Lesson Closure: The Last Gate by ywSNe5

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									Lesson Closure: The Last Gate




    (Adapted from a presentation by Mr. Jon W. Ramsey)
     . . . Setting the Table . . .
• What’s in it for me?
  This question is asked
  by students on a daily
  basis.

• At the end of the day,
  teachers need to
  remind students
  where they have been
  and where they are
  going.
          Lesson Closure . . .
• At some point near the
  end of the lesson, a
  systematic closing
  of the lesson should
  occur
        Lesson Closure . . .
• Is a “natural” stopping point in the lesson
• Points back to the lesson’s objectives and
     captures their relevance to what has been
     taught
• Keeps the “big picture” in mind
• Helps to ensure that objectives are met and
     applied by students
          Lesson Closure . . .
• May also raise related questions or ideas for
      students to ponder in anticipation of the next
      lesson – “Where are we going next?”
      “What are we going to do tomorrow?”

• Is similar to looking back on a trail so that one
      knows from which way he or she came

 Effective closure takes time and planning; build it
      into your lesson plan!!!
The Whole-Part-Whole Method of
         Teaching . . .
 Look at the “big picture”
 Provide the details (i.e., parts); content
 Check for understanding
 Make sure that students are not lost in the
    details
 Provide opportunities for application and
     practice
 Finally, review the big picture = Closure
  An Example Student Learning
   Experience – Time-wise . . .
• “Housekeeping” - ~3 to 5 minutes
• Interest Approach - ~5 to 7 minutes
• Content taught/presented - ~15 to 25 minutes
• Student Application - ~10 to 20 minutes
• Closure - ~3 to 5 minutes; perhaps more . . .
• Assessment and Evaluation of Learning -
     ~7 to 15 minutes . . .
      . . . The Lesson Plan . . .
•   Identification
•   Objectives
•   Teaching Materials
•   Preparation
•   Presentation
•   Application
•   Evaluation
Where are we going next???
Examples of Advanced Organizers (AOs)

•   Reading Assignments
•   Web projects
•   Spelling words
•   Current events
•   Feed samples or feed tags
•   Leaves or other plant samples

 AOs can be designed and used to encourage
    students to think about tomorrow’s
    lesson . . .
Food for Thought (FFT) . . .

Education produces
learning not
essentially by what a
teacher says, thinks,
or does, but by what
a pupil can be
encouraged to say,
think, do, and feel.
“To teach is to learn twice.”
                        Joseph Joubert
Did you shut the gate????

								
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