200 Canadians. This sample was conducted April 4 to April 6. Each day,
samples from four days ago are dropped from the results, and the latest day’s are added,
to get a rolling result.

The result is that events on the campaign trail can take a few days to be reflected in the
polls.

Nanos Research says the national sample is accurate to within 2.8 percentage points, 19
times out of 20. Regional results have higher margins of error.




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En bref - Le NPD promet des soins à domicile
Le Devoir , La Presse canadienne 7 avril 2011 Élections 2011
Prince George, C.-B. — Le Nouveau Parti démocratique (NPD) a ressuscité une vieille
promesse électorale, hier, en s'engageant à établir un programme national de soins à
domicile et à augmenter le financement pour les soins aux aînés.

Le NPD fait cette promesse à chaque élection depuis 2005. Le chef Jack Layton propose
d'investir 250 millions de dollars par année pour favoriser le maintien à domicile des
aînés aux prises avec des maladies chroniques. Ce programme de soins à domicile
atteindrait la somme de 1 milliard après quatre ans. L'engagement prévoit aussi de verser
une somme de 250 millions par année aux provinces afin de créer des places dans les
centres d'hébergement et de soins de longue durée pour les aînés. Comme c'est le cas
pour d'autres promesses qu'il a faites depuis le début de la campagne électorale, M.
Layton dit qu'il financera son programme grâce à l'annulation des réductions d'impôt pour
les grandes entreprises. «Les aînés au pays doivent composer avec des services de soins
de santé qui ne répondent pas toujours à leurs besoins. Pourtant, depuis cinq ans, Stephen
Harper est resté les bras croisés», a dit Jack Layton.




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Section 3 : Santé
APRIL 7TH IS WORLD HEALTH DAY 2011: "NO ACTION TODAY, NO CURE
TOMORROW"
Canadian stakeholders respond to the World Health Organization's call to counter the
emergence of highly resistant "superbugs".

WINNIPEG, April 7 /CNW/ - On this World Health Day, Canadian health organizations
are responding to the World Health Organization's (WHO) call to help preserve the life-
saving power of antimicrobials. With a commitment to review a six-point policy package
that WHO issued today to combat antimicrobial resistance (AMR), several national
organizations are working together to support action in Canada.

The response is part of an ongoing Canadian initiative, AntibioticAwareness.ca,
coordinated by numerous health-related organizations across the country. These groups
recently partnered to promote the prudent use of antimicrobials and fight the threat of
antibiotic-resistant bacteria through the use of educational resources for professionals and
the public.

"Canadians rely on antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs to treat conditions once
considered life threatening, but many of these wonder drugs are becoming ineffective due
to resistant organisms," says Dr. Margaret Fast, Scientific Director of the National
Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCCID). "Governments and non-
governmental organizations have a shared responsibility to respond to WHO's call for
commitment from governments to address AMR nationally."

The policy steps recommended by WHO include:

•develop and implement a comprehensive, financed national plan;
•strengthen surveillance and laboratory capacity;
•ensure uninterrupted access to essential medicines of assured quality;
•regulate and promote rational use of medicines;
•enhance infection prevention and control; and
•foster innovation and research and development for new tools.
"Antibiotic resistance affects all Canadians, not only those in hospitals. Today we are
seeing rates of resistance that would have been unthinkable even 10 years ago," says Dr.
Lynora Saxinger, Chair of the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious
Disease (AMMI) Canada Antimicrobial Stewardship and Resistance Committee.




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Saxinger and other infectious disease specialists are voicing their concerns at the AMMI
(Canada)-CACMID Annual Conference - a gathering of Canadian experts in clinical
microbiology and infectious diseases - which opens today, coincidentally, on World
Health Day. Many of today's discussions will revolve around emerging problems in
multidrug resistance from a Canadian perspective, including C. difficile infections and
methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

Saxinger says community associated MRSA skin and bloodstream infections, as well as
urinary infections caused by highly resistant E. coli, are alarmingly commonplace, with
new types of resistant organisms emerging regularly. "The key to control is judicious use
of antibiotics. We know that antibiotics taken for a bad cold, 'just in case', greatly
increases the likelihood of a person carrying and therefore possibly spreading resistant
bacteria to susceptible people. Needless antibiotic use also increases one's likelihood, by
five- to 10 times, of a subsequent pneumonia being caused by resistant bacteria."

Dr. Craig Stephen, professor, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of
Calgary, says it is important to recognize that AMR is an issue that crosses boundaries
between people, animals and their shared environments. "People and animals can share
the same disease-causing organisms, and antimicrobial resistance can pass back and forth
between them through a variety of routes - from direct contact, to the food we eat or the
water we drink," he explains.

Stephen says a comprehensive plan is needed to stem the tide of increasing drug
resistance. "It must take into account ways to promote reduced and rational use of
antimicrobials in animals, as well as manage the environmental routes through which
drug resistance is shared between people and animals."

Canadian partners joining to recognize the global threat of antimicrobial resistance
through AntibioticAwareness.ca include:

•National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCCID);
•Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease (AMMI) Canada;
•Community and Hospital Infection Control Association (CHICA) Canada;
•Canadian Foundation for Infectious Diseases (CFID);
•Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS);
•Do Bugs Need Drugs (DBND);
•Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors (CIPHI);
•Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA); and
•Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA).



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The AMMI (Canada) - CACMID Annual Conference is a joint effort by AMMI Canada
and the Canadian Association for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
(CACMID). This year's conference continues through Saturday.

Media interested in speaking with experts on World Health Day can contact Renée
Barclay, Communications Coordinator, NCCID, at (204) 688-6490 or email
rbarclay@icid.com.




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Le Tamiflu au coeur d'une polémique
Mise à jour le mercredi 6 avril 2011 à 20 h 19

ExclusifCommenter (25) »PartagerCourrielFacebookTwitterImprimer.
Photo: AFP/Miguel Medina

Boîte de Tamiflu



Ottawa et les provinces devront bientôt dépenser des dizaines de millions de dollars pour
renouveler leurs réserves de Tamiflu, ce médicament qu'on a stocké au coût de plus de
100 millions, en cas d'une pandémie de grippe.

Mais le Tamiflu est au coeur d'une controverse concernant son efficacité et ses effets
secondaires. L'émission Enquête de Radio-Canada a découvert que plusieurs experts qui
conseillent nos autorités de santé publique au sujet de ce médicament sont en situation de
conflit d'intérêts.

Une efficacité contestée

Certains disent que ce médicament peut sauver des vies, mais d'autres croient que c'est un
gaspillage de fonds publics.

« Nous avons trouvé que le Tamiflu avait un effet très modeste sur les symptômes de la
grippe, que c'était une différence d'une journée au maximum », explique Barbara
Mintzes, de l'Université de la Colombie-Britannique.

De plus, des centaines de cas d'effets secondaires neuropsychiatriques ont été rapportés
chez des patients qui ont pris du Tamiflu, particulièrement chez les jeunes.

Le manufacturier, Roche, dit qu'il s'agit d'effets causés par la grippe elle-même.

Conflit d'intérêts

Au Canada, plus de 40 % du Tamiflu de la réserve nationale arrivera à péremption au
cours de l'année et malgré la controverse, nos gouvernements ont toujours l'intention de
renouveler leurs stocks parce qu'ils considèrent qu'il s'agit d'un médicament sûr et
efficace.



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Radio-Canada a toutefois découvert que plusieurs experts qui conseillent nos
gouvernements sont en situation de conflit d'intérêts en raison de leurs liens avec le
fabricant. Certains ont même participé à des vidéos promotionnelles du Tamiflu.

Le chef de l'Agence de santé publique du Canada, le Dr David Butler-Jones, n'y voit pas
de problème. Ces experts déclarent à l'Agence leurs liens avec le fabricant.

Mais tout cela se fait dans le plus grand secret. La liste des experts qui conseillent le
gouvernement et leurs déclarations de conflits d'intérêts ne sont pas divulguées
publiquement.

Il est donc difficile pour les citoyens d'évaluer la valeur de l'information sur laquelle
s'appuient nos autorités.

D'après un reportage de Frédéric Zalac




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Apps Canadian-made app gives a voice to users who have difficulty speaking
Michael Oliveira
TORONTO— The Canadian Press
Published Wednesday, Apr. 06, 2011 3:24PM EDT
Last updated Wednesday, Apr. 06, 2011 6:05PM EDT
1 comment Email Print Decrease text size
Increase text size A new Canadian-made smartphone application can provide a voice for
those who have difficulty speaking for themselves due to autism, aphasia or other
medical conditions.

Researchers who have been testing the program, MyVoice, in advance of Wednesday's
launch couldn't be more thrilled with its potential.

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Especially because the app – free for six months before subscription fees kick in of
around $30 a month – competes with devices that often cost tens of thousands of dollars.

“One of the most devastating aspects of aphasia is its potential to isolate someone
because they can no longer communicate as they once did,” said Dr. Alexandra Carling-
Rowling, who is leading research into the app's possible benefits for the Aphasia
Institute, Toronto Rehab and Sunnybrook Hospital.

“They can lose their communicative confidence and they lose their ability to participate
as they used to. But with MyVoice, they don't have to constantly rely on a family
member, they can go out and do things for themselves.”

MyVoice, created by a team based out of the University of Toronto's computer science
department, is designed to do the job of much more expensive devices designed to assist
with communication.

A MyVoice user touches their phone's screen to have words or phrases spoken aloud for
them. The app can be programmed from home to have suitable words available to use
later, or a user can tap into MyVoice's ability to sense their location via GPS to offer up
suggestions.



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So, if a MyVoice user is at a movie theatre, the app can load categories of words that
would help communicate with staff at the concession stand, or groups of phrases to
discuss the movie they're seeing.

Carling-Rowling said MyVoice is also exciting because the old-fashioned AAC devices
were typically bulky to carry around and some patients felt uncomfortable using them
because of the stares they'd get from strangers.

But by using MyVoice, which currently runs on Apple and Android-based devices,
patients are using the same technology as everyone else.

“These phones are so commonplace so it overcomes the stigma for someone who has to
use augmented communication devices, because now they're using what everyone else is
using, or everyone else wants to use,” Carling-Rowling said.

“It gives them much more confidence.”

MyVoice's creators estimate there are two million families in North America that could
use their app and they were initially surprised by the enthusiastic response when they
started building the program.

“It started as a research project and as we presented it at conferences and talks people
urged us to commercialize it,” said spokesman Andrew Rusk.

“We started testing with a user named Bill and he came into our lab and instantly took off
with our product and uses it almost exclusively to communicate today.”

Dr. Rhonda McEwen, an autism technology researcher with the University of Toronto,
has been working with students with special needs at a local high school and has found
the app both easy to use and effective.

“We were working with young people who clearly have some kind of exceptionality but
they picked this up in minutes, they were able to get going, start navigating, help each
other figure it out, and they had no manual. We just did a quick demo and they were off,”
McEwen said.

“They're extremely excited about all they can do and they feel so much more empowered
and more independent with the confidence they get. We even have one young lady who




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has Cerebral palsy and with assistance we found she's already picked up quite a lot more
than we anticipated she would in a very short space of time. It's truly remarkable.”




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Section 5 : Régions
Publié le 06 avril 2011 à 20h08 | Mis à jour le 06 avril 2011 à 20h08


Ontario: les optométristes pourront prescrire des médicaments



(Toronto) Les optométristes de l'Ontario ont reçu l'autorisation de prescrire les
médicaments nécessaires pour traiter des infections oculaires bénignes et des problèmes
plus importants, comme le glaucome.
Les autorités provinciales ont approuvé de nouveaux règlements qui permettent aux
personnes souffrant de certains maux oc ulaires d'obtenir des soins de leur optométriste,
plutôt que de les obliger à consulter un médecin.

Selon le président de l'Association des optométristes de l'Ontario, cette décision
améliorera la rapidité et l'accessibilité des soins, notamment en régions éloignées, où il
n'est pas toujours facile de consulter un médecin.

Ce changement permettra aussi de réduire le temps d'attente pour les autres patients à
l'urgence et dans les cliniques sans rendez-vous, a ajouté John Mastronardi.


Dans le cadre de leur formation, les optométristes apprennent à prescrire des
médicaments depuis 1995.

L'Ontario est l'une des dernières provinces canadiennes à donner le droit de prescription à
cette profession. Toutefois, elle est aussi l'une des seules à autoriser les optométristes à
prescrire des médicaments oraux en plus des médicaments topiques.

Les patients ontariens peuvent consulter les membres de cet ordre professionnel pour une
inflammation, une infection ou des douleurs à l'oeil et à la paupière, une irritation causée
par un verre de contact, une allergie affectant les yeux, la présence de corps étrangers
superficiels, et le glaucome.




                  Compilation des articles réalisée par Daniel Dezainde                      19
        Revue de presse quotidienne Société Santé en Français
                                       2011-12-13
Ottawa
CHEO: Michel Bilodeau prendra sa retraite en novembre
Mise à jour le mercredi 6 avril 2011 à 16 h 41

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Le président et chef de la direction du Centre hospitalier pour enfants de l'est de l'Ontario,
Michel Bilodeau


Le président et chef de la direction du Centre hospitalier pour enfants de l'est de l'Ontario
a annoncé mercredi qu'il quittera ses fonctions à la fin de son contrat, en novembre.

Michel Bilodeau prend sa retraite après une vie professionnelle qui s'étend sur 41 ans,
dont 31 dans le milieu hospitalier.

Sous sa direction, le CHEO a connu une période de croissance soutenue: le taux
d'occupation est à la hausse depuis son arrivée il y a cinq ans, tant à l'hôpital qu'à
l'urgence et dans ses cliniques ambulatoires. Le nombre de chirurgie a aussi augmenté.

L'hôpital a également ouvert une nouvelle aile de soins critiques et modernisé ses
systèmes informatiques.

Le centre hospitalier a de plus réussi à équilibrer son budget sans mises à pied ou
réduction de services.




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        Revue de presse quotidienne Société Santé en Français
                                       2011-12-13
Media Advisory: Vibrant and equitable communities provide the foundation for
good health, nurses say
TORONTO, April 6 /CNW/ - More than 700 registered nurses (RNs) meeting in Toronto
this week will mark achievements in public policy, clinical excellence and in the work
they do to enrich the health and lives of their patients and communities.

The nurses are members of the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario (RNAO)
attending the organization's 86th Annual General Meeting (AGM).

"The AGM is a time to look back on what we've achieved during the past 12 months,"
says RNAO Executive Director Doris Grinspun. "Some key pieces of legislation have
forever changed the role of nurses in this province and we're celebrating how these will
improve patient care and the nursing profession as a whole."

"This is an important year in the province," says President David McNeil referring to the
provincial election set for Oct. 6. "We've been sharing policy recommendations we know
are the key ingredients for strengthening our health-care system and creating vibrant
communities. We're looking forward to hearing from the party leaders because while we
know how to care for people who are ill, we also know the conditions that influence
peoples' ability to remain healthy."

Premier Dalton McGuinty, Health Minister Deb Matthews, PC leader Tim Hudak and
NDP leader Andrea Horwath are scheduled to speak at the three-day meeting.

RNAO's AGM begins Thursday evening, April 7, and continues to Saturday, April 9 at
the Toronto Hilton, 145 Richmond Street West in Toronto, Ontario.

Highlights include:

Thursday, April 7, 7:00 - 8:00 p.m.:

•Opening ceremonies featuring speeches by The Hon. Deb Matthews, Minister of Health
and Long-Term Care; Tim Hudak, Leader of the Official Opposition; and NDP Leader
Andrea Horwath.
Friday, April 8, 8:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.:

•Premier Dalton McGuinty will address nurses at 2:10 p.m.
•RNAO Recognition Awards 3:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.
•Awards for Excellence in Health-Care Reporting 8:30 p.m.
View a complete list of the Media Award Winners and Recognition Award Winners.

Saturday, April 9, 11:30 a.m.:

•Dr. Lynn McDonald, Professor Emerita with the University of Guelph, will give a talk
about the life of Florence Nightingale



                  Compilation des articles réalisée par Daniel Dezainde                    21
        Revue de presse quotidienne Société Santé en Français
                                      2011-12-13
The Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario is the professional association
representing registered nurses in Ontario. Since 1925, RNAO has advocated for healthy
public policy, promoted excellence in nursing practice, increased nurses' contribution to
shaping the health-care system, and influenced decisions that affect nurses and the public
they serve.

For more information about RNAO, visit our website at www.rnao.org. You can also
check out our Facebook page at www.rnao.org/facebook and follow us on Twitter at
www.twitter.com/rnao.




                  Compilation des articles réalisée par Daniel Dezainde                 22

								
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