TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARD COMMITTEE ON STRATEGIC

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					               TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARD                              CHAIR
                                                                                      Lyn Bracewell Phillips
               COMMITTEE ON STRATEGIC PLANNING AND POLICY                             VICE CHAIR
                                                                                      Harold Hahn

                        1200 EAST ANDERSON LANE, ROOM 1.170                           Dennis D. Golden
                                    AUSTIN, TEXAS                                     A.W. “Whit” Riter, III
                                                                                      Amir H. Barzin
                               10:00 a.m., June 21, 2011                                 Student Representative
                                                                                      Fred W. Heldenfels IV,
                                                                                         Ex-Officio


                                          AGENDA

I. Welcome and Committee Chair’s meeting overview

II. Consideration of approval of the minutes from March 22, 2011, meeting of the Committee
    on Strategic Planning and Policy

III. Consideration of approval of the Consent Calendar for the Committee on Strategic Planning
     and Policy meeting

IV. Matters relating to the Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy

   A. Consideration of staff recommendation to the Board for approval of construction,
      rehabilitation, and property purchase projects

              1. The University of Texas at Dallas
                 Construct Arts and Technology Facilities – Arts and Technology Complex
                 800 West Campbell Road
                 Richardson, TX 75080

              2. University of Houston
                 Construct Cougar Village 2
                 4800 Calhoun
                 Houston, TX 77004

   B. Consideration of approval of construction, rehabilitation, and property purchase projects

              1. Texas A&M University
                 Renovate Corps Dormitory FY 2011
                 696 Military Mall
                 College Station, TX 77843

              2. Texas State Technical College - Waco
                  Construct East Williamson County Center Building 1
                  1501 CR 108
                  Hutto, TX 78634




                                                                                           06/11
Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy                               June 21, 2011




              3. Texas Tech University
                 Donation of Improved Real Property – Excel Building
                 1120 Main Street
                 Lubbock, TX 79401

   C. Presentations by The University of Texas System institutions on future campus plans for
      the institutions

   D. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee for
      approval of the nominated members of the Formula Funding Advisory Committees for
      2014-2015 biennium

   E. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to
      requests for a new degree program:

       SAM HOUSTON STATE UNIVERSITY

          (1) Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree with a major in Developmental Education
              Administration

       TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY-SAN MARCOS

          (2) Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degrees with a
              major in Developmental Education

       THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO

          (3) Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree with a major in in Ecology and Evolutionary
              Biology

       THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL BRANCH AT GALVESTON

          (4) Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree with a major in Rehabilitation Sciences

       UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

          (5) Master of Science (M.S.) degree with a major in Petroleum Well Design
              Engineering

          (6) Master of Science (M.S.) degree with a major in Petroleum Well Completion and
              Intervention Engineering

   F. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to
      a request from South Texas College for a Bachelor of Applied Technology in
      Medical and Health Services Management



                                                                                            06/11
Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy                                June 21, 2011



   G. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to a
      request from Texas State Technical College Harlingen, Le Tourneau University, Our Lady
      of the Lake University, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Texas A&M University-
      Kingsville, the University of Houston, The University of Texas at Brownsville in
      Partnership with Texas Southmost College, The University of Texas-Pan American, and
      Wayland Baptist University to create a Multi-Institutional Teaching Center in Harlingen,
      Texas

   H. Lunch

   I. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to
      a request from Midland College to hold a branch campus maintenance tax
      election in Pecos County
   J. Discussion of the status of the United States Department of Education list of accreditors
   K. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to
      the Request for Applications and funding for the Norman Hackerman Advanced
      Research Program 2011 Competition
   L. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to
      the distribution of funds trusteed to the Coordinating Board to support medical
      and graduate medical education for Fiscal Year 2012 and report on trusteed
      funds distributed in Fiscal Year 2011

   M. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to
      the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act funds to
      colleges for State Leadership grants for program year 2011-2012

   N. Report on the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act funds
      to colleges for Basic and Tech Prep Grants

   O. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to authorize the Assistant
      Commissioner of Academic Affairs and Research to approve the 2011 African
      American Museum Internship Report to be submitted to the Governor’s Office and
      Legislative Budget Board by October 1, 2011

   P. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to the
      appointment of members to the Certification Advisory Council

   Q. Proposed Rules:

        (1) Update on proposed amendments to Chapter 4, Rules Applying to All Public
            Institutions of Higher Education in Texas, Subchapter A, General Provisions,
            Section 4.11, Common Admission Application Forms

        (2) Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s recommendation to the Committee
            relating to proposed amendments to Chapter 13, Financial Planning, Subchapter
            H, Reporting of Tuition and Fees, Section 13.142 of Board rules, concerning
            Definitions

                                                                                           06/11
Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy                                June 21, 2011



        (3) Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s recommendation to the Committee
            relating to proposed amendments to Chapter 21, Student Services, Subchapter B,
            Sections 21.22 through 21.27 of Board rules, concerning the Determination of
            Resident Status and Waiver Programs for Certain Nonresident Persons; the repeal
            of Section 21.29, concerning Waiver Programs for Certain Nonresident Persons;
            the repeal of Section 21.30, concerning Residence Determination Official; and new
            Section 21.29, concerning Residence Determination Official

        (4) Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s recommendation to the Committee
            relating to proposed Chapter 21, Student Services, new Subchapter X, Sections
            21.730 through 21.752 of Board rules, concerning Waiver Programs for Certain
            Nonresident Persons

   R.    Discussion of proposed rule changes resulting from the 82nd Texas Legislative Session
         to be voted on at the July Board meeting and required studies

   S.    Update on Coordinating Board’s recommendations to the 82nd Texas Legislature

   T.    Update on Low-Producing Program Review

   U.    Adjourn



NOTE: The Board will not consider or act upon any item before the Committee on Strategic
Planning and Policy at this meeting. This meeting is not a regular meeting of the full Board.
Because the Board members who attend the committee meeting may create a quorum of the full
Board, the meeting of the Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy is also being posted as a
meeting of the full Board.




                                                                                          06/11
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                        AGENDA ITEM I



Welcome and Committee Chair’s meeting overview


      Dr. Lyn Phillips, Chair of the Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy, will provide the
Committee an overview of the items on the agenda.




                                                                                           06/11
                         Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                     AGENDA ITEM II



Consideration of approval of the minutes from March 22, 2011, meeting of the Committee on
Strategic Planning and Policy


RECOMMENDATION:         Approval




                                                                                      06/11
                              TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION COORDINATING BOARD
                                                    MINUTES
                                   Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy

                                      1200 East Anderson Lane, Room 1.170
                                                  Austin, Texas
                                           10:00 A.M., March 22, 2011

                                                    DRAFT Minutes

                   The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Committee on Strategic Planning
            and Policy convened at 10:05 a.m. on March 22, 2011, with the following members
            present: Harold Hahn, Vice Chair, presiding; Dennis Golden; Fred W. Heldenfels IV, Ex-
            Officio; and Eric Rohne, Student Representative.

                   The meeting is available at the following link:
                   http://www.thecb.state.tx.us/apps/Events/



                        AGENDA ITEM                                                     ACTION

 I.        Welcome and Committee Chair’s meeting                     Mr. Harold Hahn called the meeting to order and
           overview                                               advised that the meeting was being broadcast.
                                                                     Mr. Harold Hahn announced Mr. Fred Heldenfels
                                                                  was appointed as a voting member for this meeting.

II.        Approval of Minutes

           Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy                 On motion by Dr. Dennis Golden, seconded by
           meeting December 14, 2010.                             Mr. Fred Heldenfels, the Committee approved this
                                                                  item.


III.       Approval of the Consent Calendar                           On motion by Mr. Fred Heldenfels, seconded by
                                                                  Dr. Dennis Golden, the Committee approved the
                                                                  Consent Calendar.


IV.        Matters relating to the Committee on
           Strategic Planning and Policy

      A.   Consideration of recommendation to the Board for
           approval of construction, rehabilitation, and
           property purchase projects

            1. Texas A&M University                                   Mr. Vergel Gay, Associate Vice Chancellor for
               Construct Northside Residence Hall                 Facilities Planning and Construction, Texas A&M
               302 University Drive                               University System, provided an overview on the
               College Station, TX 77843                          project.

                                                              1                  Strategic Planning and Policy Minutes 3/11
                  AGENDA ITEM                                                    ACTION

                                                                On motion by Mr. Fred Heldenfels, seconded by
                                                            Dr. Dennis Golden, the Committee approved this
                                                            item.

B.   Consideration of approval of construction,
     rehabilitation, and property purchase projects

1.   Texas A&M University                                      This item was on the Consent Calendar.
     Construct Wellborn Road Grade Separation
     Wellborn Road
     College Station, TX 77840

2.   Texas A&M University - Galveston                          This item was on the Consent Calendar.
     Construct New Student Housing
     200 Seawolf Parkway
     Galveston, TX 77553

3.   Texas State University – San Marcos                       This item was on the Consent Calendar.
     Construct Bobcat Stadium: North Side Complex
     1100 Aquarena Springs
     San Marcos, TX 78666

4.   Texas Tech University                                     This item was on the Consent Calendar.
     Construct Boston Avenue Residence Hall and
     Dining Facility
     19th and Boston
     Lubbock, TX 79409

5.   The University of Texas of the Permian Basin              This item was on the Consent Calendar.
     Reapprove Construct Wagner Noel
     Performing Arts Center
     1400 N. F.M. 1788
     Midland, TX 79706

6.   University of Houston                                     This item was on the Consent Calendar.
     Reapprove Construct Classroom and Business
     Building Phase 1 and 2
     4800 Calhoun
     Houston, TX 77004

 7. University of Houston – Clear Lake                         This item was on the Consent Calendar.
    Renovate and Construct Addition to Arbor Building
    2600 Bay Area Boulevard
    Houston, TX 77058


C. Discussion of the Board Task Force’s                            Dr. Stephenson updated Committee on the
   Recommendations Relating to Exceptions to                Board Task Force’s recommendations. Dr.
   Coordinating Board Rule 5.46(15), Essential              Stephenson will discuss this item at the Board
   Criterion for New Doctoral Degree Programs               meeting on April 27, 2011.



                                                        2                 Strategic Planning and Policy Minutes 3/11
                 AGENDA ITEM                                                     ACTION

D. Lunch                                                        This item was taken out of order. The
                                                            Committee adjourned for lunch at 11:55 a.m. and
                                                            reconvened at 12.:30 p.m.

E. Consideration of adopting the staff
   recommendations to the Committee relating to
   requests for a new degree program:

   THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO

     (1)   Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.) degree          This item was on the Consent Calendar.
           with a major in Nursing Practice

   THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS OF THE PERMIAN                       On motion by Dr. Dennis Golden, seconded by
   BASIN                                                    Mr. Fred Heldenfels, the Committee approved this
                                                            item.
     (2)   Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with a
           major in Petroleum Engineering

   UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS HEALTH SCIENCE                    This item was on the Consent Calendar.
   CENTER

     (3)   Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree with a
           major in Public Health Sciences

F. Consideration of adopting the staff                          On motion by Mr. Fred Heldenfels, seconded by
   recommendation to the Committee relating to a            Dr. Dennis Golden, the Committee approved this
   request from Texas Tech University Health                item.
   Sciences Center for an administrative change to
   establish a free-standing nursing school at the
   Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center – El
   Paso Campus


G. Consideration of adopting the staff                         This item was on the Consent Calendar.
   recommendation to the Committee relating to a
   request from Texas Woman’s University for a
   Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree with a major
   in Occupational Therapy via distance education


H. Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s                 On motion by Dr. Dennis Golden, seconded by
   recommendation to the Committee relating to a            Mr. Fred Heldenfels, the Committee approved this
   request from the Texas College of Traditional            item.
   Chinese Medicine for a Certificate of Authority to
   grant degrees in Texas


I. Consideration of adopting the staff                         This item was on the Consent Calendar.
   recommendation to the Committee relating to
   revised Mission Statements from the following
   institutions:

                                                        3                 Strategic Planning and Policy Minutes 3/11
                AGENDA ITEM                                                         ACTION


    (1)   Midwestern State University
    (2)   The University of Texas Medical Branch at
          Galveston


J. Proposed Rules:

    (1)   Consideration of adopting the                            On motion by Mr. Fred Heldenfels, seconded by
          Commissioner’s recommendation to the                 Dr. Dennis Golden, the Committee approved this
          Committee relating to the proposed                   item.
          amendments to Chapter 4, Rules Applying
          to all Public Institutions of Higher Education
          in Texas, Subchapter P, Approval of
          Distance Education Courses and Programs
          for Public Institutions, Section 4.261 of
          Board rules concerning Standards and
          Criteria for Distance Education Programs

    (2)   Consideration of adopting the                            On motion by Dr. Dennis Golden, seconded by
          Commissioner’s recommendation to the                 Mr. Fred Heldenfels, the Committee approved this
          Committee relating to the proposed                   item.
          amendments to Chapter 4, Rules Applying
          to all Public Institutions of Higher Education
          in Texas, Subchapter Q, Approval of Off-
          Campus and Self-Supporting Courses and
          Programs for Public Institutions, Section
          4.275 of Board rules concerning Standards
          and Criteria for Off-Campus and Self-
          Supporting Programs

    (3)   Consideration of adopting the
                                                                   On motion by Dr. Dennis Golden, seconded by
          Commissioner’s recommendation to the
                                                               Mr. Fred Heldenfels, the Committee approved this
          Committee relating to the proposed
                                                               item.
          amendments to Chapter 5, Rules Applying
          to Public Universities and Health-Related
          Institutions of Higher Education in Texas,
          Subchapter C, Approval of New Academic
          Programs and Administrative Changes at
          Public Universities, Health-Related
          Institutions, and Assessment of Existing
          Degree Programs, Sections 5.43, 5.44, and
          5.52 concerning Definitions, Presentation of
          Requests and Steps for Implementation,
          and Assessment of Existing Degree
          Programs

    (4)   Consideration of adopting the                           This item was not voted on by the Committee
          Commissioner’s recommendation to the                 because of questions raised during the committee
          Committee relating to proposed                       meeting about the data elements in the rule and
          amendments to Chapter 21, Student                    was deferred until the April Board meeting.
          Services, Subchapter NN, Sections 21.2105
          and 21.2107 through 21.2110 and the repeal
                                                           4                 Strategic Planning and Policy Minutes 3/11
                     AGENDA ITEM                                                        ACTION

              of Section 21.2111 of Board rules, concerning
              the Exemption Program for Veterans and
              their Dependents (The Hazlewood Act)

   (5) Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s                  This item was on the Consent Calendar.
       recommendation to the Committee relating to
       proposed Chapter 21, Student Services, new
       Subchapter SS, Sections 21.2270 through 21.2273
       of Board rules, concerning the Exemption Program
       for Children of Deployed Members of the Military

   (6) Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s                  This item was on the Consent Calendar.
       recommendation to the Committee relating to
       proposed amendments to Chapter 22, Grant and
       Scholarship Programs, Subchapter B, Section 22.24
       of Board rules, concerning the Provisions for the
       Tuition Equalization Grant Program

   (7) Consideration of the Commissioner’s                           This item was on the Consent Calendar.
       recommendation to the Committee relating to
       proposed amendments to Chapter 22, Grant and
       Scholarship Programs, Subchapter S, Professional
       Nursing Shortage Reduction Program, Section
       22.508 of Board rules

K. Discussion of the status of the United States                     No action was required for this item. At this
   Department of Education list of accreditors                    time, the Department of Education has not
                                                                  completed their review.

L. Update on Coordinating Board’s priorities for the 82nd            Ms. Linda Battles, Associate Commissioner,
   Texas Legislative Session                                      provided an update on the agency’s Legislative
                                                                  Appropriations Request, and Mr. Dominic Chavez,
                                                                  Senior Director for External Relations, provided an
                                                                  update on pertinent legislation.

M. Consideration of higher education impact statements                Mr. Dominic Chavez, Senior Director for External
   for the 82nd Texas Legislature                                 Relations, provided an update.


N. Adjournment                                                           The Committee adjourned for lunch at 11:55
                                                                  a.m. and reconvened at 12:30 p.m.
                                                                         On a motion by Dr. Dennis Golden,
                                                                  seconded by Mr. Fred Heldenfels, the Committee
                                                                  adjourned at 12:35 p.m. on March 22, 2010.




                                                              5                  Strategic Planning and Policy Minutes 3/11
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                      AGENDA ITEM III



Consideration of approval of the Consent Calendar for the Committee on Strategic Planning and
Policy meeting


RECOMMENDATION:           Approval


Background Information:

       In order to save institutions time and travel costs to attend Committee on Strategic
Planning and Policy meetings in Austin, the Committee made the decision to establish a Consent
Calendar for either (1) facilities projects that meet all the standards, or (2) items that are
noncontroversial.

         Any project or item can be removed from the Consent Calendar by a Board member
within 72 hours of the meeting. If a project or item is removed from the Consent Calendar, the
institution will be expected to provide a presentation.




                                                                                         06/11
AGENDA ITEM III
Page 1

                                         Consent Calendar


IV.      Matters relating to the Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy

      B. Consideration of approval of construction, rehabilitation, and property purchase projects

                 1. Texas A&M University
                    Renovate Corps Dormitory FY 2011
                    696 Military Mall
                    College Station, TX 77843

      E. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to
         requests for a new degree program:

         UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

             (5) Master of Science (M.S.) degree with a major in Petroleum Well Design
                 Engineering

             (6) Master of Science (M.S.) degree with a major in Petroleum Completion and Well
                 Intervention Engineering

      I. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to
         a request from Midland College to hold a branch campus maintenance tax
         election in Pecos County
      K. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to
         the Request for Applications and funding for the Norman Hackerman Advanced
         Research Program 2011 Competition
      L. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to
         the distribution of funds trusteed to the Coordinating Board to support medical
         and graduate medical education for Fiscal Year 2012 and report on trusteed
         funds distributed in Fiscal Year 2011

      M. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to
         the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act funds to
         colleges for State Leadership grants for program year 2011-2012




                                                                                             06/11
AGENDA ITEM III
Page 2

   O. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to authorize the Assistant
      Commissioner of Academic Affairs and Research to approve the 2011 African
      American Museum Internship Report to be submitted to the Governor’s Office and
      Legislative Budget Board by October 1, 2011

   P. Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to the
      appointment of members to the Certification Advisory Council




                                                                                       06/11
                      Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy



                                  AGENDA ITEM IV-A


Consideration of staff recommendation to the Board for approval of construction, rehabilitation,
and property purchase projects


       1. The University of Texas at Dallas
          Construct Arts and Technology Facilities – Arts and Technology Complex
          800 West Campbell Road
          Richardson, TX 75080
          Presentation by Rick Dempsey

       2. University of Houston
          Construct Cougar Village 2
          4800 Calhoun
          Houston, TX 77004
          Presentation by Emily Messa and Spencer Moore



Thomas Keaton, Director, Finance and Resource Planning, will be available for questions.
Facilities briefing sheets are included on the following pages.




                                                                                           06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-A                                                                    June 21, 2011
Page 2

                                       Project Briefing Sheet

    1. The University of        Seeking Board Approval                      July 2010
        Texas at Dallas
Project:                        Construct Arts and Technology Facilitites – Arts and
                                Technology Complex
                                800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080
Project Number:                 009741-11-001
Project Cost:                   $60,500,000 (Total Project Cost $80,300,000)
Source of Funds:                Bonds: (Permanent University Fund, PUF - Available University
                                Funds - $35,000,000; Revenue Financing System Bonds,
                                Designated Tuition - $25,500,000)
Recommendation:                 Approval
Project Description:
         The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) proposes to construct a new research and
instructional complex to house the Arts and Technology program (ATEC), the Emerging Media and
Communication program (EMAC), and the Visual Arts program. This is the second project associated
with the Arts and Technology Complex, the initial $14,300,000 infrastructure project approved by the
Board in June of 2010, will provide the required infrastructure to support the complex. The project
will be located on the campus bordering the east edge of the newly completed Campus Mall. This
project will consist of a 157,900 GSF Arts and Technology building, the spaces in the proposed
building include assembly spaces (including a 1,200 seat lecture hall), conference rooms, faculty
offices, exhibition spaces, visualization rooms, computer labs, motion capture lab, acoustic and sound
research laboratories, and visual arts studios for painting, photography, print making and sculpture.
The current bookstore and arts studio buildings will be demolished as a part of this project. The
15,000 NASF of the total project, in specifically the visual arts portion of the complex, is scheduled to
be left as shelled space and will utilize the $5,500,000 remaining of the total projected cost.
 Standards                        Standard    Project Detail
 2010 Space Usage              Classroom:          92        Meets      Doesn’t Meet      N/A
 Efficiency (SUE) Scores:      Class Lab:          100       Meets      Doesn’t Meet      N/A
                               Overall Score:      192       Meets      Doesn’t Meet      N/A
 Rank on 2010 MP1              1st of 14
 Space Need (2010 Space            Deficit     (636,456) Meets          Doesn’t Meet      N/A
 Model)
 2010 Cost/SF: New                  $491            $275      Meets     Doesn’t Meet      N/A
 Construction – Laboratory,
 General
 Efficiency: Laboratory,        0.60 or more       0.551      Meets     Doesn’t Meet      N/A
 General
 2010 Deferred Maint.           0.05 or less        .02       Meets     Doesn’t Meet      N/A
 2010 Critical Def. Maint.          $0            0.00      Meets     Doesn’t Meet        N/A
 Property           Price      High Appraisal Low Appraisal Property Appraisals
 Appraisals




Page 1 of 3 The University of Texas at Dallas Construct Arts and Technology Facilities – Arts and
Technology Complex
AGENDA ITEM IV-A                                                                       June 21, 2011
Page 3

                                        Project Briefing Sheet

                                               GSF                   NASF              E&G NASF
 New Construction                                    157,900              87,000            85,000
 Demolition                                           43,371              34,553            21,293
 Total New Space                                     114,529              52,447            63,707

 Phase at Time of    Planning            Selecting       Design         Construction       N/A
 Submittal                               Contractor
 Start Date August 2011                          Completion Date     March 2013

                      Project Costs                             Current Cost         PCT of Total
 Building Cost (New Construction)                                 $43,500,000              71.90%
 Fixed Equipment                                                      $100,000              0.17%
 Site Development                                                   $1,000,000              1.65%
 Furniture & Moveable Equipment                                     $2,500,000              4.13%
 Construction Services                                                $250,000              0.41%
 Life Safety Compliancy                                               $250,000              0.41%
 Architectural/Design Services                                      $4,729,800              7.82%
 Project Management (System)                                        $1,931,200              3.19%
 Other Professional Fees                                              $500,000              0.83%
 Administrative Costs                                                  $89,000              0.15%
 Demolition                                                           $750,000              1.24%
 Contingency                                                        $3,800,000              6.28%
 Other Costs                                                        $1,100,000              1.82%
 Total                                                            $60,500,000            100.00%

Project Evaluation:

         The institution reports that the dynamic and innovative program in Arts and Technology
(ATEC) requires a major new facility to provide an integrated home for its undergraduate and
graduate instructional activities, its wide diversity of funded research programs, and its
entrepreneurial economic development initiatives. The program’s current facility is woefully
inadequate to meet the requirements of this field of study. The University of Texas at Dallas moved
with great agility and speed to develop its ATEC program, starting less than six years ago, and was
forced to squeeze the new activities into three separate buildings, each designed for other purposes.
The present buildings are inefficient both as a consumer of utilities and instructional space. These
facilities were ill-suited to the specialized requirements teaching and research in this field from the
beginning, and now enrollment and research activities have grown to the point that the simple lack of
adequate square feet is the dominant constraint on further progress. This new facility designed to
accommodate all of the specialized as well as general instructional and research activities of ATEC will
not only provide a significant reduction in UTD’s overall space deficit but will provide this dynamic
new program with the quality and quantity of facilities that will allow it to fulfill its promise to become
a national leader in one of the cutting-edge fields of education, research, and economic development
of the 21st century.
Page 2 of 3 The University of Texas at Dallas Construct Arts and Technology Facilities – Arts and
Technology Complex
AGENDA ITEM IV-A                                                                 June 21, 2011
Page 4

                                      Project Briefing Sheet

      This project meets the Board’s standards for space need, cost, building efficiency, deferred
maintenance, and critical deferred maintenance.

Project Notes:

   1. This project will meet the building efficiency standard of 60 percent for new laboratory general
      construction when the additional 15,000 NASF of shell space is completed; bringing the
      completed building efficiency from 55 percent to 65 percent.

 Approval Action:                    Date of Approval                     Signature
                            Board July 28, 2011
                        Conditions
                    Project History




Page 3 of 3 The University of Texas at Dallas Construct Arts and Technology Facilities – Arts and
Technology Complex
AGENDA ITEM IV-A                                                 June 21, 2011
Page 5


                   KEY MEASURES FROM THE ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM
AGENDA ITEM IV-A                                                 June 21, 2011
Page 6


                   KEY MEASURES FROM THE ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM
AGENDA ITEM IV-A                                                                 June 21, 2011
Page 7


                                       Project Briefing Sheet

   2. University of Houston          Seeking Board Approval               July 2011

Project:                 Construct Cougar Village 2
                         4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77004
Project Number:          003652-11-002
Project Cost:            $50,000,000
Source of Funds:         Bonds: (Auxiliary Enterprise Revenues, Auxiliary Enterprise Revenue
                         - $50,000,000)

Recommendation:          Approval

Project Description:

        The University of Houston (UH) seeks approval to construct a new 291,000 GSF Cougar Village
2. This project is for the design and build delivery of a student residence facility consisting of
approximately 275 two bedroom shared bath units, three apartments for resident staff, and
approximately 35 individual apartments for resident assistants. This project is the second phase of
two similar residence facilities to be located along Wheeler Avenue at the southern edge of the UH
campus. Each student bedroom shall accommodate two beds for a total capacity of approximately
1,100 beds. Amenities shall include a reception area and lobby with security desk, central and floor
lounges, computer room, laundry rooms, fitness area, an outside-accessed living-learning center with
staff offices, floor kitchenettes, and vending areas with electrical power and data service.

 Standards                      Standard     Project Detail
 Space Usage Efficiency       Classroom:          831       Meets    Doesn’t Meet     N/A
                                                     1
 (SUE) Standard Scoring:      Class Lab:         100        Meets    Doesn’t Meet     N/A
                              Overall            1831       Meets    Doesn’t Meet     N/A
                              Score:
 Rank on 2010 MP1             14th of 22
 Space Need (2010 Space          Deficit      (953,421)1   Meets     Doesn’t Meet     N/A
 Model)
 2010 Cost/SF: New                  $163          $134     Meets     Doesn’t Meet     N/A
 Construction, Housing
 Apartments
 Efficiency: General            0.60 or           0.65     Meets     Doesn’t Meet     N/A
                                 more
 2010 Deferred Maint.         0.05 or less        0.04      Meets    Doesn’t Meet     N/A
 2010 Critical Def. Maint.        $0              0.00      Meets    Doesn’t Meet     N/A
 Property           Price    High Appraisal Low   Appraisal Meets    Doesn’t Meet     N/A
 Appraisals




Page 1 of 3 University of Houston Construct Cougar Village 2
AGENDA ITEM IV-A                                                                      June 21, 2011
Page 8


                                        Project Briefing Sheet

                                               GSF                  NASF              E&G NASF
New Construction                                     291,000           189,000                   0
Total New Space                                      291,000           189,000                   0

 Phase at Time of    Planning           Selecting       Design         Construction       N/A
 Submittal                              Contractor
 Start Date March 2012                          Completion Date     July 2013

                        Project Costs                               Current Cost      PCT of Total
Building Cost (New Construction)                                     $38,945,000          77.89%
Furniture & Moveable Equipment                                        $2,300,000           4.60%
Architectural/Design Services                                         $3,457,000           6.91%
Project Management (System)                                           $1,500,000           3.00%
Administrative Costs                                                    $448,000           0.90%
Contingency                                                           $2,500,000           5.00%
Other Costs                                                             $850,000           1.70%
Total                                                                $50,000,000         100.00%

Project Evaluation:

        According to the institution, this facility will provide student housing; and has the added
benefit of enlivening the campus after class hours, building community among students, providing
student amenities, and supporting increased enrollment goals.

        The institution’s occupancy rate per the Fall 2010 Student Housing Report is at 87.8 percent,
whereas the state average is 96.5 percent. The UH occupancy rate suffers because the majority of
the undergraduate student housing does not meet the amenities wanted by the students; therefore,
they make other housing arrangements. For example, Cougar Place is going to be demolished in the
near future because the buildings at Cougar Place have reached the end of their functional life and
are in need of replacement. Undergraduate housing at Moody Towers and the Quads are also in need
of modernization and this project will lead the effort in the methodical replacement and renovation of
antiquated housing as well as support the university’s tier one initiative of attaining the status of
being a residential campus.

        This project will add approximately 1,100 beds to the institution’s current available capacity
by July 2013; this 16 percent increase is in line with the UH Student Housing Master Plan which
includes a overall 20 percent increase over a five year period, this will also result in lower occupancy
rates as new housing replaces old.

        The project meets the Board’s standards for cost, building efficiency, deferred maintenance,
and critical deferred maintenance.




Page 2 of 3 University of Houston Construct Cougar Village 2
AGENDA ITEM IV-A                                                              June 21, 2011
Page 9


                                     Project Briefing Sheet

Project Notes:

   1. Board Standards for Space Usage Efficiency (SUE) and space need are not applicable to
      projects containing no E&G space.
 Approval Action:                     Date of Approval                Signature
                             Board July 28, 2011
                        Conditions
                    Project History




Page 3 of 3 University of Houston Construct Cougar Village 2
AGENDA ITEM IV-A                                                 June 21, 2011
Page 10


                   KEY MEASURES FROM THE ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM
AGENDA ITEM IV-A                                                 June 21, 2011
Page 11


                   KEY MEASURES FROM THE ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy



                                      AGENDA ITEM IV-B


Consideration of approval of construction, rehabilitation, and property purchase projects


              1. Texas A&M University
                 Renovate Corps Dormitory FY 2011
                 696 Military Mall
                 College Station, TX 77843
                 On Consent Calendar

              2. Texas State Technical College - Waco
                 Construct East Williamson County Center Building 1
                 1501 CR 108
                 Hutto, TX 78634
                 Presentation by Dr. Elton Stuckly, Dr. Gary Hendricks, Paul Woodfin

              3. Texas Tech University
                 Donation of Improved Real Property – Excel Building
                 1120 Main Street
                 Lubbock, TX 79401
                 Presentation by Michael Molina


Thomas Keaton, Director, Finance and Resource Planning, will be available for questions.
Facilities briefing sheets are included on the following pages.




                                                                                            06/11
Agenda Item IV-B                                                                     June 21, 2011
Page 2
                                     Project Briefing Sheet
   1. Texas A&M University          Seeking Committee Approval                    July 2011

Project:                            Renovate Corps Dormitory - FY 2011
                                    696 Military Mall, College Station, TX 77843
Project Number:                     003632-09-026
Project Cost:                       $13,750,000
Source of Funds:                    Bonds: (Revenue Financing System Bonds, Housing
                                    Revenue- $13,750,000)
Recommendation:                     Approval

Project Description:

       Texas A&M University proposes to renovate 34,700 Harrell Hall Dorm eight located in
the Corps of Cadets Quadrangle on the main campus of Texas A&M University. Harrell Hall, built
in 1938, is a four-story dormitory and will be the first dorm to undergo renovation in the Corps
of Cadets housing. Renovation includes addressing fire, life safety, and accessibility deficiencies,
the HVAC system, water intrusions, plumbing upgrades and quality of life issues including
bathroom and shower improvements, installing a vending and laundry facility on the first floor,
improving space utilization in cadet rooms, lighting improvements, noise reduction, electrical
and communication upgrades, technology enhancements and the need for extremely robust,
durable and functional fixtures and finishes. Automated building control and maintenance
systems that tie into the university’s current system will also be included in the scope of this
renovation. Site improvements will include upgrades to surrounding sidewalks, landscaping and
drainage.

        In addition to the dorm renovation, the existing Academic Lounge D at the west end of
Harrell Hall will be demolished and replaced with a new four-story 17,887 GSF Leadership
Learning Center connecting Harrell Hall dorm eight and Lacy Hall Dorm six. The Leadership
Learning Center will contain a lobby, computing center, study rooms, academic advising offices,
multi-use training labs, offices, meeting rooms, offices for training officers, leadership
development program director’s office, instructional labs, cadet lounge, two elevators and
elevator lobby, and a stairwell. This new center will connect two adjacent dorms at each floor
level.




Page 1 of 3 Texas A&M University Renovate Corps Dormitory – FY 2011
Agenda Item IV-B                                                                        June 21, 2011
Page 3
                                     Project Briefing Sheet
 Standards                         Standard    Project Detail
 2009 Space Usage               Classroom:          921       Meets       Doesn’t Meet       N/A
 Efficiency (SUE) Scores:       Class Lab:         1001       Meets       Doesn’t Meet       N/A
                                                       1
                                Overall Score:     192        Meets       Doesn’t Meet       N/A
 Rank on 2010 MP1               25th of 27
 Space Need (2009 Space             Deficit     (951,464)1 Meets          Doesn’t Meet       N/A
 Model)
 2010 Cost/SF: New                  $224              $154      Meets     Doesn’t Meet       N/A
 Construction –
 Housing,Dormitory
 2010 Cost/SF: Repair and           $143              $155      Meets     Doesn’t Meet       N/A
 Renovation
 Housing,Dormitory
 Efficiency: General Use        0.60 or more          0.60      Meets     Doesn’t Meet       N/A
 Efficiency: Current Building        .67              .672      Meets     Doesn’t Meet       N/A
 2009 Deferred Maint.            0.05 or less          .02      Meets     Doesn’t Meet       N/A
 2009 Critical Def. Maint.           $0            0.00      Meets        Doesn’t Meet       N/A
 Property           Price       High Appraisal Low Appraisal Meets        Doesn’t Meet       N/A
 Appraisals
                                                GSF                     NASF            E&G NASF
New Construction                                       17,887             10,705                   0
Repair and Renovation                                  34,700             23,216                   0
Demolition                                              5,012              2,234                   0
Total New Space                                        12,875              8,471                   0
 Phase at Time of    Planning           Selecting       Design           Construction       N/A
 Submittal                              Contractor
 Start Date June 2011                           Completion Date     August 2012
                        Project Costs                               Current Cost        PCT of Total
Building Cost (New Construction)                                      $2,756,679             20.05%
Building Cost (Repair & Renovation)                                   $5,372,306             39.07%
Fixed Equipment                                                       $1,472,000             10.71%
Site Development                                                        $419,444              3.05%
Furniture & Moveable Equipment                                          $950,000              6.91%
Construction Services                                                   $510,486              3.71%
Life Safety Compliancy                                                  $202,000              1.47%
Architectural/Design Services                                           $793,000              5.77%
Project Management (System)                                             $354,968              2.58%
Other Professional Fees                                                 $332,000              2.41%
Demolition                                                               $32,769              0.24%
Environmental Development                                                $54,802              0.40%
Contingency                                                             $499,546              3.63%
Total                                                                $13,750,000           100.00%

Page 2 of 3 Texas A&M University Renovate Corps Dormitory – FY 2011
Agenda Item IV-B                                                                    June 21, 2011
Page 4
                                    Project Briefing Sheet
Project Evaluation:
        The institution reports that the Corps of Cadets dormitories and lounge buildings have
undergone two renovations; once in the 1980s which addressed air conditioning needs; and
again in the early 1990s, with lighting and finish upgrades. Dorm eight (Harrell Hall), originally
constructed in 1938, is scheduled to be the first residence hall to undergo significant
renovations in 2011 with a thorough living-learning facility upgrade program to be implemented
over the following years in the subsequent eleven Corps of Cadets dorms. The forty-five year
old Corps of Cadets Learning-Study (Academic) Lounge D adjacent to Harrell Hall is small and
antiquated relative to current Texas A&M University group study resources, academic advising
programs, living-learning meeting space needs and pathway access at this significant corner of
the Quad. Renovating the Corps of Cadets dormitories and replacing old academic lounges will
thus directly and indirectly enhance campus life at all levels and the leadership-learning
opportunities of Texas A&M University students. The effort ensures the Corps of Cadets Quad
will continue to contribute in important ways to the University’s traditions and multiple missions.
        The institution’s occupancy rate per the Fall 2010 Student Housing Report is at 94
percent, whereas the state average is 96.5 percent. This project will not add any additional
beds to the institution’s available capacity.
        This project meets the Board’s standards cost, building efficiency, deferred maintenance,
and critical deferred maintenance.
Project Notes:
   1. Space Usage Efficiency (SUE) and space need are not applicable to projects containing
      no E&G space.
   2. This project meets the Board standard for Repair and Renovation building efficenciy by
      not reducing the current building efficiency.


 Approval Action:                     Date of Approval                       Signature
                         Committee June 21, 2011
                         Conditions
                     Project History




Page 3 of 3 Texas A&M University Renovate Corps Dormitory – FY 2011
Agenda Item IV-B                                             June 21, 2011
Page 5

               KEY MEASURES FROM THE ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM
Agenda Item IV-B                                              June 21, 2011
Page 6
                KEY MEASURES FROM THE ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM
Agenda Item IV-B                                                                  June 21, 2011
Page 7
                                   Project Briefing Sheet

    2. Texas State            Seeking Committee Approval                    July 2011
        Technical College
        - Waco
Project:                      Construct East Williamson County Center Building 1
                              1501 County Road 108, Hutto, TX 78634
Project Number:               003634-11-001
Project Cost:                 $17,875,322
Source of Funds:              Bonds: (Designated Tuition, Other Local Funds - $17,875,322)
Recommendation:               Approval

Project Description:

        Texas State Technical College - Waco (TSTC-Waco) seeks approval to construct an
111,650 GSF building for the East Williamson County Multi-Institution Teaching Center
(EWCHEC) at Hutto. Texas State Technical College - Waco and Temple College will utilize this
111,650 SF facility for instructional programs and support services to serve students from East
Williamson County and adjacent areas. The Hutto Center will be located north of the
intersection of US 79 and SH 130, fronting on SH 130 on the west and County Road 108 on the
east. Texas State Technical College - Waco will lease to Temple College a significant portion
(35,800 SF) of the space in this building for an average of $19.60 per SF per year for 25 years.
TSTC-Waco will utilize 53,520 SF of space for instructional programs, which will be designed to
provide efficient space utilization through inter-disciplinary lab spaces. Both Boards have
approved an operating agreement during the week of May 2, 2011, to specify the
responsibilities of each partner in accordance with Texas Education Code, Section 130.092.

 Standards                      Standard      Project Detail
 Space Usage Efficiency      Classroom:            491       Meets     Doesn’t Meet    N/A
 (SUE) 2010 Scores:          Class Lab:            571       Meets     Doesn’t Meet    N/A
                                                      1
                             Overall Score:       106        Meets     Doesn’t Meet    N/A
 Rank on 2010 MP1            3rd of 5
 Space Need (2010 Space          Surplus    143,2301         Meets     Doesn’t Meet    N/A
 Model)
 2010 Cost/SF: Laboratory      $492           $114           Meets     Doesn’t Meet    N/A
 /General
 Efficiency: Laboratory     .60 or more        .80           Meets     Doesn’t Meet    N/A
 /General Use
 2010 Deferred Maint.           .00            .04           Meets     Doesn’t Meet    N/A
 2010 Critical Def. Maint.      .00           .051           Meets     Doesn’t Meet    N/A
 Property          Price   High Appraisal Low Appraisal      Meets     Doesn’t Meet    N/A
 Appraisals

                                               GSF                   NASF         E&G NASF
New Construction                                   111,650             89,320           53,520
Total New Space                                    111,650             89,320           53,520


Page 1 of 2 Texas State Technical College – Waco Construct East Williamson County Center
Building 1
Agenda Item IV-B                                                                    June 21, 2011
Page 8
                                   Project Briefing Sheet

 Phase at Time of    Planning           Selecting       Design       Construction       N/A
 Submittal                              Contractor
 Start Date August 2011                         Completion Date   April 2013

                        Project Costs                             Current Cost      PCT of Total
Building Cost (New Construction)                                   $12,722,662           71.17%
Fixed Equipment                                                       $500,000            2.80%
Site Development                                                    $1,618,685            9.06%
Furniture & Moveable Equipment                                        $500,000            2.80%
Architectural/Design Services                                       $1,000,000            5.59%
Contingency                                                         $1,533,975            8.58%
Total                                                              $17,875,322         100.00%

Project Evaluation:

       The institution reports that this project as authorized by Texas Education Code, Section
130.092, the mission of the East Williamson County Higher Education Center is to serve the
residents of the East Williamson County region by providing convenient access to quality
academic transfer degree programs, workforce degree and certificate programs, and licensure
programs. These programs will equip residents to advance their careers and will help meet the
workforce needs of current and prospective employers located in East Williamson County and
adjacent areas. The Coordinating Board accepted the feasibility study for the Hutto Center in
January 2011. The Coordinating Board also approved Temple College to hold a branch campus
maintenance tax election in the Hutto Independent School District in its January meeting.

       This project meets the Board’s standard for cost. However, this project does not meet
the Board standards for Space Use Efficiency (SUE), space need, and critical deferred
maintenance.

Project Notes:

   1. The Institution has an acceptable Plan of Action on file to improve its Space Use
      Efficiency (SUE), space surplus, and critical deferred maintenance.

 Approval Action:                    Date of Approval                     Signature
                        Committee June 21, 2011
                        Conditions
                    Project History




Page 2 of 2 Texas State Technical College – Waco Construct East Williamson County Center
Building 1
Agenda Item IV-B                                              June 21, 2011
Page 9
                KEY MEASURES FROM THE ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM
Agenda Item IV-B                                              June 21, 2011
Page 10
                KEY MEASURES FROM THE ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM
Agenda Item IV-B                                                                  June 21, 2011
Page 11

                                   Project Briefing Sheet
   3. Texas Tech University            Seeking Committee Approval          July 2011


Project:                               Donation of Improved Real Property Excel
                                       Building Lubbock
                                       1120 Main Street, Lubbock, TX 79401
Project Number:                        003644-09-015
Project Cost:                          $2,150,000
Source of Funds:                       Donation: (Gifts/Donations - $950,000); Cash: (Higher
                                       Education Assistance Fund Proceeds - $1,200,000)
Recommendation:                        Approval

Project Description:

         Texas Tech University seeks Coordinating Board approval of a previously institutional
accepted donation of improved real property from Southwestern Public Service Company
consisting of 0.703 acres of land with one improvement totaling 29,752 GSF, located at 1120
Main Street, Lubbock, Texas. Upon approval of this project application, Texas Tech University
will mitigate the institutions acceptance of deferred maintenance of $460,000 of the improved
property and provide asbestos abatement, fire suppression and life safety upgrades, and
associated renovations.

 Standards                      Standard    Project Detail
 Space Usage Efficiency       Classroom:         92 1        Meets    Doesn’t Meet     N/A
 (SUE) Scores:                Class Lab:        100 1        Meets    Doesn’t Meet     N/A
                              Overall           192 1        Meets    Doesn’t Meet     N/A
                              Score:
 Rank on 2010 MP1             Not Reported2
 Space Need (2010 Space          Deficit     (774,477)       Meets    Doesn’t Meet     N/A
 Model)
 2010 Cost/SF: Renovation,        $141            $24        Meets    Doesn’t Meet     N/A
 Office/General
 Efficiency: General Use         0.60 or         .60       Meets      Doesn’t Meet     N/A
                                  more
 2010 Deferred Maint.          0.05 or less      .01       Meets      Doesn’t Meet     N/A
 2010 Critical Def. Maint.         $0            .00       Meets      Doesn’t Meet     N/A
 Property      Donation Value Low Appraisal High Appraisal Meets      Doesn’t Meet     N/A
 Appraisals                   Tax assessor Mark Campbell
                 $950,000       $935,678      $950,000




Page 1 of 3 Texas Tech University Donation of Improved Real Property – Excel Building -
Lubbock
Agenda Item IV-B                                                                     June 21, 2011
Page 12

                                    Project Briefing Sheet


                                                GSF                 NASF             E&G NASF
Real Property Improvements                            29,752            17,851            17,851
Repair and Renovation                                 29,752            17,851            17,851
Amt to be Removed from Inventory
Total New Space                                       29,752            17,851            17,851

 Phase at Time of    Planning            Selecting       Design       Construction       N/A
 Submittal                               Contractor
 Start Date May 2011                             Completion Date   August 2011

                         Project Costs                              Current Cost     PCT of Total
Building Cost (Repair & Renovation)                                    $715,000          33.26%
Site Acquisition                                                       $950,000          44.19%
Life Safety Compliancy                                                 $460,000          21.40%
Other Professional Fees                                                  $18,000           0.84%
Contingency                                                               $7,000           0.33%
Total                                                                $2,150,000         100.00%

Project Evaluation:

        The institution has accepted this improved property donation and the associated
$460,000 of deferred maintenance prior to the submission of a project application or receiving
Coordinating Board approval. Section 17.1 (A) (4) requires an institution to submit a project
application for Board approval if “Improved real property acquired by gift or lease-purchase if
the institution intends to include the improved real property in its E&G buildings and facilities
inventory and the value of the improved property is more than $300,000.”

        The institution reports that in order to meet Texas Tech University’s academic program
growth and mission the university has evaluated the administrative functions that do not
interact with the students on a day-to-day basis. The analysis has rendered the need to relocate
those service groups outside the core in order to free up prime academic space. Acceptance of
the improved real property donated by Southwestern Public Service Company will allow Texas
Tech University to renovate a facility versus construction of additions or new facilities. The
renovation of the donated property will allow for the strategic relocation of university personnel
from Tech Plaza, the Administration Building, and other facilities within the Texas Tech
University campus core; thus creating a stronger and more efficient academic core.

        This improved property donation has a total of $460,000 of deferred maintenance
associated with the transfer. The asbestos abatement, fire suppression and life safety upgrades
will be addressed under this project application.

        This project meets the Board’s standard for cost, space need, deferred maintenance,
and critical deferred maintenance.


Page 2 of 3 Texas Tech University Donation of Improved Real Property – Excel Building -
Lubbock
Agenda Item IV-B                                                                  June 21, 2011
Page 13

                                   Project Briefing Sheet
Project Notes:

   1. The standards for space use efficiency are not applicable to real property acquisitions.
   2. The institution reports that this property acquisition was an unforeseen donation and
      was not listed on the most recent MP1 submission.
 Approval Action:                    Date of Approval                     Signature
                        Committee June 21, 2011
                        Conditions
                    Project History




Page 3 of 3 Texas Tech University Donation of Improved Real Property – Excel Building -
Lubbock
Agenda Item IV-B                                             June 21, 2011
Page 14

               KEY MEASURES FROM THE ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM
Agenda Item IV-B                                              June 21, 2011
Page 19
                KEY MEASURES FROM THE ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM
                           Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                       AGENDA ITEM IV-C



Presentations by The University of Texas System institutions on future campus plans for the
institutions


RECOMMENDATION:           No action required


Background Information:

         The Strategic Planning and Policy Committee has requested an overview from each
institution or system regarding their campus master plans. This will allow Committee members to
put projects into a broader perspective.

       Dr. David Prior, Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, The University of Texas
System, will be available to answer any questions regarding the information sent under separate
cover.




                                                                                         06/11
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                      AGENDA ITEM IV-D



Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee for approval of the
nominated members of the Formula Funding Advisory Committees for 2014-2015 biennium


RECOMMENDATION:           Approval of proposed membership for formula advisory committees


Background Information:

        Texas Education Code, Section 61.059(b) requires the Board to “devise, establish, and
periodically review and revise formulas for the use of the Governor and the Legislative Budget
Board in making appropriations recommendations to the Legislature for all institutions of higher
education, including the funding of postsecondary vocational-technical programs. As a specific
element of the periodic review, the Board shall study and recommend changes in the funding
formulas based on the role and mission statements of institutions of higher education. In
carrying out its duties under this section, the Board shall employ an ongoing process of
committee review and expert testimony and analysis.”

         To assist in this process, there are three advisory committees established each summer
of odd-numbered years to prepare a recommendation to the Board. The formula
recommendation is submitted to the Strategic Planning and Policy Committee at its quarterly
meeting in the spring of even-numbered years. The Committee recommendation is submitted to
the full Board at its April meeting for approval.

        This process meets the requirement of Texas Education Code, Section.61.059(d) which
states that “Not later than June 1 of every even-numbered calendar year, the Board shall notify
the governing boards and the chief administrative officers of the respective institutions of
higher education and university systems, the Governor, and the Legislative Budget Board of the
formulas designated by the Board to be used by the institutions in making appropriation
requests for the next succeeding biennium.”

       The proposed list of committee members will be distributed at the meeting under
separate cover.




                                                                                          06/11
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                    AGENDA ITEM IV-E (1)


Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to a request from
Sam Houston State University for a Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree with a major in
Developmental Education Administration


RECOMMENDATION:          Approval and authorization to implement an Ed.D. in Developmental
                         Education Administration. Staff recommend approval with the
                         understanding that following implementation of the program the institution
                         will submit five annual reports confirming the presence of faculty and other
                         resources consistent with institutional commitments. The reports will also
                         provide an assessment of student progress.


             BACKGROUND INFORMATION AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

        Sam Houston State University’s (SHSU) proposed Ed.D. in Developmental Education
Administration (DEA) would focus on the preparation of educators to develop and administer
programs for underprepared community college and university students in math, reading,
and/or writing. This program would emphasize original research in developmental education
with an emphasis on the administration of programs in order to develop leaders in the field of
Developmental Education Administration. Because the most likely student cohort for such a
degree is working developmental education educators and administrators, the proposed
program would be offered in an online format. No other Texas public institution currently offers
a doctoral degree in Developmental Education; Grambling University in Louisiana is the only
other institution in the country that offers such a program and that program is not offered
online.

        As part of the approval consideration process, a site visit to SHSU was conducted on
August 10, 2010, with three out-of-state consultants: Dr. Hunter Boylan, Director of the
National Center for Developmental Education and Professor of Higher Education at Appalachian
State University; Dr. Linda Thompson, Director, McNair Scholars Programs, Chair of the National
Association of Developmental Education Certification Council, and Professor of Psychology at
Harding University; and Dr. Norman Stahl, Department Chair and Professor of Education
Literacy, Northern Illinois University. On February 28, 2011, the Distance Education Advisory
Committee (DEAC) reviewed the portions of the proposal related to its distance delivery and
recommended approval.




                                                                                           06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (1)
Page 2


                                                      NEED

Employment Opportunities                 The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) 2008 to 2018
                                         Employment Projections Report indicates a 2.3 percent growth
                                         nationally in educational administration at the postsecondary
                                         level, and the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) 2008 to
                                         2018 projections indicate a 10.2 percent growth in educational
                                         administration at the postsecondary level. Neither the BLS nor
                                         TWC disaggregate these projections into specific administrative
                                         fields, so it is impossible to ascertain from the projections the
                                         true demand and growth for developmental education
                                         administrators. BLS projects a 15.1 percent growth for Adult
                                         Literacy, Remedial Education and GED teachers, and TWC
                                         projects a 22.6 percent growth for the same occupations,
                                         supporting the need for administrative personnel for the new
                                         teachers and programs.

Projected Enrollment                     The program plans to admit 15 students in the first year,
                                         increasing to 42 students by the fifth year. Because students
                                         would enter with a master’s degree, the doctoral degree is
                                         anticipated to take 3 years to complete.

Plan to Recruit                          Underrepresented students would be a targeted focus of
Underrepresented Students                recruitment and retention efforts by SHSU for this program.
                                         Plans to establish formalized relationships with community
                                         colleges for developmental education research purposes would
                                         expand opportunities to recruit employees in underrepresented
                                         groups as doctoral students. Institutions such as Dallas County
                                         Community College District (DCCCD) with 45 percent of
                                         employees in underrepresented groups and Lone Star College
                                         System (LSCS) with 25 percent of employees in
                                         underrepresented groups would be potential partners.1
                                         Because of the online delivery of this program, recruitment
                                         efforts would also be national. Scholarship funds would be
                                         made available to help attract and retain underrepresented
                                         students.

Existing State Programs                  Currently, Texas does not have a Ph.D. or an Ed.D. program
                                         with a sole focus on developmental education or
                                         developmental education administration.




1
    According to Office of Institutional Research at DCCD and LSCS
                                                                                               06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (1)
Page 3


                           QUALITY AND RESOURCES

Faculty                      SHSU is committed to hiring two new tenure-track faculty at
                             the rank of Associate Professor or above that would be
                             dedicated to the proposed program. Additional core faculty
                             would be drawn from the existing faculty in the College of
                             Education. These faculty members represent a wide range of
                             experience in educational administration as well as reading and
                             English. The program would also partner with the Department
                             of Mathematics and Statistics and the SHSU’s Student Advising
                             and Mentoring Center. Support faculty members for the
                             proposed program also have specializations in reading, English,
                             and mathematics and would be available to serve on
                             dissertation committees.

                             A review of the faculty research activities over the last five
                             years shows an active publication record in educational
                             administration and leadership. The seven core faculty
                             members average 11 refereed publications per year with
                             additional articles and other publications under review.
                             Proposed core faculty have obtained more than $1,000,000 in
                             external grant funds for individual and partnered projects over
                             the last five years.

Other Personnel              SHSU has a well-established Office of Distance Education that
                             is positioned to provide support services for the proposed
                             online program.

Facilities and Equipment     Sufficient office and lab space exists for the proposed
                             developmental education administration program in SHSU’s
                             Teacher Education Center. The third floor of the Center was
                             recently modified with this program in mind and includes
                             sufficient space for faculty and research assistant offices,
                             conference space, and a distance education lab. Additional
                             space is available for growth in the same building. SHSU has
                             appropriate distance education equipment and support services
                             for students and faculty. Electronic gathering sites would also
                             be available for students to post materials, to share
                             information, to have informal discussions, and to conference
                             with faculty members and/or advisors.




                                                                                  06/11
 AGENDA ITEM IV-E (1)
 Page 4


 Library, Supplies, Materials                 The SHSU library has a variety of resources in this field,
                                              including electronic subscriptions to developmental education
                                              journals. An additional $10,000 has been allocated to
                                              strengthen library resources. The library currently uses instant
                                              messaging and texting to provide all students with real-time
                                              access to a librarian to develop a research strategy, or suggest
                                              appropriate resources on a given topic. Additionally, a librarian
                                              is assigned to work with each student for the duration of
                                              her/his doctoral program.

 Accreditation                                Not Applicable. There are no accrediting agencies for
                                              developmental education administration programs.

             NEW FIVE-YEAR COSTS                                           SOURCES OF FUNDING

 Personnel                                                   Anticipated New Formula Funding*               $948,841
    Faculty                              $1,150,570
    Program Admin                          $242,212
    Clerical/Staff                         $208,433


 Library, Supplies, and                     $10,000          Other State Funding1                           $643,290
 Materials
                                                             Reallocation of Existing Resources             $242,212

                                                             Other SHSU Funding2                        $1,199,720
 Other Costs
    Graduate Assistants          00        $566,400
    Scholarships                           $300,000

 Est. 5-Year Costs                     $2,485,115            Est. 5-Year Revenues                     $2,791,851

 The Chief Executive Officer of the institution has certified, and staff has determined,
 that the institution will have funds sufficient to support the proposed program.

 Estimated formula funding generated by the institution in years two through five of the proposed
 program would total $948,841.

 $948,841 based on these figures: 19.3 FTE students in year two; 28 FTE students in year three; 28
 FTE students in year four and 28 FTE students in year five taking 20 SCH/year at a formula rate of
 $475.13 ($62.19 x weigh factor of 7.64).

*The anticipated level of formula funding in this analysis is a projection. It represents the ideal state
funding scenario derived using the current state funding amounts and the institution’s projected
enrollment for the program. Given the current budgetary situation, it is likely that the anticipated formula
funding level for this program will be lower than that which has been projected using the current state
funding.

 1
     Statutory tuition, designated tuition and graduate tuition
 2
     Funds from Office of Graduate Studies at SHSU
                                                                                                            06/11
                                                              Online Resume for Legislators and Other Policymakers
                                                                      SAM HOUSTON STATE UNIVERSITY
Location: Huntsville, Gulf Coast Region
Doctoral Accountability Peer Group: Texas A&M - Commerce, Texas A&M - Corpus Christi, Texas A&M - Kingsville, Texas Southern Univ, Texas State Univ - San Marcos, Texas Woman's Univ
Out-Of-State Peers: East Tennessee State University, Indiana University Of Pennsylvania - Main Campus, Middle Tennessee State University, University Of North Carolina At Greensboro, University Of South Alabama
Degrees Offered: Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral
Institutional Resumes         Accountability System      Definitions        Institution Home Page



                                  Enrollment                                                                            Funding                                                     Costs
                         Fall 2005        Fall 2009        Fall 2010                                           Total Appropriated Funds                                 Average Annual Total Academic
    Race/Ethnicity       Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent                                              Including Faculty &                                 Costs for Resident Undergraduate
White                      11,097   72.5%   11,287   67.5%   11,202   65.0%                                    Staff Health & Retirement                                    Student Taking 30 SCH
Hispanic                    1,691   11.0%    2,290   13.7%    2,664   15.5%                                 Year             Amount                                                        Texas Rates
African American            2,065   13.5%    2,511   15.0%    2,625   15.2%                                FY 2005               $56,133,113                        Year         Institution     Peer Group Avg
Multi-Racial Afr Am              0    .0%         0    .0%        59    .3%                                FY 2009               $76,488,822                     FY 2006             $4,592             $4,668
Asian                          182   1.2%       265   1.6%       338   2.0%                                FY 2010               $77,161,956                     FY 2010             $6,515             $6,335
International                  183   1.2%       256   1.5%         2    .0%                                     Total Amount of Money                            FY 2011             $7,000             $6,837
Other & Unknown                 90    .6%       106    .6%       346   2.0%                                      from Any Source In FY
Total                      15,308  100.0%   16,715  100.0%   17,236  100.0%                                 Year             Amount
                                                                                                           FY 2005              $134,395,312
                                                                                                           FY 2009              $190,710,878
                                                                                                           FY 2010              $216,484,657

                                                        Student Success                                                                               Student Success: National Comparison
                 One-Year Persistence of First-time,                                        Graduation Rate of First-time,                                  Graduation Rate of First-time, Degree-seeking Students
             Full-time, Degree Seeking Undergraduates                                Full-time Degree Seeking Undergraduates                                      after 4 and 6 Years from the Same Institution
                  Enter Fall 2004 Enter Fall 2008 Enter Fall 2009                          After 4 and 6 Years at a Public or                                               (IPEDS National Definition)
  Cohort                  2,082          2,090            2,122                            Independent Institution in Texas                                                               Institution       Out-of-State Peers
  Total                  86.6%          88.5%            86.3%                                    Institution             Peer Group                     Cohort & Duration                   Rate                 Rate
  Same                   70.9%          74.9%            71.5%            Cohort & Duration       Cohort      Rate        Cohort     Rate                 Fall 2001 4-year                        12.0%                 20.6%
  Other                  15.7%          13.6%            14.8%            Fall 2000 4-year          1,648     21.2%         7,865    18.0%                Fall 2004 4-year                          .0%                 20.6%
                 Two-Year Persistence of First-time,                      Fall 2004 4-year          2,082     24.0%         9,954    19.6%                Fall 2005 4-year                        22.0%                 21.8%
             Full-time, Degree Seeking Undergraduates                     Fall 2005 4-year          2,179     29.7%       10,005     22.3%                Fall 1999 6-year                        39.0%                 42.0%
                  Enter Fall 2003 Enter Fall 2007 Enter Fall 2008         Fall 1998 6-year          1,533     49.7%         7,038    48.0%                Fall 2002 6-year                        44.0%                 44.8%
  Institution Persistence                                                 Fall 2002 6-year          1,582     54.5%         9,138    46.6%                Fall 2003 6-year                        45.0%                 46.4%
  Cohort                  1,772          2,213            2,090           Fall 2003 6-year          1,772     54.1%       10,120     45.1%
  Total                  81.8%          81.7%            80.2%
                                                                                             Six-year Graduation & Persistence Rate
  Same                   58.7%          61.4%            62.1%
                                                                                              for First-time Undergraduate Students
  Other                  23.0%          20.3%            18.1%
                                                                                               Requiring Developmental Education
  Peer Group Persistence
                                                                                                           Fall 2004 Cohort
  Cohort                  1,445          1,445            1,455
                                                                                          Student Group            Cohort       Rate
  Total                  71.3%          76.5%            76.8%
                                                                                          For Students Needing
  Same                   52.4%          58.1%            58.8%
                                                                                          Developmental Education:
  Other                  19.0%          18.5%            18.0%
                                                                                          Institution                   265      63.4%
                  Average Number of Fall & Spring Semesters                               Peer Group                    415      40.5%
                   and SCH Attempted for Bachelor's Degree                                For Students NOT Needing
                Institution                     Peer Group Average                        Developmental Education:
   Year         Grads       Sem     SCH         Grads     Sem           SCH               Institution                 1,699      69.5%
  FY 2006       1,769       10.28  151.76       1,156    10.45         152.83             Peer Group                    943      71.0%
                                                                                       *Peer Group data is average for peer group.
  FY 2009       2,323        9.96  143.40       1,398    10.57         149.09
  FY 2010       2,358        9.98  145.15       1,366    10.50         149.29
                                                      Online Resume for Prospective Students, Parents and the Public
                                                                  SAM HOUSTON STATE UNIVERSITY
Location: Huntsville, Gulf Coast Region
Doctoral Accountability Peer Group: Texas A&M - Commerce, Texas A&M - Corpus Christi, Texas A&M - Kingsville, Texas Southern Univ, Texas State Univ - San Marcos, Texas Woman's Univ
Out-Of-State Peers: East Tennessee State University, Indiana University Of Pennsylvania - Main Campus, Middle Tennessee State University, University Of North Carolina At Greensboro, University Of South Alabama
Degrees Offered: Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral
Institutional Resumes         Accountability System      Definitions        Institution Home Page


             Enrollment                                                                                                          Admissions
                          Fall 2010                                         Middle 50% of Test Scores, for First-Time                              Application for First-time Undergraduate Admission
     Race/Ethnicity       Number Percent                                           Undergraduates, Fall 2010                                                              Fall 2010
 White                      11,202   65.0%                         Test Section                   ACT                      SAT                                                              Enrolled
 Hispanic                    2,664   15.5%                        Composite                                                                 Race/Ethnicity         Applicants Accepted         All       Top 10%
 African American            2,625   15.2%                        Math                http://www.CollegePortraits.org                   White                         3,517         79.4%     45.1%       12.5%
 Multi-Racial Afr Am             59    .3%                        English                                                               African American              2,174         44.7%     46.7%       13.5%
 Asian                          338   2.0%                        Critical Reading                                                      Multi-Racial Afr Am             127         61.4%     38.5%       20.0%
 International                    2    .0%                                                                                              Hispanic                      2,102         63.2%     33.2%       16.8%
 Other & Unknown                346   2.0%                                                                                              Asian                           129         63.6%     25.6%       23.8%
 Total                      17,236  100.0%                                                                                              International                      0          .0%       .0%         .0%
                                                                                                                                        Other                           193         76.2%     36.7%       14.8%
                                                                                                                                        Total                         8,242         65.5%     41.8%       13.8%

                 Financial Aid                                                                            Costs                                                                  Degrees Awarded
          Need-based Aid for Undergraduates                              Annual Costs for Resident                                  Tuition, Fall 2010                        Type                       FY 2010
                  Enrolled in Fall 2008                                    Undergraduate Student                                Level                $ per SCH                Bachelor's                   3,242
                                % of UGs   Average                         Taking 30 SCH, FY 2011                          Undergraduate                    $163              Master's                       756
         Type of Aid            Receiving  Amount             Type of Cost                      Average Amount             Graduate                         $213              Doctoral                        34
   Grants or Scholarships           34.6%   $4,755            Total Academic Cost                       $7,000          Rates of Tuition per SCH                              Professional                     0
   Loans                            36.9%   $4,131            On-campus Room & Board                    $7,022          Mandatory Fees as Defined by CB                       Total                        4,032
   Work Study                        2.2%   $1,880                                                                      Amount & Percent of Tuition Increase (UGrad)
                                                              Books & Supplies                          $1,084
                                                                                                                        Amount & Percent of Tuition Increase (Grad)
   Grants, Scholarships,                                      Off-Campus Transportation
    Loans or Workstudy              45.3%   $7,086             & Personal Expenses                      $5,046
                                                              Total Cost                              $20,152




                        Instruction                                                                                           Baccalaureate Success
   Measure of Excellence                              Fall 2010                               Graduation Rate of First-time, Full-time                        Number of SCH in Fall & Spring Semesters
   Undergraduate Classes with < 20 Students              31.6%                                         Degree-seeking Students                                  Attempted to Earn a Bachelor's Degree
   Undergraduate Classes with > 50 Students                9.7%                                                Entering                                                                 FY 2010 Average
   % of Teaching Faculty Tenured/Tenure-track            63.6%                               Measure             Fall     Cohort       Rate                       Program                 Sem         SCH
   Student/Faculty Ratio                                   25:1                        4-year Rate Total           2005      2,179      29.7%           Agriculture                        10.25      150.20
       First-time Licensure                                                             Same Institution                                26.8%           Business                            9.92      143.02
           or Certification                                                             Other Institutions                               3.0%           Fine Arts and Architecture         10.18      150.83
      Examination Pass Rate                                                            5-year Rate Total           2004      2,082      49.4%           Health                             10.24      154.68
                          FY 2010                                                       Same Institution                                42.9%           Liberal Arts                       10.20      145.26
        Field               Rate                                                        Other Institutions                               6.5%           Science and Math                   10.20      155.12
  Education*                98.00%                                                     6-year Rate Total           2003      1,772      54.1%           Social Sciences and Service         9.72      142.19
  Law                            %                                                      Same Institution                                45.1%           Technology                         10.96      159.53
  Pharmacy                       %                                                      Other Institutions                               9.0%           All                                 9.98      145.15
  Nursing                        %
  Engineering                    %
*Data for FY 2009
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                     AGENDA ITEM IV-E (2)


Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to a request from
Texas State University-San Marcos for Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)
degrees with a major in Developmental Education


RECOMMENDATION:          Approval and authorization to implement a Ph.D. and an Ed.D. in
                         Developmental Education. Staff recommend approval with the
                         understanding that following implementation of the program the institution
                         will submit five annual reports confirming the presence of faculty and other
                         resources consistent with institutional commitments. The reports will also
                         provide an assessment of student progress.


             BACKGROUND INFORMATION AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

        Texas State University-San Marcos (TxStU-SM) proposes a Ph.D. and an Ed.D. in
Developmental Education (DE). The programs would focus on producing highly trained
researchers, practitioners, and administrators in developmental education through a rigorous
research program that targets theoretical, empirical, and applied issues in developmental
education. Both programs would work collaboratively with stakeholders in the field of
developmental education to conduct professional development and evaluation initiatives
designed to transform the field of developmental education at all levels. The research mission of
the Ph.D. program focuses on the generation of “research-based knowledge that describes,
predicts, explains, and designs theory, processes, practices, and policies of developmental
education”. The first five courses in both programs may be offered in a hybrid format, blending
face-to-face and online instruction. No other Texas public institution currently offers a doctoral
degree in developmental education; Grambling University in Louisiana is the only institution in
the country that offers an Ed.D. in Developmental Education. There is no institution offering a
Ph.D. in Developmental Education.

       As part of the approval consideration process, a site visit to TxStU-SM was conducted on
March 25, 2011, with three out-of-state consultants: Dr. Linda Thompson, Director, McNair
Scholars Programs, Chair of the National Association of Developmental Education Certification
Council, and Professor of Psychology at Harding University; Dr. Dolores Perin, Professor of
Psychology and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University; and Dr. Jeanne Higbee,
Professor of Postsecondary Teaching and Learning, University of Minnesota.




                                                                                            06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (2)
Page 2

                                       NEED

Employment Opportunities    A review of faculty job postings in The Chronicle of Higher
                            Education and Inside Higher Education shows a consistent high
                            demand for faculty in developmental education throughout the
                            country, particularly at the community college level. Faculty
                            employment at the university level includes preparing teachers
                            to work with developmental education areas such as literacy
                            and mathematics with a focus on the developmental education
                            field. The Bureau of Labor Statistics‟ (BLS) 2008 to 2018
                            Employment Projections Report indicates a 2.3 percent growth
                            nationally in educational administration at the postsecondary
                            level, and the Texas Workforce Commission‟s (TWC) 2008 to
                            2018 projections indicate a 10.2 percent projected growth in
                            educational administration at the postsecondary level. Neither
                            the BLS nor TWC disaggregate these projections into specific
                            administrative fields, so it is impossible to ascertain from the
                            projections the true demand and growth for developmental
                            education administrators. BLS projects a 15.1 percent growth
                            for Adult Literacy, Remedial Education and GED teachers, and
                            TWC projects a 22.6 percent growth for the same occupations,
                            supporting the need for administrative personnel for the new
                            teachers and programs.

Projected Enrollment        The Ph.D. program would admit 4 full-time students the first
                            year and have a total of 19 full-time students the fifth year.
                            The Ed.D. program would admit 8 full-time and part-time
                            students the first year and have a total of 35 full-time and
                            part-time students the fifth year. The Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees
                            are anticipated to take four years to complete for full-time
                            students.

Plan to Recruit             TxStU-SM would implement a national marketing effort to
Underrepresented Students   recruit potential underrepresented students for both programs.
                            Program faculty would use Internet-based and print resources
                            including announcements on DE and related national listservs;
                            online and print graduate school guides (e.g.,
                            GraduateSchools.com, and Peterson„s Guide to Graduate
                            Programs in Business, Education, Health and Law); and
                            advertisements in DE and learning support publications and
                            journals (e.g., Journal of College Reading and Learning)
                            TxStU-SM would implement a national marketing effort to
                            recruit potential underrepresented students for both programs.
                            Program faculty would use Internet-based and print resources




                                                                                 06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (2)
Page 3

Plan to Recruit               including announcements on DE and related national listservs;
Underrepresented Students     online and print graduate school guides (e.g.,
(cont)                        GraduateSchools.com, and Peterson„s Guide to Graduate
                              Programs in Business, Education, Health and Law); and
                              advertisements in DE and learning support publications and
                              journals (e.g., Journal of College Reading and Learning,
                              Journal of Developmental Education, Research and Teaching in
                              Developmental Education, Learning Assistance Review) and
                              related disciplines (e.g., Adult Education Quarterly, Adult
                              Learning, Community/Junior College Quarterly of Research and
                              Practice, American Mathematical Society Notices, Diversity
                              Issues in Higher Education, English Journal, Hispanic Outlook,
                              and Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy). The Department
                              would disseminate program information and advertise
                              assistantship and scholarship opportunities at national,
                              regional, and state DE and discipline-related conferences
                              through conference presentations, exhibits, conference
                              programs, and selected conference proceedings.

                              TxStU-SM views retention of underrepresented doctoral
                              candidates as important as recruitment. Program features
                              would increase likelihood of candidate retention and
                              completion. Opportunities for financial support through student
                              grants and fellowships, teaching assistant positions funded
                              through the university, and other positions funded through
                              faculty grants would support retention. A one-hour research
                              seminar for all candidates in each cohort would be required the
                              first three semesters each student was enrolled in their
                              program in order to build community and connect with faculty.
                              An advising and mentoring program would also support
                              retention of underrepresented students.

Existing State Programs       Currently, Texas does not have a Ph.D. or an Ed.D. program
                              with a sole focus on developmental education.

                            QUALITY AND RESOURCES

Faculty                       TxStU-SM has recently hired three new tenured associate
                              professors with established research agendas in developmental
                              education and a new tenure-track assistant professor. Several
                              of the faculty have distance learning teaching experience and
                              have conducted research on the use of distance education and
                              new technology in developmental education. The core faculty
                              have expertise and established research records on
                              developmental literacy, developmental mathematics, learning
                              support, learning theory, motivation, achievement, and degree
                              persistence. Support faculty members for the proposed
                              program have specializations in reading, English, and
                              mathematics and would be available to serve on dissertation
                              committees.


                                                                                   06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (2)
Page 4

Faculty (cont)                 A review of the faculty research activities over the last five
                               years shows an active publication record in developmental
                               education. The nine core faculty members average six
                               refereed publications per year with additional articles and other
                               publications under review. Core faculty have obtained external
                               grants totaling above $1,000,000 for developmental education
                               for individual and partnered projects over the last five years.


Other Personnel                In the first year, 6 doctoral students would receive graduate
                               assistantships, and by the fifth year nineteen doctoral students
                               would receive graduate assistantships. In addition, TxStU-SM
                               has a well-established Office of Distance Education that is
                               positioned to provide support services for possible online or
                               hybrid classes.

Facilities and Equipment       Sufficient faculty and graduate student office space and a
                               gathering space for graduate students for the proposed
                               doctoral programs are available in the recently renovated
                               section of the TxStU-SM College of Education building.

Library, Supplies, Materials   The library has a comprehensive collection of developmental
                               education resources, including electronic subscriptions to
                               developmental education journals. An additional $75,000 has
                               been allocated to expand library resources during the five
                               years of the proposed programs.

Accreditation                  Not Applicable. There are no accrediting agencies for
                               developmental education programs.




                                                                                     06/11
 AGENDA ITEM IV-E (2)
 Page 5

         NEW FIVE-YEAR COSTS                                                 SOURCES OF FUNDING

 Personnel                                              Anticipated New Formula Funding*                     $513,000
   Faculty                         $1,388,041
                                                        Reallocation of Existing Resource1                 0$1,879,381
    Program Admin                    $238,910
                                                        Other TxStU-SM Funding2                              $403,996
    Clerical/Staff                   $429,769

 Facilities and Equipment            $125,000

 Library, Supplies, and
     Materials                       $175,000

 Other Costs

     Graduate Assistants           $2,066,608


 Est. 5-Year Costs               $2,796,377             Est. 5-Year Revenues                               $2,796,377

 The Chief Executive Officer of the institution has certified, and staff has determined,
 that the institution will have funds sufficient to support the proposed program.

 Estimated formula funding generated by the institution in years two through five of the proposed
 program would total $513,000.

 $948,841 based on these figures: 16 FTE students in year two; 25.5 FTE students in year three;
 33.66 FTE students in year four and 39.16 FTE students in year five taking 18 SCH/year at a formula
 rate of $475.13. ($62.19 x weigh factor of 7.64).

*The anticipated level of formula funding in this analysis is a projection. It represents the ideal state
funding scenario derived using the current state funding amounts and the institution‟s projected
enrollment for the program. Given the current budgetary situation, it is likely that the anticipated formula
funding level for this program will be lower than that which has been projected using the current state
funding.
                                                            1
                                                                 Funds from TxStU-SM Auxiliary Reserves
                                                             2
                                                                 Designated tuition and graduate tuition




                                                                                                             06/11
                                                               Online Resume for Legislators and Other Policymakers
                                                                    TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY - SAN MARCOS
Location: San Marcos, Central Region
Doctoral Accountability Peer Group: Sam Houston State Univ, Texas A&M - Commerce, Texas A&M - Corpus Christi, Texas A&M - Kingsville, Texas Southern Univ, Texas Woman's Univ
Out-Of-State Peers: East Tennessee State University, Northern Arizona University, San Jose State University, University Of Nevada - Las Vegas, University Of North Carolina At Greensboro
Degrees Offered: Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral, Professional
Institutional Resumes        Accountability System       Definitions      Institution Home Page



                                  Enrollment                                                                             Funding                                                       Costs
                          Fall 2005        Fall 2009        Fall 2010                                           Total Appropriated Funds                                  Average Annual Total Academic
    Race/Ethnicity        Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent                                              Including Faculty &                                  Costs for Resident Undergraduate
White                       19,070   70.3%   20,242   65.7%   20,359   62.5%                                    Staff Health & Retirement                                     Student Taking 30 SCH
Hispanic                     5,396   19.9%    7,236   23.5%    8,199   25.2%                                 Year             Amount                                                         Texas Rates
African American             1,279    4.7%    1,750    5.7%    1,865    5.7%                                FY 2005              $108,995,883                         Year         Institution     Peer Group Avg
Multi-Racial Afr Am               0    .0%         0    .0%       134    .4%                                FY 2009              $145,699,390                      FY 2006             $5,252             $4,668
Asian                           601   2.2%       797   2.6%       733   2.3%                                FY 2010              $145,986,241                      FY 2010             $7,480             $6,335
International                   398   1.5%       323   1.0%       233    .7%                                     Total Amount of Money                             FY 2011             $7,830             $6,837
Other & Unknown                 385   1.4%       455   1.5%    1,049    3.2%                                      from Any Source In FY
Total                       27,129  100.0%   30,803  100.0%   32,572  100.0%                                 Year             Amount
                                                                                                            FY 2005              $255,811,343
                                                                                                            FY 2009              $366,177,117
                                                                                                            FY 2010              $382,202,602

                                                         Student Success                                                                                Student Success: National Comparison
                 One-Year Persistence of First-time,                                         Graduation Rate of First-time,                                   Graduation Rate of First-time, Degree-seeking Students
             Full-time, Degree Seeking Undergraduates                                 Full-time Degree Seeking Undergraduates                                       after 4 and 6 Years from the Same Institution
                  Enter Fall 2004 Enter Fall 2008 Enter Fall 2009                           After 4 and 6 Years at a Public or                                                (IPEDS National Definition)
  Cohort                  2,753          3,443            3,804                             Independent Institution in Texas                                                                Institution       Out-of-State Peers
  Total                  90.8%          92.0%            91.5%                                     Institution             Peer Group                      Cohort & Duration                   Rate                 Rate
  Same                   74.4%          78.6%            78.6%             Cohort & Duration       Cohort      Rate        Cohort     Rate                  Fall 2001 4-year                        21.0%                 18.0%
  Other                  16.5%          13.4%            12.9%             Fall 2000 4-year          2,520     22.7%         7,865    18.0%                 Fall 2004 4-year                        22.0%                 19.0%
                 Two-Year Persistence of First-time,                       Fall 2004 4-year          2,753     27.3%         9,954    19.6%                 Fall 2005 4-year                        24.0%                 19.4%
             Full-time, Degree Seeking Undergraduates                      Fall 2005 4-year          3,040     30.1%       10,005     22.3%                 Fall 1999 6-year                        52.0%                 44.0%
                  Enter Fall 2003 Enter Fall 2007 Enter Fall 2008          Fall 1998 6-year          2,581     58.6%         7,038    48.0%                 Fall 2002 6-year                        54.0%                 46.0%
  Institution Persistence                                                  Fall 2002 6-year          2,643     63.8%         9,138    46.6%                 Fall 2003 6-year                        56.0%                 46.0%
  Cohort                  2,807          3,238            3,443            Fall 2003 6-year          2,807     65.5%       10,120     45.1%
  Total                  85.5%          86.4%            86.2%
                                                                                              Six-year Graduation & Persistence Rate
  Same                   67.0%          70.3%            69.4%
                                                                                               for First-time Undergraduate Students
  Other                  18.5%          16.1%            16.8%
                                                                                                Requiring Developmental Education
  Peer Group Persistence
                                                                                                            Fall 2004 Cohort
  Cohort                  1,445          1,445            1,455
                                                                                           Student Group            Cohort       Rate
  Total                  71.3%          76.5%            76.8%
                                                                                           For Students Needing
  Same                   52.4%          58.1%            58.8%
                                                                                           Developmental Education:
  Other                  19.0%          18.5%            18.0%
                                                                                           Institution                   266      64.7%
                  Average Number of Fall & Spring Semesters                                Peer Group                    415      40.5%
                   and SCH Attempted for Bachelor's Degree                                 For Students NOT Needing
                Institution                     Peer Group Average                         Developmental Education:
   Year         Grads       Sem     SCH         Grads     Sem            SCH               Institution                 2,475      76.3%
  FY 2006       3,252       10.40  147.19       1,156    10.45          152.83             Peer Group                    943      71.0%
                                                                                        *Peer Group data is average for peer group.
  FY 2009       3,866       10.16  141.46       1,398    10.57          149.09
  FY 2010       3,852       10.12  141.47       1,366    10.50          149.29
                                                       Online Resume for Prospective Students, Parents and the Public
                                                                TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY - SAN MARCOS
Location: San Marcos, Central Region
Doctoral Accountability Peer Group: Sam Houston State Univ, Texas A&M - Commerce, Texas A&M - Corpus Christi, Texas A&M - Kingsville, Texas Southern Univ, Texas Woman's Univ
Out-Of-State Peers: East Tennessee State University, Northern Arizona University, San Jose State University, University Of Nevada - Las Vegas, University Of North Carolina At Greensboro
Degrees Offered: Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral, Professional
Institutional Resumes        Accountability System       Definitions      Institution Home Page


             Enrollment                                                                                                           Admissions
                          Fall 2010                                          Middle 50% of Test Scores, for First-Time                              Application for First-time Undergraduate Admission
     Race/Ethnicity       Number Percent                                            Undergraduates, Fall 2010                                                              Fall 2010
 White                      20,359   62.5%                          Test Section                   ACT                      SAT                                                              Enrolled
 Hispanic                    8,199   25.2%                         Composite                                                                 Race/Ethnicity         Applicants Accepted         All       Top 10%
 African American            1,865    5.7%                         Math                http://www.CollegePortraits.org                   White                         7,222         63.2%     51.9%       12.2%
 Multi-Racial Afr Am            134    .4%                         English                                                               African American              1,022         48.6%     51.1%       14.2%
 Asian                          733   2.3%                         Critical Reading                                                      Multi-Racial Afr Am             115         59.1%     60.3%       22.0%
 International                  233    .7%                                                                                               Hispanic                      4,562         61.7%     44.5%       15.3%
 Other & Unknown             1,049    3.2%                                                                                               Asian                           349         58.7%     39.0%       11.3%
 Total                      32,572  100.0%                                                                                               International                     34        47.1%     43.8%         .0%
                                                                                                                                         Other                           309         64.7%     49.0%       15.3%
                                                                                                                                         Total                        13,613         61.5%     49.0%       13.4%

                 Financial Aid                                                                              Costs                                                                 Degrees Awarded
          Need-based Aid for Undergraduates                               Annual Costs for Resident                                  Tuition, Fall 2010                        Type                       FY 2010
                  Enrolled in Fall 2008                                     Undergraduate Student                                Level                $ per SCH                Bachelor's                   5,299
                                % of UGs   Average                          Taking 30 SCH, FY 2011                          Undergraduate                    $191              Master's                     1,246
         Type of Aid            Receiving  Amount              Type of Cost                      Average Amount             Graduate                         $241              Doctoral                        26
   Grants or Scholarships           35.6%   $4,797             Total Academic Cost                       $7,830          Rates of Tuition per SCH                              Professional                     0
   Loans                            38.4%   $4,220             On-campus Room & Board                    $7,310          Mandatory Fees as Defined by CB                       Total                        6,571
   Work Study                        3.6%   $1,888                                                                       Amount & Percent of Tuition Increase (UGrad)
                                                               Books & Supplies                          $1,050
                                                                                                                         Amount & Percent of Tuition Increase (Grad)
   Grants, Scholarships,                                       Off-Campus Transportation
    Loans or Workstudy              44.8%   $7,584              & Personal Expenses                      $3,410
                                                               Total Cost                              $19,600




                        Instruction                                                                                            Baccalaureate Success
   Measure of Excellence                               Fall 2010                               Graduation Rate of First-time, Full-time                        Number of SCH in Fall & Spring Semesters
   Undergraduate Classes with < 20 Students               30.1%                                         Degree-seeking Students                                  Attempted to Earn a Bachelor's Degree
   Undergraduate Classes with > 50 Students               14.6%                                                 Entering                                                                 FY 2010 Average
   % of Teaching Faculty Tenured/Tenure-track             53.4%                               Measure             Fall     Cohort       Rate                       Program                 Sem         SCH
   Student/Faculty Ratio                                    29:1                        4-year Rate Total           2005      3,040      30.1%           Agriculture                        10.45      140.95
       First-time Licensure                                                              Same Institution                                26.8%           Business                            9.41      132.44
           or Certification                                                              Other Institutions                               3.3%           Engineering                        10.75      163.53
      Examination Pass Rate                                                             5-year Rate Total           2004      2,753      55.0%           Fine Arts and Architecture         10.69      145.09
                          FY 2010                                                        Same Institution                                47.3%           Health                             10.18      147.07
        Field               Rate                                                         Other Institutions                               7.7%           Liberal Arts                       10.04      138.66
  Education*                99.00%                                                      6-year Rate Total           2003      2,807      65.5%           Science and Math                   10.63      149.00
  Law                            %                                                       Same Institution                                55.0%           Social Sciences and Service        10.31      145.09
  Pharmacy                       %                                                       Other Institutions                              10.5%           Technology                         11.23      164.61
  Nursing                        %                                                                                                                       All                                10.12      141.47
  Engineering                    %
*Data for FY 2009
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                    AGENDA ITEM IV-E (3)


Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to a request from
The University of Texas at El Paso for a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree with a major in
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


RECOMMENDATION:          Approval and authorization to implement a Ph.D. in Ecology and
                         Evolutionary Biology. Staff recommend approval with the understanding
                         that following implementation of the program the institution will submit five
                         annual reports confirming the presence of faculty and other resources
                         consistent with institutional commitments. The reports will also provide an
                         assessment of student progress.


             BACKGROUND INFORMATION AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

        The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) proposes a Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary
Biology (EEB). The proposed program would focus on the scientific study of the relationships
and interactions across levels of biological organization, with several research disciplines
coalescing into the emerging field of ecology and evolutionary biology. The program would
provide doctoral students with high-level training in molecular evolutionary biology and
phylogenetics and prepare them to conduct research in ecology and environmental biology with
a regional emphasis at the UTEP-sponsored Indio Mountains Research Station, Rio Bosque
Wetlands Park, Herpetological Collection, Herbarium Laboratory, Greenbaum Laboratory
(evolutionary genetics), Laboratory for Environmental Biology, and the campus Bioscience
Research Building laboratories. Through focusing on ecology of the Northern Chihuahuan
Desert and IPY-ROAM projects in the Antarctic, UTEP’s proposed program would create a
specialized academic niche within the extreme climates research field. Students in the
proposed program would have opportunities to participate in interdisciplinary research
conducted by faculty in the existing Ph.D. in Pathobiology and at the Border Biomedical
Research Center. Additionally, the proposed program would provide the Department of
Homeland Security and other federal agencies in the region with additional doctorally trained
research experts to expand examination of the ecological impact of military training on desert
regions.

        As part of the approval consideration process, a site visit to UTEP was conducted on
October 13, 2010, with three out-of-state consultants: Dr. Daniel Blumstein, Professor of
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Chair of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary
Biology at the University of California, Los Angeles; Dr. Nicholas Strausfeld, Professor of
Evolutionary Biology and Neuroscience at the University of Arizona; and Dr. Alan Prather,
Associate Professor of Plant Biology and Director of Graduate Studies at Michigan State
University.




                                                                                           06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (3)
Page 2



                                       NEED

Employment Opportunities    As the proposed UTEP Ph.D. program is in an emerging field,
                            the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Projections 2008 to
                            2018 Report provides workforce information relevant to
                            ecology and evolutionary biology under three areas:
                            Environmental Scientists including Health (27.86 percent
                            projected increase in employment); Biological Scientists, All
                            Other (18.76 percent increase in employment); and
                            Conservation Scientist (11.92 percent increase in employment).
                            The Texas Workforce Commission’s projections from 2008 to
                            2018 include a 23 percent increase in employment for
                            Environmental Scientists including Health with 395 jobs
                            openings each year; a 22 percent increase in employment for
                            Biological Scientists, All Other with 95 job openings each year;
                            and a 14 percent increase in employment for Conservation
                            Scientist with 15 job opening each year. Professional job
                            advertisements seem to support the workforce projections. In
                            May 2011, the Evolution Directory-EvoDIR, an evolutionary
                            biology web site job bank, lists more than 70 positions in
                            evolutionary biology; Nature.com lists 48 job openings this
                            year for ecology and evolutionary biology. As of May 2011,
                            USA Jobs, the official job site of the federal government, lists
                            more than 25 jobs nationwide for the keywords “ecology”,
                            “evolutionary”, and “biology”. As of May 2011, the Ecology
                            Society of America had 18 positions listed, the Society for
                            Developmental Biology listed 17 positions, and the American
                            Society for Cell Biology listed 46 positions. The types of
                            positions for graduates with the EEB Ph.D. include research
                            scientist, director, community project manager, ecologist, post-
                            doctoral fellow, and university faculty.

Projected Enrollment        The program plans to admit 8 students in the first year,
                            increasing to 26 students by the fourth year and 28 students
                            by the fifth year. The degree is anticipated to take five years to
                            complete.

Plan to Recruit             UTEP has a history of successfully recruiting and retaining
Underrepresented Students   students from underrepresented groups, particularly Hispanics.
                            In 2009, 46 percent of the UTEP’s doctoral students were
                            Hispanic.

Existing State Programs     There are two comparable doctoral programs at public
                            institutions in Texas. The University of Texas Austin’s Ph.D. in
                            Ecology, Evolution and Behavior had 90 applicants in 2009 and
                            accepted 30 students. The University of Houston’s Ph.D. in
                            Biology with an Ecology and Evolution track had 13 applicants
                            in 2009 and accepted 4 students. Texas A&M University has
                                                                                   06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (3)
Page 3
                             an Interdisciplinary Research Program in Ecology and
                             Evolutionary Biology that allows students from the 15 member
                             departments to work on research teams, but the institution
                             does not offer a full degree in this area.

                           QUALITY AND RESOURCES

Faculty                      The core faculty members represent a wide range of specialties
                             that would meet the needs of the ecology and evolutionary
                             biology doctoral program including vertebrate zoology,
                             population biology, environmental biology, plant physiological
                             ecology, botany, zoology, biology, wildlife and fisheries
                             sciences, and ecology and evolutionary biology. The
                             Department of Biological Sciences developed a five-year
                             strategic plan in 2004 that included an agreement on
                             development of the curriculum in this field and prioritizing
                             faculty hiring to support the existing undergraduate core
                             curriculum and a possible Ph.D. program. The support faculty
                             members for the EEB program also have diverse specializations
                             in the field that include biochemistry, biophysics, immunology,
                             microbiology, biomedical science, botany, cell biology,
                             pharmacology and molecular and cell biology and would be
                             available to serve on dissertation committees.

                             A review of the faculty research activities over the last five
                             years shows that the eleven core faculty members average six
                             refereed publications per year, with additional articles and
                             other publications under review, and wrote seven book
                             chapters. Faculty members have a consistent record of grant-
                             funded research projects individually and in partnership with
                             other institutions. Core faculty have obtained $8,563,653 in
                             external research funds over the last five years. Faculty
                             members have also directed an average of five graduate
                             student research projects and/or served on thesis/dissertation
                             committees during the last five years.

Other Personnel              A collections manager/curator would be hired in year two, and
                             a part-time grants and contracts specialists would be hired
                             during year one.

Facilities and Equipment     Sufficient office and lab space exists for the proposed EEB
                             program in UTEP’s recently constructed Bioscience Research
                             Building. In addition, UTEP has a number of existing facilities
                             that would be used including the Herbarium Laboratory,
                             Greenbaum Laboratory (evolutionary genetics), and the
                             Laboratory for Environmental Biology, Indio Mountains
                             Research Station, Rio Bosque Wetlands Park, Border
                             Biomedical Research Center, Regional Geospatial Service
                             Canter, and the Centennial Museum.

                                                                                  06/11
 AGENDA ITEM IV-E (3)
 Page 4
 Library, Supplies, Materials                      The UTEP library has a variety of resources in this field, and an
                                                   additional $24,869 has been allocated to strengthen library
                                                   resources.

 Accreditation                                     Not Applicable. There are no accrediting agencies for ecology
                                                   and evolutionary biology programs.




            NEW FIVE-YEAR COSTS                                                SOURCES OF FUNDING

 Personnel                                $1,507,198          Anticipated New Formula Funding*           $1,902,723
    Faculty                                 $625,188
    Program                                 $278,548          Reallocation of Existing Resources            $637,378
        Administration
 Facilities and Equipment                 $1,007,600
 Library                                     $24,869          Federal Funding1                              $637,279
 Supplies, and Materials                     $25,000

 Other Expenditures                                           Other Funding2                                $275,768
    Faculty Start-up                           $300,000
    Graduate Assistants                        $603,462


 Est. 5-Year Costs                      $2,864,667            Est. 5-Year Revenues                     $3,453,148

 The Chief Executive Officer of the institution has certified, and staff has determined,
 that the institution will have funds sufficient to support the proposed program.

 Estimated formula funding generated by the institution in years two through five of the proposed
 program would total $1,902,723 based on these figures: 13 students in year two; 19 students in year
 three; 26 students in year four and 28 students in year five taking 21 SCH/year at a formula rate of
 $1,902,723. ($62.19 x weigh factor of 20.05).

*The anticipated level of formula funding in this analysis is a projection. It represents the ideal state
funding scenario derived using the current state funding amounts and the institution’s projected
enrollment for the program. Given the current budgetary situation, it is likely that the anticipated formula
funding level for this program will be lower than that which has been projected using the current state
funding.




 1
     Federal Funding (In-hand)
 2
     Designated and Board Authorized tuition
                                                                                                            06/11
                                                              Online Resume for Legislators and Other Policymakers
                                                                    THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO
Location: El Paso, Upper Rio Grande Region
Emerging Research Accountability Peer Group: Texas Tech Univ, UT Arlington, UT Dallas, UT San Antonio, Univ of Houston, Univ of North Texas
Out-Of-State Peers: Florida Atlantic University - Boca Raton, San Diego State University, University Of Akron Main Campus, University Of New Mexico - Main Campus, University Of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Degrees Offered: Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral
Institutional Resumes        Accountability System         Definitions       Institution Home Page



                                  Enrollment                                                                            Funding                                                      Costs
                         Fall 2005        Fall 2009        Fall 2010                                           Total Appropriated Funds                                  Average Annual Total Academic
    Race/Ethnicity       Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent                                              Including Faculty &                                  Costs for Resident Undergraduate
White                       2,277   11.8%    2,172   10.4%    2,198   10.0%                                    Staff Health & Retirement                                     Student Taking 30 SCH
Hispanic                   13,945   72.4%   15,973   76.1%   16,802   76.2%                                 Year             Amount                                                         Texas Rates
African American               477   2.5%       635   3.0%       618   2.8%                                FY 2005               $81,751,881                         Year         Institution     Peer Group Avg
Multi-Racial Afr Am              0    .0%         0    .0%        17    .1%                                FY 2009              $111,577,682                      FY 2006             $4,886             $5,610
Asian                          239   1.2%       282   1.3%       274   1.2%                                FY 2010              $115,852,435                      FY 2010             $6,224             $8,138
International               2,134   11.1%    1,821    8.7%    1,848    8.4%                                     Total Amount of Money                             FY 2011             $6,504             $8,480
Other & Unknown                185   1.0%        94    .4%       294   1.3%                                      from Any Source In FY
Total                      19,257  100.0%   20,977  100.0%   22,051  100.0%                                 Year             Amount
                                                                                                           FY 2005              $220,194,816
                                                                                                           FY 2009              $282,459,634
                                                                                                           FY 2010              $331,421,463

                                                        Student Success                                                                                Student Success: National Comparison
                 One-Year Persistence of First-time,                                         Graduation Rate of First-time,                                  Graduation Rate of First-time, Degree-seeking Students
             Full-time, Degree Seeking Undergraduates                                 Full-time Degree Seeking Undergraduates                                      after 4 and 6 Years from the Same Institution
                  Enter Fall 2004 Enter Fall 2008 Enter Fall 2009                           After 4 and 6 Years at a Public or                                               (IPEDS National Definition)
  Cohort                       .         2,060            2,281                             Independent Institution in Texas                                                               Institution       Out-of-State Peers
  Total                        .        82.7%            83.9%                                     Institution             Peer Group                     Cohort & Duration                   Rate                 Rate
  Same                         .        71.3%            73.2%             Cohort & Duration       Cohort      Rate        Cohort     Rate                 Fall 2001 4-year                         5.0%                 12.2%
  Other                        .        11.4%            10.7%             Fall 2000 4-year          2,018      4.4%       15,796     18.0%                Fall 2004 4-year                         4.0%                 15.4%
                 Two-Year Persistence of First-time,                       Fall 2004 4-year          2,321      8.0%       19,504     22.3%                Fall 2005 4-year                         5.0%                 16.0%
             Full-time, Degree Seeking Undergraduates                      Fall 2005 4-year          2,181     10.0%       18,940     22.6%                Fall 1999 6-year                        28.0%                 41.6%
                  Enter Fall 2003 Enter Fall 2007 Enter Fall 2008          Fall 1998 6-year          1,639     29.7%       13,779     48.3%                Fall 2002 6-year                        31.0%                 43.8%
  Institution Persistence                                                  Fall 2002 6-year          2,279     33.8%       18,514     52.4%                Fall 2003 6-year                        32.0%                 44.6%
  Cohort                  2,421          2,017            2,060            Fall 2003 6-year          2,421     35.0%       20,741     54.3%
  Total                  72.1%          77.5%            75.7%
                                                                                             Six-year Graduation & Persistence Rate
  Same                   53.5%          59.9%            60.6%
                                                                                              for First-time Undergraduate Students
  Other                  18.6%          17.6%            15.1%
                                                                                               Requiring Developmental Education
  Peer Group Persistence
                                                                                                           Fall 2004 Cohort
  Cohort                  2,963          3,022            3,062
                                                                                          Student Group            Cohort       Rate
  Total                  81.4%          81.4%            82.0%
                                                                                          For Students Needing
  Same                   57.8%          58.6%            60.0%
                                                                                          Developmental Education:
  Other                  23.6%          22.7%            22.0%
                                                                                          Institution                 1,136      47.3%
                  Average Number of Fall & Spring Semesters                               Peer Group                    473      51.4%
                   and SCH Attempted for Bachelor's Degree                                For Students NOT Needing
                Institution                     Peer Group Average                        Developmental Education:
   Year         Grads       Sem     SCH         Grads     Sem            SCH              Institution                 1,068      66.2%
  FY 2006       1,104       11.53  155.18       2,281    10.60          149.11            Peer Group                  2,173      73.1%
                                                                                       *Peer Group data is average for peer group.
  FY 2009       1,666       11.25  145.38       2,596    10.53          145.21
  FY 2010       1,733       11.13  145.24       2,628    10.46          145.29
                                                      Online Resume for Prospective Students, Parents and the Public
                                                                THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO
Location: El Paso, Upper Rio Grande Region
Emerging Research Accountability Peer Group: Texas Tech Univ, UT Arlington, UT Dallas, UT San Antonio, Univ of Houston, Univ of North Texas
Out-Of-State Peers: Florida Atlantic University - Boca Raton, San Diego State University, University Of Akron Main Campus, University Of New Mexico - Main Campus, University Of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Degrees Offered: Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral
Institutional Resumes        Accountability System         Definitions       Institution Home Page


             Enrollment                                                                                                           Admissions
                          Fall 2010                                          Middle 50% of Test Scores, for First-Time                              Application for First-time Undergraduate Admission
     Race/Ethnicity       Number Percent                                            Undergraduates, Fall 2010                                                              Fall 2010
 White                       2,198   10.0%                          Test Section                   ACT                      SAT                                                              Enrolled
 Hispanic                   16,802   76.2%                         Composite                                                                 Race/Ethnicity         Applicants Accepted         All       Top 10%
 African American               618   2.8%                         Math                http://www.CollegePortraits.org                   White                           596         96.1%     41.7%       21.8%
 Multi-Racial Afr Am             17    .1%                         English                                                               African American                217         95.9%     31.7%       12.1%
 Asian                          274   1.2%                         Critical Reading                                                      Multi-Racial Afr Am                8      100.0%      37.5%       33.3%
 International               1,848    8.4%                                                                                               Hispanic                      4,048         97.0%     54.7%       14.9%
 Other & Unknown                294   1.3%                                                                                               Asian                             53        92.5%     38.8%        5.3%
 Total                      22,051  100.0%                                                                                               International                   190         97.9%     94.1%        3.4%
                                                                                                                                         Other                           151         96.7%     59.6%        8.0%
                                                                                                                                         Total                         5,263         96.8%     53.7%       14.4%

                 Financial Aid                                                                             Costs                                                                  Degrees Awarded
          Need-based Aid for Undergraduates                              Annual Costs for Resident                                   Tuition, Fall 2010                        Type                       FY 2010
                  Enrolled in Fall 2008                                    Undergraduate Student                                 Level                $ per SCH                Bachelor's                   3,031
                                % of UGs   Average                         Taking 30 SCH, FY 2011                           Undergraduate                    $169              Master's                       888
         Type of Aid            Receiving  Amount             Type of Cost                      Average Amount              Graduate                         $227              Doctoral                        54
   Grants or Scholarships           51.2%   $5,333            Total Academic Cost                       $6,504           Rates of Tuition per SCH                              Professional                     0
   Loans                            37.1%   $4,228            On-campus Room & Board                    $8,426           Mandatory Fees as Defined by CB                       Total                        3,973
   Work Study                        2.9%   $2,827                                                                       Amount & Percent of Tuition Increase (UGrad)
                                                              Books & Supplies                          $1,335
                                                                                                                         Amount & Percent of Tuition Increase (Grad)
   Grants, Scholarships,                                      Off-Campus Transportation
    Loans or Workstudy              58.3%   $7,511             & Personal Expenses                      $3,588
                                                              Total Cost                              $19,853




                        Instruction                                                                                            Baccalaureate Success
   Measure of Excellence                               Fall 2010                               Graduation Rate of First-time, Full-time                        Number of SCH in Fall & Spring Semesters
   Undergraduate Classes with < 20 Students               31.8%                                         Degree-seeking Students                                  Attempted to Earn a Bachelor's Degree
   Undergraduate Classes with > 50 Students               11.1%                                                 Entering                                                                 FY 2010 Average
   % of Teaching Faculty Tenured/Tenure-track             62.8%                               Measure             Fall     Cohort       Rate                       Program                 Sem         SCH
   Student/Faculty Ratio                                    21:1                        4-year Rate Total           2005      2,181      10.0%           Business                           11.03      146.15
       First-time Licensure                                                              Same Institution                                 9.6%           Engineering                        11.07      155.13
           or Certification                                                              Other Institutions                                .4%           Fine Arts and Architecture         11.73      154.27
      Examination Pass Rate                                                             5-year Rate Total           2004      2,321      24.2%           Health                             11.35      138.66
                          FY 2010                                                        Same Institution                                22.7%           Liberal Arts                       11.54      144.29
        Field               Rate                                                         Other Institutions                               1.6%           Science and Math                   10.31      147.08
  Education*                91.00%                                                      6-year Rate Total           2003      2,421      35.0%           Social Sciences and Service        10.95      141.54
  Law                            %                                                       Same Institution                                31.5%           All                                11.13      145.24
  Pharmacy                       %                                                       Other Institutions                               3.5%
  Nursing                    85.3%
  Engineering                64.4%
*Data for FY 2009
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                    AGENDA ITEM IV-E (4)

Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to a request
from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston for a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
degree with a major in Rehabilitation Sciences


RECOMMENDATION:               Approval and authorization to implement a Doctor of Philosophy
                              (Ph.D.) degree with a major in Rehabilitation Sciences. Staff
                              recommend approval with the understanding that following
                              implementation of the program the institution will submit five annual
                              reports assessing progress in the implementation of the proposal.


                      BACKGROUND AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

       The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) proposes a Doctor of
Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree with a major in Rehabilitation Sciences. The purpose of this doctoral
program is to prepare researchers who are formally trained in rehabilitation, chronic disease,
and disability and to improve strategies for prevention and treatment of disabilities. UTMB
would coordinate the resources and expertise in collaborating departments and schools to
provide didactic, clinical research, and laboratory experiences necessary to prepare students as
independent rehabilitation scientists. The program would be administered through the
Graduate School of Biomedical Science as an interdisciplinary research degree.

        In 1999, UTMB identified 20 core faculty members with primary appointments in a
variety of departments across the health science center interested in participating in
collaborative rehabilitation research and planning a curriculum in rehabilitation sciences. UTMB
was successful in obtaining a postdoctoral training grant from the National Institute on
Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). From 1998-2000, UTMB began constructing an
interdisciplinary curriculum consistent with the Institute on Medicine (IOM) report and received
planning authority from the Coordinating Board. A number of core rehabilitation sciences
faculty had appointments through the graduate program in Preventive Medicine and
Community Health (PMCH). The partnership with an established graduate program allowed
several courses to be shared (research design, biostatistics, and epidemiology), and the core
faculty developed courses relevant to the rehabilitation sciences curriculum. In 2001, UTMB
obtained a T32 National Research Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This
National Center of Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR) supports pre-doctoral students in
the new curriculum in rehabilitation sciences. In 2001, based on the progress made in
establishing the rehabilitation sciences curriculum and the success in obtaining external
funding to support both predoctoral and postdoctoral fellows, UTMB authorized the
establishment of an institution-wide Center for Rehabilitation Sciences. In 2001, the School of
Health Professions created a Division of Rehabilitation Sciences.

       UTMB has been successful in maintaining its training grant funding at the pre- and
postdoctoral levels. In 2007, UTMB received a K12 Rehabilitation Research Development award
from NIH to support tenure-track faculty who are physical or occupational therapists to
develop research careers ($4.9 million).
                                                                                          06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (4)
Page 2

       In 2008, the UTMB Rehabilitation Sciences Curriculum ranked among the top Ph.D.
programs in the nation among kinesiology, exercise science, and rehabilitation science
(Chronicle of Higher Education). In 2010, UTMB secured an R24 resource infrastructure grant
to support research and training in the use of large administrative datasets (NIH R24
HD065702, $4.1 million).

        For the proposed program, UTMB would admit students with baccalaureate degrees
who would enroll in coursework equivalent to three years of study (81-92 SCH) and would
require a dissertation. Students with a master’s degree would be required to complete didactic
coursework equivalent to two years of study (55-72 SCH) and a dissertation.

          The conceptual framework for the curriculum for the proposed program is based on the
World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and
Health. Components of the model include body structure and functioning (physiological
functions of body systems such as vision, hearing, mobility, and pain), activity (ability to
perform a task in the manner or range considered normal), and participation (person’s ability
to fulfill expected social and cultural roles based on what is expected given a person’s age, sex,
social status, and cultural setting).

        To begin establishing an infrastructure for rehabilitation research and advanced
graduate education, UTMB based its work on two IOM reports, which helped raise awareness
of the need for research related to disability and chronic disease: Enabling America and
Disability in America: A National Agenda for Prevention. The later report states that disabilities
and chronic diseases will be the major public health issues in the U.S. in the next twenty years.

        As part of the approval consideration process, a site visit to UTMB was made with three
out-of-state consultants:

      William C. Mann, OTR, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor and Chair, Department of
       Occupational Therapy and Ph.D. Program in Rehabilitation Science; Director, Center for
       Telehealth, The University of Florida; Director, Rehabilitation Outcomes Research
       Center, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System.

      Peter Esselman, MD, Professor and Chair, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine,
       University of Washington

      Mark W. Rogers, PT, PhD, FAPTA, Professor and Vice Chair for Research; Director, PhD
       Program in Physical Rehabilitation Science, Department of Physical Therapy and
       Rehabilitation Science; Professor, Departments of Neurology and Anatomy and
       Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine

                                             NEED

Employment Opportunities              To date, 15 students have graduated from the
                                      Rehabilitation Sciences curriculum at UTMB. All graduates
                                      are employed in positions directly related to their
                                      professional skills and training. The employers identified
                                      are UTHSC-SA Department of Physical Therapy, King
                                      Saud University Department of Rehabilitation Sciences,
                                      Duke University Division of Exercise and Nutrition,
                                      Amedisys Home Health, Johnson Space Center (NASA)
                                                                                            06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (4)
Page 3

                            Space Life Sciences Unit, Texas Women’s University
                            Department of Physical Therapy, University of Oklahoma
                            School Rehabilitation Sciences, UT Southwestern Medical
                            Center, Johnson & Johnson Research Scientist, Innovation
                            Neurotronics, Inc. (Austin, TX), and UTMB Department of
                            Physical Therapy, and Division of Rehabilitation Sciences.

                            The two primary goals of Healthy People 2010; the U.S.
                            Department of Health and Human Services’ plan, are to
                            increase the quality and years of healthy life for all
                            Americans and eliminate health disparities. In a recent
                            publication on Disability and Secondary Conditions (Focus
                            Area 6, Healthy People 2010), the U.S. Surgeon General
                            stated that the goals of increased quality and years of life
                            and the elimination of health disparities are important for
                            persons with disabilities. He noted that a new generation
                            of researchers is needed to achieve these goals.

Projected Enrollment        UTMB expects one to two new full-time equivalent (FTE)
                            students to enroll each year for the first five years of the
                            program, in addition to the 12 students currently enrolled and
                            taking courses in the Rehabilitation Sciences curriculum.

Existing State Programs     There is one additional Ph.D. program in Rehabilitation
                            Sciences offered at Texas Tech University Health Sciences
                            Center (TTUHSC) in Lubbock, located approximately 568 miles
                            from Galveston. The TTUHSC program was approved in May
                            2009 and has accepted its first cohort of students. TTUHSC
                            currently has seven students enrolled and anticipate enrolling
                            10 to 12 students per year. There have been no graduates
                            from the program at this time.

Plan To Recruit             UTMB reports success in recruiting students from
Underrepresented Students   underrepresented groups in the Rehabilitation Sciences
                            curriculum and there are no notable differences in gender.
                            UTMB uses multiple mechanisms to recruit and retain students
                            from underrepresented groups, including the Graduate School
                            of Biomedical Sciences’ early enrollment program, the Summer
                            Undergraduate Research Program, the Bridging Master’s
                            Students to the PhD (NIH grant) that also partners with
                            minority-serving institutions in Texas to support master’s
                            students and enroll them after graduation into a Ph.D.
                            program, and the PREPing to a Biomedical PhD (NIH grant)
                            that also partners with minority-serving institutions to recruit
                            recent graduates (within three years) to complete a year of
                            research and some coursework at UTMB. Students in the
                            PREPing program are encouraged to enroll in a Ph.D. program
                            at UTMB.



                                                                                  06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (4)
Page 4

                                 QUALITY AND RESOURCES

Faculty                             UTMB identified 27 faculty who have been involved in
                                    interdisciplinary rehabilitation and disability research, with
                                    external grants totaling $6.2 million as principal investigators,
                                    and more than 400 articles published or in-press in refereed
                                    journals since 2001. The core faculty in the interdisciplinary
                                    program have primary appointments in a variety of
                                    departments including Preventative Medicine and Community
                                    Health, Physical Therapy, Population Health Sciences,
                                    Occupational Therapy, Orthopedic Surgery and Rehabilitation,
                                    and Internal Medicine. ($262,145 reallocated costs for five
                                    years)

Other Personnel                     Costs for an administrative manager and clerical personnel are
                                    reallocated. Increases of three percent are budgeted annually.
                                    ($216,818 five-year cost)

Facilities and Equipment            No facilities have been added or modified in preparation for
                                    the proposed doctoral program. Faculty and staff use existing
                                    space of the graduate program and appropriate departments.
                                    Courses attended by rehabilitation sciences students are held
                                    primarily in Ewing Hall, which houses the PMCH Department
                                    and graduate program. Ewing Hall has 123,892 square feet of
                                    floor space with laboratories, offices, conference rooms, and
                                    classroom space.

Library, Supplies, Materials        No new library holdings were necessary to support the
                                    proposed program since existing resources were determined
                                    to be fully adequate. Brett Kirkpatrick, Library Director and
                                    Associate Vice President for Academic Resources, certified that
                                    the library resources are adequate to support the proposed
                                    program.

Educator Certification Program      Not applicable.




                                                                                           06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (4)
Page 5


Accreditation                                 No external accreditation is available for rehabilitation sciences
                                              programs

            FIVE-YEAR COSTS                                                   SOURCES OF FUNDING

Personnel1                                      $0              Other State Funding*                              $638,257

Supplies and Materials                 $105,121                 Federal funding**                              $1,799,330

                                                                Formula Funding                                   $169,680

Other- Travel and                      $318,548                 Other funding                                     $468,542
Tuition/fees                                                    (identify)+

Est. 5-Year Costs                     $423,669                  Est. 5-Year                                  $3,075,809
                                                                Revenues

The Chief Executive Officer of the institution has certified, and staff has
determined, that the institution will have funds sufficient to support the proposed
program.

¹The costs for faculty and staff salaries/benefits and general operating costs will continue to be integrated into existing
budgets within the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health (SOM), the Division of Rehabilitation
Sciences, and the Center for Rehabilitation Sciences. Cost for ten graduate students, including stipends, tuition/fees, travel,
and supplies/materials are budgeted within NIH training and research grants, the Center for Rehabilitation Sciences,
endowment accounts, and other faculty-generated sources.

*Other state funding includes funds already allocated to departments that support faculty and staff salaries/benefits and
general operating expenses.

**NIH T32 training grant, NASA research grant, NIH R01 research grant

+Other funding includes the Center for Rehabilitation Sciences, endowment funds and other faculty-generated sources.




                                                                                                                06/11
                                                           Online Resume for Legislators and Other Policymakers
                                                       THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL BRANCH AT GALVESTON
Location: Galveston, Gulf Coast Region
Health Related Institution Accountability Peer Group: Texas A&M System HSC, Texas Tech Univ HSC, UNT HSC, UT HSC Houston, UT HSC San Antonio, UT HSC Tyler, UT M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, UT Southwestern
Medical Center
Out-Of-State Peers: Medical College Of Georgia, University Of California-San Francisco, University Of Virginia Health Science Center
Degrees Offered: Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral, Professional
Institutional Resumes         Accountability System        Definitions      Institution Home Page

                              Enrollment                                                                                                     Costs
               Category                    Fall 2005    Fall 2009   Fall 2010                                                Average Annual Total Academic Costs for
  Medical School Students                       830          920         923                                                          Resident Full-time Student
  Total Enrollment                           2,172        2,430       2,660                                                 Undergraduate Student            Graduate Student
  Physicians Certified in Residency             603          464         488                                                                    Peer                           Peer
                                                                                                           Year             Institution        Group         Institution      Group
                                                                                                         FY 2006                $3,409      $2,835               $2,410         $2,776
                                                                                                         FY 2010                $5,473      $4,772               $3,368         $3,795
                                                                                                         FY 2011                $7,219      $6,234               $3,867         $4,222




                                                                                       Student Success
                     Nursing and Allied Health Degrees Awarded                                                                    National Data: Nursing or Allied Health Degrees Awarded
                     FY 2005               FY 2009             FY 2010                                                          FY 2004                     FY 2008                    FY 2009
                                 Peer                  Peer                Peer                                                              Out-of-state                 Out-of-state               Out-of-state
      Type           Institution Group     Institution Group   Institution Group                                Year            Institution Peers Ave.      Institution Peers Ave.     Institution   Peers Ave.
  Bachelor's            223        147        251        184      312        217                              Associate's               .              .            .               .          .               .
  Master's              126         84        183         94      211         92                               Bachelor's            210           180           279            138         251            142
  Doctoral                 4         1         11          5         2         3                                 Master's             98           121           181            148         183            151
  Professional             0         1         21         16       38         22                                 Doctoral              4             12             .             67           .             84



                                                            Percent of Medical School Students              Pass Rate of Medical School Students
    Research Expenditures                                         Practicing Primary Care                   on Part 1 or Part 2 of Any Examination
  Year                                    Amount
                                                                 in Texas after Graduation                          for a Medical License
  FY 2004                             $132,768,911
                                                                                          Peer                                              Peer
  FY 2008                             $153,461,284
                                                            Year        Institution      Group             Year          Institution       Group
  FY 2009                             $153,713,920
                                                          FY 2005         26.12%           36.29%        FY 2005              97.10%          94.41%
                                                          FY 2009         30.40%           31.35%        FY 2009              97.00%          96.54%
                                                          FY 2010         19.79%           31.12%        FY 2010              96.85%          96.19%



                                                     Funding
       Total Appropriated Funds Including                                    Total Amount of Money from
    Faculty and Staff Health and Retirement                                   Any Source Available in FY
  Year                                 Amount                              Year                     Amount
  FY 2006                         $325,079,676                             FY 2006           $1,417,205,786
  FY 2009                         $470,875,694                             FY 2009           $1,590,524,815
  FY 2010                         $427,245,097                             FY 2010           $1,664,495,313
                                                   Online Resume for Prospective Students, Parents and the Public
                                                  THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL BRANCH AT GALVESTON
Location: Galveston, Gulf Coast Region
Health Related Institution Accountability Peer Group: Texas A&M System HSC, Texas Tech Univ HSC, UNT HSC, UT HSC Houston, UT HSC San Antonio, UT HSC Tyler, UT M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, UT Southwestern
Medical Center
Out-Of-State Peers: Medical College Of Georgia, University Of California-San Francisco, University Of Virginia Health Science Center
Degrees Offered: Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral, Professional
Institutional Resumes         Accountability System        Definitions      Institution Home Page

                                 Enrollment                                                                        Costs                                              Financial Aid
                                      Fall 2010                                                     Annual Academic Costs for Full-time                    Need-based Aid for Graduate Students (GS)
                                                              Physicians Certified                       Resident Student, FY 2011                                           Fall 2008
                       Total Students      Medical Students     in Residency*                 Type of Cost                  Average Amount                                          % of GSs    Average
 Race/Ethnicity        Number % of Total Number % of Total Number % of Total                  Undergraduate                            $7,219                Type of Aid            Receiving   Amount
 White                   1,309       49.2%    454       49.2%       0         .0%             Graduate                                 $3,867          Grants or Scholarships           6.4%       $8,663
 Hispanic                  417       15.7%    165       17.9%       0         .0%             First-time Medical Student              $15,046          Loans                           60.7%       $8,404
 African American          273       10.3%      95      10.3%       0         .0%         Rates of Tuition per SCH                                     Work Study                        .9%       $2,170
 Multi-Racial Afr Am          2        .1%       0        .0%       0         .0%         Mandatory Fees as Defined by CB                              Grants, Scholarships,
                                                                                          Amount & Percent of Tuition Increase (UGrad)
 Asian/Pacific Isl.        377       14.2%    153       16.6%       0         .0%                                                                      Loans or Workstudy              60.7%       $9,348
                                                                                          Amount & Percent of Tuition Increase (Grad)
 International               73       2.7%       8        .9%       0         .0%
 Other & Unknown           209        7.9%      48       5.2%       0         .0%
 Total                   2,660     100.0%     923      100.0%     488     100.0%
* Data for FY 2011




                                                                                                                                                                 First-time Licensure or Certification
                                                            Student Success                                                                                              Examination Pass Rate
     Pass Rate of Medical School Students             Percent of Medical School Students               Nursing and Allied Health Degrees, FY 2010
                                                                                                                                                                                FY 2010
     on Part 1 or Part 2 of Any Examination                 Practicing Primary Care                                                         Peer
                                                                                                                                                                                                   Peer
             for a Medical License                         in Texas after Graduation                     Year            Institution       Group
                                                                                                                                                                  Field          Institution      Group
                                     Peer                                           Peer            Bachelor's                    312            217
                                                                                                                                                             Dental                     N/A         86.3%
    Year          Institution       Group             Year        Institution      Group            Master's                      211             92
                                                                                                                                                             Allied Health           90.3%          92.0%
  FY 2010              96.85%          96.19%       FY 2010         19.79%           31.12%         Doctoral                         2             3
                                                                                                                                                             Nursing                 94.1%          92.7%
                                                                                                    Professional                   38             22
                                                                                                                                                             Pharmacy                   N/A         94.9%
                                                                                                                                                             Medical                 96.9%          96.2%


     Research Expenditures
  Year                                Amount
  FY 2009                         $153,713,920
                       Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                  AGENDA ITEM IV-E (5)

Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to a
request from the University of Houston to create a Master of Science (M.S.) degree with
a major in Petroleum Well Design Engineering


RECOMMENDATION: Approval and authorization to create a Master of Science
                (M.S.) in Petroleum Well Design Engineering.


                   BACKGROUND AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

         The proposed program would teach the specialized scientific and engineering
skills required for the construction of oil and gas wells. Traditionally trained petroleum
engineers typically acquire most of their well design knowledge and skills on the job
over a period of six to eight years. The proposed program considerably reduces the
time required for a petroleum engineer to be able to function independently. The
proposed program would be the first of its kind in Texas.


                                           NEED

Employment Opportunities              The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) indicated that
                                      21,900 petroleum engineers were employed in
                                      2008. By 2018, that number is expected to
                                      increase by 18 percent to 25,900. The BLS
                                      indicated that a portion of the best employment
                                      opportunities may be overseas.

                                      The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) estimated
                                      that 13,440 petroleum engineers were employed in
                                      2008 in Texas and projects that 20,140 petroleum
                                      engineers will be employed by 2018 (an increase of
                                      50 percent). Considering new engineering jobs and
                                      expected vacancies in existing jobs, TWC estimates
                                      that 950 petroleum engineering jobs will become
                                      available each year between 2009 and 2018.

                                      Four letters of support from the petroleum industry
                                      were included with the proposal. Three are from
                                      Houston- based oil and gas industry producers:
                                      Marathon Oil Company, Tetra Technologies, and
                                      FMC technologies. The letters speak generally to
                                      the need for oil and gas industry engineers. The
                                      fourth letter is from Shell Oil and speaks directly to
                                      the need for the proposed program.
                                                                                       06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (5)
PAGE 2


                              According to a study conducted in 2007 by Bowen
                              Consulting and the University of Houston Bauer
                              College of Business, shortages of highly educated
                              personnel in the petroleum industry results in an
                              annual cost of more than five billion dollars as a
                              result of not being able to maximize the
                              monetization of hydrocarbon resources, a
                              significant percentage of which are located in
                              Texas. Fully qualified well engineers are included
                              in the shortage of highly qualified personnel.


Projected Enrollment          The program plans to admit 5 students in the first
                              year, increasing to 20 students by the fifth year.
                              The degree is anticipated to take five years to
                              complete.


Plan to Recruit
Underrepresented Students     In 2009, the University of Houston received
                              a $300,000 grant from the Texas Workforce
                              Commission to bolster its efforts to recruit
                              historically underrepresented students for
                              the university’s engineering programs.

                              The grant is supported by U.S. Department
                              of Labor funds and is meant to spur job
                              growth that aligns with the Governor’s
                              statewide industry cluster initiative. The
                              program includes peer mentoring to
                              support incoming freshmen and transfer
                              students in the Cullen College of
                              Engineering.

Existing State Programs       Five public universities currently offer master’s
                              degrees in general petroleum engineering:
                              Texas A&M University, Texas A&M
                              University–Kingsville (natural gas
                              engineering), Texas Tech University,
                              University of Texas at Austin, University of
                              Houston.

                            QUALITY AND RESOURCES

Faculty                       Program faculty would consist of adjunct and full-
                              time instructors. Three new full-time faculty
                              members would be hired for the proposed
                              program. One faculty member would be hired
                              during the first year and two more would be hired
                              in year two following implementation.
                                                                              06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (5)
PAGE 3


Facilities and Equipment         Current facilities and equipment are adequate for
                                 implementation of the proposed program.
                                 Additional classroom facilities would be located in
                                 the new petroleum engineering facility, the
                                 University of Houston Energy Research Park.

                                 Students would have access to well sites near
                                 Houston and elsewhere in the state. Houston area
                                 and other petroleum well service companies have
                                 expressed willingness to allow students to visit and
                                 use on-site facilities for educational purposes.
                                 These arrangements would be similar to those
                                 currently in place for the existing Master of
                                 Petroleum Engineering degree.

Libraries, Supplies, Materials   The University of Houston libraries have collected
                                 material relevant to petroleum engineering,
                                 geosciences, and the petroleum industry for
                                 decades. The library recently acquired new
                                 holdings that are directly relevant to petroleum
                                 engineering: the entire set of peer-reviewed
                                 journals of the Society of Petroleum Engineers; the
                                 Journal of Petroleum Technology; One Petro,
                                 including the Society of Petroleum Engineers
                                 papers and proceedings from the Offshore
                                 Technology Conferences; and the Society of
                                 Petrophysicists and Well Long Analysts.

                                 The library also subscribes to Petroleum Abstracts
                                 and numerous other relevant professional
                                 publications.

Accreditation                    The University of Houston does not plan to seek
                                 accreditation for this program. Because graduation
                                 from an undergraduate program is generally
                                 considered adequate preparation for entry into the
                                 engineering profession, most institutions choose to
                                 accredit undergraduate programs only.

Educator Certification Program   Not Applicable




                                                                                06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (5)
PAGE 4


                                          Costs and Funding

                Five-Year Costs                               Five-Year Funding
            1
Personnel                                $721,097 Reallocated Funds                                          $0

Facilities & Equipment                    $22,500 Anticipated New Formula                           $341,647
                                                  Funding3
Library, Supplies, Materials              $12,000 Special Item Funding                                       $0

Other2                                    $81,900 Other4                                          $1,178,957

Total Costs                            $837,497 Total Funding                                   $1,520,604

Est. 5-Year Costs            $837,497                        Est. 5-Year Revenue              $1,520,604

The chief executive officer of the institution has certified, and the staff has
determined, that the institution will have sufficient funds to support the
proposed program.

Estimated formula funding generated by the institution in years three through five of the
proposed program would be $341,647.

_________________________
1
    New faculty

2
    Administrative support

3
    The anticipated level of formula funding in this analysis is a projection. It represents the ideal state
funding scenario derived using the current state funding amounts and the institution’s projected enrollment
for the program. Given the current budgetary situation, it is likely that the anticipated formula funding level
for this program will be lower than that which has been projected using the current state funding.
4
    Tuition, fees, grants




                                                                                                         06/11
                                                               Online Resume for Legislators and Other Policymakers
                                                                           UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON
Location: Houston, Gulf Coast Region
Emerging Research Accountability Peer Group: Texas Tech Univ, UT Arlington, UT Dallas, UT El Paso, UT San Antonio, Univ of North Texas
Out-Of-State Peers: University Of Cincinnati-Main Campus, University Of Illinois At Chicago, University Of New Mexico - Main Campus, University Of South Carolina - Columbia, University Of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Degrees Offered: Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral, Professional
Institutional Resumes       Accountability System        Definitions         Institution Home Page



                                  Enrollment                                                                             Funding                                                       Costs
                          Fall 2005       Fall 2009       Fall 2010                                             Total Appropriated Funds                                  Average Annual Total Academic
    Race/Ethnicity        Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent                                              Including Faculty &                                  Costs for Resident Undergraduate
White                       13,483  39.0%   13,038  35.2%   13,212  34.1%                                       Staff Health & Retirement                                     Student Taking 30 SCH
Hispanic                     6,494  18.8%    7,643  20.7%    8,641  22.3%                                    Year             Amount                                                         Texas Rates
African American             4,509  13.0%    4,973  13.4%    4,869  12.6%                                   FY 2005              $208,037,988                         Year         Institution     Peer Group Avg
Multi-Racial Afr Am               0   .0%         0   .0%       228   .6%                                   FY 2009              $258,649,298                      FY 2006             $6,645             $5,610
                                                                                                            FY 2010              $257,364,298                      FY 2010             $8,496             $8,138
                                                                                                                 Total Amount of Money                             FY 2011             $8,496             $8,480
                                                                                                                  from Any Source In FY
                                                                                                             Year             Amount
                                                                                                            FY 2005              $564,017,002
                                                                                                            FY 2009              $621,716,309
                                                                                                            FY 2010              $723,019,105

                                                         Student Success                                                                                Student Success: National Comparison
                 One-Year Persistence of First-time,                                         Graduation Rate of First-time,                                   Graduation Rate of First-time, Degree-seeking Students
             Full-time, Degree Seeking Undergraduates                                 Full-time Degree Seeking Undergraduates                                       after 4 and 6 Years from the Same Institution
                  Enter Fall 2004 Enter Fall 2008 Enter Fall 2009                           After 4 and 6 Years at a Public or                                                (IPEDS National Definition)
  Cohort                  3,044          3,507            3,107                             Independent Institution in Texas                                                                Institution       Out-of-State Peers
  Total                  89.1%          89.8%            91.0%                                     Institution             Peer Group                      Cohort & Duration                   Rate                 Rate
  Same                   76.9%          78.5%            81.5%             Cohort & Duration       Cohort      Rate        Cohort     Rate                  Fall 2001 4-year                        10.0%                 20.0%
  Other                  12.2%          11.2%             9.4%             Fall 2000 4-year          2,847     13.4%       15,796     18.0%                 Fall 2004 4-year                        12.0%                 21.8%
                 Two-Year Persistence of First-time,                       Fall 2004 4-year          3,044     16.6%       19,504     22.3%                 Fall 2005 4-year                        12.0%                 23.0%
             Full-time, Degree Seeking Undergraduates                      Fall 2005 4-year          3,218     17.0%       18,940     22.6%                 Fall 1999 6-year                        40.0%                 49.4%
                  Enter Fall 2003 Enter Fall 2007 Enter Fall 2008          Fall 1998 6-year          2,952     46.6%       13,779     48.3%                 Fall 2002 6-year                        42.0%                 51.2%
  Institution Persistence                                                  Fall 2002 6-year          3,125     49.0%       18,514     52.4%                 Fall 2003 6-year                        41.0%                 52.8%
  Cohort                  3,092          3,292            3,507            Fall 2003 6-year          3,092     49.1%       20,741     54.3%
  Total                  81.9%          83.1%            82.4%
                                                                                              Six-year Graduation & Persistence Rate
  Same                   61.9%          64.7%            64.6%
                                                                                               for First-time Undergraduate Students
  Other                  20.0%          18.4%            17.8%
                                                                                                Requiring Developmental Education
  Peer Group Persistence
                                                                                                            Fall 2004 Cohort
  Cohort                  2,963          3,022            3,062
                                                                                           Student Group            Cohort       Rate
  Total                  81.4%          81.4%            82.0%
                                                                                           For Students Needing
  Same                   57.8%          58.6%            60.0%
                                                                                           Developmental Education:
  Other                  23.6%          22.7%            22.0%
                                                                                           Institution                   345      59.7%
                  Average Number of Fall & Spring Semesters                                Peer Group                    473      51.4%
                   and SCH Attempted for Bachelor's Degree                                 For Students NOT Needing
                Institution                     Peer Group Average                         Developmental Education:
   Year         Grads       Sem     SCH         Grads     Sem            SCH               Institution                 2,361      72.4%
  FY 2006       2,956       10.95  153.78       2,281    10.60          149.11             Peer Group                  2,173      73.1%
                                                                                        *Peer Group data is average for peer group.
  FY 2009       3,048       10.88  149.30       2,596    10.53          145.21
  FY 2010       2,985       10.68  148.53       2,628    10.46          145.29
                                                       Online Resume for Prospective Students, Parents and the Public
                                                                        UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON
Location: Houston, Gulf Coast Region
Emerging Research Accountability Peer Group: Texas Tech Univ, UT Arlington, UT Dallas, UT El Paso, UT San Antonio, Univ of North Texas
Out-Of-State Peers: University Of Cincinnati-Main Campus, University Of Illinois At Chicago, University Of New Mexico - Main Campus, University Of South Carolina - Columbia, University Of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Degrees Offered: Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral, Professional
Institutional Resumes       Accountability System        Definitions         Institution Home Page


             Enrollment                                                                                                           Admissions
                          Fall 2010                                          Middle 50% of Test Scores, for First-Time                              Application for First-time Undergraduate Admission
     Race/Ethnicity       Number Percent                                            Undergraduates, Fall 2010                                                              Fall 2010
 White                      13,212   34.1%                          Test Section                   ACT                      SAT                                                              Enrolled
 Hispanic                    8,641   22.3%                         Composite                                                                 Race/Ethnicity         Applicants Accepted         All         Top 10%
 African American            4,869   12.6%                         Math                http://www.CollegePortraits.org                   White                         2,889         82.9%     36.5%         16.7%
 Multi-Racial Afr Am            228    .6%                         English                                                               African American              2,979         49.5%     40.9%         16.9%
 Asian                       7,676   19.8%                         Critical Reading                                                      Multi-Racial Afr Am             181         61.3%     39.6%         15.9%
 International               3,278    8.5%                                                                                               Hispanic                      4,036         65.5%     38.4%         22.2%
 Other & Unknown                848   2.2%                                                                                               Asian                         2,210         82.3%     49.8%         22.6%
 Total                      38,752  100.0%                                                                                               International                   516         67.4%     35.9%          2.4%
                                                                                                                                         Other                           303         80.9%     33.1%         12.3%
                                                                                                                                         Total                        13,114         68.9%     40.3%         19.1%

                 Financial Aid                                                                              Costs                                                                 Degrees Awarded
          Need-based Aid for Undergraduates                               Annual Costs for Resident                                  Tuition, Fall 2010                        Type                        FY 2010
                  Enrolled in Fall 2008                                     Undergraduate Student                                Level                $ per SCH                Bachelor's                    4,778
                                % of UGs   Average                          Taking 30 SCH, FY 2011                          Undergraduate                    $185              Master's                      1,722
         Type of Aid            Receiving  Amount              Type of Cost                      Average Amount             Graduate                         $271              Doctoral                        233
   Grants or Scholarships           30.5%   $5,447             Total Academic Cost                       $8,496          Rates of Tuition per SCH                              Professional                    497
   Loans                            32.1%   $4,139             On-campus Room & Board                    $7,538          Mandatory Fees as Defined by CB                       Total                         7,230
   Work Study                        2.2%   $2,626                                                                       Amount & Percent of Tuition Increase (UGrad)
                                                               Books & Supplies                          $1,100
                                                                                                                         Amount & Percent of Tuition Increase (Grad)
   Grants, Scholarships,                                       Off-Campus Transportation
    Loans or Workstudy              44.1%   $6,914              & Personal Expenses                      $5,121
                                                               Total Cost                              $22,255




                        Instruction                                                                                            Baccalaureate Success
   Measure of Excellence                               Fall 2010                                Graduation Rate of First-time, Full-time                       Number of SCH in Fall & Spring Semesters
   Undergraduate Classes with < 20 Students               33.1%                                          Degree-seeking Students                                 Attempted to Earn a Bachelor's Degree
   Undergraduate Classes with > 50 Students               22.8%                                                  Entering                                                                FY 2010 Average
   % of Teaching Faculty Tenured/Tenure-track             65.9%                                Measure             Fall     Cohort       Rate                      Program                 Sem         SCH
   Student/Faculty Ratio                                    24:1                         4-year Rate Total           2005      3,218      17.0%          Business                           10.46      146.85
       First-time Licensure                                                               Same Institution                                15.2%          Engineering                        10.84      151.74
           or Certification                                                               Other Institutions                               1.8%          Fine Arts and Architecture         11.53      156.73
      Examination Pass Rate                                                              5-year Rate Total           2004      3,044      41.4%          Health                             10.47      152.55
                          FY 2010                                                         Same Institution                                36.0%          Liberal Arts                       10.78      145.31
        Field               Rate                                                          Other Institutions                               5.4%          Science and Math                   10.19      145.85
  Education*                99.00%                                                       6-year Rate Total           2003      3,092      49.1%          Social Sciences and Service        10.60      147.66
  Law                        91.0%                                                        Same Institution                                40.7%          Technology                         12.38      168.13
  Pharmacy                   98.1%                                                        Other Institutions                               8.4%          All                                10.68      148.53
  Nursing                        %
  Engineering               81.58%
*Data for FY 2009
                         Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                   AGENDA ITEM IV-E (6)

Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to a request
from the University of Houston to create a Master of Science (M.S.) degree with a major in
Petroleum Well Completion and Intervention Engineering


RECOMMENDATION: Approval and authorization to create a Master of Science
                (M.S.) in Petroleum Well Completion and Intervention
                Engineering.


                    BACKGROUND AND PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

         Advances in oil production technology are requiring the field of petroleum
engineering to become increasingly specialized. The proposed program would teach the
scientific and engineering skills required for the specialized field of petroleum well
completion and intervention. Well completion is the stage of the well development process
that enables a well to become productive. Well intervention includes operations such as
diagnostics, stimulation, and alterations to the state of a well during and at the end of its
productive life.

                                            NEED

Employment Opportunities             The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) indicated that
                                     21,900 petroleum engineers were employed in 2008.
                                     That number is expected to increase by 18 percent to
                                     25,900 by 2018. The BLS indicated that a portion of
                                     the best employment opportunities may be overseas.

                                     The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) estimated
                                     that 13,440 petroleum engineers were employed in
                                     2008 in Texas and projects that 20,140 petroleum
                                     engineers will be employed by 2018 (an increase of 50
                                     percent). Considering new engineering jobs and
                                     expected vacancies in existing jobs, TWC estimates
                                     that 950 petroleum engineering jobs will become
                                     available each year between 2009 and 2018.

                                     Four letters of support from the petroleum
                                     industry were included with the proposal. Three
                                     are from Houston- based oil and gas industry
                                     producers: Marathon Oil Company, Tetra
                                     Technologies, and FMC technologies. The
                                     letters speak generally to the need for oil and gas
                                     industry engineers. The fourth letter is from Shell
                                     Oil and speaks directly to the need for the
                                     proposed program.
                                                                                         06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (6)
Page 2


                             According to a study conducted in 2007 by Bowen
                             Consulting and the University of Houston Bauer
                             College of Business, shortages of highly educated
                             personnel in the petroleum industry results in an
                             annual cost of more than five billion dollars as a
                             result of not being able to maximize the
                             monetization of hydrocarbon resources, a
                             significant percentage of which are located in
                             Texas. Fully qualified well engineers are included
                             in the shortage of highly qualified personnel.

Projected Enrollment         The program plans to admit 5 students in the first
                             year, increasing to 20 students by the fifth year. The
                             degree is anticipated to take five years to complete.

Plan to Recruit
Underrepresented Students    In 2009, the University of Houston received
                             a $300,000 grant from the Texas Workforce
                             Commission to bolster its efforts to recruit
                             historically underrepresented students for
                             the university’s engineering programs.

                             The grant is supported by U.S. Department
                             of Labor funds and is meant to spur job
                             growth that aligns with the Governor’s
                             statewide industry cluster initiative. The
                             program includes peer mentoring to
                             support incoming freshmen and transfer
                             students in the Cullen College of
                             Engineering.

Existing State Programs      Five public universities currently offer master’s
                             degrees in general petroleum engineering:
                             Texas A&M University, Texas A&M
                             University–Kingsville (natural gas
                             engineering), Texas Tech University,
                             University of Texas at Austin, University of
                             Houston.


                            QUALITY AND RESOURCES

Faculty                      Program faculty would consist of adjunct and full-time
                             instructors. Three new full-time faculty members
                             would be hired for the proposed program. One faculty
                             member would be hired during the first year and two
                             more would be hired in year two following
                             implementation.


                                                                                 06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (6)
Page 3

Facilities and Equipment         Current facilities and equipment are adequate for
                                 implementation of the proposed program. Additional
                                 classroom facilities would be located in the new
                                 petroleum engineering facility, the University of
                                 Houston Energy Research Park.

                                 Students would have access to well sites near
                                 Houston and elsewhere in the state. Houston area
                                 and other petroleum well service companies have
                                 expressed willingness to allow students to visit and
                                 use on-site facilities for educational purposes.
                                 These arrangements would be similar to those
                                 currently in place for the existing Master of
                                 Petroleum Engineering degree.

Libraries, Supplies, Materials   The University of Houston libraries have collected
                                 material relevant to petroleum engineering,
                                 geosciences, and the petroleum industry for
                                 decades. The library recently acquired new
                                 holdings that are directly relevant to petroleum
                                 engineering: the entire set of peer-reviewed
                                 journals of the Society of Petroleum Engineers; the
                                 Journal of Petroleum Technology; One Petro,
                                 including the Society of Petroleum Engineers
                                 papers and proceedings from the Offshore
                                 Technology Conferences; and the Society of
                                 Petrophysicists and Well Long Analysts.

                                 The library also subscribes to Petroleum Abstracts
                                 and numerous other relevant professional
                                 publications.

Accreditation                     The University of Houston does not plan to seek
                                 accreditation for this program. Because graduation
                                 from an undergraduate program is generally
                                 considered adequate preparation for entry into the
                                 engineering profession, most institutions choose to
                                 accredit undergraduate programs only.

Educator Certification Program   Not Applicable




                                                                                   06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-E (6)
Page 4

                                             Costs and Funding

                  Five-Year Costs                                Five-Year Funding
Personnel1                                 $721,097 Reallocated Funds                                             $0

Facilities & Equipment                            $0 Anticipated New Formula                             $478,306
                                                     Funding3
Library, Supplies, Materials                 $12,000 Special Item Funding                                         $0

Other2                                       $78,650 Other4                                            $1,571,942

Total Costs                              $811,747 Total Funding                                     $2,050,248

Est. 5-Year Costs                       $811,747 Est. 5-Year Revenue                                $1,520,604

The chief executive officer of the institution has certified, and the staff has
determined, that the institution will have sufficient funds to support the
proposed program.

Estimated formula funding generated by the institution in years three through five of the
proposed program would be $478,306.

_________________________
1
    New faculty

2
    Administrative support

3
   The anticipated level of formula funding in this analysis is a projection. It represents the ideal state funding
scenario derived using the current state funding amounts and the institution’s projected enrollment for the
program. Given the current budgetary situation, it is likely that the anticipated formula funding level for this
program will be lower than that which has been projected using the current state funding.
4
    Tuition, fees, grants




                                                                                                             06/11
                                                               Online Resume for Legislators and Other Policymakers
                                                                           UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON
Location: Houston, Gulf Coast Region
Emerging Research Accountability Peer Group: Texas Tech Univ, UT Arlington, UT Dallas, UT El Paso, UT San Antonio, Univ of North Texas
Out-Of-State Peers: University Of Cincinnati-Main Campus, University Of Illinois At Chicago, University Of New Mexico - Main Campus, University Of South Carolina - Columbia, University Of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Degrees Offered: Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral, Professional
Institutional Resumes       Accountability System        Definitions         Institution Home Page



                                  Enrollment                                                                             Funding                                                       Costs
                          Fall 2005       Fall 2009       Fall 2010                                             Total Appropriated Funds                                  Average Annual Total Academic
    Race/Ethnicity        Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent                                              Including Faculty &                                  Costs for Resident Undergraduate
White                       13,483  39.0%   13,038  35.2%   13,212  34.1%                                       Staff Health & Retirement                                     Student Taking 30 SCH
Hispanic                     6,494  18.8%    7,643  20.7%    8,641  22.3%                                    Year             Amount                                                         Texas Rates
African American             4,509  13.0%    4,973  13.4%    4,869  12.6%                                   FY 2005              $208,037,988                         Year         Institution     Peer Group Avg
Multi-Racial Afr Am               0   .0%         0   .0%       228   .6%                                   FY 2009              $258,649,298                      FY 2006             $6,645             $5,610
                                                                                                            FY 2010              $257,364,298                      FY 2010             $8,496             $8,138
                                                                                                                 Total Amount of Money                             FY 2011             $8,496             $8,480
                                                                                                                  from Any Source In FY
                                                                                                             Year             Amount
                                                                                                            FY 2005              $564,017,002
                                                                                                            FY 2009              $621,716,309
                                                                                                            FY 2010              $723,019,105

                                                         Student Success                                                                                Student Success: National Comparison
                 One-Year Persistence of First-time,                                         Graduation Rate of First-time,                                   Graduation Rate of First-time, Degree-seeking Students
             Full-time, Degree Seeking Undergraduates                                 Full-time Degree Seeking Undergraduates                                       after 4 and 6 Years from the Same Institution
                  Enter Fall 2004 Enter Fall 2008 Enter Fall 2009                           After 4 and 6 Years at a Public or                                                (IPEDS National Definition)
  Cohort                  3,044          3,507            3,107                             Independent Institution in Texas                                                                Institution       Out-of-State Peers
  Total                  89.1%          89.8%            91.0%                                     Institution             Peer Group                      Cohort & Duration                   Rate                 Rate
  Same                   76.9%          78.5%            81.5%             Cohort & Duration       Cohort      Rate        Cohort     Rate                  Fall 2001 4-year                        10.0%                 20.0%
  Other                  12.2%          11.2%             9.4%             Fall 2000 4-year          2,847     13.4%       15,796     18.0%                 Fall 2004 4-year                        12.0%                 21.8%
                 Two-Year Persistence of First-time,                       Fall 2004 4-year          3,044     16.6%       19,504     22.3%                 Fall 2005 4-year                        12.0%                 23.0%
             Full-time, Degree Seeking Undergraduates                      Fall 2005 4-year          3,218     17.0%       18,940     22.6%                 Fall 1999 6-year                        40.0%                 49.4%
                  Enter Fall 2003 Enter Fall 2007 Enter Fall 2008          Fall 1998 6-year          2,952     46.6%       13,779     48.3%                 Fall 2002 6-year                        42.0%                 51.2%
  Institution Persistence                                                  Fall 2002 6-year          3,125     49.0%       18,514     52.4%                 Fall 2003 6-year                        41.0%                 52.8%
  Cohort                  3,092          3,292            3,507            Fall 2003 6-year          3,092     49.1%       20,741     54.3%
  Total                  81.9%          83.1%            82.4%
                                                                                              Six-year Graduation & Persistence Rate
  Same                   61.9%          64.7%            64.6%
                                                                                               for First-time Undergraduate Students
  Other                  20.0%          18.4%            17.8%
                                                                                                Requiring Developmental Education
  Peer Group Persistence
                                                                                                            Fall 2004 Cohort
  Cohort                  2,963          3,022            3,062
                                                                                           Student Group            Cohort       Rate
  Total                  81.4%          81.4%            82.0%
                                                                                           For Students Needing
  Same                   57.8%          58.6%            60.0%
                                                                                           Developmental Education:
  Other                  23.6%          22.7%            22.0%
                                                                                           Institution                   345      59.7%
                  Average Number of Fall & Spring Semesters                                Peer Group                    473      51.4%
                   and SCH Attempted for Bachelor's Degree                                 For Students NOT Needing
                Institution                     Peer Group Average                         Developmental Education:
   Year         Grads       Sem     SCH         Grads     Sem            SCH               Institution                 2,361      72.4%
  FY 2006       2,956       10.95  153.78       2,281    10.60          149.11             Peer Group                  2,173      73.1%
                                                                                        *Peer Group data is average for peer group.
  FY 2009       3,048       10.88  149.30       2,596    10.53          145.21
  FY 2010       2,985       10.68  148.53       2,628    10.46          145.29
                                                       Online Resume for Prospective Students, Parents and the Public
                                                                        UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON
Location: Houston, Gulf Coast Region
Emerging Research Accountability Peer Group: Texas Tech Univ, UT Arlington, UT Dallas, UT El Paso, UT San Antonio, Univ of North Texas
Out-Of-State Peers: University Of Cincinnati-Main Campus, University Of Illinois At Chicago, University Of New Mexico - Main Campus, University Of South Carolina - Columbia, University Of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Degrees Offered: Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral, Professional
Institutional Resumes       Accountability System        Definitions         Institution Home Page


             Enrollment                                                                                                           Admissions
                          Fall 2010                                          Middle 50% of Test Scores, for First-Time                              Application for First-time Undergraduate Admission
     Race/Ethnicity       Number Percent                                            Undergraduates, Fall 2010                                                              Fall 2010
 White                      13,212   34.1%                          Test Section                   ACT                      SAT                                                              Enrolled
 Hispanic                    8,641   22.3%                         Composite                                                                 Race/Ethnicity         Applicants Accepted         All         Top 10%
 African American            4,869   12.6%                         Math                http://www.CollegePortraits.org                   White                         2,889         82.9%     36.5%         16.7%
 Multi-Racial Afr Am            228    .6%                         English                                                               African American              2,979         49.5%     40.9%         16.9%
 Asian                       7,676   19.8%                         Critical Reading                                                      Multi-Racial Afr Am             181         61.3%     39.6%         15.9%
 International               3,278    8.5%                                                                                               Hispanic                      4,036         65.5%     38.4%         22.2%
 Other & Unknown                848   2.2%                                                                                               Asian                         2,210         82.3%     49.8%         22.6%
 Total                      38,752  100.0%                                                                                               International                   516         67.4%     35.9%          2.4%
                                                                                                                                         Other                           303         80.9%     33.1%         12.3%
                                                                                                                                         Total                        13,114         68.9%     40.3%         19.1%

                 Financial Aid                                                                              Costs                                                                 Degrees Awarded
          Need-based Aid for Undergraduates                               Annual Costs for Resident                                  Tuition, Fall 2010                        Type                        FY 2010
                  Enrolled in Fall 2008                                     Undergraduate Student                                Level                $ per SCH                Bachelor's                    4,778
                                % of UGs   Average                          Taking 30 SCH, FY 2011                          Undergraduate                    $185              Master's                      1,722
         Type of Aid            Receiving  Amount              Type of Cost                      Average Amount             Graduate                         $271              Doctoral                        233
   Grants or Scholarships           30.5%   $5,447             Total Academic Cost                       $8,496          Rates of Tuition per SCH                              Professional                    497
   Loans                            32.1%   $4,139             On-campus Room & Board                    $7,538          Mandatory Fees as Defined by CB                       Total                         7,230
   Work Study                        2.2%   $2,626                                                                       Amount & Percent of Tuition Increase (UGrad)
                                                               Books & Supplies                          $1,100
                                                                                                                         Amount & Percent of Tuition Increase (Grad)
   Grants, Scholarships,                                       Off-Campus Transportation
    Loans or Workstudy              44.1%   $6,914              & Personal Expenses                      $5,121
                                                               Total Cost                              $22,255




                        Instruction                                                                                            Baccalaureate Success
   Measure of Excellence                               Fall 2010                                Graduation Rate of First-time, Full-time                       Number of SCH in Fall & Spring Semesters
   Undergraduate Classes with < 20 Students               33.1%                                          Degree-seeking Students                                 Attempted to Earn a Bachelor's Degree
   Undergraduate Classes with > 50 Students               22.8%                                                  Entering                                                                FY 2010 Average
   % of Teaching Faculty Tenured/Tenure-track             65.9%                                Measure             Fall     Cohort       Rate                      Program                 Sem         SCH
   Student/Faculty Ratio                                    24:1                         4-year Rate Total           2005      3,218      17.0%          Business                           10.46      146.85
       First-time Licensure                                                               Same Institution                                15.2%          Engineering                        10.84      151.74
           or Certification                                                               Other Institutions                               1.8%          Fine Arts and Architecture         11.53      156.73
      Examination Pass Rate                                                              5-year Rate Total           2004      3,044      41.4%          Health                             10.47      152.55
                          FY 2010                                                         Same Institution                                36.0%          Liberal Arts                       10.78      145.31
        Field               Rate                                                          Other Institutions                               5.4%          Science and Math                   10.19      145.85
  Education*                99.00%                                                       6-year Rate Total           2003      3,092      49.1%          Social Sciences and Service        10.60      147.66
  Law                        91.0%                                                        Same Institution                                40.7%          Technology                         12.38      168.13
  Pharmacy                   98.1%                                                        Other Institutions                               8.4%          All                                10.68      148.53
  Nursing                        %
  Engineering               81.58%
*Data for FY 2009
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                       AGENDA ITEM IV-F


Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to a request
from South Texas College to create a Bachelor of Applied Technology degree with a major in
Medical and Health Services Management


RECOMMENDATION:              Pending



      Supplemental materials will be sent prior to the June 21, 2011 Strategic Planning
Committee meeting.




                                                                                          06/11
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                       AGENDA ITEM IV-G

Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to a request
from Texas State Technical College Harlingen, LeTourneau University, Our Lady of the Lake
University, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, University of
Houston, The University of Texas at Brownsville in Partnership with Texas Southmost College,
The University of Texas-Pan American, and Wayland Baptist University to create a Multi-
Institutional Teaching Center in Harlingen, Texas


RECOMMENDATION:             Approval


       The proposal responds to the growing demand for upper-division educational
opportunities in South Texas and represents sound educational policy for the state. Further,
the proposal conforms to Coordinating Board rules, Section 5.73(6) on the establishment of
Higher Education Centers.

Background Information:

       Off-campus educational units are a means to extend academic credit courses and
programs from a parent institution to locations away from an institution’s main campus. Large
off-campus units, such as university system centers and multi-institutional teaching centers, are
expected to have substantial and growing student enrollments and a broad array of courses and
programs that are offered by a single institution or multiple institutions. Chapter 5, Subchapter
D, Section 5.73(6) of Coordinating Board rules require that off-campus educational units receive
Board or Legislative approval due to the magnitude of their anticipated student enrollments and
the need for coordinated efforts that may sometimes cross university systems.

        Texas State Technical College (TSTC) Harlingen, LeTourneau University, Our Lady of the
Lake University, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Texas A&M University-Kingsville,
University of Houston, The University of Texas at Brownsville in partnership with Texas
Southmost College, The University of Texas-Pan American, and Wayland Baptist University
propose to establish a Multi-Institutional Teaching Center (MITC) to be called the University
Center at Harlingen (UCH). The proposed MITC would provide upper-level and graduate courses
to residents of Cameron County and surrounding service areas. The UCH would be located at
2424 Boxwood in Harlingen, Texas, in a soon-to-be completed 25,333 square foot building. This
new facility, which is LEED Gold Certified (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design),
would also house the Harlingen Economic Development Corporation (HEDC) offices and the
Corporate and Community Education division of TSTC Harlingen. The HEDC owns the facility
and TSTC Harlingen would function as manager and operator of the UCH.

        TSTC Harlingen, as manager and operator of the facility, would hire an executive
director to manage and oversee facility operations. The administrator would also maintain terms
of the memoranda of understanding between TSTC Harlingen and each partner university
through the assistance of a University Center Governing Council. The Governing Council would
be made up of appointed representatives from each UCH partner institution and would establish


                                                                                           06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-G
Page 2

a process of communication and decision-making on matters relating to the UCH, including
procedures, evaluation, accountability, conflict resolution, program and course offerings, and
the addition of new partners.

1. Need for the facility based on projected student enrollments:

        While TSTC Harlingen fills an entry-level higher education option in Cameron County,
there are only two universities located within a 50-mile radius of Harlingen. Due to limited
transportation infrastructure, student work schedules and socioeconomic barriers in South
Texas, the distance to these universities is burdensome for many students, youth and adults
alike. The city of Harlingen formed a committee to bring business, public education, higher
education and local government together to plan for future education and workforce demands.
The Harlingen 100 Education Committee held public forums to discuss issues relevant to access
to higher education and its impact on the economic development of the community. As a result
of those forums, the committee decided to pursue establishment of a MITC in Harlingen. The
HEDC stepped in and funded the construction of the $4.2 million University Center as a local
investment in higher education. Educational opportunities available through the UCH would help
ensure that properly credentialed college graduates would be available to meet the current
needs of local employers as well as future needs in expected growth areas within the
workforce.

Anticipated headcounts for participating institutions:

                                   FY2011    FY2012      FY2013    FY2014    FY2015    FY2016
 LeTourneau University                  24        35          40        40        40        40
 Our Lady of the Lake University       120       160         180       210       220       230
 Texas A&M Corpus Christi               10        10          10        10        10        10
 Texas A&M Kingsville                  103       107         110       113       115       117
 University of Houston                  60       150         170       190       210       230
 The University of Texas at            120       120         140       140       160       160
 Brownsville in Partnership with
 Texas Southmost College
 The University of Texas-Pan            45        99          99        99        99         99
 American
 Wayland Baptist University            165       205         228       252       273        293
    Total Anticipated Headcounts       647       886         977      1054      1127       1179

2. Duplication of the offerings of existing institutions and higher education facilities within one
hour’s driving time of the proposed center:

       A recent study by The University of Texas at Brownsville indicated a high demand for
upper-level programs, and each proposed degree program addresses a student and workforce
need. While there are higher education institutions located within an hour’s drive of the
proposed MITC, that distance (and travel time) are obstacles for working adults and young
TSTC Harlingen graduates who are the most likely to attend the UCH. The UCH proposal
provided justifications and data from participating institutions to support program selections.




                                                                                              06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-G
Page 3


3. Access for students who might otherwise not enroll in upper-division and graduate courses:

        The U.S. Census Bureau indicates that the Rio Grande Valley’s population grew 22.8
percent between 2000 and 2008. This is significantly higher than the 15.6 percent statewide
growth rate during the same period. While the high value of technical degrees and the low
tuition of academic transfer courses available through TSTC Harlingen benefit students, they fall
short of providing the upward mobility desired by many residents and required by industry. The
combined barriers of cost, access, and proximity create obstacles to area residents’ transition to
baccalaureate-level education. With the collaboration of eight institutions of higher education,
the UCH would improve access to baccalaureate (and graduate) programs in an underserved
region of south Texas. All of the undergraduate programs offered at the UCH would have a
formally articulated 2+2 degree plan. The plans would identify the Texas Common Course
Numbers (TCCN) for lower-division community and technical college courses and the upper-
division courses needed to complete the various baccalaureate degrees. Although the
articulation agreements for the UCH programs would be designed for TSTC Harlingen transfer
students, the TCCN used in the 2+2 plans would help ensure a seamless transition into upper-
division coursework and degree completion for students from other two-year institutions.

       Data from the U.S. Census Bureau indicate that 9.9 percent of Cameron County
residents have baccalaureate degrees; 4.9 percent have graduate/professional degrees; and
17.2 percent have some college, no degree. It would appear that there is a large segment of
the population that could benefit from the opportunities to be provided by the establishment of
the UCH.

4. Academic Oversight:

        Universities delivering the degree programs at the UCH are solely responsible for
academic oversight and meeting standards of accreditation. With the support of UCH staff,
universities would maintain admissions criteria, degree requirements, faculty qualifications,
standards of instruction, learning resources, learning outcomes, instructional materials and
support, evaluation of courses, and other accreditation requirements at the same level of
quality as those on their main campuses. Each university would certify in the Memorandum of
Understanding (to be signed if the UCH proposal is approved) that it has committed the
necessary resources to sustain participation in the UCH.

5. Prospects for provision of high-quality teaching and learning:

       Each participating university would be responsible for the quality of its degree programs.
Some indicators of student success and institutional excellence as reported in the Coordinating
Board’s Accountability System at the participating Texas public institutions are provided in the
table below:




                                                                                            06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-G
Page 4


Institution      Graduation Rate     Student to      Percentage of    Percentage of
                 for Students who    Faculty Ratio   Tenure-Track     Baccalaureate
                 completed at        (2009)          Faculty (2009)   Graduates enrolled in
                 least 30 SCH at a                                    a Graduate Program
                 two-year college                                     or Employed with one
                 (2010)                                               year of Graduation
                                                                      (2009)
Texas A&M        50.2 percent        21:1            52.4             81.1
Corpus Christi
Texas A&M        57 percent          17:1            69.1             83.1
Kingsville
University of    42.4 percent        24:1            65.9             75.2
Houston
University of    51.8 percent        11:1            62.8             83.8
Texas at
Brownsville
University of    60.1 percent        25:1            61.4             81.6
Texas Pan
American
Statewide        34.8 percent        21:1            64.7             78.1
Percentages



6. Adequacy of student support services:

        As the University Center manager, TSTC Harlingen would employ sufficient full- and
part-time staff to support operation of the facility and the student support areas. Transfer
coordination and additional student support services would be provided by the TSTC Harlingen
Academic Achievement Center for general advising, academic planning, and connecting
students with home campus resources and services. Many student services such as admission,
registration, bursar, and bookstore would be provided by the home campus via the Internet.
The UCH would have multiple computers available for students to access university websites.
UCH staff would be trained to navigate each of the UCH partner websites and to assist students
with online services.

       Academic advising would differ for transfer and graduate students. Transfer students
would have access to the Academic Achievement Center. All TSTC Harlingen advisors and UCH
staff would have a solid knowledge of the 2+2 degree plans for undergraduates. Current TSTC
Harlingen students would be able to meet with advisors to develop transfer plans. Transfer
students would have the option of meeting with university advisors or admissions counselors on
the TSTC Harlingen campus. Each UCH partner has access to the TSTC campus to recruit and
advise students. Our Lady of the Lake University would provide full-time advisors at the UCH.
The University of Texas at Brownsville would have advisors at the UCH two or three days a
week.

7. Need for the proposed programs:

       The eight universities participating in the UCH propose to offer 42 unduplicated degree
programs (21 baccalaureate programs, 20 master’s programs, 1 doctoral program) and three
graduate certificates at the facility in Harlingen. Workforce projections indicate a strong regional


                                                                                              06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-G
Page 5

workforce need for many of the proposed programs. The highest growth areas included those
associated with health care and health care management (28.9 percent growth rate), education
(24.5 percent growth rate), computer specialists (24 percent growth rate), protective services
(23.7 percent growth rate), business (23.5 percent growth rate), human services (20.6 percent
growth rate), and management (8.9 percent growth rate). Bachelor of Applied Science degrees
are completion degrees for students who already have associate’s degrees. Interdisciplinary
Studies degrees allow students to apply coursework in multiple fields toward an undergraduate
degree. Other proposed degree programs reflect student interest, such as aviation studies,
engineering, and retailing.

Proposed program offerings are listed below. For the Texas public institutions, none of the
proposed programs are low-producing on the main campuses.

LeTourneau University
    B.B.M. - Business Management
    B.I.S. - Interdisciplinary Studies
    B.S.H.S. - Human Services
    B.S. - Aviation Studies
    B.B.M. - Business Management in Non-Profit Management
    B.S. - Psychology
    M.A. - Counseling (LPC and LMFT)
    M.A. - Psychology
    M.S. - Healthcare Administration

Our Lady of the Lake University
    B.A.S. - Computer Information Systems and Security
    B.S. - Healthcare Administration
    M.A. - Human Sciences
    M.S. - Organizational Leadership
    M.Ed. - Curriculum and Instruction
    M.B.A. - Healthcare Management
    Ph.D. - Leadership Studies

Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi
    M.S. - Occupational Training and Development

Texas   A&M University-Kingsville
        B.S. - Interdisciplinary Studies (EC-6)
        B.A. - Communication
        B.S. - Criminology
        B.S.I.T. - Industrial Technology
        M.S. - Industrial Engineering
        M.S. - Bilingual Education

University of Houston
    B.S. - Retailing and Consumer Science
    B.S. - Supply Chain and Logistics
    B.S. - Human Resource Development

                                                                                              06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-G
Page 6

      M.S. - Human Resource Development
      M.S. - Technology Project Management

The University of Texas at Brownsville
    B.B. A. - Management
    B.S. - Health and Human Performance
    B.A. - Psychology
    M.Ed. - Educational Leadership
    M.A. - Counseling and Guidance
    M.S. - Mathematics

The University of Texas-Pan American
    M.Ed. - Education Administration
    Master of Accountancy
    Graduate Certificate-Principal Credential Program
    Graduate Certificate in Communication Training and Consulting
    Graduate Certificate in Media Relations and Strategic Communication

Wayland Baptist University
   B.A.S. - Applied Science
   B.S.I.S. - Interdisciplinary Studies
   B.C.M. - Christian Ministry
   M.C.M. - Christian Ministry
   M.A. - Management
   M.Ed. - Elementary and secondary education track

Financial Arrangements to Support the UCH

       Each university partner would pay TSTC Harlingen a fee based on credit hour
enrollment. Included in the fee would be classroom use, services provided by the Academic
Achievement Center, general building maintenance and operations, utilities, property insurance,
personnel, telephone, computer lab use, digital library use, and IT services. Additional
dedicated space within the TSTC Harlingen campus proper would also be available for a fee.
Fees paid to TSTC Harlingen would be set by the University Center Governing Council in
cooperation with the administration of TSTC Harlingen in sufficient amount to cover all
operational expenses of the center. Based on state average costs and historical data from TSTC
Harlingen, the initial fee would be set at $50 per semester credit hour for face-to-face, ITV, and
hybrid courses. That fee would remain in place for two years until facility specific data can
provide a more exact break even cost for the UCH operations. At that time, the rate would be
reviewed and adjusted by the Governing Council to a rate that would cover expected UCH
expenses, plus a contribution to an appropriate reserve fund. All finances would be reviewed
annually by the Finance Committee and approved by the UCH Governing Council.




                                                                                            06/11
    AGENDA ITEM IV-G
    Page 7

                            Five Year Enrollment and Financial Plan

                                   University Partner Information
                                                     FY12         FY13      FY14       FY15           FY16
                    1
Student Headcount                                    886        977        1054       1127        1179
Student FTE2                                         443        489         527        564         590
Annual Semester Credit Hours3                       5316       5862        6324       6762        7074
University Staff FTE4                                2.0        2.0         2.0        2.0         2.0



                                      UCH Financial Information

Revenue Sources
University Center Fees5                         $265,800 $293,100 $316,200 $338,100 $353,700

Expenses
Staff Salaries6                                  $76,000 $77,520 $79,070 $80,652 $82,265
Fringe Benefits6                                  16,240   16,565   16,896   17,234   17,579
UCH Operations6                                   19,333   19,720   20,114   20,516   20,927
Building Maintenance & Operations6               152,252 155,297 158,403 161,571 164,802
Equipment/Equipment Replacement                       0        0    25,000   35,000   45,000
Total Expenses7                                 $263,825 $269,102 $299,484 $314,973 $330,573

Operating Margin8                                 $1,975    $23,998      $16,716   $23,127     $23,127



1
  As reported by each partner.
2
  Assumes average student taking six credit hours.
3
  Assumes average student attends two semesters.
4
  One full-time director and two half-time media/library specialists.
5
  Fees will be assessed at $50 per semester credit hour.
6
  Assumes an annual increase in costs of two percent per year.
7
  Total expenses do not include any costs for building construction or original equipment, which have
been financed primarily by the Economic Development Corporation of Harlingen, and leave no debt
associated with this project.
8
   The University Center concept is to break even. The UCH budget will be reviewed and approved by the
Governing Council annually, and fees will be adjusted accordingly. Fees may not be increased more than
five percent in any one year. TSTC will fund any temporary shortfalls in funding.


                                                                                              06/11
                                Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                               AGENDA ITEM IV-I

Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to a request
from Midland College to hold a branch campus maintenance tax election in Pecos County


RECOMMENDATION: Approval


Background Information:

      Pecos County, Texas is within the service area of Midland College. Pecos County is the
second largest county in the state, covering over 4,700 square miles. According to the 2000
U.S. Census, the population of the county was 16,809.1 The proposed branch campus would be
located in Fort Stockton, the county seat of Pecos County.




       Midland College began offering courses in Fort Stockton in 1972 in order to provide
access to higher education in Pecos County. The higher education facilities nearest Fort
Stockton are Odessa College (75 miles distant) and Sul Ross University (59 miles distant).

     In 1994, establishment of the Williams Regional Technical Training Center (WRRTC) began
with $850,000 in grants and donations from 21 sources. The building is owned by the Fort
Stockton Independent School District and was expanded in 2001 by 10,000 square feet. The
expansion was funded by $1,350,000 in donations. The school district, City of Fort Stockton,
and Pecos County pay for all facility costs. Midland College pays for instruction and
administration.

      The WRRTC opened in 1996 with an enrollment of 1,053 students. Pecos County has
dynamic swings in its economy due to oil and gas industry fluctuations; however, student
enrollment at the WRTTC has grown steadily. By 2009, WRRTC enrollment had increased to
1,536 students.


1
    The 2010 census records for Texas have not been released.




                                                                                         06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-I
Page 2


Local Steering Committee
       The primary source of revenue for the WRTTC operations is contact hour reimbursement
and tuition and fees. However, there is concern that without increased revenue, cost increases
in all areas of instruction and campus operation are eroding the center’s ability to remain viable.
In order to assure the continued availability of higher education opportunities for Pecos County
residents and respond to the workforce needs of area employers, Midland College formed a
steering committee to explore the possibility of establishing a branch campus in Fort Stockton.
The committee consists of one college representative and seven civic leaders in the Fort
Stockton area.

       Midland College hosted a community forum on January 6, 2010. More than 50 Pecos
County residents attended. Attendees included representatives of the three independent school
districts in Pecos County, the Fort Stockton Chamber of Commerce, community leaders
including county commissioners, the Fort Stockton City Council, local banks, the local hospital
board, and local business owners. Feedback from attendees indicated a high degree of support
for the establishment of a Midland College branch campus in Fort Stockton.

      The steering committee conducted a feasibility study to assess the need for establishing a
Midland College Branch Campus in Pecos County. The study indicated that there has been a
great deal of support from regional business, foundations, and the public that has sustained the
WRRTC since its inception. However, increasing maintenance costs, the need to upgrade
classroom and laboratory computers and teaching equipment, and assuring that existing course
offerings are adequately funded requires a dependable and continuous source of revenue.
Establishing the WRRTC as a branch campus of Midland College would permit a broader range
of courses and programs to be made available to the citizens of Pecos County. Dialogue with
community and business leaders furthermore revealed the need for increased educational
opportunities to help improve the overall economy of the area.

Request to Hold a Branch Campus Maintenance Tax Election
      The 2000 U.S. Census determined that the population of Pecos County was 16,809. Under
the provisions of Coordinating Board Rules, Chapter 8, Subchapter E, Rule 8.96, circulation of a
petition to hold a branch campus maintenance tax election is not required for counties or
independent schools districts with a population of 150,000 or less. Midland College has
requested Coordinating Board approval to hold a branch campus maintenance tax election in
Pecos County in November 2011.

Tax Rate and New Revenue
       The election would propose a tax levy of one cent per hundred dollars in valuation of
taxable property. Based on the current taxable property values, the tax would generate
approximately $350,000 in revenue annually, which would permit Midland College to make
more higher education opportunities available to the residents of Pecos County.

Instructional Programs
      The WRRTC currently offers academic courses in economics, English, government, history,
mathematics, and Spanish. The Center also provides developmental education.




                                                                                             06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-I
Page 3

      Technical course offerings include administrative assisting, automotive technology (basic),
beginning legal technology, business administration, child care basic skills, computer
information systems, energy technology, vocational nursing, and vocational nursing to
registered nursing crossover. Additional courses are available via televised distance learning
including accounting, criminal justice, various humanities courses, the sciences, sociology,
speech, and psychology.

       The WRRTC also offers a range of continuing education programs to assist working
professionals. Offerings include nurse’s aide and medication aid courses, courses in emergency
medical services, law enforcement, and community learning courses in subjects such as
computer operation and software use.

      Midland college offers dual credit courses in partnership with Fort Stockton High School.
Dual credit offerings are very important in Pecos County because statistics indicate that the
percentage of high school graduates who pursue higher education is substantially below the
state average. Currently, academic dual credit offerings include history, government,
economics, and English. Technical dual credit offerings include automotive technology, energy
technology, and health science technology.

Library and Learning Resources
      A professionally staffed general use computer lab is available at the WRTTC, providing
access to a variety of electronic research databases. Additionally, students and faculty members
may attend training sessions on using electronic information resources. Students and faculty
members may request materials held by the library on the main campus.

      Students may order textbooks and other learning materials online from the Midland
College bookstore or from other online book vendors. The Midland College bookstore has a
part-time employee at the WRTTC to assist students with any issues that may arise with regard
to books and learning materials acquisition. If a student orders books online from the college
bookstore, the books are delivered to the WRTTC at specified times prior to and during the first
week of class each semester.

Student Services
      The WRRT currently has four part-time advisors who offer academic advising, counseling,
degree planning, transfer advice, financial aid information, and skills assessment. Services are
available during the day and evening hours. Students enrolling at the WRTTC are supported
with comprehensive registration assistance. Support of this type is particularly important
because the majority of students are the first in their families to attend college and have little or
no knowledge about the registration process.

Technology
      The information technology (IT) department at the WRTTC works closely with the IT
department on the main campus. The WRTTC IT department is staffed by a full-time
coordinator and two part-time computer technicians and provides maintenance and support for
all computing and electronic learning equipment.




                                                                                              06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-I
Page 4

Faculty
      At present, many courses offered at the WRTTC are taught by adjunct faculty members
from the Fort Stockton area. All adjunct faculty members meet or exceed the standards
established by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. The
WRTTC faculty use the same course planning protocols that are used on the main campus to
ensure the quality and uniformity of course design and content. Similarly, grading
procedures are identical to those on the main campus. Student evaluations of courses and
instructors are conducted at the end of the fall and spring semesters. Student evaluation
information is compiled and reviewed by the appropriate dean as part of the regular faculty
member assessment process




                                                                                       06/11
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                       AGENDA ITEM IV-J


Discussion of the status of the United States Department of Education list of accreditors


RECOMMENDATION:               No Action Required


Background Information:

        This item concerns the manner by which postsecondary accrediting agencies are
recognized by the United States Department of Education and how these accreditors evaluate
postsecondary institutions. The Strategic Planning and Policy Committee first discussed this item
at its September 21, 2010 meeting. The Committee decided to keep this topic on future
agendas as a discussion item until the Department of Education completes a review of its
internal accreditation standards. At this time, the Department of Education has not completed
the review.




                                                                                            06/11
                           Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                        AGENDA ITEM IV-K

Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to the Request
for Applications and funding for the Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program 2011
Competition


RECOMMENDATION:               Approval and authorization to expend funds


Background Information:

        Texas Education Code, Chapter 142 directs the Coordinating Board to administer the
Advanced Research Program (ARP). In 2007, the Coordinating Board officially changed the
program name to the Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program (NHARP) in honor of the
long-time contributions of Dr. Norman Hackerman. In 2011, the Texas Legislature passed
House Bill 2631, which changed the name of the program in statute.

         NHARP statute authorizes awards to Texas faculty conducting basic research in specific
disciplines at eligible public and independent institutions of higher education. Eligible faculty
may submit proposals to support new and innovative basic science projects. Proposals are
selected by a panel of national peer reviewers representing specific scientific disciplines. Funded
projects at public and independent higher education institutions are required to support
undergraduate students and must support graduate, and/or undergraduate students at public
and independent health-related institutions. The funding available for the 2011 competition is
$1.0 million. In 2009, the Legislature appropriated $16.4 million, which supported 95 projects at
24 institutions.

      The 2011 request for applications (RFA), which was reviewed by the Board’s Advisory
Committee on Research Programs (ACORP) at its meeting on June 7, 2011, includes
recommended revisions to limit the funding levels, eligible faculty, and disciplines for individual
awards.

        Following Board approval of the 2011 RFA, it will be posted at
http://www.thecb.state.tx.us/NHARP/. All eligible institutional representatives (public and
independent institutions) and investigators will be notified of its availability. The peer review
process will begin in fall 2011, and the Board will receive a recommendation of proposed grant
recipients at its April 2012 meeting.




                                                                                              06/11
                                Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                                Agenda Item IV-L

Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to the
distribution of funds trusteed to the Coordinating Board to support medical and graduate
medical education for Fiscal Year 2012 and report on trusteed funds distributed in Fiscal Year
2011


RECOMMENDATION:                     Approval


Background Information:

       The following table shows the biennial appropriation history of the trusteed programs
that support medical and graduate medical education of primary care physicians in Texas.

                                FY 2002-       FY 2004-        FY 2006-        FY 2008-       *FY 2010-           FY 2012-
           Program                2003           2005            2007            2009           2011                2013
  1. Family Practice
                                $20,599,709    $18,383,522     $17,464,310     $17,464,310     $21,214,310        $5,600,000
  Residency Program
  2. Primary Care Residency
                                 $5,886,460     $5,253,104      $4,990,440      $4,990,440      $4,990,440               $0
  Program
  3. Graduate Medical
                                $15,200,000     $3,828,222      $3,636,804        $600,000        $600,000               $0
  Education Program
  4. Statewide Preceptorship
                                 $1,941,436       $997,400        $904,289        $904,289        $904,289               $0
  Programs
  5. Joint Admissions
                                 $4,000,000     $3,490,900      $3,316,355      $5,616,355     $10,616,355        $7,006,794
  Medical Program (JAMP)
  6. Resident Physician
                                 $8,070,238             $0              $0              $0              $0               $0
  Compensation Program
  7. Family Practice
                                 $1,974,400             $0              $0              $0              $0               $0
  Residency Pilot Project
  Total                        $57,672,243    $31,953,148    $30,312,198     $29,575,394     $38,325,394      $12,606,794
 *All programs received reductions of 5 percent or greater. Specific information on funding reductions for each
program is provided in the following descriptions.

        In 2003, the Coordinating Board delegated authority to the Commissioner to release
funds trusteed for medical and graduate medical education programs, with the understanding
that an annual report will be made to the Board. As required by statute, advisory committees
provide the Commissioner with recommendations regarding allocation of funds.

        The Coordinating Board provides trusteed funds to programs as directed by the Texas
Legislature. Two programs—the Joint Admission Medical Program and the Texas Statewide
Preceptorship Program—support the preparation and education efforts at the undergraduate
and medical school levels, while three programs—the Family Practice Residency, the Primary
Care Residency, and the Graduate Medical Education—support the education and training of
physicians who have received either a Doctor of Medicine (MD) or a Doctor of Osteopathic
Medicine (DO) degree. This level of graduate or post-MD/DO training is referred to as residency
training. Two programs previously funded by the Texas Legislature did not receive an
appropriation from the 78th, 79th, 80th, 81st, or 82nd Texas Legislatures (Resident Physician
Compensation Program and Family Practice Pilot Projects). Three programs previously funded
last biennium by the Texas Legislature did not receive an appropriation from the 82nd Texas

                                                                                                             06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-L
Page 2

Legislature (Primary Care Residency Program, Graduate Medical Education Program, and the
Statewide Preceptorship Programs).

        Graduate medical education, also called residency training, is the final stage of formal
education that a physician must complete prior to receiving a Texas medical license, entering
independent practice, and obtaining board certification in a medical specialty area. Residency
training is a three-to-eight-year commitment of education and training in a nationally-accredited
program, typically located in hospital settings. Texas has 74 nationally-accredited primary care
residency programs. Residency programs are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate
Medical Education (ACGME) or the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), depending on
whether the residency program accepts MD- or DO-trained physicians.

        Since 1979, the Legislature has supported graduate medical education to encourage the
training of certain kinds of physicians. An overview of each of the programs funded by the Texas
Legislature follows:

   1. Family Practice Residency Program

            FY 2011 Amount:          $ 9,013,753
            FY 2012 Amount:          $ 2,800,000


      (a) Family Practice Residency Operational Programs

            FY 2011 Actual per-resident funding:           $    13,019
            FY 2012 Estimated per-resident funding:        $     3,966

            The Family Practice Residency Program (FPRP) was established in 1977 by the
       Texas Legislature to increase the numbers of physicians selecting family practice as their
       medical specialty and to encourage those physicians to establish their practices in rural
       and underserved communities in Texas. Since its inception, the program has provided
       funding support for more than 8,202 family practice residents.

             The FPRP provides grants to Texas' 29 nationally-accredited family practice
       residency programs located in every region of the state and provides support for Texas’
       health care education and delivery network. Funding recommendations are made to the
       Commissioner by the statutory 12-member Family Practice Residency Advisory
       Committee. The Advisory Committee members serve voluntarily and do not receive
       travel or per diem reimbursement for their participation.

              The Fiscal Year 2011 funding level was $13,019 per resident, down from the Fiscal
       Year 2010 amount of $14,564.50 per resident, due to implementation of the funding
       reduction. In FY 2011, funding supported 693 residents. Funding levels were based on
       the number of certified family practice residents in training on September 1, 2010. The
       per-resident amount for FY 2012 will be determined, based on the number of residents
       certified in training on September 1, 2011.



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AGENDA ITEM IV-L
Page 3

      (b) Family Practice Faculty Development Center

            In Fiscal Year 2010, the Family Practice Faculty Development Center received
      $393,337. In Fiscal Year 2011, the amount was reduced by five percent to $373,670. In
      Fiscal Year 2012, no funding is available to support the program.

            The Family Practice Faculty Development Center (Center), located in Waco, was
      established in 1978 with federal and state funding to provide training for current and
      future family practice residency and medical school faculty. The Center offers a full
      range of opportunities for residents and faculty to enhance their skills in research,
      teaching, management, and administration of academic family medicine. The Center
      annually selects and trains seven family medicine faculty fellows in research and
      pedagogy. A majority of the fellows pursue leadership roles within residency programs,
      with many eventually serving as residency directors. In FY 2008, the Center added
      supervision and maintenance of the Rural Rotations to its responsibilities.

              In 1997, the Center received recognition from the Pew Charitable Trust
      Foundation for its activities in primary care. In FY 2006, the Center received its last year
      of a federal grant of $300,000 under Title VII funding provisions of the U.S. Department
      of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration. In an
      effort to maintain the Center’s activities, state funding of the Center was increased that
      year.

     (c) Rural and Public Health Rotations

              For Fiscal Year 2011, the amount available to support month-long experiences in
      rural and public health was 30 percent less than Fiscal Year 2010. Funding was reduced
      in FY 2011 to $168,425. In FY 2012, staff estimates $51,000 to support an estimated 25
      rural rotations. No public health rotations will be supported in FY 2012.

              The Texas Legislature established the Rural Rotation program in 1989 and added
      Public Health in 1997. It is statutorily mandated that all accredited Texas family practice
      residency programs provide their residents with an opportunity to participate in a one-
      month rotation in a rural or public health setting.

              Rural and public health rotations are supported by Family Practice Residency
      Program funds, as required by a rider in the General Appropriations Act. Both the
      participating resident and the residency program receive funding under the program.
      However, the rural and public health supervisors serve as volunteers and are not
      compensated for their services.

              In FY 2011, approximately 60 family practice residents will complete a rural or
      public health rotation. Participating family practice residents receive a stipend of $1,000
      upon completion of either a rural or public health rotation. In addition, residency
      programs receive funding of $1,500 for each resident who completes a rural rotation
      and the resident's travel costs may be reimbursed. For residents completing a public



                                                                                            06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-L
Page 4

       health rotation, the public health agency that hosts the resident and compensation for
       the residency program may receive up to $2,000.

2. Primary Care Residency Program

             FY 2011 Amount:         $ 2,495,220
             FY 2012 Amount:         $         0

        In 1995, the Texas Legislature created the Primary Care Residency Program to provide
funds to create new residency positions and support positions that had not previously been
funded, as a mechanism to increase the number of primary care physicians trained in the state.
Since the establishment of this program, the Texas Legislature increased the appropriated
funds, from $888,570 in FY 1997 to $3,084,730 in FY 1999 through FY 2003. In FY 2004 and FY
2005 appropriations were reduced by 15 percent to $2,626,552 annually. Funding was reduced
by an additional 5 percent to $2,495,220 for each year of the FY 2006 and FY 2007 biennium.
Funds were reduced again in FY 2010 and FY 2011 by 26.6 percent to $1,830,000 annually. In
FY 2011, the funds provided support for 122 residents in 23 primary care residency programs.

         Under this program, funding is limited to Texas primary care residency programs,
defined as family practice (not supported by the Family Practice Residency Program), general
internal medicine, general pediatrics, or obstetrics/gynecology. Funding is provided to residency
programs based on residency program directors’ identification and designation of residents
likely to remain in Texas to practice. The residency program receives funds for the duration of
the designated residents’ training, up to a maximum of four years for obstetrics/gynecology
residents. Funds may be expended on educational enhancements that benefit all residents in
training at the program.

       Beginning in FY 2010, all family practice residency programs supported previously under
the Primary Care Residency Programs were transferred to receive funding exclusively under the
Family Practice Residency Program. If funding is provided, it would support residency positions
in primary care residency programs of Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Obstetrics/Gynecology.

3. Graduate Medical Education Program

             FY 2011 Amount:         $ 300,000
             Per-resident amount:    $     910

             FY 2012 Amount:         $        0
             Per-resident amount:    $        0

    The amount appropriated for each year of the 2010 and 2011 biennium was of $300,000.
This amount was reduced for each year by 5 percent, reducing available funding for FY 2010
and FY 2011 to $285,000.




                                                                                           06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-L
Page 5

    The Graduate Medical Education (GME) Program was established by the Texas Legislature in
1997 to increase the state’s support of medical residency programs. In FY 2011, the Board
contracted with teaching hospitals and local foundations to support independent residency
training and provided per-resident funding of $910 to 313 primary care residents in training at
independent residency programs.

         Participation in the program is limited to residency programs that incur the costs of
faculty supervision and education or the stipend costs of resident physicians in accredited
clinical residency programs in the state.

        In 2007, the 80th Texas Legislature transferred $3,000,000 of this trusteed fund to
support the health-related institutions through a direct appropriation to the state’s health-
related institutions through the Graduate Medical Education formula funding. The GME formula
funding is provided only to health-related institutions. Funding for teaching hospitals with
accredited, but unaffiliated with a Texas medical school received funding through the
Coordinating Board program.

4. Statewide Preceptorship Programs in Family Practice, Internal Medicine, and Pediatrics

             FY 2011 Amount:          $ 406,930
             FY 2012 Amount:          $       0

        The programs were appropriated $452,144 for each year of the 2010 and 2011
biennium. Funding was reduced in FY 2011 by 10 percent to $406,930. While no funding is
available to support the efforts of these programs in FY 2012, staff will work with the
participating institutions to maintain the database of volunteer supervisors.

        The Preceptorship Programs provide funding to Texas medical students who complete a
one-month experience with a family physician, internist, or pediatrician. The programs’ goals
are to increase interest in primary care and encourage participants to choose primary care
careers. Participants spend a month in one of three primary care specialties: family medicine,
general internal medicine, or general pediatrics. The guiding premise of the preceptorship
experience is that early exposure to a primary care medical specialty may positively influence
future career decisions and practice patterns.

        Medical students typically participate in the preceptorship programs during the summer
between their first and second year of medical school. The students work in practicing
physicians’ offices and experience the daily life and work of primary care physicians.
Participating medical students are encouraged to select a primary care physician whose practice
is located away from their medical school. The medical students may select from a volunteer
faculty of 1,400 primary care physicians located statewide.

        The preceptorship program in family practice was established in 1978 and served as a
model for the development in 1995 of the preceptorship programs in internal medicine and
pediatrics. Since 1981, the Coordinating Board has contracted with The University of Texas
Health Science Center at Houston to operate the preceptorship program in family practice, and
since 1996 the Coordinating Board has contracted with two non-profit organizations—the Texas


                                                                                                 06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-L
Page 6

Chapter of the American College of Physicians and the Texas Pediatric Society—to establish and
operate the programs in internal medicine and pediatrics, respectively.

5. Joint Admission Medical Program

             FY 2010 – FY 2011 Amount:       $ 10,607,155
             FY 2012 – FY 2013 Amount:       $ 7,006,794

       The 2010 and 2011 biennium appropriation amount was $10,616,355. In FY 2011, the
funding was reduced by 5 percent, or $530,818, due to statewide budget reductions.

        The Coordinating Board contracts with the Joint Admission Medical Program (JAMP)
Council to maintain and administer the program through The University of Texas System Office,
Texas Medical and Dental Schools Application Service (TMDSAS). The program was created by
the 77th Texas Legislature in 2001 and provides services to support and encourage highly-
qualified, economically-disadvantaged students pursuing a medical education. In 2007, the 80th
Texas Legislature increased the program’s funding by $2,300,000 for the FYs 2008 and 2009
biennium and expanded eligibility to students attending Texas independent institutions. In
2009, the 81st Texas Legislature increased the program’s funding by an additional $5,000,000
for the FYs 2010 and 2011 biennium, which allowed more students to enroll in the program and
continued funding for the students currently enrolled in the program.

        JAMP provides funding support for both undergraduate and medical students.
Participating JAMP students are eligible to receive a scholarship each semester beginning in
their sophomore year of college. Undergraduate students also receive a stipend to attend
summer internships following their sophomore and junior years. JAMP students receive
mentoring and personal assistance to prepare for medical school while attending college. Most
importantly, if they fulfill all requirements, these students receive a guarantee of admission to
attend a Texas medical school. The first cohort of JAMP students was selected in 2003 and
graduated from medical school in spring 2010. They have now completed their first year of
residency training. The second cohort of JAMP students, selected in 2004, graduated from
Texas medical schools in May. Of the 57 JAMP graduates in the first two classes, 61 percent
(35) entered into residencies in Texas and 65 percent (37) are training to become primary care
physicians.




                                                                                            06/11
                              Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                          AGENDA ITEM IV-M

Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to the Carl D.
Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act funds to colleges for State Leadership
Grants for program year 2011-2012


RECOMMENTATION: Approval


Background Information:

        The Coordinating Board invited Texas public postsecondary institutions to submit Request
for Applications (RFA) to receive a State Leadership grant supported with federal funding through
the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006, Public Law 109-270
(Perkins IV). Perkins funds are used to develop and enhance career and technical programs that
lead to high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand careers. State Leadership grants are awarded to
support the advancement of career and technical education in Texas.

         Following a review of 29 pre-proposals by Coordinating Board staff, 22 applicants were
invited to submit full proposals. Each proposal focused on one of the nine priority topics for the
2011-2012 program year. Priority topics include comprehensive professional development
activities; improvement of career guidance and academic counseling; improvement of academic
and career and technical skills; improvement of student achievement through educational
partnerships; alignment of career and technical education programs; development, improvement,
or expansion of technology; activities that increase the academic performance of special
population students including students in non-traditional fields of study; and the improvement or
development of new curriculum. Selected projects are required to have statewide impact on
career and technical education. State Leadership projects and activities are also aligned with the
accelerated Closing the Gaps by 2015 plan.

       Federal funding provided for Perkins under Title I, which supports the State Leadership
Grants, is estimated to receive a 20 percent reduction for program year 2011-2012. The proposed
budget reduction would likely decrease funding for the State Leadership Grants from $2.8 million
in 2011 to $2.65 million in 2012.

       Staff request approval to award funding for the following State Leadership grants based
on the following estimates:




                                                                                           06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-M
Page 2

                                STATE LEADERSHIP GRANTS



Project                                    Institution    Allocation

Pending staff review and recommendation



Total Allocations                                         $2.65 million




                                                               06/11
                               Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                           AGENDA ITEM IV-N


Report on the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act funds to
colleges for Basic and Tech Prep Grants


RECOMMENTATION: No action required


Background Information:

        As the state’s sub-recipient of the federal Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education
Improvement Act (Perkins IV) funding, the Coordinating Board administers a formula allocation to
support the Basic Grants for the community and technical colleges. The Basic Grants support the goals
outlined in Perkins IV. The Coordinating Board publishes a Request for Application (RFA) for eligible
Texas colleges to apply to receive a Perkins Basic Grant.

        Perkins Basic Grants are used to develop and enhance career and technical programs that
lead to high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand careers.

       As part of the responsibility delegated to the Coordinating Board by the State Board of
Education, the Coordinating Board annually allocates Perkins funds to the state’s public two-year
colleges. Funds for Title I of the Perkins Act are allocated to the state and divided between
secondary and postsecondary education according to a formula developed by the Texas Education
Agency (TEA). As part of the Commissioner’s work with staff in aligning all activities and resources
with the accelerated Closing the Gaps by 2015 plan, policy and funding changes have been
implemented to ensure Perkins funding supports these goals and objectives. The following
information describes the Basic Grants and the formula used in the allocation.

Basic Grants

        Perkins Basic Grants provide support for career and technical programs at Texas public
community and technical colleges. These grants are awarded annually and are based upon the
formula prescribed by the federal Perkins Act. Each eligible institution is allocated funding based
on the total number of students that are enrolled in technical programs and receiving Pell
grants, as reported by the institution. Eligible institutions in Texas include all 50 community
college districts, three Lamar State Colleges, and the Texas State Technical College System. The
allocation of the total Title I federal funds that supports the Basic Grant remains at a 70/30 split
between TEA and the Coordinating Board.

        An eligible institution must qualify for a grant of at least $50,000 to receive an
allocation. If an institution does not meet the established threshold, they may be eligible to
receive a minimum award and may be required to form a consortium with nearby community or
technical colleges. Adjustments are available to allow institutions to qualify for the formula to
allow those institutions that may not achieve the necessary enrollment of students to receive a
grant.

                                                                                             06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-N
Page 2

        In previous program years, institutions have spent approximately 9 percent of Perkins
funds for upgrading their instructional equipment, 13 percent for revising curricula, 17 percent for
guidance and counseling, 31 percent for serving special populations (textbooks, transportation,
dependent care), and 30 percent for other education-related activities (professional development,
travel, administration).

         The funding provided through the Basic Grants must be used to accomplish the
following: 1) strengthen the academic and career and technical skills of students participating in
career and technical education programs; 2) link career and technical education at the
secondary level and career and technical education at the postsecondary level; 3) provide
students with strong experience in and understanding of all aspects of an industry, which may
include work-based learning experiences; 4) develop, improve, or expand the use of technology
in career and technical education; 5) provide professional development programs to secondary
and postsecondary teachers, faculty, administrators, and career guidance and academic
counselors who are involved in integrated career and technical education programs; 6) develop
and implement evaluations of the career and technical education programs carried out with
funds, including an assessment of how the needs of special populations are being met; 7)
initiate, improve, expand, and modernize quality career and technical education programs,
including relevant technology; 8) provide services and activities that are of sufficient size,
scope, and quality to be effective; and 9) provide activities to prepare special populations,
including single parents and displaced homemakers who are enrolled in career and technical
education programs, for high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand occupations that will lead to self-
sufficiency. Additionally, the Basic Grants must address the goals included in the Texas State
Plan for 2008-2013, under the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act
of 2006; the Closing the Gaps: The Texas Higher Education Plan; and the requirements of
Public Law 109-270, Title I, Career and Technical Education Assistance to the States.

        A list of Basic Grant allocations for program year 2011-2012 by college is provided on the
following page.

Tech Prep Grants and Funding

         Federal funding for Tech Prep grants has been eliminated for program year 2011-2012. It
is anticipated that the 26 regional Tech Prep consortia will close after August 31, 2011, in
accordance with close-out procedures established by the Coordinating Board.




                                                                                            06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-N
Page 3

                        PERKINS BASIC GRANT ALLOCATIONS

      Institution                                         Allocation*
     Alamo Community College District                 $    1,869,626
     Alvin Community College                          $      106,092
     Amarillo College                                 $      532,153
     Angelina College                                 $      420,606
     Austin Community College                         $    1,125,273
     Blinn College                                    $      261,329
     Brazosport College                               $       57,467
     Central Texas College                            $      409,630
     Cisco Community College                          $      235,340
     Clarendon College                                $       95,507
     Coastal Bend College                             $      242,472
     College of the Mainland                          $      141,526
     Collin County Community College District         $      208,731
     Dallas County Community College District         $    1,312,884
     Del Mar College                                  $      572,456
     El Paso County Community College District        $      562,751
     Frank Phillips College                           $       64,632
     Galveston College                                $       78,702
     Grayson County College                           $      391,343
     Hill College                                     $      216,955
     Houston Community College System                 $      986,336
     Howard County Junior College District            $      224,071
     Kilgore College                                  $      367,910
     Lamar Institute of Technology                    $      306,828
     Lamar State College-Orange                       $      245,192
     Lamar State College-Port Arthur                  $      117,018
     Laredo Community College                         $      438,828
     Lee College                                      $      298,148
     Lone Star College System District                $      793,026
     McLennan Community College                       $      647,201
     Midland College                                  $      182,905
     Navarro College                                  $      486,247
     North Central Texas Community College District   $      264,163
     Northeast Texas Community College                $      198,033
     Odessa College                                   $      141,429
     Panola College                                   $      145,581
     Paris Junior College                             $      270,107
     Ranger College                                   $       50,000
     San Jacinto Community College District           $      500,105




                                                                        06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-N
Page 4

      Institution                                           Allocation*
      South Plains College                              $        365,842
      South Texas College                               $       1,321,808
      Southwest Texas Junior College                    $        285,642
      Tarrant County College District                   $       1,030,597
      Temple College                                    $        199,808
      Texarkana College                                 $        221,384
      Texas Southmost College                           $        331,335
      TSTC Harlingen                                    $        567,245
      TSTC Marshall                                     $        132,016
      TSTC Waco                                         $       1,020,957
      TSTC West Texas                                   $        189,288
      Trinity Valley Community College                  $        429,122
      Tyler Junior College                              $        571,561
      Vernon College                                    $        145,956
      Victoria College, The                             $        161,556
      Weatherford College                               $        103,584
      Western Texas College                             $          50,000
      Wharton County Junior College                     $        213,079

     Total Formula Allocations                              $22,909,383




* The allocations may change based on funding made available from uncommitted Perkins State
Leadership and Administration funds.




                                                                                     06/11
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                      AGENDA ITEM IV-O


Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to authorize the Assistant Commissioner of
Academic Affairs and Research to approve the 2011 African American Museum Internship
Report to be submitted to the Governor’s Office and Legislative Budget Board by October 1,
2011


RECOMMENTATION:              Approval


Background Information:


        Since 2002, the General Appropriations Act, Strategy C.4.12, has appropriated funds to
the Coordinating Board each fiscal year to support a student internship program at the African
American Museum in Dallas. The Coordinating Board contracted with The University of Texas at
Dallas to administer the 2011 funds appropriation.

       The Texas General Appropriations Act requires the Coordinating Board to submit an
annual report to the Governor’s Office and the Legislative Budget Board describing the overall
performance of the internship program. The report is due on October 1st each year.

        Staff recommends that the authority to review and approve the final report be delegated
to the Assistant Commissioner of Academic Affairs and Research in order to meet the October
1, 2011 deadline.




                                                                                          06/11
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                       AGENDA ITEM IV-P


Consideration of adopting the staff recommendation to the Committee relating to the
appointment of members to the Certification Advisory Council


RECOMMENDATION:                Appoint members

                               -Dr. Alan Runge, Concordia University
                               -Dr. Carolyn Green, Texas A&M University
                               -Ms. Joyce Williams, Dallas County Community College District

Background Information:

      In accordance with Texas Education Code, Section 61.314, Coordinating Board Rules,
Section 7.7(b) establishes the Certification Advisory Council to advise the Board on
standards and procedures related to certification of private, nonexempt postsecondary
educational institutions; to assist the Commissioner in the examination of individual
applications for Certificates of Authority; and to perform other duties related to certification
that the Board finds appropriate.

     The council consists of six members with experience in higher education, three of
whom are drawn from exempt private postsecondary institutions in Texas. The members
are appointed to two-year staggered terms. Three members’ terms will expire in August
2011.




                                                                                       06/11
                                   Alan P. Runge




Education
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska:                                   1991-1997
         Ph.D., August 1997, Educational Administration: Curriculum and Instruction
                (Physics Emphasis)
         (Dissertation listed separately.)

         M.S., University of Nebraska, Lincoln, May 1994, Physics and Astronomy, non-
                thesis option
                Advisor: Dr. Roger D. Kirby
    DeVry University, Kansas City, Missouri:                                     2002-2003
         M.B.A. with Graduate Certificate in Project Management
    Miami University, Oxford, Ohio:                                              1989-1991
         M.S., May 1991, Physics
         Thesis: “Investigating Magnetic Anisotropy Using a Low Temperature Torque
                Magnetometer”
         Abstract:      The low temperature adaptation and calibration of a novel torque
                magnetometer is given. The temperature variance of the magnetic anisotropy
                for various transition metal-non magnetic multilayer systems is measured.
         Chairman: Dr. Michael J. Pechan
    Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas:                                  1987-1989
         B.S., May 1989, Physics
    Concordia Teachers College, Seward, Nebraska:                                1984-1987
         B.A., May 1987, Physical Science
         Lutheran Teacher Diploma, completed and awarded October 2009

Dissertation
    Title: “Impact of Maple™ on the Design, Instruction, and Achievement in an
          Undergraduate Physics Mathematical Methods Course”
    Abstract:        A qualitative case study design, combined with supporting quantitative
         methods, is used to provide a holistic description of a single undergraduate math
         methods course. This research focuses on the impact of Maple™ as a tool for course
         delivery, teaching, learning, and problem solving. Measures of achievement gain
         related to the use of Maple™ are given.
    Chairman: Dr. David W. Brooks
Alan Runge
     2

Professional Certifications
      Certified Computing Professional certification through the Institute for the Certification
              of Computing Professionals, April 2002
      Certified Wideband Network Engineer, April 2000

      Microsoft Certified Professional, NT Workstation/Server 4.0, November 1998
      AMX Certified Programmer, Level 2, October 1995

Academic Experience
      Concordia University Texas, Austin, TX, Provost,                    March 2007 – Present
         Duties: Responsible for strategic leadership of operational units directly support the
                Institution’s mission, including: Academic Services, Student Services,
                Enrollment Management (admissions and financial aid), Athletics and
                Registrar. Responsible for overall budgets in assigned departments, hiring and
                personnel decisions, strategic planning and operational oversight. The Provost
                is the Chair of the Faculty and sits on all faculty committees. Reports to the
                President of the University and sits on the Administrative Council of the
                Institution under the President’s direction. Teaching responsibilities are set at
                1 course per year.
      DeVry University, Houston, TX, Dean of Academic Affairs, July 2003 – March 2007
        Duties: Selected for new management team to open new campus location in Houston,
               TX market. Campus enrollments have shown steady growth each term,
               currently totaling just under 800 undergraduate students with retention in the
               top half of the 23 campuses in the system. Manage the Department of
               Academic Affairs and provide academic leadership to campus and extended
               Metro Area including three remote centers. Provide input to strategic
               planning, manage departmental expense, salary and capitol budgets, ensure
               state and accreditation rules and requirements are met, ensure student support
               and retention initiatives are in place and effective and support outreach and
               recruiting programs. Responsibilities included 4 academic departments, each
               lead by a Dean, the Registrar Office, Academic Support Center and Library,
               with a total departmental staff of 32 FT and over 55 PT adjunct faculty.
      DeVry University, Kansas City, MO, Academic Dean of Telecommunications
        Management and Business Administration,                         July 1999 – July 2003
        Duties: Manage and coordinate 16 full-time and approximately 22 part-time faculty,
               manage local implementation of Telecommunications Management and
               Business Administration degree program curricula, course delivery,
               scheduling and faculty assignments, establish and maintain articulation and
               transfer agreements with other institutions, oversee assessment activities for
               program, teach (time permitting) networking courses within programs
      Concordia University, St. Paul, MN, Assist. Professor/Program Manager of
         Information Technology in Management,                       July 1997 – June 1999
         Duties: Assigned as first Program Manager for new Information Technology in
                Management bachelor’s degree completion program for adults and minor
                                                                                    Alan Runge
                                                                                         3

                 emphasis program in Computer Information Systems, responsible for
                 developing materials and managing all course curricula for total of 25
                 undergraduate courses and one graduate course, hire adjunct professors and
                 make instructor assignments for all courses, teach at undergraduate and
                 graduate level, administer Microsoft AATP programs, elected chair of Faculty
                 Development Committee and serve on Faculty Senate
      University of Nebraska, Teaching Assistant, Chemistry,                        Fall 1996
         Duties: Taught General Chemistry II labs using CBL™ systems

      University of Nebraska, Instructor, Teachers College,                        Spring 1995
      Curriculum & Instruction 882: Instructional Applications of Computers
         Duties: Assisted with instruction and class lecture presentations, used Hypercard to
                 introduce computer based instructional material design concepts and basic
                 scripting techniques

      Miami University, OH, Teaching Assistant, Physics,      August1989 - December 1990
         Duties: Coordinated advanced general physics lab, which included instrumentation,
                computer interfaces and programming, and electronics

      Manhattan High School, Manhattan, Kansas, Teacher’s Aide,                  Fall 1988
        Duties: Taught AP physics and physical education as practicum teaching experience
                and through Kansas State University

      Kansas State University, Teaching Assistant, Physics,         August 1987 - May 1989
         Duties: Taught general physics and engineering physics labs, assisted with
                planetarium and observatory restoration projects and public showings staff

      Concordia University, NE, Teaching Assistant, Chemistry, January 1986 - May 1987
         Duties: Taught general chemistry lab, graded organic chemistry


Research Experience
      University of Nebraska, Research Assistant, Physics,         August 1991 - May 1994
         Duties: Manufacture of rare earth alloys, made magnetic measurements using: torque
                 magnetometer; alternating gradient force magnetometer (AGFM); optical Kerr
                 effect, and x-ray spectroscopy

      Miami University, Research Assistant, Physics,         August 1990 - June 1991
         Duties: Performed LabView™ program development, computer interfacing, research
                related to masters thesis

Publications
      Runge, A, Spiegel, A., Pytlik Z., L., Dunbar, S., Fuller, B., Sowell, G., Brooks, D.
             (1999). “Hands-on Computer Use in Science Classrooms: The Skeptics Are Still
             Waiting”. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 8, 33-44
Alan Runge
     4

      Zhang, Y., Runge, A. P., Shan, Z. S., Sellmyer, D. J. (1994). "Magnetic and magneto-
             optical properties of Mn5(Ge1-xMx)3 alloys with M=Sn, Pb". Journal of Applied
             Physics, 75, 6354-6356
      Runge, A. P., Bait, M. E., Pechan, M. J. (1993). "Variable temperature ultralow
             compliance torque magnetometer". Review of Scientific Instrumentation, 64,
             802-804

Conference Presentations
      Runge, A., Casagrande F. A., Whitney P. (2010). Managing Faculty Compensation
             Frameworks. 38th Annual Institute for Chief Academic Officers and Chief
             Financial Officers. November 7, 2010, group oral presentation
      Runge, A. (2010). Personal Leadership. Leadership Cedar Park Retreat. October 11,
             2010, invited presentation
      Runge, A. (2007). Critical Thinking: How We Solve Problems. 2007 Texas District
             Church Worker Conference – Missional People, Passions, Places. November 19,
             2007, invited presentation
      Runge, A., Longenecker, H., Singer, M. (2007). The Changing IS Field and
             Redevelopment of the CLEP Information Systems and Computer Applications
             Exam. ISECON 2007, November 4, 2007, panel presentation
      Busby, P., Runge, A., Davis, R. (2005). Emerging Technologies – Access for All.
             Houston Information Technology Empowerment Consortium Conference,
             February 10, 2005, panelist
      Runge, A. P. (1998). Microsoft Networking for Dummies. Concordia University Tech
             Day Conference, September 1, 1998, oral
      Runge, A. P., Brooks, D. W. (1997). Incorporating symbolic computer algebra programs
             into undergraduate course curricula. Nebraska Educational Technology
             Association Spring Conference, April 24-25, oral
      Runge, A. P. (1995). Multimedia for the Classroom. Operation Chemistry 1995, June 12-
             15, invited workshop
      Zhang, Y., Runge, A. P., Shan, Z. S., Sellmyer, D. J. (1993). Magnetic and magneto-
             optical properties of Mn5(Ge1-xMx)3 alloys with M=Sn, Pb. 38th Annual
             Conference on Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, November 15-18, oral
      Zhang, Y., Runge, A. P., Shan, Z. S., Sellmyer, D. J. (1993). Magnetic and magneto-
             optical properties of Mn5(Ge1-xMx)3 alloys with M=Sn, Pb. 41st Annual
             Midwest Solid State Conference, September 24-25, oral
      Runge, A. P. (1991). Magnetic characterization of multilayer specimens using a torque
             magnetometer. 39th Annual Midwest Solid State Conference, September 27-28,
             poster
      Runge, A. P., Bait, M. E., Pechan, M. J. (1991). Variable temperature, low compliance
             torque magnetometer. 5th Joint MMM-Intermag Conference, June 18-21, oral
                                                                                    Alan Runge
                                                                                         5

Professional Honors, Service and Memberships
     Commission on Colleges, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Institutional
          Review Committee, 2010
     City of Cedar Park, Mayoral Special Planetarium Task Force, 2010-2011
     College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Chair, Test Development Committee –
            Information Systems and Computer Applications, The College Board, 1998 - 2007
     Association of American Colleges and Universities, since 2005
     Ron Taylor Award, DeVry, Inc. (employee award for excellence) 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
     Institute for Certification of Computing Professionals, Certification Council member
             since June 2002
     Association of Information Technology Professionals, since 1997

     Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 1999 - 2003
     American Association of Physics Teachers, 1995-1998
     Nebraska Educational Technology Association, 1996-1997
     Sigma Xi, nomination accepted in 1991
     American Society for Physics Students (Sigma Pi Sigma), accepted 1989

Other Employment
     Sole Proprietor, Technology Solution Services,                             founded 1995
     Duties: Program, design, and upgrade AMX control systems, design, Install and maintain
            multimedia systems for business and education, provide Windows and Macintosh
            technical support, user support and training, create and maintain corporate web
            sites, prepare web ready multimedia and graphics, design and create virtual reality
            solutions using QT-VR technology

     Instructional Technology Specialist, University of Nebraska, Information Services,
                                                                                  1994 - 1996
        Duties: Managed technical support for hardware and software and user training for
                use of multimedia equipped classrooms, auditoriums, and conference rooms,
                assisted in faculty development of instructional technology and multimedia
                material for Macintosh and Windows platforms, designed workshop and
                training curriculum materials for multimedia development software packages
                and multimedia system use, assisted with specification, design, and
                installation project management of classroom multimedia systems, installed,
                programmed, and maintained AMX control systems, performed authorized
                NEC CRT projector service, supervised student support staff

     Study Material Designer, John’s Notes, Lincoln Nebraska,                     1992 - 1994
Alan Runge
     6

             Duties: Attended all class sessions and provided typed, illustrated notes and study
                    guides for courses: 6 sections of General Astronomy 101 and one complete
                    course study guide, 2 sections of General Physics 141

      Area Manager, Oetting’s Detasseling, Inc, Seward, Nebraska, Summers           1985 - 1991
         Duties: Managed all office and field operations as Area Manager of north central
                Illinois for 3 years, directed human resource activities including hiring 20
                supervisor level employees and up to 450 daily field workers, made daily
                work assignments, negotiated work contracts with seed companies, budget
                responsibilities for up to $1.4 million in revenues, maintained average worker
                wages for area above corporate average each year based on a performance
                ranking pay scale

Other Interests
      Commercial pilot license (single engine - airplane), instrument rated, 4 phases of FAA
           WINGS pilot safety award program completed
      Civil Air Patrol, U.S.A.F. Civilian Auxiliary, Major, Search and Rescue/Disaster
             Relief/Counter Drug mission rated pilot, Lees Summit Composite Squadron
             Deputy Commander since 2002, Nebraska Wing Chief of Staff June 1993 - July
             1995, member since 1991
      Board of Elders, St. John Lutheran Church, 2006-2007
      PADI Certified Open Water SCUBA diver, since 1997
      Avid Sailor and competition sailboat race crew

References
      Thomas Cedel, Ph.D.                             Concordia University Texas
      President                                       3400 IH 35 North
                                                      Austin, TX 78705-2799

      Pete Mueller, M.Div.                            ACTS Lutheran Church
      Pastor                                          1304 RR 620 N
                                                      Austin, Texas 78734

      David Bahn, D.Th.                               St John Lutheran Church
      Senior Pastor                                   15235 Spring Cypress
                                                      Cypress, TX 77410

      Marie Hallinan, M.S.                            DeVry University
      Metro & Campus President                        11125 Equity Dr.
                                                      Houston, TX 77041-8217

      David Brooks, Ph.D.                             University of Nebraska - Lincoln
      Prof. of Chemistry Education,                   118 Henzlik Hall
         Curriculum and Instruction                   Lincoln, NE 68588-0356

      Robert DeWerff, Ph.D.                           Concordia University
                                                                             Alan Runge
                                                                                  7

Prof. of Religion,                        275 Syndicate St. North
Provost                                   St. Paul, MN 55104-5494

Larry Oetting, Ph.D.                      Concordia University
Prof. of Health & Human                   651 N 6th Street
        Performance - Emeriti             Seward, NE 68434

Charles Ansorge, Ph.D.                    University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Prof. of Educational Psychology           202 Mabel Lee
                                                 Lincoln, NE 68588-0229

Roger Kirby, Ph.D.                        University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Prof. of Physics & Astronomy              116 Brace Lab
        Graduate/Department Chair         Lincoln, NE 68588-0111

Additional references are available upon request.
                             Carolyn Wilson Green, Ph.D.
                          Texas A&M University-San Antonio




Dr. Green currently serves as the Director of Information Technology Center
Development at Texas A&M University-San Antonio. She has worked for the past ten
years to help establish Texas A&M-San Antonio as a stand-alone university. In the
leadership roles she has held at the university she has led the academic master planning
committee, designed and implemented the university’s institutional effectiveness
planning process, and established academic affairs administrative processes and
procedures as the institution transitioned from being a System Center to operating as an
independent institution. Having previously served as SACS liaison at another institution,
she currently serves as member of the leadership team preparing the university’s
application for separate accreditation by SACS and as the Chair of the Council on
Assessment and Planning. She is an Associate Professor of Computer Information
Systems.

Prior to her current position, Dr. Green served as the university’s Interim Provost and
Vice President for Academic Affairs. During the time that the campus operated as a
System Center, she served as the center’s Interim Executive Director/Dean of Academic
and Student Affairs from 2005 to 2008 and subsequently as Dean of Academic Affairs
until her appointment as Interim Provost. She had previously served as Chair of the
Department of Business Administration and subsequently as Associate Vice President for
Academic Affairs at the University of Texas at Brownsville. She had previously been an
Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems at the University of Houston.
Dr. Green received her bachelor’s degree with honors in mathematics and her doctorate
in management information systems from the University of Houston.

Prior to entering the field of higher education, Dr. Green worked for 15 years in
information systems management and consulting in the oil and gas and construction
industries, including positions with Pennzoil, M. W. Kellogg, The Western Company of
North America, and Brown & Root. She also served for 10 years as Associate Editor of
the Database Newsletter. Dr. Green was recognized as one of Five Outstanding Young
Houstonians by the Houston Jaycees in 1988 and was recognized as a Hidden Hero by
City Year in 2009.

Dr. Green is a member of the South San Antonio Chamber of Commerce Board of
Directors, the Information Technology Committee of the Greater San Antonio Chamber
of Commerce, the South San Antonio ISD Education Foundation Board, the San Antonio
College Computer Information Systems Advisory Board and the St. Philip’s College
Computer Information Systems Advisory Board.
                                CURRICULUM VITAE

A. EDUCATION
Doctor of Philosophy in Business Administration              University of Houston
       Major: Management Information Systems

Bachelor of Arts, Mathematics                                University of Houston

 B. TEACHING POSITIONS
2009-Present   Associate Professor at Texas A&M University-San Antonio
2005-2009      Associate Professor at Texas A&M University Kingsville-System
               Center San Antonio
2001-2005      Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University Kingsville-System
               Center San Antonio
1996-1999      Assistant Professor at the University of Texas at Brownsville
1993-1995      Assistant Professor at the University of Houston
1992-1993      Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Houston

C. ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
2010-Present   Director of IT Center Development at Texas A&M University-San
               Antonio
2009-2010      Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at Texas
               A&M University-San Antonio
2007-2009      Dean of Academic and Student Affairs at Texas A&M University
               Kingsville-System Center San Antonio
2005-2007      Interim Executive Director and Dean of Academic and Student
               Affairs at Texas A&M University Kingsville-System Center San
               Antonio
1998-1999      Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs at the University of
               Texas at Brownsville
1997-1998      Chair of the Department of Business Administration at the
               University of Texas at Brownsville
1988-1999      Information Systems Consultant
1988-1998      Associate Editor, Data Base Newsletter
1987-1988      Manager, Information Management, Pennzoil Company
1985-1987      Manager, Data Administration, Pennzoil Company
1984-1985      Lead Analyst, Data Administration, Pennzoil Company
1983-1984      Data Base Consultant, Western Company of North America
1981-1982      Data Base Administrator, Western Company of North America
D. PUBLICATIONS
Hurley, T.A. and C.W. Green (2006). “Knowledge Management: Motivating Strategic
Behavior.” International Journal of Applied Management and Technology, Vol. 4.1

Green, Carolyn W. and Tracy A. Hurley (2006). "Encouraging Participation in
Communities of Practice: The Effects of Normative Influence and Technological Support
on Knowledge Creation and Transfer", in Encyclopedia of Communities of Practice in
Information and Knowledge Management, Steve Clarke and Elayne Coakes, eds., Idea
Group.

Hurley, Tracy A. and Carolyn W. Green (2005). “Knowledge Management and the
Nonprofit Industry: A Within and Between Approach”, Journal of Knowledge
Management Practice, Vol. 6.

Green, Carolyn W. and Tracy A. Hurley (2005). “Technology Use Rationale and
Assimilation in the Implementation of Electronic Data Interchange”, Proceedings of the
Eleventh Americas Conference on Information Systems.

Hurley, Tracy A. and Carolyn W. Green (2005). “Creating a Knowledge Management
Culture: the Role of Task, Structure, Technology, and People in Encouraging
Knowledge Creation and Transfer”, Proceedings of the 2005 Midwest Academy of
Management Conference.

Green, Carolyn Wilson, Tracy Hurley, and Peter Shaw (2004). “Knowledge Management
in Organizational Settings: The Effect of Normative Influence and Technological Support
on Knowledge Creation and Transfer”, Proceedings of the 2004 Information Resources
Management Association (IRMA) International Conference, 444-447.

Hurley, Tracy A. and Carolyn W. Green (2004). “Incorporating Knowledge
Management into Nonprofit Organizations: Theory and Possibilities”, Proceedings of the
2004 Midwest Academy of Management Conference.

Hurley, Tracy A., Carolyn W. Green, and Peter Shaw (2004). “Incorporating Knowledge
Management into Nonprofit Organizations: Theory, Problems and Strategies”,
Proceedings of the 2004 Society for Advancement of Management (SAM) Conference.

Green, Carolyn Wilson (2003). “Adoption Rationale and Post-Adoption Activity:
Institutional and Strategic Influences on EDI Adoption and Implementation”, Online
Bulletin of the DIGIT Special Interest Group, International Conference on Information
Systems (ICIS) Conference (http://mis.uah.edu/sigadit/workshops/w2003program.html).

Green, Carolyn Wilson and Mary Jane Saxton (2002). “Human Nature, Empowerment,
Privacy, and Paradigms in Information Technology Studies”, Proceedings of the 33rd
Southwest Decision Sciences Institute Conference.
Green, Carolyn Wilson (1998). "Normative Influence on the Acceptance of Information
Technology: Measurement and Effects", Small Group Research, Vol. 29, No. 1, 85-123.
Green, Carolyn W. and Karen Ruhleder (1995). "Globalization, borderless worlds, and
the Tower of Babel: metaphors gone awry", Journal of Organizational Change
Management, Vol. 8, No. 4, 55-68.

Ruhleder, Karen and Carolyn Green (1993). "Globalization and the Tower of Babel",
Proceedings of the 26th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
(HICSS) Conference, Vol. 4, 460-468.
                                            Joyce Williams’ Biography


Education

Joyce Williams’ educational background includes:

       Bachelor's degree in Sociology from Mississippi Valley State University
       Master’s of Education in Counseling & Guidance from Delta State University
       Postgraduate Studies in Educational Psychology from the University of Mississippi
       Postgraduate Studies in Higher Education Leadership from the University of North Texas

Professional Experience

Joyce Williams is District Director of Workforce Education and Development for the Dallas
County Community College District.
 DCCCD is one of the largest undergraduate institutions of higher education in Texas. It includes seven accredited
colleges, and six educational centers; three of which are designated as Hispanic Serving Institutions serving over
80,000 students, a student enrollment representing over 100 countries and more than 75 spoken languages.

She has served as:

       Interim District Director of Workforce Education (DCCCD)
       Executive Dean of Program Development/Technical Education;
        Richland College (DCCCD)
       Continuing Education and Workforce Training Dean;
        Richland College (DCCCD)
       Center Manager Private Industry Council-Workforce Solutions of Greater Dallas

Joyce Williams professional accomplishments in higher education include:
     President of Texas Association of College Technical Educators
        TACTE represents the fifty college districts in Texas regarding issues on technical education.
       Chair of the WECM Leadership Committee
        The WECM Leadership Committee is responsible for the development, review, and implementation
        of credit and non-credit courses into the Texas Workforce Education Course Manual (WECM).
       E-Learning Committee for Texas
        E- Learning Committee is responsible for providing advice to TACC (Texas Association of
        Community Colleges) regarding implementation and policies related to distant learning in Texas.
       Dual Credit Taskforce for Texas
        This committee is charged with implementation and coordination of dual credit course offerings at the
        community college level in collaboration with the Texas P-16 Committee.

Community Involvement
Ms. Williams is actively involved in the community. Her current activities include:
Board member for DFW Technology & Education Council, Boys and Girls Club of Dallas, and business
taskforce committee member of the Dallas Urban League Business & Industry Committee.
                                       Joyce Williams
Summary of       Professional leadership skills and experience in secondary and higher education
Qualifications   environments
                 Expertise in building strategic partnerships and workforce development
                 Knowledgeable of state and federal guidelines that govern higher education in Texas

Education        Mississippi Valley State University, 1985 – Bachelor of Science- Sociology Delta
                 State University, 1987– Master of Education-Counseling & Guidance
                 Postgraduate Studies, 1988 – University of Mississippi -Educational Psychology
                 Postgraduate Studies, 2004- University of North Texas - Higher Education
                 Leadership

                 District Director of Workforce Education and Development,
Professional     Dallas County Community College District
Experience
                 Dallas County Community College District is one of the largest undergraduate
                 institutions of higher education in Texas. It includes seven accredited colleges, and
                 six educational centers; three of which are designated as Hispanic Serving
                 Institutions serving over 80,000 students a student enrollment representing over 100
                 countries and more than 75 spoken languages.

                 Responsibilities
                  The role is to provide guidance in area of technical education for CTE programs
                 with direct oversight workforce development with a primary focus on building
                 strategic partnerships between industry and DCCCD colleges. Responsibilities
                 also include program approval, course approval, and state compliance of credit
                 technical programs and non-credit, as well as approval of academic field courses
                 and international study abroad programs for the seven colleges.
                  The position of the District Director of Workforce Development requires frequent
                 presentations at community and business forums. In addition this position provides
                 entrepreneurial leadership and promotes the District and or colleges through active
                 involvement in community, business, civic, industry and other organizations. In
                 addition to the management of the following grants and or workforce initiatives i.e.
                 CCID $500,000, Energy Efficiency Grant $119,000, Small Business TWC
                 $200,000, TWC Apprentice Programs $150,000 and TWC ARRA $1.4 million

                 Strategic Accomplishments:

                  Developed a strategic plan for building articulation agreements with 4-year institutions in teacher
                 education and workforce education programs. Assisted colleges to create new associate of applied
                 degrees and awards in the area of Energy, Game Technology, Allied Health, Digital Forensic, and
                 Manufacturing.

                 Created a collaborative model for non-credit programs to serve industry as well
                 as implemented an innovative approach for integrating international and
                 workforce programs

                 Interim District Director of Workforce Education
                 Dallas County Community College District 2007-2009
                 Dallas County Community College District is one of the largest undergraduate
                 institutions of higher education in Texas. It includes seven accredited colleges, and
                 two educational centers; three of which are designated as Hispanic Serving
                 Institutions serving over 60,000 credit students and 25,000 non-credit students with a
                 student enrollment representing over 100 countries.
Responsibilities
 The role was to provide direct oversight local and state compliance guidelines for
workforce education procedures /processes for seven colleges. District liaison for
academic, technical, alternative certification for teacher education programs;
approval of international study abroad and field courses for seven colleges;
coordination
and workforce development of new programs. Facilitator of the district wide councils
for Deans of Continuing Education and Technical Education Deans. Management of
FIPSE grant and DCCCD Foundation funds for Teacher Education programs.

Strategic Accomplishments:
Lead the development of marketing brochures for teacher education and international
education as a district wide effort.
Assisted colleges with feasibility data for new program development and assisted
Eastfield and El Centro develop new associate degrees.
Assist with development of international workforce partnership between Mauritius
North Lake College
Coordinated North Texas Regional STEM ( Science, Technology, Engineering and
Mathematics) workshop
Currently working with Garland and Arlington chambers on a collaborative model for
meeting the needs for advance manufacturing for Dallas County.
Assisting colleges to build collaborative relationship between colleges to support
workforce needs resulting in new technical degrees and certificates.

Executive Dean of Program Development/ Technical Education 2003
Richland College of the Dallas Community College District
Richland College is the largest of seven colleges of the Dallas County Community
College District with a student enrollment of over 15,000 credit students and
approximately 4,000 non-credit students. It is the only community college to be
awarded the Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award.

Responsibilities
 The role was to provide leadership to the institution for the development and
enhancement of technical programs and instructional dean for the Teacher
Preparation Division. Responsible for developing and implementing a plan for
environmental scanning of labor market trends, based upon the local, state, national
and global economic trends, establishment of systemic processes to ensure the
feasibility of program viability within the institutional structure, development of new
and maintain current community and international partnerships with local businesses
and non-profit agencies. In addition the position provided direct supervision of
faculty and administrators for the Teacher Education Division which included
scheduling of classes, hiring of adjunct faculty, advising of students, negotiating
articulation agreements with local universities, evaluation of faculty and staff, and
annual review of program success of student enrollment, number of graduates and
curriculum updates.
Strategic Accomplishments
Project director for the Title III grant: Strengthening Institutions for $1.8 million
dollars. Lead the development and implementation four associate of applied science
degrees and a CEU program for the college.
Lead the college team designing the development of international partnerships with
               Russia, Finland, and Estonia.
               Leadership of the Teacher Preparation Division which resulted in an increased
               enrollment of 23% in undergraduate programs, 100% placement in the Education
               Personnel program, and enrollment increase of 85% in the Alternative Teacher
               Certification Program.

               Continuing Education and Workforce Training August 1996- 2003
               Richland College Dallas, Texas
               Responsibilities
                The role was to provide leadership of the Continuing Education Division,
               supervision of staff, approve faculty credentials, program and development, resolving
               faculty and student issues, generating reports for contact hour reimbursement, work
               with faculty and coordinators in Credit technical programs, maintain membership on
               CE and technical educational employer advisory committees, as well as CE
               compliance officer responsible for submission of program revisions to district and
               THECB on behalf of the college. The positions required vast knowledge of THECB
               rules for CE and Technical Educational workforce programs.

               Strategic Accomplishments

               Revised registration processes for Continuing Education that improved the audit
               procedures that resulted in 100% accuracy of Coordinating Board reports under my
               supervision. Increased the number of community based partnerships with college for
               continuing education offerings and developed a comprehensive process guide for
               Continuing Education Division.

               Developed a database for tracking CE faculty contracts with a check point system to
               prevent audit issues. Developed a tracking and enrollment process to track required
               professional development for staff.

               Center Manager Private Industry Council of Dallas 1990-1996

               The Private Industry Council funded by state funds to serve city and county residents
               of Dallas to provide workforce training, educational services, and youth services.

               Responsibilities
               The position included the evaluation of workforce grants, implementation of system
               to track and monitor performance of grants but limited to the management of the
               Garland and Richardson locations, direct supervision of ten staff, management and
               coordination of temporary sites at Brookhaven College, Johnson Controls and FDIC
               (out- placement centers for displaced workers). In addition, membership on
               community committees such as Garland Housing Authority, Garland Community
               Task Force, and FDIC committee co-chair. Tracking the referral and placement of
               over 3000 participants

               Strategic Accomplishments

               Maintain the highest productive office for referrals to job training. Selected to design
               and implement outplacement centers for dislocated workers in Garland and North
               Dallas service area. Over 80% of the 3000 students served through the center were
               successfully placed in employment.

Professional
Affiliations   President of Texas Association of College Technical Educators 2009-2011. TACTE
               represents the fifty college districts in Texas regarding issues on technical education.
             Chair of the WECM Leadership Committee 2008-2010. WECM Leadership
             Committee is responsible for the development, review, and implementation of credit
             and non-credit courses into Texas’s Workforce Education Course Manual.

             E-Learning Committee for Texas – 2010. E- Learning Committee is responsible for
             provide advise to TACC( Texas Association of Community Colleges) regarding
             implementation and policies related to distant learning in Texas

             Dual Credit Taskforce for Texas- 2010. This committee is charged with
             implementation and coordination of dual credit course offerings at the community
             college level in collaboration with the Texas P-16 Committee.

Community
Advocacy     Board member for Boys and Girls Club of Dallas- 2010
             Dallas Urban League Business & Industry Committee- 2009
References
             Available upon request
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy

                                    AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (1)


Update on proposed amendments to Chapter 4, Rules Applying to All Public Institutions of
Higher Education in Texas, Subchapter A, General Provisions, Section 4.11, Common Admission
Application Forms


RECOMMENDATION:              pending, 30-day comment period


Background Information:

       The Coordinating Board staff propose an amendment to Chapter 4, Subchapter A,
Section 4.11 (f) to change calculation and billing procedures. The new billing procedures would
change the billing sent date and due date from spring to summer and September 15 to no later
than December of each fiscal year respectively.

Date approved by the Commissioner for publication in the Texas Register: May 23, 2011

Date published in the Texas Register: June 3, 2011

The 30-day comment period with the Texas Register ends on: July 3, 2011

At this time no comments have been received.




                                                                                         06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (1)


        Chapter 4. Rules Applying to All Public Institutions of Higher Education in Texas
                               Subchapter A. General Provisions


4.1    Purpose
4.2    Authority
4.3    Definitions
4.4    Student Absences on Religious Holy Days
4.5    Common Calendar
4.6    Minimum Length of Courses and Limitation on the Amount of Credit that a Student May
       Earn in a Given Time Period
4.7    Student Transcripts
4.8    Expert Witnesses
4.9    Excused Absence for a Person Called to Active Military Service
4.10   Limitations on the Number of Courses That May Be Dropped under Certain
       Circumstances by Undergraduate Students
4.11   Common Admission Application Forms


4.1 – 4.10 No Changes.

4.11 Common Admission Application Forms


(a) – (e) No Changes.

(f) The Coordinating Board shall enter into a contract with a public institution of higher
education to maintain the electronic common application system for use by the public in
applying for admission to participating institutions and for distribution of the electronic
application to the participating institutions designated by the applicant. Operating costs of the
system will be paid for by all institutions required to use the common application plus
independent and health-related institutions that contract to use the electronic application. Each
participating institution shall pay a portion of the cost based on the percentage of its enrollment
compared to the total enrollment of all participating institutions based on the previous year's
certified enrollment data. The Coordinating Board will monitor the cost of the system and notify
the institutions on an annual basis of their share of the cost. Billings for the services for the
coming year will be calculated and sent to the institutions in the [spring] summer and payments
must be received [by September 15] no later than December 1, of each fiscal year.
                      Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (2)



Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s recommendation to the Committee
relating to proposed amendments to Chapter 13, Financial Planning, Subchapter H,
Reporting of Tuition and Fees, Section 13.142 of Board rules, concerning Definitions


RECOMMENDATION:              Pending


Background Information:

       Two new definitions are proposed, one for “exemptions” and one for “waivers.”
The other definitions are renumbered accordingly.

       The amendments were published in the May 27, 2011, issue of the Texas
Register. Because the public comment period will not end until June 27, 2011, staff
recommends that these rules be voted on at the Coordinating Board meeting on July 28,
2011.




                                                                                   06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (2)                                                                 June 21, 2011
Page 1

                              CHAPTER 13. FINANCIAL PLANNING

                     SUBCHAPTER H. REPORTING OF TUITION AND FEES

Section
13.140.        Purpose.
13.141.        Authority.
13.142.        Definitions.
13.143.        Reporting.


13.140. – 13.141.      (No change.)

13.142.        Definitions.

      The following words and terms, when used in this subchapter, shall have the following
meanings, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:

       (1) – (4)       (No change.)

       (5)    Exemptions--Programs authorized by state statute that allow a resident, and in
some cases a nonresident, student to enroll in an institution of higher education and pay a
reduced amount of tuition and/or fees.

       (6) [(5)] General academic teaching institution--An institution included in the provisions
of Texas Education Code, §61.003(3).

         (7) [(6)] Incidental fee--A mandatory fee authorized by the governing board of an
institution and collected under Texas Education Code, §55.16 or §130.084, and levied at the
discretion of the governing board of an institution that is charged to all students; or a
discretionary fee collected under Texas Education Code, §54.504, for particular services
provided to students.

        (8) [(7)] Institution or institution of higher education--Any public technical institute,
public junior college, public senior college or university, medical or dental unit, public state
college, or other agency of higher education as defined in Texas Education Code, §61.003(8).

         (9) [(8)] Mandatory fee--A fee authorized by statute or the governing board of an
institution that is charged to a student upon enrollment. For institutions other than public
community colleges, such fees would be required to be paid by the census date or other date
as mandated by the state for formula funding purposes. Examples of such fees are: laboratory
fees, course and incidental fees collected under Texas Education Code, §55.16(c), and other
mandatory fees as authorized by the governing board of the institution. For public community
colleges, such fees would include fees collected from students enrolled in state-funded
continuing education courses.

              (A)   Laboratory fee--A mandatory fee that is charged under Texas Education
       Code, §54.501.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (2)                                                                 June 21, 2011
Page 2


              (B)   Compulsory fee--A mandatory fee authorized under Texas Education
       Code, §§54.503, 54.5061, and 54.513.

       (10) [(9)] Medical and dental unit--An institution included in the provisions of Texas
Education Code, §61.003(5).

       (11) [(10)] Optional fee--Has the same meaning as discretionary fee defined in
paragraph (4) of this section.

         (12) [(11)] Public junior or community college--Any junior or community college
certified by the board in accordance with Texas Education Code, §61.063.

       (13) [(12)] Public technical institute--An institution included in the provisions of Texas
Education Code, §61.003(7).

       (14) [(13)] Required fee--Has the same meaning as mandatory fee defined in
paragraph (9) [(8)] of this section.

       (15) [(14)] Tuition--Statutory, designated, and/or board-authorized tuition.

              (A)    Statutory tuition--A tuition charge authorized under Texas Education
       Code, §54.051, in an amount determined by the Texas Legislature for resident or
       nonresident students. This includes the charge for state-funded continuing education
       courses.

                (B)  Designated tuition--A tuition charge authorized under Texas Education
       Code, §54.0513, that institutions other than public community colleges may impose on
       any graduate or undergraduate, resident or nonresident student, in an amount that the
       governing board of the institution considers necessary for the effective operation of the
       institution.

              (C)      Board authorized tuition--A tuition charge that a general academic
       teaching institution or a medical and dental unit may impose on any graduate resident
       or nonresident student in an amount as specified in Texas Education Code, §54.008.

       (16) [(15)] Tuition fee--Statutory, designated, and/or board-authorized tuition.

       (17) Waivers--Programs authorized by state statute that allow a nonresident student
to enroll in an institution of higher education and pay a reduced amount of nonresident tuition.

13.143.        (No change.)
                       Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                 AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)



Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s recommendation to the Committee
relating to proposed amendments to Chapter 21, Student Services, Subchapter B,
Sections 21.22 through 21.27 of Board rules, concerning the Determination of Resident
Status and Waiver Programs for Certain Nonresident Persons; the repeal of Section
21.29, concerning Waiver Programs for Certain Nonresident Persons; the repeal of
Section 21.30, concerning Residence Determination Official; and new Section 21.29,
concerning Residence Determination Official


RECOMMENDATION:               Pending


Background Information:

        The name of Subchapter B of Coordinating Board rules is amended due to the
proposed deletion of Section 21.29. Section 21.29 is proposed for repeal and is
simultaneously being proposed as Chapter 21, Subchapter X, Sections 21.730 through
21.752, of Coordinating Board rules. The repeal of Section 21.29 necessitates the repeal
of Section 21.30 and the proposal of new Section 21.29, concerning Residence
Determination Official.

         Section 21.22 is amended to accomplish the following: (1) update the name of
the “Texas Common Application” to “ApplyTexas Application” in paragraph 4, “Core
Residency Questions;” (2) move the definition for “Eligible nonimmigrant” to its
appropriate place in the alphabetical listing of definitions; (3) add a definition for
“Erroneously classifies a person as a nonresident” to provide institutions guidance
regarding the circumstances under which they must reimburse students who were
misclassified as nonresidents; (4) amend the definition for “Gainful Employment” (new
paragraph 12) to indicate institutions should use their student financial aid budget
figures in determining whether a student’s earnings are sufficient to be considered the
basis of domicile; (5) add a definition for “Residential real property” (new paragraph 29)
to clarify that persons establishing domicile based on the ownership of property in Texas
must own property on which a dwelling is located; and (6) amend the definition of
“Temporary absence” (new paragraph 30) to clarify it applies to persons who have
established domicile in the state. The definitions have been renumbered as appropriate.

        Section 21.23 is amended to indicate that the rules adopted by the Board in April
2011 are effective beginning with residency decisions made after the census date of the
2011 fall semester. Rules adopted in January 2011 were scheduled to go into effect for
fall 2011, but many residency decisions have already been made for fall 2011.

                                                                                    06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)
Page Two


Therefore, the amendment to this section would allow the rules adopted in January
2011 to apply to decisions made for spring 2012 and later.

        New section 21.24(h) is added to provide institutions guidance in determining
the residency status of persons in the United States Armed Forces, and their spouses
and children. Section 21.26(c) is amended to correct the reference to the title of Section
21.25.

         Former Chart I was deleted from the rules and is now posted on the
Coordinating Board’s website. Former Charts II and III were renumbered as Charts I
and II. The amendment to Section 21.27(a) updates the name of Revised Chart III to
Revised Chart II. Item 3 of Chart I (Affidavit) is amended to refer to residing in Texas
for “thirty-six months” rather than “three years,” to more precisely reflect statutory
language.

        The title of Chart II, Part A is amended to remove the word “a” from the phrase,
“establish a domicile.” The more appropriate phrase is to “establish domicile.”
Additional guidance is added to Part A(1)(a) to indicate employment directly related to
student status cannot be a basis for establishing domicile. Part A(1)(c) is amended to
indicate all persons living on public assistance for 12 months (not just homeless
persons) could use documentation for the service providers as a basis for establishing
domicile.

        The title of Chart II, Part C, is amended to remove an extra comma. Item 6 of
Chart II, Part C is amended to clarify that licensure used to support a claim to domicile
must be issued by the State of Texas or a local (Texas) entity.

       The amendments were published in the June 3, 2011, issue of the Texas
Register. Because the public comment period will not end until July 3, 2011, staff
recommends that these rules be voted on at the Coordinating Board meeting on July 28,
2011.




                                                                                     06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                             June 21, 2011
Page 1

                             CHAPTER 21. STUDENT SERVICES

  SUBCHAPTER B.       DETERMINATION OF RESIDENT STATUS [AND WAIVER PROGRAMS FOR
                            CERTAIN NONRESIDENT PERSONS]


Section
21.21. Authority and Purpose.
21.22. Definitions.
21.23. Effective Date of Subchapter.
21.24. Determination of Resident Status.
21.25. Information Required to Establish Resident Status.
21.26. Continuing Resident Status.
21.27. Reclassification Based on Additional or Changed Information.
21.28. Errors in Classification.
[21.29. Waiver Programs for Certain Nonresident Persons.]
21.29. [21.30.] Residence Determination Official.


21.21. (No change.)

21.22. Definitions.

      The following words and terms, when used in this subchapter, shall have the following
meanings, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:

              (1)    Census date--The date in an academic term for which an institution is
       required to certify a person’s enrollment in the institution for the purposes of
       determining formula funding for the institution.

              (2)     Clear and Convincing Evidence--That degree of proof that will produce a
       firm conviction or a firm belief as to the facts sought to be established. The evidence
       must justify the claim both clearly and convincingly.

                (3)   Coordinating Board or Board--The Texas Higher Education Coordinating
       Board.

              (4)     Core Residency Questions--The questions promulgated by the Board to
       be completed by a person and used by an institution to determine if the person is a
       Texas resident. For enrollments prior to the 2008-2009 academic year, institutions may
       use the core questions developed and distributed by the Board in 1999 or later,
       including the core questions included in the ApplyTexas Application [Texas Common
       Application], or the core questions set forth in current Board rules or posted on the
       Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board web site. The core questions to be used for
       enrollments on or after the 2008-2009 academic year shall be the core questions in the
       ApplyTexas Application [Texas Common Application] or core questions posted on the
       Board web site.

                (5)   Dependent--A person who:
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                              June 21, 2011
Page 2


                    (A)    is less than 18 years of age and has not been emancipated by
             marriage or court order; or

                     (B)    is eligible to be claimed as a dependent of a parent of the person
             for purposes of determining the parent’s income tax liability under the Internal
             Revenue Code of 1986.

             (6)     Domicile--A person’s principal, permanent residence to which the person
      intends to return after any temporary absence.

             (7)     Eligible for Permanent Resident Status--A person who has filed an I-485
      application for permanent residency and has been issued a fee/filing receipt or notice of
      action by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) showing that
      his or her I-485 has been reviewed and has not been rejected.

             (8)     Eligible Nonimmigrant--A person who has been issued a type of
      nonimmigrant visa by the USCIS that permits the person to establish and maintain
      domicile in the United States.

              (9)      Erroneously classifies a person as a nonresident--An action done if an
      institution, in spite of information to the contrary that is provided by the student by the
      census date of a given semester, fails to classify an otherwise eligible student as a
      resident.

             (10)[(8)]      Established domicile in Texas--Physically residing in Texas with
      the intent to maintain domicile in Texas for at least the 12 consecutive months
      immediately preceding the census date of the term of enrollment, allowing for
      documented temporary absences.

             [(9)    Eligible Nonimmigrant – A person who has been issued a type of
      nonimmigrant visa by the USCIS that permits the person to establish and maintain
      domicile in the United States.]

              (11)[(10)]      Financial need--An economic situation that exists for a student
      when the cost of attendance at an institution of higher education is greater than the
      resources the family has available for paying for college. In determining a student’s
      financial need an institution must compare the financial resources available to the
      student to the institution’s cost of attendance.

              (12)[(11)]      Gainful employment--Employment intended to provide an income
      to a person or allow a person to avoid the expense of paying another person to perform
      the tasks (as in child care) that is sufficient to provide at least one-half of the
      individual’s tuition, fees and living expenses as determined in keeping with the
      institution’s student financial aid budget or that represents an average of at least
      twenty hours of employment per week. A person who is self-employed or who is living
      off his/her earnings may be considered gainfully employed for purposes of establishing
      residency, as may a person whose primary support is public assistance. Employment
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                                June 21, 2011
Page 3

      conditioned on student status, such as work study, the receipt of stipends, fellowships,
      or research or teaching assistantships does not constitute gainful employment.

            (13)[(12)]    General Academic Teaching Institution--As the term is defined in
      Texas Education Code, Section 61.003.

              (14)[(13)]      Institution or institution of higher education--Any public technical
      institute, public junior college, public senior college or university, medical or dental unit,
      or other agency of higher education as defined in Texas Education Code, Section
      61.003(8).

            (15)[(14)]    Legal guardian--A person who is appointed guardian under the
      Texas Probate Code, Chapter 693, or a temporary or successor guardian.

             (16)[(15)]    Maintain domicile--To physically reside in Texas such that the
      person intends to always return to the state after a temporary absence. The
      maintenance of domicile is not interrupted by a temporary absence from the state, as
      provided in paragraph (29)[(27)] of this section.

             (17)[(16)]    Managing conservator--A parent, a competent adult, an
      authorized agency, or a licensed child-placing agency appointed by court order issued
      under the Texas Family Code, Title 5.

             (18)[(17)]     Nonresident tuition--The amount of tuition paid by a person who
      does not qualify as a Texas resident under this subchapter unless such person qualifies
      for a waiver program under Subchapter X [§21.29] of this title (relating to Waiver
      Programs for Certain Nonresident Persons).

             (19)[(18)]    Nontraditional secondary education--A course of study at the
      secondary school level in a nonaccredited private school setting, including a home
      school.

            (20)[(19)]      Parent--A natural or adoptive parent, managing or possessory
      conservator, or legal guardian of a person. The term would not otherwise include a
      step-parent.

            (21)[(20)]      Possessory conservator--A natural or adoptive parent appointed
      by court order issued under the Texas Family Code, Title 5.

             (22)[(21)]      Private high school--A private or parochial school in Texas.

            (23)[(22)]    Public technical institute or college--The Lamar Institute of
      Technology or any campus of the Texas State Technical College System.

            (24)[(23)]       Regular semester--A fall or spring semester, typically consisting of
      16 weeks.

             (25)[(24)]      Residence--A person’s home or other dwelling place.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                                  June 21, 2011
Page 4

                (26)[(25)]     Residence Determination Official--The primary individual at each
        institution who is responsible for the accurate application of state statutes and rules to
        individual student cases.

                (27)[(26)]     Resident tuition--The amount of tuition paid by a person who
        qualifies as a Texas resident under this subchapter.

               (28)    Residential real property--Real property on which a dwelling is located.

               (29)[(27)]      Temporary absence--Absence from the State of Texas by a person
        who has established domicile in the state, with the intention to return, generally for a
        period of less than five years. For example, the temporary absence of a person or a
        dependent’s parent from the state for the purpose of service in the U. S. Armed Forces,
        U. S. Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Defense, U. S. Department of State, as
        a result of an employment assignment, or for educational purposes, shall not affect a
        person’s ability to continue to claim that Texas is his or her domicile.

              (30)[(28)]     United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) --The
        bureau of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security that is responsible for the
        administration of immigration and naturalization adjudication functions and establishing
        immigration services policies and priorities.

21.23. Effective Date of this Subchapter.

       Each institution shall apply these rules beginning with enrollments for the Fall Semester,
2006. Changes to these rules adopted in January 2011 are effective with residency decisions
made after the census date of the [for the] Fall Semester, 2011.

21.24. Determination of Resident Status.

        (a) - (g)      (No change.)

         (h)    A member of the United States Armed Services whose Home of Record with the
military is Texas is presumed to be a Texas resident, as are his or her spouse and dependent
children. A member whose Home of Record is not Texas but who provides the institution Leave
and Earnings Statements that show the member has claimed Texas as his or her place of
residence for the 12 consecutive months prior to enrollment is presumed to be a Texas
resident, as are his or her spouse and dependent children.

21.25. Information Required to Initially Establish Resident Status.

      (a)     To initially establish resident status under Section 21.24 of this title (relating to
Determination of Resident Status),

              (1)      a person who qualifies for residency under Section 21.24 (a)(1) shall
       provide the institution with:

                      (A)      a completed set of Core Residency Questions; and
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                                  June 21, 2011
Page 5

                       (B)      if the person is not a Citizen of the United States or a Permanent
               Resident of the U.S., the person shall, in addition to the other requirements of
               this section, provide the institution with a signed affidavit (in the form provided in
               Chart I, which is incorporated into this subchapter for all purposes), stating that
               the person will apply to become a Permanent Resident of the U.S. as soon as the
               person becomes eligible to apply.

               (2)     a person who qualifies for residency under Section 21.24 (a)(2) or (3)
       shall provide the institution with a completed set of Core Residency Questions.

         (b)    An institution may request that a person provide documentation to support or
clarify the answers to the Core Residency Questions. Appropriate documents are not limited to
those listed in Chart II, which is incorporated into this subchapter for all purposes. In addition,
the institution may request documents that support the information the student may provide in
the Core Residency Questions, Section H.

       (c)      An institution shall not impose any requirements in addition to the requirements
established in this section for a person to establish resident status.

21.26. Continuing Resident Status.

       (a) - (b) (No change.)

        (c)    A person who enrolls in an institution after two or more consecutive regular
semesters during which the person is not enrolled in a public institution shall submit the
information required in Section 21.25 of this title, (relating to Information Required to Initially
Establish Resident Status), and satisfy all the applicable requirements to establish resident.

21.27. Reclassification Based on Additional or Changed Information.

          (a)    If a person is initially classified as a nonresident based on information provided
through the set of Core Residency Questions, the person may request reclassification by
providing the institution with supporting documentation as described in Revised Chart II [III],
which is incorporated into Section 21.25(b) of this title (relating to Information Required to
Initially Establish Resident Status).

        (b) - (d)      (No change.)

21.28. (No change.)

[21.29. Waiver Programs for Certain Nonresident Persons.

        A person who is classified as a nonresident under the provisions of this section shall be
permitted to pay resident tuition, if the person qualifies for one of the following waiver
programs:

               (1)     Economic Development and Diversification Program.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                             June 21, 2011
Page 6

                     (A)    A nonresident person, (including a Citizen, a Permanent Resident
            of the U.S., a person who is eligible to be a Permanent Resident of the U.S., and
            an eligible nonimmigrant) whose family has been transferred to Texas by a
            company established as part of the state's Economic Development and
            Diversification Program not earlier than five years before the relevant enrollment
            date, and a person’s spouse and children, shall pay resident tuition as soon as
            they move to Texas, if the person provides the institution with a letter of intent
            to establish Texas as his/her home. A person who moves to Texas to attend an
            institution before his/her family is transferred is permitted to pay the resident
            tuition beginning with the first semester or term after the family moves to the
            state.

                    (B)     After the family has maintained a residence in Texas for 12
            months, the person may request a change in classification in order to pay
            resident tuition.

                   (C)    A current list of eligible companies is maintained on the
            Coordinating Board web site at www.collegeforalltexans.com.

            (2)    Program for Teachers, Professors, their Spouses and Dependents.

                     (A)    A nonresident person (including a Citizen, Permanent Resident of
            the U.S., a person who is eligible to be a Permanent Resident of the U.S., and an
            eligible nonimmigrant) employed as a teacher or professor at least half time on a
            regular monthly salary basis (not as hourly employee) by an institution shall pay
            resident tuition at any institution in the state and the spouse and dependent
            children of the nonresident person shall also pay resident tuition.

                   (B)   This waiver program is applicable only during the person’s periods
            of employment.

                     (C)    If a spouse or dependent child of the teacher or professor attends
            an institution other than the employing institution, the employing institution shall
            provide a letter to the spouse or child’s institution verifying the employment of
            the teacher or professor.

            (3)   Program for Teaching Assistants and Research Assistants, their Spouses
     and Dependents.

                     (A)    A nonresident person (including a Citizen, Permanent Resident of
            the U.S., a person who is eligible to be a Permanent Resident of the U.S., and an
            eligible nonimmigrant) employed by an institution as a teaching or research
            assistant on at least a half-time basis in a position related to his/her degree
            program shall pay resident tuition at any institution in this state and the spouse
            and dependent children of the nonresident person shall also pay resident tuition.

                    (B)   The employing institution shall determine whether or not the
            person’s employment relates to the degree program.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                             June 21, 2011
Page 7

                     (C)    If a spouse or dependent child of the teacher or professor attends
            an institution other than the employing institution, the employing institution shall
            provide a letter to the spouse or child’s institution verifying the employment of
            the teaching or research assistant.

                   (D)   This waiver program is applicable only during the person’s periods
            of employment.

            (4)    Program for Competitive Scholarship Recipients.

                     (A)   A nonresident person (including a Citizen, Permanent Resident of
            the U.S., a person who is eligible to be a Permanent Resident of the U.S., and an
            eligible nonimmigrant) who receives a competitive scholarship from the
            institution may be allowed to pay resident tuition.

                   (B)     In order for the person to be eligible for this waiver program, the
            competitive scholarship must:

                           (i)     total at least $1,000 for the period of time covered by the
                    scholarship, not to exceed 12 months; and

                           (ii)    be awarded by a scholarship committee authorized in
                    writing by the institution's administration to grant scholarships that
                    permit this waiver of nonresident tuition; and

                            (iii)   be awarded according to criteria published in the
                    institution’s paper or electronic catalog, available to the public in advance
                    of any application deadline; and

                          (iv)    be awarded under circumstances that cause both the
                    funds and the selection process to be under the control of the institution;
                    and

                           (v)     permit awards to both resident and nonresident persons.

                    (C)     The scholarship award shall specify the semester or semesters for
            which the scholarship is awarded and a waiver of nonresident tuition under this
            provision shall not exceed the semester or semesters for which the scholarship is
            awarded.

                    (D)    If the scholarship is terminated for any reason prior to the end of
            the semester or semesters for which the scholarship was initially awarded, the
            person shall pay nonresident tuition for any semester following the termination of
            the scholarship.

                     (E)    The total number of persons receiving a waiver of nonresident
            tuition in any given semester under this provision shall not exceed 5 percent of
            the students enrolled in the same semester in the prior year in that institution.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                                  June 21, 2011
Page 8

                       (F)     If the scholarship recipient is concurrently enrolled at more than
               one institution, the waiver of nonresident tuition is only effective at the institution
               awarding the scholarship. An exception for this rule exists for a nonresident
               person who is simultaneously enrolled in two or more institutions of higher
               education under a program offered jointly by the institutions under a partnership
               agreement. If one of the partnership institutions awards a competitive
               scholarship to a person, the person is entitled to a waiver of nonresident tuition
               at the second institution.

                       (G)     If a nonresident person is awarded a competitive academic
               scholarship or stipend under this provision and the person is accepted in a clinical
               biomedical research training program designed to lead to both a doctor of
               medicine and doctor of philosophy degree, he or she is eligible to pay the
               resident tuition rate.

                        (H)    A student awarded a competitive scholarship prior to fall 2009
               that entitled him or her to pay resident tuition in the 2009-2010 academic year is
               entitled to continue paying resident tuition in subsequent semesters if awarded
               competitive scholarships in keeping with subsection (4) of this section and if the
               student remains enrolled in the same certificate or degree program. This
               provision expires August 1, 2014.

               (5)     Programs for Lowered Tuition for Individuals from Bordering States or
     Mexico.
                        (A)     Programs that Require Reciprocity. Waivers of nonresident tuition
               made through each of the following three programs for persons from states
               neighboring Texas must be based on reciprocity and the institution shall not
               grant these waivers unless the institution has been provided with a current
               written agreement with a similar institution in the other state, agreeing to lower
               tuition for Texas students attending that institution. A participating Texas
               institution shall file a copy of such agreements with the Board and the
               agreements shall not be more than 2 years old. The amount of tuition charged
               shall not be less than the Texas resident tuition rate.

                              (i)    Persons residing in New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas or
                       Louisiana may pay a lowered nonresident tuition when they attend Texas
                       A&M-Texarkana, Lamar State College-Port Arthur, Lamar State College-
                       Orange or any public community or technical college located in a county
                       adjacent to their home state.

                              (ii)    Persons residing in New Mexico and Oklahoma may pay a
                       lowered nonresident tuition when they attend a public technical college
                       located within 100 miles of the border of their home state.

                             (iii)   Persons residing in counties or parishes of New Mexico,
                       Oklahoma, Arkansas or Louisiana adjacent to Texas may pay a lowered
                       nonresident tuition at any institution.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                              June 21, 2011
Page 9

                            (iv)    If a person or a dependent child’s family moves to Texas
                    from a bordering state after the person or dependent child has received
                    a waiver of nonresident tuition based on reciprocity as described in this
                    section, the person is eligible for a continued waiver of nonresident
                    tuition for the 12-month period after the relocation to Texas.

                    (B)    Programs That Do Not Require Reciprocity. Persons who reside in
            another state may pay a lowered nonresident tuition not less than $30 per
            semester credit hour above the current resident tuition rate when they attend a
            general academic teaching institution located within 100 miles of the Texas
            border if:
                           (i)     the governing board of the institution approves the tuition
                   rate as in the best interest of the institution and finds that such a rate will
                   not cause unreasonable harm to any other institution; and

                            (ii)    the Commissioner approves the tuition rate by finding that
                    the institution has a surplus of total educational and general space as
                    calculated by the Board’s most current space projection model. This
                    obligation to obtain the approval of the Commissioner is continuing and
                    approval to participate in this waiver program must be obtained at least
                    every two years.

                    (C)    Programs for Residents of Mexico. Subject to the following
            provisions, persons who are currently residents of Mexico and those persons who
            are temporarily residing outside of Mexico but with definite plans to return to
            Mexico shall pay resident tuition.

                           (i)      An unlimited number of residents of Mexico who have
                    demonstrated financial need and attend a general academic teaching
                    institution or a component of the Texas State Technical College System, if
                    the institution or component is located in a county adjacent to Mexico,
                    Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi, Texas A&M University–Kingsville,
                    the University of Texas at San Antonio, or Texas Southmost College shall
                    pay resident tuition.

                            (ii)    A limited number of residents of Mexico who have financial
                    need may attend a general academic teaching institution or campus of
                    the Texas State Technical College System located in counties not
                    adjacent to Mexico and pay resident tuition This waiver program is
                    limited to the greater of two students per 1000 enrollment, or 10
                    students per institution.

                           (iii)  An unlimited number of residents of Mexico who have
                    demonstrated financial need and register in courses that are part of a
                    graduate degree program in public health conducted by an institution in a
                    county immediately adjacent to Mexico shall pay resident tuition.

             (6)    Program for the beneficiaries of the Texas Tomorrow Fund. A person
      who is a beneficiary of the Texas Tomorrow Fund shall pay resident tuition and required
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                             June 21, 2011
Page 10

      fees for semester hours paid under the prepaid tuition contract. If the person is not a
      Texas resident, all tuition and fees not paid under the contract shall be paid at the
      nonresident rate.

            (7)     Program for Inmates of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. All
      inmates of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice shall pay resident tuition.

              (8)    Program for Foreign Service Officers. A Foreign Service officer employed
      by the U.S. Department of State and enrolled in an institution shall pay resident tuition
      if the person is assigned to an office of the U.S. Department of State that is located in
      Mexico.

             (9)    Program for Registered Nurses in Postgraduate Nursing Degree
      Programs. An institution may permit a registered nurse authorized to practice
      professional nursing in Texas to pay resident tuition and fees without regard to the
      length of time that the registered nurse has resided in Texas, if the nurse:

                    (A)    is enrolled in a program designed to lead to a master's degree or
            other higher degree in nursing; and

                   (B)      intends to teach in a program in Texas designed to prepare
            students for licensure as registered nurses.

             (10) Programs for Military and Their Families. Members of the U.S. Armed
      Forces, Army National Guard, Air National Guard, Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps
      or Coast Guard Reserves and Commissioned Officers of the Public Health Service, and
      their Spouses or Dependent Children.

                     (A)    Assigned to Duty in Texas. Nonresident members of the U.S.
            Armed Forces, members of Texas units of the Army or Air National Guard, Army,
            Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard Reserves and Commissioned
            Officers of the Public Health Service who are assigned to duty in Texas, and their
            spouses, or dependent children, shall pay resident tuition. To qualify, the person
            shall submit during his or her first semester of enrollment in which he or she will
            be using the waiver program, a statement from an appropriately authorized
            officer in the service, certifying that he or she (or a parent) will be assigned to
            duty in Texas on the census date of the term he or she plans to enroll and that
            he or she, if a member of the National Guard or Reserves, is not in Texas only to
            attend training with Texas units. Such persons shall pay resident tuition so long
            as they reside continuously in Texas or remain continuously enrolled in the same
            degree or certificate program. For purposes of this subsection, a person is not
            required to enroll in a summer semester to remain continuously enrolled.

                     (B)    After Assignment to Duty in Texas. A spouse and/or dependent
            child of a nonresident member of the U.S. Armed Forces, or of a Commissioned
            Officer of the Public Health Service who has been reassigned elsewhere after
            having been assigned to duty in Texas shall pay resident tuition so long as the
            spouse or child resides continuously in Texas. For purposes of this subsection, a
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                             June 21, 2011
Page 11

            person is not required to enroll in a summer semester to remain continuously
            enrolled.

                    (C)     Out-of-State Military. A spouse and/or dependent child of a
            member of the U.S. Armed Forces, or of a Commissioned Officer of the Public
            Health Service who is stationed outside of Texas shall pay resident tuition if the
            spouse and/or child moves to this state and files a statement of intent to
            establish residence in Texas with the institution that he or she attends.

                    (D)    Survivors. A spouse and/or dependent child of a member of the
            U.S. Armed Forces, or of a Commissioned Officer of the Public Health Service
            who died while in service, shall pay resident tuition if the spouse and/or child
            moves to Texas within 60 days of the date of death. To qualify, a person shall
            submit satisfactory evidence to the institution that establishes the date of death
            of the member and that the spouse and/or dependent child has established [a]
            domicile in Texas.

                    (E)    Spouse and Dependents who Previously Lived in Texas. A spouse
            and/or dependent child of a member of the U.S. Armed Forces, or of a
            Commissioned Officer of the Public Health Service who previously resided in
            Texas for at least six months shall pay resident tuition, if the member or
            commissioned officer, at least 12 months prior to the census date of the spouse’s
            or dependent child’s enrollment in an institution:

                           (i)    filed proper documentation with the military or Public
                    Health Service to change his/her permanent residence to Texas and
                    designated Texas as his/her place of legal residence for income tax
                    purposes; and

                           (ii)    registered to vote in Texas, and

                           (iii) has satisfied a least one of the following requirements for
                    the 12 months prior to the first day of the relevant semester:

                                   (I)   ownership of real estate in Texas with no
                           delinquent property taxes;

                                   (II)   registration of an automobile in Texas, or

                                   (III) execution of a currently-valid will deposited with a
                           county clerk in Texas that indicates he/she is a resident of Texas.

                    (F)     Honorably Discharged Veterans. A former member of the U.S.
            Armed Forces or Commissioned Officer of the Public Health Service and his/her
            spouse and/or dependent child shall pay resident tuition for any semester
            beginning prior to the first anniversary of separation from the military or health
            service, if the former member:
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                               June 21, 2011
Page 12

                          (i)    had, at least one year preceding the census date of the
                   term or semester, executed a document with U.S. Armed Forces or Public
                   Health Service that is in effect on the census date of the term or
                   semester and that changed his/her permanent residence to Texas and
                   designated Texas as his/her place of legal residence for income tax
                   purposes; and

                           (ii)   had registered to vote in Texas for at least 12 months
                   prior to the census date of the term or semester, and

                          (iii)   provides documentation that the member has, not less
                   than 12 months prior to the census date of the term in which he or she
                   plans to enroll, taken 1 of the 3 following actions:

                                  (I)    purchased real estate in Texas with no delinquent
                          property taxes;

                                   (II)   registered an automobile in Texas, or

                                  (III) executed a currently-valid will that has been
                          deposited with a county clerk in Texas that indicates he/she is a
                          resident of Texas.

                     (G)    NATO Forces. Non-immigrant aliens stationed in Texas under the
            agreement between the parties to the North Atlantic Treaty regarding status of
            forces, their spouses and dependent children, shall pay resident tuition.

                     (H)    Radiological Science Students at Midwestern State University.
            Members of the U.S. Armed Forces stationed outside the State of Texas who are
            enrolled in a bachelor of science or master of science degree program in
            radiological sciences at Midwestern State University by instructional
            telecommunication shall pay resident tuition and other fees or charges provided
            for Texas residents, if they began the program of study while stationed at a
            military base in Texas.

                    (I)   Persons Eligible for Federal Education Benefits for Veterans, their
            Spouses and Children. Persons eligible for benefits under the federal Post 9/11
            Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008 or any other federal law authorizing
            educational benefits for veterans are eligible to pay the resident tuition rate
            without regard to the length of time they have been in the state, as are their
            spouses and children (including stepchildren), if they meet the following
            conditions:

                          (i)    file a letter of intent with their institution to establish
                   residency in Texas;

                          (ii)    reside in this state while enrolled in the institution; and,
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                                June 21, 2011
Page 13

                               (iii)  if qualifying as a child, be 25 years of age or younger on
                      the first day of the term in which the person is registering unless meeting
                      the hardship provisions described in clause (iv) of this subparagraph.

                                (iv)   If the child applying for an exemption under this provision
                      is 25 years of age or older but can provide proof to the institution of
                      severe illness or other debilitating condition that affected the person’s
                      ability to use the benefit before reaching that age, the child’s period of
                      eligibility to use the waiver shall be extended for a length of time equal to
                      the period of illness or incapacity.

               (11) Program for the Center for Technology Development and Transfer.
       Under agreements authorized by Texas Education Code, Section 65.45, a person
       employed by the entity with whom the University of Texas System enters into such an
       agreement, or the person’s spouse or child, may pay resident tuition when enrolled in a
       University of Texas System institution.]

21.29.[21.30.] Residence Determination Official.

        Each institution shall designate an individual who [that] is employed by the institution as
a Residence Determination Official who shall be knowledgeable of the requirements set out in
this subchapter and the applicable statutes.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                              June 21, 2011
Page 14

   Figure: 19 TAC §21.25(c)
Chart I
                                          AFFIDAVIT

STATE OF TEXAS                 §
                               §
COUNTY OF ____________________ §

       Before me, the undersigned Notary Public, on this day personally appeared
___________________________________________________,
known to me, who being by me duly sworn upon his/her oath, deposed and said:

1. My name is ________________________________________________________. I am ___
years of age. I have personal knowledge of the facts stated herein and they are all true and
correct.

2. I graduated or will graduate from a Texas high school or received my GED certificate in
Texas.

3. I resided in Texas for thirty-six months [three years] leading up to graduation from high
school or receiving my GED certificate.

4. I have resided or will have resided in Texas for the 12 months immediately preceding the
census date of the semester in which I will enroll in __________________________________
                                                                (college/university).

5. I have filed or will file an application to become a permanent resident of the United States
as soon as I am eligible to do so.

In witness whereof, this ____________day of _______________________, _________.

                          ___________________________________
                                       (Signature)

                          ___________________________________
                                     (Printed Name)

                          ___________________________________
                                     (Student I.D.#)

                          ___________________________________
                                  (Student Date of Birth)

SUBCRIBED TO AND SWORN TO BEFORE ME, on the ___________________ day of

________________________________________, ___________________________, to certify
which witness my hand and official seal.

__________________________________ Notary Public in and for the State of Texas
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                                   June 21, 2011
Page 15

                                  Revised Chart II
       Documentation to Support Establishing and Maintaining Domicile in Texas

The following documentation may be requested by the institution regarding a person’s
responses to the Core Residency Questions. Documents that may be used as proof that:
        (1) The person or the dependent’s parent established domicile in Texas, and
        (2) The person or the dependent’s parent has maintained domicile in Texas
            continuously for at least 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the census
            date of the term in which the person enrolls,
include but are not limited to the following:

                                      Part A
     Documents that may Support the Establishment of [a] Domicile in Texas and
                          Maintenance of Domicile in Texas
1.   SIGNIFICANT GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT

     a. An employer’s statement of dates of employment in Texas (beginning and current or
        ending dates) that encompass at least 12 consecutive months immediately preceding
        the census date of the term in which the person enrolls. However, employment
        conditioned on student status, such as work study, the receipt of stipends, fellowships,
        or research or teaching assistantships does not constitute gainful employment.

     b. Other documents that show the person or the dependent’s parent, for at least 12
        consecutive months immediately preceding the census date of the term in which the
        person enrolls:
        1) has been engaged in employment intended to provide an income to the person or
           allow the person to avoid the expense of paying another to perform tasks (as in child
           care) that is sufficient to provide at least one-half of the individual’s tuition and living
           expenses or represents an average of at least 20 hours per week; or
        2) is self-employed in Texas or is living off his/her earnings; or
        3) is primarily supported by public assistance in Texas.

     c. For a [homeless] person living on public assistance, written statements from the office
        of one or more social service agencies located in Texas that attest to the provision of
        services to the [homeless] person for the 12 consecutive months immediately preceding
        the census date of the term in which the person enrolls.

2.   SOLE OR JOINT MARITAL OWNERSHIP OF RESIDENTIAL REAL PROPERTY

     Title to residential real property in Texas with documentation to verify 12 consecutive
     months of ownership immediately preceding the census date of the term in which the
     person enrolls, such as a Warranty Deed, with the person or the dependent’s parent having
     established and maintained domicile at that residence.

3.   MARRIAGE TO A PERSON WHO HAS ESTABLISHED AND MAINTAINED DOMICILE IN TEXAS

     Marriage Certificate or Declaration of Registration of Informal Marriage with documentation
     to support that spouse has established and maintained domicile in Texas for the 12
     consecutive months preceding the census date of the term in which the person enrolls.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                                June 21, 2011
Page 16


4.   OWNERSHIP OF A BUSINESS ENTITY

     Documents that evidence the organization of the business in Texas that reflect the
     ownership interest of the person or dependent’s parent, and the customary management of
     the business by the person or dependent’s parent without the intention of liquidation for the
     foreseeable future.


                                    Part B
  Documents that May Provide Support to a Claim of Residence in Texas for the 12
 Consecutive Months Immediately Preceding the Census Date of the Term in which
                              the Person Enrolls

1. Utility bills for the 12 consecutive months preceding the census date;

2. A Texas high school transcript for full senior year immediately preceding the census date;

3. A transcript from a Texas institution showing presence in the state for the 12 consecutive
months preceding the census date;

4. A Texas driver’s license or Texas ID card that has not expired and, if it reflects an origination
date, shows an origination date at least 12 months prior to the census date;

5. Cancelled checks that reflect a Texas residence for the 12 consecutive months preceding the
census date;

6. A current credit report that documents the length and place of residence of the person or
the dependent’s parent to be in Texas and the length of residence to be at least 12 consecutive
months preceding the census date.

7. Texas voter registration card that was issued at least 12 months prior to the census date.

8. Pay stubs for the 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the census date, reflecting
significant gainful employment in Texas;

9. Bank statements reflecting a Texas address for the 12 consecutive months immediately
preceding the census date;

10. Written statements from the office of one or more social service agencies, attesting to the
provision of services for at least the 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the census
date.

11. Lease or rental of residential real property in the name of the person or the dependent’s
parent for the 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the census date.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (3)                                                               June 21, 2011
Page 17



                                        Part C
          Other Documents that May be Used to Lend Support To or Clarify
      an Individual’s Claim of Domicile or Residence,[,] as Appropriate, in Texas

Among other documents that may be used to lend support to or clarify an individual’s claim of
having established and maintained domicile or residence, as appropriate, in Texas are the
following:

1. Tax return of the student or parent(s).

2. Visa, passport or other pertinent immigration documents.

3. Leave and Earnings Statements (LES).

4. Documents or statements to clarify answers to Core Residency Questions.

5. A Texas high school transcript to verify thirty-six months’ presence in the state and
graduation from a Texas high school.

6. State of Texas or local (Texas) licenses to conduct a business or practice a profession in this
state.
                        Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                  AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)



Consideration of adopting the Commissioner’s recommendation to the Committee
relating to proposed Chapter 21, Student Services, new Subchapter X, Sections 21.730
through 21.752 of Board rules, concerning Waiver Programs for Certain Nonresident
Persons


RECOMMENDATION:                Pending


Background Information:

        The majority of waiver programs referred to in these sections were formerly
found in Subchapter B, Determination of Resident Status and Waiver Programs for
Certain Nonresident Persons, Section 21.29. The relocation to a separate subchapter of
Board rules will make it easier for institutions and individuals to locate rules relevant to
tuition waivers. In each section, information is uniformly provided to identify the
enabling legislation, student eligibility requirements, eligible institutions, and the fiscal
impact of each waiver.

       Four programs not previously found in Section 21.29 of Board rules have been
added: Section 21.734 for the Academic Common Market; Section 21.739 for the
Foreign Service Officer waiver; Section 21.741 for the Good Neighbor Scholarship
waiver; and Section 21.745 for the Olympic Athletes’ waiver.

       Four new definitions – “child,” “remain continuously enrolled,” “reciprocal
waiver,” and “waiver” – have been added in Section 21.731 to provide additional clarity
to these terms as used in the context of tuition waivers for public institutions of higher
education.

        Previous sections dealing with waivers for citizens of Mexico with financial need
are combined into Section 21.736, and are reduced to a cross-reference to Coordinating
Board Rules, Chapter 21, Subchapter BB, concerning Programs for Enrolling Students
from Mexico. Section 21.752 was added to provide a cross-reference to rules for the
state’s two exchange programs which also allow nonresidents to pay reduced tuition –
the Texas National Student Exchange Program and the Reciprocal Educational Exchange
Program.

       The amendments were published in the June 3, 20011, issue of the Texas
Register. Because the public comment period will not end until July 3, 2011, staff
recommends that these rules be voted on at the Coordinating Board meeting on July 28,
2011.
                                                                                        06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                              June 21, 2011
Page 1

                              CHAPTER 21. STUDENT SERVICES

          SUBCHAPTER X. WAIVER PROGRAMS FOR CERTAIN NONRESIDENT PERSONS


Section
21.730.       Authority and Purpose.
21.731.       Definitions.
21.732.       Effective Date of Subchapter.
21.733.       General Provisions that Apply to All Waivers.
21.734.       Academic Common Market.
21.735.       Center for Technology Development, Management, and Transfer.
21.736.       Citizens of Mexico with Financial Need.
21.737.       Competitive Scholarships.
21.738.       Economic Development and Diversification Program.
21.739.       Foreign Service Officers.
21.740.       General Academic Teaching Institutions Located within 100 Miles of the Texas
              Border.
21.741.       Good Neighbor Scholarship.
21.742.       Inmates of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice.
21.743.       Military and their Families.
21.744.       North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Forces, their Spouses and Children.
21.745.       Olympic Athletes.
21.746.       Registered Nurses Enrolled in Postgraduate Nursing Degree Programs.
21.747.       Scholarship Recipients Enrolled in Biological Research.
21.748.       States Bordering Texas.
21.749.       Teachers, Professors, their Spouses and Dependents.
21.750.       Teaching Assistants and Research Assistants, their Spouses and Dependents.
21.751.       Texas Guaranteed Tuition Plan (formerly the Texas Tomorrow Fund)
              Beneficiaries.
21.752.       Exchange Programs.


21.730.       Authority and Purpose.

        Texas Education Code, Section 54.075, authorizes the Board to adopt rules to carry out
the purposes of Texas Education Code, Chapter 54, Subchapter B, concerning the determination
of resident status for tuition purposes.

21.731.       Definitions.

      The following words and terms, when used in this subchapter, shall have the following
meanings, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:

              (1)     Census date--The date in an academic term for which an institution is
       required to certify a person’s enrollment in the institution for the purposes of
       determining formula funding for the institution.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                                  June 21, 2011
Page 2

              (2)     Child--Unless otherwise indicated, a person who is the biological or
      adopted child, or who is claimed as a dependent on a federal income tax return filed for
      the preceding year or who will be claimed as a dependent on a federal income tax
      return for the current year.

               (3)    Coordinating Board or Board--The Texas Higher Education Coordinating
      Board.

               (4)    Dependent--A person who:

                      (A)    is less than 18 years of age and has not been emancipated by
               marriage or court order; or

                      (B)     is eligible to be claimed as a dependent of a parent of the person
               for purposes of determining the parent’s income tax liability under the Internal
               Revenue Code of 1986.

               (5)     Financial need--An economic situation that exists for a student when the
      cost of attendance at an institution of higher education is greater than the resources the
      family has available for paying for college. In determining a student’s financial need an
      institution must compare the financial resources available to the student to the
      institution’s cost of attendance.

             (6)   General Academic Teaching Institution--As the term is defined in Texas
      Education Code, Section 61.003.

              (7)      Institution or institution of higher education--Any public technical
      institute, public junior college, public senior college or university, medical or dental unit,
      or other agency of higher education as defined in Texas Education Code, Section
      61.003(8).

              (8)    Nonresident tuition--The amount of tuition paid by a person who does not
      qualify as a Texas resident under Subchapter B, Chapter 54, Texas Education Code.

              (9)    Parent--A natural or adoptive parent, managing or possessory
      conservator, or legal guardian of a person. The term would not otherwise include a step-
      parent.

            (10) Public technical institute or college--The Lamar Institute of Technology or
      any campus of the Texas State Technical College System.

              (11) Reciprocal Waiver--A program authorized by Texas statutes to enable a
      nonresident student to pay a tuition rate less than the nonresident rate, described in
      section 21.748 of this title (relating to States Bordering Texas), and based on a
      reciprocal agreement between the Texas institution in which the nonresident student
      enrolls and a similar institution in the state from which the nonresident student came.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                                   June 21, 2011
Page 3

              (12) Remain Continuously Enrolled--Continue to enroll for the fall and spring
       terms of an academic year. Summer enrollment is not a requirement.

              (13) Resident tuition--The amount of tuition paid by a person who qualifies as
       a Texas resident under Texas Education Code, Chapter 54, Subchapter B.

              (14) Waiver--A program authorized by Texas statutes that allows a
       nonresident student to enroll in an institution of higher education and pay a reduced
       amount of nonresident tuition.

21.732.        Effective Date of this Subchapter.

        Each institution shall apply this subchapter beginning with tuition and fees paid for the
Fall Semester, 2012.

21.733.        General Provisions that Apply to All Waivers.

         (a)    Unless otherwise stated, waivers apply only to tuition paid by a person to the
institution at which he or she met the requirements of the waiver and by which he or she was
granted the waiver.

       (b)     Eligibility for a waiver only applies during terms or semesters in which the person
meets all program requirements.

       (c)     Waivers do not apply to courses for which an institution does not receive formula
funding (tax support) from the state.

21.734.        Academic Common Market.

        (a)   Authorizing Statute. The ability of Texas students and institutions to participate
in the Academic Common Market is authorized through Texas Education Code §160.07.

       (b)    Eligible Persons. Persons who are Texas residents and who are pursuing
graduate studies that are not offered in Texas are eligible to participate.

        (c)     Eligible Institutions. Institutions of higher education located in states that are
parties to the Southern Regional Education Compact are eligible to participate.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.

21.735.        Center for Technology Development, Management, and Transfer.

      (a)    Authorizing Statute. The waiver program for employees of the Center for
Technology Development, Management, and Transfer is authorized through Texas Education
Code §65.45.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                                   June 21, 2011
Page 4

       (b)     Eligible Persons. A nonresident person employed by an entity with which the
University of Texas System enters into an agreement as a part of the Center for Technology
Development, Management, and Transfer is eligible for a waiver under this section.

         (c)     Eligible Institutions. An eligible person may use this waiver only if enrolled in an
institution of the University of Texas System.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.

21.736.        Citizens of Mexico with Financial Need.

      (a)      Authorizing Statute. The waiver program for citizens of Mexico with financial
need enrolled in certain institutions is authorized through Texas Education Code §54.060(b) and
(c).
      (b)      For more information, see the Subchapter BB of this chapter (relating to
Programs for Enrolling Students from Mexico).

21.737.        Competitive Scholarships.

       (a)    Authorizing Statute. The waiver program for scholarship students is authorized
through Texas Education Code §54.064.

       (b)    Eligible Persons. A nonresident person who receives a competitive scholarship
from a Texas public institution of higher education under the following conditions may receive a
waiver under the provisions of this section.

               (1)     The competitive scholarship must meet the following requirements:

                      (A)     total at least $1,000 for the period of time covered by the
               scholarship, not to exceed 12 months;

                       (B)      be awarded by a scholarship committee authorized in writing by
               the institution's administration to grant scholarships that permit this waiver of
               nonresident tuition;

                      (C)     be awarded according to criteria published in the institution’s
               paper or electronic catalog, available to the public in advance of any application
               deadline;

                       (D)    be awarded under circumstances that cause both the funds and
               the selection process to be under the control of the institution; and

                       (E)     permit awards to both resident and nonresident persons.

              (2)    The waiver of nonresident tuition under this provision shall only apply to
       the semester or semesters for which the enabling scholarship is awarded.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                                  June 21, 2011
Page 5

              (3)     If the scholarship is terminated for any reason prior to the end of the
       semester or semesters for which it was initially awarded, the person shall pay
       nonresident tuition for any semester following the termination of the scholarship.

              (4)     The total number of persons receiving a waiver of nonresident tuition in a
       given semester under this provision shall not exceed 5 percent of the total number of
       students enrolled in the institution in the same semester in the prior year.

        (c)     Eligible Institutions. A waiver received under this section only applies to tuition
paid to the institution that awarded the enabling scholarship unless the person is simultaneously
enrolled in two or more public institutions of higher education under a program offered jointly
by the institutions under a partnership agreement, in which case the person is entitled to a
waiver also at the second institution.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.

21.738.        Economic Development and Diversification Program.

       (a)     Authorizing Statute. The Economic Development and Diversification Program is
authorized through Texas Education Code §54.066.

        (b)      Eligible Persons. A nonresident person transferred to Texas by a company
established at a location in Texas as part of the state’s Economic Development and
Diversification Program and the person’s spouse and children are eligible for a waiver through
this section if:

               (1)     The company location at which the person is employed (see
       www.collegeforalltexans.com for a list of eligible companies) was established in Texas
       prior to the census date of the term in which the waiver is to be used;

              (2)    No more than five years have passed since the date the company location
       was established in Texas as of the census date of the term in which the waiver is to be
       used; and

               (3)   The person provides the institution a letter of intent to establish Texas as
       his or her home.

         (c)     Eligible Institutions. An eligible person may use this waiver at any Texas public
institution of higher education.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.

21.739.        Foreign Service Officers.

       (a)    Authorizing Statute. The Foreign Service Officers Program is authorized through
Texas Education Code §54.070.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                                   June 21, 2011
Page 6

       (b)    Eligible Persons. Foreign Service Officers employed by the U.S. Department of
State and enrolled in institutions of higher education are eligible if assigned to an office of the
Department of State located in Mexico.

         (c)     Eligible Institutions. An eligible person may use this waiver at any Texas public
institution of higher education.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.

21.740.        General Academic Teaching Institutions Located within 100 Miles of the Texas
               Border.

       (a)    Authorizing Statute. The waiver program for individuals attending Texas general
academic teaching institutions located within 100 miles of the Texas border is authorized
through Texas Education Code §54.0601, “Nonresident Tuition Rates at Certain Institutions.”

         (b)    Eligible Persons. Any nonresident person attending an eligible institution is
eligible for a waiver under this section.

         (c)    Eligible Institutions. An eligible person may use this waiver at any eligible
institution located within 100 miles of the boundary of Texas with another state if:

               (1)     the governing board of the institution approves the tuition rate as in the
       best interest of the institution and finds that such a rate will not cause unreasonable
       harm to any other institution; and

              (2)     the Commissioner approves the tuition rate by finding that the institution
       has a surplus of total educational and general space as calculated by the Board’s most
       current space projection model. This obligation to obtain the approval of the
       Commissioner is continuing, and approval to participate in this waiver program must be
       obtained at least every two years.

         (d)    Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay a tuition rate set by the
institution, but not less than $30 more than the resident tuition rate.

21.741.        Good Neighbor Scholarship.

       (a)     Authorizing Statute. The waiver program for persons who are residents of other
nations of the American Hemisphere is authorized through Texas Education Code §54.207.

      (b)     For more information, see the Subchapter K of this chapter (relating to The Good
Neighbor Scholarship Program).

21.742.        Inmates of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice.

        (a)    Authorizing Statute. The waiver program for inmates of the Texas Department
of Criminal Justice is authorized by a rider included in the Public Community/Junior Colleges
section of the Appropriations Act.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                                  June 21, 2011
Page 7


         (b)    Eligible Persons. An inmate of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice is
eligible for a waiver under the cited provision.

         (c)     Eligible Institutions. An eligible person may use this waiver at any Texas public
institution of higher education.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.

21.743.        Military and their Families.

        (a)     Authorizing Statute. The waiver program for military personnel and their families
is authorized through Texas Education Code (TEC) §54.058.

         (b)     Eligible Persons. The following nonresident persons are eligible for a waiver
under this section. Once they have received a waiver under this section, they continue to be
eligible for the waiver so long as they remain continuously enrolled in the same degree or
certificate program. The person’s eligibility to pay tuition and fees at the rate provided for Texas
residents does not terminate because the person is no longer a member of the Armed forces of
the United States or is no longer the child or spouse of a member of the Armed Forces of the
United States.

               (1)     (TEC §54.058(b); Assigned to Duty) Members and their spouses or
       dependent children (including stepchildren) of the following branches of the service who
       provide the institution a statement from an appropriately authorized officer in the
       service certifying that they (or a spouse or parent) will be assigned to duty in Texas on
       the census date of the term in which he or she plans to enroll:

                       (A)     the U. S. Armed Forces, Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps;

                       (B)   Army National Guard, Air National Guard, and Coast Guard
               Reserves who are members of Texas units and are not in Texas only to attend
               training, and

                       (C)    Commissioned Officers of the Public Health Service.

               (2)    (TEC §54.058(c); Reassigned to Duty Outside of Texas) The spouse or
       dependent child (including stepchildren) of persons listed in subsection (b)(1) of this
       section who have been reassigned to duty outside of Texas, if the spouse or child
       resides continuously in Texas.

               (3)    (TEC §54.058(d); Spouse and Dependents who Previously Lived in
       Texas) The spouse and dependent children (including stepchildren) of a member of the
       U. S. Armed Forces or a Commissioned Officer of the Public Health Service who
       previously resided in Texas for at least six months shall pay resident tuition if the
       member or commissioned officer, at least 12 months prior to the first day of the
       spouse’s or dependent child’s enrollment in an institution:
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                               June 21, 2011
Page 8

                     (A)     filed proper documentation with the military or Public Health
             Service to change his or her permanent residence to Texas and designated Texas
             as his or her place of legal residence for income tax purposes;

                     (B)    registered to vote in Texas; and

                     (C)    has either:

                            (i)      held ownership of real estate in Texas with no delinquent
                     property taxes, or

                            (ii)    held registration of an automobile in Texas, or

                             (iii)  has executed a currently-valid will and had it on deposit
                     with a county in clerk in Texas that indicates he or she is a resident of
                     Texas.

              (4)      (TEC §54.058(f); Survivors of Out-of-State Member of the Military) The
      surviving spouse or child (including stepchild) of a non-Texas member of the U. S.
      Armed Forces or a Commissioned Officer of the Public Health Service who died while in
      service, if he or she moves to Texas within 60 days of the date of death and provides
      proof of eligibility to the institution.

             (5)      (TEC §54.058(g); Spouse or Child of Out-of-State Member of the Military)
      The spouse or child (including stepchild) of a non-Texas member of the U. S. Armed
      Forces or of a Commissioned Officer of the Public Health Service stationed outside of
      Texas, if the spouse or child resides in Texas and files a statement of intent to establish
      residence in Texas with the institution that he or she attends.

              (6)     (TEC §54.058(h); Radiological Science Students at Midwestern State
      University) Members of the U. S. Armed Forces stationed outside the State of Texas
      who are enrolled in a bachelor of science or master of science degree program in
      radiological sciences at Midwestern State University by instructional telecommunication,
      if they began the program of study while stationed at a military base or other installation
      in Texas.

              (7)     (TEC §54.058(i); Honorably Discharged or Retired Veterans) An
      honorably discharged or retired member of the U. S. Armed Forces or Commissioned
      Officer of the Public Health Service and his or her spouse and children (including
      stepchildren) who are enrolling in a term or semester at a state institution of higher
      education that begins before the first anniversary of the member’s separation from the
      Armed Forces, if the former member had, at least 12 months prior to the first day of
      enrollment in an institution:

                     (A)    filed proper documentation with the military or Public Health
             Service to change his or her permanent residence to Texas and designated Texas
             as his/her place of legal residence for income tax purposes;
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                                     June 21, 2011
Page 9

                        (B)    registered to vote in Texas; and

                        (C)    has either:
                               (i)      held ownership of real estate in Texas with no delinquent
                        property taxes, or

                               (ii)    held registration of an automobile in Texas, or

                                (iii)  has executed a currently-valid will and had it on deposit
                        with a county in clerk in Texas that indicates he or she is a resident of
                        Texas.

               (8)    (TEC §54.058(k); Veterans, Spouses and Children) Veterans eligible for
       federal education benefits, and their spouses and children (including stepchildren) if
       they:

                        (A)    file a letter of intent with their institution to establish residency in
               Texas;

                        (B)    reside in this state while enrolled in the institution; and,

                       (C)     if qualifying as a child, is 25 years of age or younger on the first
               day of the term in which the person is registering unless the child can provide
               proof to the institution of severe illness or other debilitating condition that
               affected his or her ability to use the benefit before reaching that age, in which
               case the child’s period of eligibility to use the waiver shall be extended for a
               length of time equal to the period of illness or incapacity.

        (c)      Eligible Institutions. With the exception of the waiver described in subsection
(b)(6) of this section, an eligible person may use a waiver described in this section at any Texas
public institution of higher education.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.

21.744.        North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Forces, their Spouses and Children.

       (a)    Authorizing Statute. The waiver program titled “NATO Agreement” is authorized
through Texas Education Code §54.074.

      (b)    Eligible Persons. Nonresident persons stationed in Texas under the agreement
between the Parties to the North Atlantic Treaty Regarding the Status of Their Forces, their
spouses and dependent children are eligible for a waiver under this section.

         (c)     Eligible Institutions. An eligible person may use this waiver at any Texas public
institution of higher education.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                                   June 21, 2011
Page 10

21.745.        Olympic Athletes.

       (a)      Authorizing Statute. The waiver program titled “Tuition Rates for Olympic
Athletes” is authorized through Texas Education Code §54.073.

        (b)     Eligible Persons. A nonresident person is eligible to receive a waiver under this
section if the person:

               (1)  is in residence and in training as a participating athlete in a Community
       Olympic Development Program or at a United States Olympic training center located in
       this state;

               (2)     is residing permanently or temporarily in this state while in training as a
       participating athlete:

                       (A)     in a Community Olympic Development Program located in Texas;
               or

                     (B)    at a United States Olympic training center located in this state in a
               program approved by the governing body for the athlete ’s Olympic sport; or

               (3)     is residing permanently or temporarily in this state while in training as a
       participating athlete at a facility in this state approved by the governing body for the
       athlete’s Olympic sport, in a program approved by that body.

       (c)     Eligible Institutions. An eligible person may use this waiver only while attending
the University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.

21.746.        Registered Nurses Enrolled in Postgraduate Nursing Degree Programs.

       (a)    Authorizing Statute. The waiver program for registered nurses enrolled in
postgraduate nursing degree programs is authorized under Texas Education Code §54.069.

        (b)     Eligible Persons. A nonresident person is eligible to receive a waiver under this
section if the person:

               (1)     is a registered nurse authorized to practice professional nursing in Texas;

              (2)    is enrolled in a program designed to lead to a master’s degree or other
       higher degree in nursing; and

               (3)    intends to teach in a program in Texas designed to prepare students for
       licensure as registered nurses.

        (c)     Eligible Institutions. A waiver received under this section applies to tuition paid
to the public institution at which the eligible person is enrolled in an eligible program of study.
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                                  June 21, 2011
Page 11


       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.

21.747.        Scholarship Recipients Enrolled in Biomedical Research.

       (a)     Authorizing Statute. The waiver program titled “Biomedical Research Program;
Scholarship Student” is authorized through Texas Education Code §54.065.

       (b)     Eligible Persons. A nonresident person or a citizen of a country other than the
United States of America who holds a competitive academic scholarship or stipend and is
accepted in a clinical and biomedical research training program designed to lead to both doctor
of medicine and doctor of philosophy degrees is eligible for a waiver under this section.

        (c)    Eligible Institutions. A waiver received under this section only applies to tuition
paid to the public institution that awarded the enabling scholarship.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.

21.748.        States Bordering Texas.

       (a)    Authorizing Statute. The waiver program for persons from states bordering
Texas is authorized through Texas Education Code §54.060(a) and (g).

       (b)     Eligible Persons.

               (1)      Persons who are residents of New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas or
       Louisiana are eligible for a waiver under this section if they attend an eligible Texas
       public institution of higher education.

              (2)     Persons who previously were residents of one of the named states and
       who moved to Texas from one of the named states within the 12 months prior to the
       census date of the student’s enrollment may receive the waiver until such time they
       have established a claim to residency in Texas.

       (c)     Eligible Institutions.

               (1)     Persons residing in New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas or Louisiana may
       pay a lowered nonresident tuition when they attend an upper-level institution, Lamar
       State College-Port Arthur, Lamar State College-Orange or any public community or
       technical college located in a county adjacent to their home state. The Texas institution
       must have a current letter (dated no less than two years prior) on file with the
       Coordinating Board documenting the agreement for a reciprocal reduced tuition rate it
       has with a similar institution in the neighboring state.

               (2)    Persons residing in New Mexico and Oklahoma may pay a lowered
       nonresident tuition when they attend a public technical college located within 100 miles
       of the border of their home state. The Texas institution must have a current letter
       (dated no less than two years prior) on file with the Coordinating Board documenting
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                                  June 21, 2011
Page 12

       the agreement for a reciprocal reduced tuition rate it has with a similar institution in the
       neighboring state.

                (3)     Persons residing in counties or parishes of New Mexico, Oklahoma,
       Arkansas or Louisiana adjacent to Texas may pay a lowered nonresident tuition at any
       Texas public institution of higher education. The Texas institution must have a current
       letter (dated no less than two years prior) on file with the Coordinating Board
       documenting the agreement for a reciprocal reduced tuition rate it has with a similar
       institution in the neighboring state.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate.

               (1)    An eligible person from counties or parishes adjacent to Texas shall pay
       the resident tuition rate.

               (2)     An eligible person from counties or parishes located away from the
       border of Texas shall pay a tuition rate equivalent to the amount a Texas resident would
       pay in their state, but not less than the Texas resident tuition rate.

21.749.        Teachers, Professors, their Spouses and Dependents.

       (a)     Authorizing Statute. The waiver program for faculty and their dependents is
authorized through Texas Education Code §54.059.

       (b)     Eligible Persons. A nonresident employed as a teacher or professor at least half
time on a regular monthly salary basis (not as an hourly employee) by a Texas public institution
of higher education and the spouse and dependent children of the employed teacher or
professor are eligible for a waiver under this section.

         (c)     Eligible Institutions. An eligible person may use this waiver at any public
institution of higher education. If the teacher or professor or spouse or dependent child of such
a person attends an institution other than the employing institution, the employing institution is
to provide a letter to the attended institution, verifying the employment of the faculty member.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.

21.750.        Teaching Assistants and Research Assistants, their Spouses and Dependents.

       (a)     Authorizing Statute. The waiver program for teaching and research assistants is
authorized through Texas Education Code §54.063.

       (b)    Eligible Persons. A nonresident person employed by a Texas public institution of
higher education as a teaching or research assistant on at least a half-time basis in a position
determined by the institution to be relevant to the assistant’s degree program and the spouse
and dependent children of such a person are eligible for a waiver under this section.

         (c)     Eligible Institutions. An eligible person may use this waiver at any Texas public
institution of higher education. If the research or teaching assistant or spouse or dependent
AGENDA ITEM IV-Q (4)                                                                  June 21, 2011
Page 13

child of such a person attends an institution other than the employing institution, the employing
institution is to provide a letter to the attended institution, verifying the employment of the
research or teaching assistant.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate.

21.751.        Texas Guaranteed Tuition Plan (formerly the Texas Tomorrow Fund)
               Beneficiaries.

       (a)   Authorizing Statute. The waiver program for beneficiaries of the Texas
Guaranteed Tuition Plan (formerly the Texas Tomorrow Fund) is authorized through Texas
Education Code §54.621(c).

       (b)     Eligible Persons. A nonresident beneficiary of the Texas Guaranteed Tuition Plan
(formerly the Texas Tomorrow Fund) is eligible for a waiver under this section.

         (c)     Eligible Institutions. An eligible person may use this waiver at any Texas public
institution of higher education.

       (d)     Adjusted Tuition Rate. An eligible person shall pay the resident tuition rate for
the hours paid under the Texas Guaranteed Tuition Plan (formerly the Texas Tomorrow Fund)
contract, but will pay the nonresident rate for any hours not paid for through the contract.

21.752.        Exchange Programs.

        Two additional programs authorize institutions of higher education to participate in
reciprocal exchange programs that may allow a nonresident to pay a reduced tuition rate:

        (1)     The Texas National Student Exchange Program, which applies to exchanges with
other institutions located in the United States. This program is authorized through Texas
Education Code §51.930. See the Subchapter EE of this chapter (relating to the Texas National
Student Exchange Program).

        (2)     The Reciprocal Educational Exchange Program, which applies to exchanges with
other institutions located in countries other than the United States. This program is authorized
through Texas Education Code §54.060(c). See the Subchapter AA of this chapter (relating to
the Reciprocal Educational Exchange Program).
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                     AGENDA ITEM IV-R


Discussion of proposed rule changes resulting from the 82nd Texas Legislative Session to be
voted on at the July Board meeting and required studies


RECOMMENDATION:              No action required until the July Board meeting


Background Information:

       Susan Brown, Assistant Commissioner for Planning and Accountability; MacGregor
Stephenson, Assistant Commissioner for Academic Affairs and Research; and Dan Weaver,
Assistant Commissioner for Student Services, will update the Board on proposed rule changes
and required studies resulting from the 82nd Texas Legislative Session.




                                                                                         06/11
                          Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                         AGENDA ITEM IV-S



Update on Coordinating Board’s recommendations to the 82nd Texas Legislature


RECOMMENDATION:           No action required


Background Information:

        The 82nd Legislature has adjourned Sine Die. Significant legislation focused on
improving student success by reinventing higher education funding, reforming developmental
education, creating a seamless transfer pathway, and prioritizing TEXAS Grants to students who
achieve certain academic criteria were approved and are on their way to the Governor. The
final budget reduces student financial aid, formula funding, and other key college readiness
programs critical to continuing Texas’ momentum toward acheiving the goals of Closing the
Gaps by 2015.

        The table below provides the status of the legislation that was filed based on the
Coordinating Board’s recommendations. Linda Battles, Associate Commissioner, will provide an
update on the agency’s Legislative Appropriations Request, and Dominic Chavez, Senior Director
for External Relations, will provide an update on legislation.

             Status of Coordinating Board’s Legislative Recommendations
                                     (As of 07/01/11)


   Bill Number            Author          Sponsor             Topic             Status

                                                          Outcomes-based
HB 9                         Branch          Zaffirini                        Sent to Governor
                                                                 Funding
                                                              TEXAS Grant
HB 10/SB 28                  Zaffirini         Branch    College Readiness    Sent to Governor
                                                                Reform Act
                                                            Developmental
HB 1244/SB 1564               Castro            West                          Sent to Governor
                                                                Education

HB 1460/SB 1396              Branch            Patrick    Cost Efficiencies              Dead


HB 1497                      Howard                           Perkins Split              Dead




                                                                                         06/11
AGENDA ITEM IV-S
Page 2


HB 2631                 Branch     Zaffirini     Hackerman ARP      Sent to Governor

                                               GenTX/State P-16
HB 2909                 Branch     Shapiro                          Sent to Governor
                                               Council Expansion
                                                 Criminal History
HB 2937                  Lewis     Zaffirini      Access for CB     Sent to Governor
                                                      Employees

                                                  Degree Plan &
HB 3025                 Branch     Zaffirini                        Sent to Governor
                                                Reverse Transfer


HB 3469                 Patrick                  Review of CCRS                 Dead


HB 3577             L. Gonzales    Zaffirini               TEOG     Sent to Governor


HB 3578             L. Gonzales    Zaffirini    Emergency Loans     Sent to Governor

                                                        Physician
HB 3579             L. Gonzales    Zaffirini                        Sent to Governor
                                                 Education Loans
                                                     Satisfactory
                                               Academic Progress
HB 3631/SB 1724         Branch     Zaffirini    Requirements for                Dead
                                                   Exemptions &
                                                         Waivers
                                                   Exemptions &
SB 32                  Zaffirini   Branch                Waivers    Sent to Governor
                                                    Consolidation

SB 282/SB 5            Zaffirini   Branch              Reporting    Sent to Governor



SB 639/HB 2905     Van de Putte    Branch      Veteran's Benefits   Sent to Governor


                                                    Financial Aid
SB 851                 Zaffirini   Branch                           Sent to Governor
                                                        Deadline

SB 1799                   West     Branch       Bonding Capacity    Sent to Governor

                                                Bonding Capacity
                                                                        Filed with the
SJR 50                    West     Branch          Constitutional
                                                                    Secretary of State
                                                    Amendment



                                                                                06/11
                         Committee on Strategic Planning and Policy


                                    AGENDA ITEM IV-T


Update on Low-Producing Program Review


RECOMMENDATION:             No action required



       MacGregor Stephenson, Assistant Commissioner for Academic Affairs and Research, will
update the Board on the low-producing program review.




                                                                                      06/11

				
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