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									             CURRICULUM CONTENT AND EVALUATIONS

A-C.1.a: The accounting programs must satisfy the Business Curriculum Standards
(C.1-2).

The School meets all business curriculum standards (C.1-2). The School offers programs leading
to a bachelor’s degree, a master of accountancy degree, a master of tax accounting degree, and
Ph.D. in Accounting. Each of these programs draws heavily on other departments within the
college and university to provide the background and context needed to understand the modern
business environment. The undergraduate program uses what can be described as a “building
block” approach:

        General Education requirements           30 hours
        Restricted non-C&BA electives            23
        Unrestricted non-C&BA electives           9
          Total non-C&BA hours                   62 (50 %)
        Business functional field courses        28
        Major program courses                    33
         Total C&BA courses                      61
        Free elective                             1
        Total required hours for degree         124

This program has been designed to ensure that the student is exposed to the perspectives that
provide a context for business, including all areas specifically addressed in Business Standard
C.1.1. At least 50% of the hours required must be taken in non-business subjects (C.1.2.a). The
business functional course content includes accounting, behavioral science, economics, and
mathematics and statistics (C.1.2.b). Written and oral communication skills are developed
throughout the curriculum, with increasing emphasis as the student progresses (C.1.2.c).
Requirements in the major are consistent with the mission of the college (C.1.2.d), and at least
50% of business credit hours must be completed at the University of Alabama (C.1.2.e).

A-C.1.b: The accounting academic unit faculty should develop curriculum to support the
accounting academic unit’s mission and each program’s educational objectives.

As noted in the Mission and Objectives section of this Self-Evaluation Report, the mission of the
School is:

    To maintain high quality undergraduate and graduate programs that attract top students
    and prepare them for professional careers in business and to foster the understanding and
    practice of accounting through research.

In quest of fulfilling this mission, the School faculty reviews the curriculum of each program on a
regular and on-going basis. Changes in the curriculum may be initiated by individual faculty
members, or by a group of faculty members representing a specialty area or program within the
School. The faculty as a whole considers the recommended change and, if approved, forwards
the recommendation to the College Faculty Executive Board (FEB). The FEB is composed of
representatives from each department and works through a standing committee structure. Each
standing committee (undergraduate, masters and PhD) includes representatives of each
department. The FEB has the option of asking for further clarification of a requested change,
approving the change as non-substantive, or forwarding the recommended change to the faculty


Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                  C-1
as a whole for a vote. Changes in the content of existing courses are also on-going and generally
do not require approval beyond the School faculty. Changes in official course descriptions and
titles must be approved by the FEB, usually as non-substantive changes.

A-C.1.c: Accounting academic unit faculty members should be involved in ongoing
processes to ensure that accounting programs reflect the current needs of the profession,
business, and other organizations and society.

The dynamic nature of the accounting discipline requires that the content of accounting programs
be constantly assessed and evaluated in an effort to remain current. The accounting profession
requires that entrants possess both technical knowledge and a well-developed set of management
skills. Students must learn to recognize problems, solve them, and communicate the solutions
both verbally and in writing. Furthermore, these problems may be both practical and theoretical
in nature. To ensure that graduates of the Culverhouse School of Accountancy possess the
knowledge and skills desired, the curriculum is revised periodically and individual course content
is revised virtually every time a course is offered.

During the period covered by the Self-Evaluation Report the School has had both curriculum and
course content changes. For example,

In the undergraduate program:
        · The emphasis in the introductory accounting class was changed from a focus on
            preparation of accounting information to the use of accounting information.
        · The method of instruction in the intermediate accounting sequence was changed from
            the traditional balance sheet approach to the business activity model approach using
            case methods.
        · The coverage of accounting systems in the undergraduate program was effectively
            doubled by making the material previously covered in the first systems class a
            prerequisite, moving the content of what had previously been the second systems
            class to the first class, and then using the second systems class to cover additional
            material.
        · The second undergraduate tax course will be required of all undergraduate majors in
            accounting.

In the Master of Accountancy program:
        · Added a required class in accounting systems design.
        · Added a class in information systems security, auditing, and control.

In the PhD program:
        · Added a seminar in accounting systems.
        · Added a seminar in behavioral accounting research methods.
        · Restructured course content and sequence to emphasize research methods in the first
            year and literature in the second.
        · Added summer research requirements to encourage the development of research
            ideas and publishable papers.

The MAcc program is a current area of evaluation. The faculty is examining the content and
structure of that program with the goal of increasing the value added by the program to our
students. That discussion has led to the possibility of a new set of core requirements.



C-2                                                                AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
The School faculty review programs through a committee structure with separate committees for
each primary area of instruction: auditing, financial, managerial, systems, and taxation. Each
masters program and the PhD program also have advisory committees.

The Professional Advisory Board discusses the curriculum with faculty and provides assistance in
identifying areas for improvement or development. Students and alumni provide input through
surveys and through discussion. The director meets with students each semester to discuss
programs and curriculum issues.

Faculty participate in programs and activities provided by the AAA, its sections, other
professional organizations, and accounting firms that focus on course content and emerging
issues.

A-C.1.d: The total number of accounting hours required for each accounting degree
program should reflect the program’s mission, the capabilities and prior preparation of the
students, and the level and rigor of instruction. Accounting hours include those in courses
dealing with the development, measurement, analysis, validation, and communication of
financial and other information.

All degree programs offered by the Culverhouse School of Accountancy require completion of an
appropriate number of hours in accounting courses consistent with the mission of the respective
program and the prior preparation of the student.

        Bachelors                       27-30 hours of accounting
        Master of Accountancy           a minimum of 18 hours of accounting
        Master of Tax Accounting        21-24 hours of accounting and taxation
        Ph.D. in Accounting             a minimum of 21 hours of PhD level accounting
                                        courses and requirements with additional preparation in
                                        accounting if needed




Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                               C-3
                            UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

REQUIREMENTS

A-C.2.a: The general education component should focus on developing student capacities
essential to a broad education.

General education requirements are established and monitored by the College. The objective of
the College is to provide a well-rounded education in business including a broad foundation in the
liberal arts, a proficiency in analytical methods, and awareness of social, technological, political,
legal and economic forces likely to be encountered upon graduation. Undergraduate course
requirements are detailed in Exhibit C-1.

                                      Exhibit C-1
                           Undergraduate Course Requirements
GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES (30 HOURS)
EC 110 Principles of Micro-Economics
EC 111 Principles of Macro-Economics
EN 101 Freshman Composition I
EN 102 Freshman Composition II
MATH112 or MATH 115 Precalculus
MATH 121 or MATH 125 Calculus
CS 102 Microcomputer Applications
COM 123 Public Speaking
CS 285 Computerized Management Information Systems
CS 385 Prototyping Interfaces Using a Visual Programming Environment
RESTRICTED NON-C&BA ELECTIVES (23 HOURS)
Natural Science--8 hrs. (To include two hours of laboratory experience)
Humanities & Fine Arts--12 hrs. (Consisting of at least 3 hours of Literature, and at least
3 hours in the Fine Arts. The remaining 6 hours are to be chosen from the Humanities,
Literature, and/or Fine Arts. COM 123 satisfies a humanities requirement.)
History, Social & Behavioral Sciences--6 hrs. (12 semester hours with at least 3 hours in
History and at least 6 hours chosen from among other disciplines in the Social &
Behavioral Sciences. EC 110 and EC 111 required above satisfy 6 hours of the
requirement.)
OTHER ELECTIVES\C&BA or Non-C&BA (1 HOUR)
UNRESTRICTED NON-C&BA ELECTIVES (9 HOURS)
FUNCTIONAL FIELD COURSES (28 HOURS)
Lower Division (C or better required in each course)




C-4                                                                  AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
AC 210 Introduction to Accounting
ST 260 Statistics Methods
LGS 200 Business Law & Society

Upper Division (C or better required in each course)
MGT 300 Organizational Theory
MKT 300 Marketing
IM 300 Production Management
FI 302 Business Finance
MGT 395 Managerial Communications Strategies
GBA 490 Strategic Management Policy
MAJOR PROGRAM COURSES (33 HOURS)
(C or better required in each course)
AC 310 Financial Accounting I
AC 311 Financial Accounting II
AC 361 Managerial & Cost Accounting
AC 371 Income Taxation I
AC 389 Accounting Information Systems I
AC 432 Introduction to Auditing
AC 489 Accounting Information Systems II
AC 456 Non-profit Accounting OR
AC 471 Income Taxation II
Additional Business or Accounting Electives (9 hrs.)
TOTAL REQUIRED HOURS FOR DEGREE = 124

Requirements for the undergraduate degree were modified in 2001 for students entering the
program in the fall of 2002 or later. CS 285 and CS 385 were dropped as requirements. AC 289,
Computer Applications, was added in place of these courses. Students may take CS 285 instead
of AC 289, but accounting majors are encouraged to take AC 289. The change was made
because of concern about the availability and content of the CS courses. Beginning in the fall of
2002, both AC 456 and AC 471 will be required. The College has moved ST 260 from the
functional field category to the general education category.

Undergraduate accounting course titles and descriptions were revised in 2001. These changes
will appear in the 2002 undergraduate catalog.


A-C.2.b: Undergraduate accounting degree programs shall include an appropriate
combination of accounting, business, and other topics to meet the goals and objectives of the
program’s mission. Appropriate learning activities should be incorporated to provide the
graduates with the competencies that are consistent with the mission of the program and
the expectation of the market(s) served by that program.




Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                C-5
As stated in the mission statement of the School, a goal of the undergraduate program is
excellence and a strategy for achieving that goal is:

      Design and deliver a curriculum that encourages students to develop the knowledge and
      skills important for success. This curriculum focuses on development of a strong
      understanding of accounting, business processes, and information technology and the
      ability to apply this knowledge to solving business problems and communicating these
      solutions.

To implement this strategy, the School has identified core competencies that must be incorporated
within the curriculum. Exhibit C-2 indicates these competencies and summarizes where they are
included in the curriculum using the following code:

         T=   Theme: this competency cuts across several content areas of the course.
         C=   Significant component: this competency is a significant content area of the course.
         I=   Introduced: this competency is introduced, but is not a focal point of this course.
         N=   Not covered: this competency is not addressed in this course.

                                           Exhibit C-2
                   Core Competencies in Undergraduate Accounting Courses




                                                                                                            External Environment



                                                                                                                                                    Oral Communication
                                                                                     Technological Issues



                                                                                                                                   Group Dynamics



                                                                                                                                                    Communications

                                                                                                                                                                         Analytical Skills
                                                    Ethical Issues

                                                                     Global Issues




210 - Introduction to Accounting                    T                I               I                      T                      N                Written
                                                                                                                                                    N         I          C
310 – Financial Accounting I                        I                I               T                      T                      T                T         T          T
311 – Financial Accounting II                       I                I               T                      T                      T                T         T          T
351 – Managerial Accounting Decisions*              I                I               I                      I                      N                N         I          C
352 – Corporate Financial Reporting*                I                I               I                      T                      N                I         C          T
361 – Managerial and Cost Accounting                I                C               T                      T                      C                I         C          T
371 – Income Taxation I                             T                I               C                      T                      T                T         T          T
389 – Accounting Information Systems I              C                I               T                      C                      T                C         C          C
432 – Introduction to Auditing                      C                I               C                      T                      C                C         C          C
456 – Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting         C                N               I                      T                      I                I         C          C
471 – Income Taxation II                            I                I               C                      T                      N                T         C          T
489 – Accounting Information Systems II             C                C               T                      C                      T                C         C          C
*Courses for non-accounting majors



A-C.2.c: A minimum of 21 semester hours (including up to 6 semester hours of
introductory accounting) in courses dealing with the development, measurement, analysis,
validation, and communication of financial and other information is required for an
undergraduate accounting degree program. The composition of these courses should be
consistent with the goals and objectives of the program’s mission.



C-6                                                                                                           AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
As shown in Exhibit C-1, accounting majors are required to take a minimum of 24 hours of
accounting and may elect to take additional hours. These course all deal with the development,
measurement, analysis, validation, and communication of financial and other information. For
students entering the program in the fall of 2002, 27 hours of accounting will be required, to
include Income Tax II and Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting. Students may also obtain
three hours credit for an internship.


A-C.2.d: A minimum of 90 semester hours (or its equivalent) must be required in courses
outside of the accounting discipline.

As shown in Exhibit C-1, accounting majors are required to take at least 90 hours outside courses
in the accounting discipline.

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM SUCCESS

Enrollment in the undergraduate program has decreased in recent years, following national
norms. Student success remains high based on the numbers of students entering graduate
programs and the success of students in obtaining honors, scholarships, and other awards.
Students entering graduate programs have performed well, and placement from those programs
has been good, as noted in the discussion of master’s programs.

During the 2001-2002 academic year, the faculty reviewed the undergraduate program and began
efforts to recruit students into the program. The School began a professional speakers series to
bring practitioners to the University to speak to students about career opportunities in accounting
and to overcome common myths about accounting. Students receive bonus points in the
introductory course for attending these sessions. Also, the School has begun a visitation program
in which students in the introductory course are provided an opportunity to visit with accounting
firms and industry to observe their activities. Special orientation sessions also are held for
prospective accounting students to provide a description of educational requirements and career
opportunities and prospects.

Student satisfaction with the undergraduate program appears to be high, based on exit surveys.
The School and College participate in the AACSB/EBI educational benchmarking study.
Graduating students are surveyed about their satisfaction with the program. Alabama is one of
about 180 universities nationwide that participate in this program. Data are processed by EBI and
reported on an aggregate basis. The College selects six programs for special comparison. The
programs selected by the College are other major state universities, mostly in the Southeast.
Exhibit C-3 provides information for the program relative to these six universities and
participating universities as a whole. A 7-point scale, where 1 is very dissatisfied and 7 is very
satisfied is used in the survey.

The School has scored especially well in Quality of Faculty/Instruction, Extent and Quality of
Skills Training, Quality of Advising and Course Availability, Facilities and Computer Resources,
Placement and Career Services, and Overall Satisfaction.




Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                 C-7
                                       Exhibit C-3
                         Undergraduate Student Satisfaction Results
                                                                           2001    2001   2001
                                                                          Select 6 Class Overall
Satisfaction Factor and Comparison           1998 1999 2000        2001 Rank Rank Rank
Number of Universities                                                       6      62    184
Quality of Faculty/Instruction in Accounting   5.08 5.62 5.46        5.33    1      10     38
Faculty Responsiveness, Fair Grading           5.40 5.79 5.75        5.74    4      16     61
Breadth of Curriculum                          4.85 5.01 4.72        4.75    3      31    113
Amount and Value of Student Teamwork           5.25 5.63 5.55        5.19    2      24     82
Size of Classes                                5.46  5.5 5.58        5.47    1      21    110
Student Organizations and Extracurricular      4.77 5.14 4.93        4.80    4      38    104
Extent and Quality of Skills Training          5.42 5.87 5.74        5.62    1       8     34
Quality of Advising and Course Availability    5.15 5.46 5.45        5.36    1      11     38
Facilities and Computing Resources             5.98 5.93  5.9        6.01    1       2      3
Academic Quality and Teamwork of Students      5.19 5.78 5.72        5.43    3      16     59
Placement and Career Services                  5.38 5.42 5.29        5.51    2      14     27
Overall Satisfaction                           5.62 5.76 5.79         5.8    1       4      9
Note: By agreement with EBI, these data are confidential and cannot be used for marketing
purposes. EBI specifically permits the data to be used for accreditation purposes, however.


                                 MASTER’S PROGRAMS

A-C.3.a: All accounting master’s degree programs shall include an appropriate
combination of accounting, business, and other topics to meet the goals and objectives of the
program’s mission. Appropriate learning activities should be incorporated to provide the
graduates with the competencies that are consistent with the mission of the program and
the expectation of the market(s) served by that program.


REQUIREMENTS

The objective of the Master of Accountancy program is “To provide students with
greater breadth and depth of understanding in accounting and business than it is
possible to attain in an undergraduate program alone.” A strategy articulated for
accomplishing this objective is:

Design and deliver a curriculum that builds upon and enhances the student’s
undergraduate education and includes coverage of the most recent developments in
accounting theory and practice, and with the extant technology in the field.

Exhibit C-4 indicates these competencies and summarizes where they are included in the
curriculum using the following code:
        T = Theme: this competency cuts across several content areas of the course.
        C = Significant component: this competency is a significant content area of the course.
        I = Introduced: this competency is introduced, but is not a focal point of this course.
        N = Not covered: this competency is not addressed in this course.


C-8                                                               AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
                                               Exhibit C-4
                Core Competencies in the Master of Accountancy Program




                                                                                                                                            Oral Communication
                                                                                        Technological Issues




                                                                                                                           Group Dynamics




                                                                                                                                            Communications

                                                                                                                                                                  Analytical Skills
                                                       Ethical Issues

                                                                        Global Issues




                                                                                        Environment

                                                                                                               Diversity
                                                                                        External




                                                                                                                                            Written
510 – Systems Development                              T                C               I          C           N           C                I          I         C
512 – Advanced Accounting Problems                     I                C               T          C           I           C                I         C          T
522 – Contemporary Developments in Accounting          I                I               I          T           N           C                C         C          C
Theory
523 – Financial Statement Analysis                     T                T               I          T           T           T                T         T          T
532 – Advanced Auditing                                T                C               C          T           C           T                T         T          T
533 – Systems Security, Control and Auditing           I                N               T          C           N           C                C         C          C
534 – Forensic Accounting                              T                I               N          C           I           T                T         T          I
554 – Professional Certification                       T                I               I           I          N           N                I         C          T
561 - Advanced Managerial Accounting                   C                I               I          C           I           C                I         C          T

Students in the MAcc are permitted to take up to 12 hours of non-accounting courses.

PROGRAM SUCCESS

Enrollment in the MAcc program increased with the advent of the 150 hour requirement in
Alabama in 1995. Enrollment has declined in recent years, following the trend of decreasing
enrollment in the undergraduate program. The quality of entering students remains high and
placement has been good. The average undergraduate GPA of students entering the program last
year was 3.52. Average GMAT scores of students entering the program in the last four years
were:
       1998-99-556
       1999-00-553
       2000-01-548
       2001-02-550

In 2001, the School surveyed graduates of the MAcc and MTA programs concerning their
success in taking the CPA Exam. The survey was sent to 313 former students who graduated
between 1995 and 2000. Of these graduates, 257 had taken the exam at least once; 25 had not
taken the exam, and 31 did not respond to the survey. Of those taking the exam, 71% (183) had
passed all parts of the exam, including 31% (79) who passed on their first attempt. Of the
remaining students who had taken the exam, 9% (23) had passed three parts, and 6% (16) had
passed two parts.

Other measures of success are described in later sections of this document.




Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                                                                              C-9
A-C.3.b: All master’s degree programs included in the accounting program must
include a minimum of 30 semester hours beyond the undergraduate degree, of
which a minimum of 18 semester hours should be in courses reserved primarily for
graduate students.

Students enrolled in the Master of Accountancy program must complete a total of 30 hours
beyond the bachelor’s degree. A minimum of 24 hours must be taken in courses reserved
exclusively for graduate students. The program consists of a minimum of 18 hours of accounting
as follows:

Required accounting courses (15 hours)
AC 510 – Systems Development (Also offered as MIS 510)
AC 512 – Advanced Accounting Problems
AC 522 – Contemporary Developments in Accounting Theory
AC 532 – Advanced Auditing
AC 533 – Systems Security, Control, and Auditing

Elective accounting courses (minimum of 3 hours)
AC 523 – Financial Statement Analysis
AC 534 – Forensic Accounting
AC 554 – Professional Certification
AC 561 – Advanced Managerial Accounting
Certain courses offered in the MTA program (described later) also may be taken by MAcc
students.

Required non-accounting courses (3 hours)
LGS 504 – Legal Issues in Accounting

Elective non-accounting courses (up to 9 hours)
Electives must be approved by the coordinator of the master of accountancy program.

As noted earlier, the faculty is currently examining the MAcc program. Course offerings and
requirements may differ for students entering the program in the fall of 2002.


A-C.3.c: MBA programs with a concentration in accounting should contain not
less than 12 semester hours in courses dealing with the development, measurement,
analyses, validation, and communication of financial and other information, of
which a minimum of 9 semester hours must be in courses reserved exclusively for
graduate students. The 18-hour breadth requirement in Business Standard C.1.3.b
must also be satisfied.

The MBA program does not offer an accounting concentration option. An MBA student with an
undergraduate degree in accounting may enroll in graduate level accounting classes with
permission from the director of the School. The usual motivation for a student to request
permission to take accounting classes is the 150-hour law in Alabama. The law requires specific
courses such as a second auditing class that is only available at the graduate level.



C-10                                                             AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
The accounting faculty are currently exploring an MBA concentration in accounting that would
focus on risk, assurance, and control issues. If implemented, the concentration would prepare
students for positions in internal auditing and enterprise risk management.


A-C.3.d: Master’s in accounting programs should contain not less than 15 semester
hours in courses dealing with the development, measurement, analyses, validation,
and communication of financial and other information, of which a minimum of 12
semester hours must be in courses designed primarily for graduate students.

As noted in A-C.3.b, the Master of Accountancy degree requires a minimum of 18 hours in
courses dealing with the development, measurement, analyses, validation, and communication of
financial and other information, and a minimum of 24 hours in courses reserved exclusively for
graduate students.


A-C.3.e: Other specialized master’s programs in accounting (including Master’s of
Taxation programs) should contain not less than 15 semester hours in courses in
their specialized area or in courses dealing with the development, measurement,
analyses, validation, and communication of financial and other information of
which a minimum of 12 semester hours must be in courses designed primarily for
graduate students.

REQUIREMENTS

Students in the MTA program are required to complete a minimum of 31 hours of approved
coursework beyond the undergraduate degree. A minimum of 24 hours must be taken in courses
open only to graduate students, and 15 of these must be in courses in accounting and taxation at
the University of Alabama.

Required courses (18 hours)
ACC 573 – Individual Tax Planning
ACC 575 – Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders
ACC 576 – Advanced Corporate Taxation
ACC 577 – Tax Practice and Procedure
ACC 578 – Partnership Taxation
ACC 593 – Research and Communication in Taxation

Required non-accounting courses (4 hours)
LAW 612 – Legal Research (1 hour)
LAW 725 – Legal Concepts of Property

Electives (9 hours)
ACC 456 – Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting
ACC 512 – Advanced Accounting Problems
ACC 522 – Contemporary Developments in Accounting Theory
ACC 532 – Advanced Auditing
LGS 504 – Legal Issues in Accounting




Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                              C-11
The objective of the MTA program is to provide an in-depth coverage of tax accounting that
emphasizes the legal as well as accounting requirements of this highly specialized area. In part,
this is to be achieved with the following strategy:

    Design and deliver a curriculum that provides preparation in the technical areas of tax
    law and develops the research, communication and analytical skills necessary for a
    successful career in taxation.

Exhibit C-5 indicates these competencies and summarizes where they are included in the
curriculum using the following code:

        T=     Theme: this competency cuts across several content areas of the course.
        C=     Significant component: this competency is a significant content area of the course.
        I=     Introduced: this competency is introduced, but is not a focal point of this course.
        N=     Not covered: this competency is not addressed in this course.

                                        Exhibit C-5
                Core Competencies in the Master of Tax Accounting Program




                                                                                                              External Environment
                                                                                     Techno-logical Issues




                                                                                                                                                                  Oral Communication
                                                                                                                                                 Group Dynamics




                                                                                                                                                                  Communications

                                                                                                                                                                                       Analytical Skills
                                                    Ethical Issues

                                                                     Global Issues




                                                                                                                                     Diversity




                                                                                                                                                                  Written
573 – Individual Tax Planning                      T                 T               N                        I                      N           N                N         N          T
575 – Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders     I                N               N                       N                       N           N                T         C          T
576 – Advanced Corporate Taxation                   I                N               N                       N                       N           N                T         C          T
577 – Tax Practices and Procedures                 C                 I               C                       C                       I           C                C         C          C
578 – Partnership Taxation                          I                N               N                       N                       N           N                T         C          T
593 – Research and Communication in Taxation       T                 C               T                       T                       N           N                T         T          T



PROGRAM SUCCESS

The MTA program has been very successful in attracting and placing quality students. The
average GPA of students entering the program last year was 3.57. Average GMAT scores for
students entering the program in the last five years were:
        1997-592
        1998-562
        1999-584
        2000-578
        2001-592

Other measures of success are described in later sections of this document.




C-12                                                                                                         AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
                                   DOCTORAL PROGRAM

 A-C.4:   Doctoral degree programs in accounting should satisfy the curriculum
 requirements for doctoral programs specified in Business Standard C.1.5.

 The doctoral degree program in accountancy satisfies the curriculum requirements as specified in
 business standard C.1.5. The program is designed to provide a thorough knowledge of the
 concepts of accounting and its related disciplines, together with reasoning, communication and
 quantitative skills essential for a successful career as an accounting educator responsible for
 research and teaching.


 PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

 The program is primarily constructed to provide the knowledge base and skills necessary to
 effectively practice the research function in accounting education. Each student admitted to the
 program must, prior to admission, have successfully completed a program of designated masters-
 level courses in accounting, economics, finance, statistics and business. With this background,
 each student immediately enters a two-year program of doctoral level accounting courses that are
 designed to provide direct involvement in the processes of research. These courses are
 supplemented by accounting research workshops and research paper requirements, each of which
 includes a working interaction with selected faculty.

 Each student therefore reaches the dissertation stage of the program having spent two to three
 years developing skills and interests pertinent to his or her chosen research topic, and having
 become well accustomed to completing research tasks such as literature reviews, problem
 identification, hypothesis formulation and testing, and paper writing, presentation, and evaluation.

 Students are given an opportunity to benefit from research workshops conducted by leading
 academics from other institutions. As shown in Exhibit C-6, these workshops provide an
 exposure to researchers from other institutions.

                                            Exhibit C-6
                Garner Center for Current Accounting Issues-Visiting Scholars

  Date       Presenter and Institution                        Title of Presentation
1/24/97   Jesse Dillard                    “Fluid Structures: A Structuration Approach to Evaluating
          University of New Mexico         Information Technology”
3/21/97   Chris Hogan                      “Information and Valuation Implications of Restructuring
          Vanderbilt University            Charges”
4/11/97   Wayne Landsman                   “Valuation Characteristics of Equity Book Value and Net
          University of North Carolina-    Income: Test of the Abandonment Option Hypothesis”
          Chapel Hill
4/18/97   Brian Gibson                     “An Information Economic Framework for Management
          University of New Castle         Accounting”
4/25/97   Benjamin Ayers                   “The Joint Influence of Taxes on the Capital Structure of
          University of Georgia            Small Businesses”
5/2/97    Trevor Harris                    “Dividend and Capital Gains Taxation in Firm Valuation:
          Columbia University              New Evidence”
9/12/97   Anne Beatty                      “An Examination of Trade-Offs in the Use of Investment
          Pennsylvania State University    Securities and Interest Rate Swaps”



 Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                   C-13
                                          Exhibit C-6, continued

  Date       Presenter and Institution                           Title of Presentation
9/26/97    Thomas Linsmeier                    “Fair Value Accounting: Evidence from Closed-End
           University of Illinois              Mutual Funds”
11/7/97    Michael Peters                      “The Effect of Outside Information Sources on the
           University of Maryland              Economic Consequences of Management Reporting
                                               Strategies”
11/21/97   Inder Khurana                       “Value-Relevance of Nuclear Decommissioning Cost
           University of Missouri-             Disclosures”
           Columbia
4/17/98    Mary Barth                          “Brand Values and Capital Market Valuation”
           Stanford University
5/1/98     Timothy Fogarty                     “Antecedents and Consequences of Burnout in
           Case Western Reserve                Accounting: Beyond the Role Stress Model”
           University
10/23/98   Larry Brown                         “Managerial Behavior and the Bias in Analysts’ Earnings
           Georgia State University            Forecasts”
11/13/98   Rachel Hayes                        “Implicit Contracts and the Explanatory Power of Top
           Northwestern University             Executive Compensation for Future Performance”
11/20/98   Richard Riley                       “Compensation Philosophies, Accounting Choices, and
           West Virginia University            Informativeness of Earnings”
11/30/98   Somnath Bhattacharya                “Consistency in Control Risk Assessments: Does the
           University of Texas–El Paso         Metric Matter?”
12/4/98    Anthony Catanach                    “Teaching Intermediate Financial Accounting Using a
           Villanova University                Business Activity Model”
12/11/98   Jonathan Woodroof                   “An Empirical Assessment of User Affectivity
           Middle Tennessee State              Predispositions”
           University
12/14/98   Amelia Baldwin                      “The Integration of Accounting and Information Systems”
           Florida International University
1/8/99     Dale Lunsford                       "On the Communication Role of Alternative Systems
           The University of Southern          Analysis and Design Methodologies: An Empirical
           Mississippi                         Evaluation"
1/22/99    Patrick Wheeler                     "The Effects of User-choice Decision Aid Features on
           Georgia State University            Decision Behavior and Judgement Quality"
9/17/99    Bruce Billings                      "Do Stock Prices Fully reflect Information in Dividends
           Florida State University            about Future Earnings"
10/8/99    A. Faye Borthick                    "Comprehension in Internal control Evaluation:
           Georgia State University            Performance as a Function of Knowledge Structure and
                                               Test Structure Compatibility"
11/5/99    William Stammerjohan                "Legal Costs and Accounting Choices: Another Test of
           Mississippi State University        the Litigation Hypothesis"
1/21/00    Terry Warfield                      “The Demand for Differential Audit Services: Evidence
           University of Wisconsin-            from the German Audit Market”
           Madison
3/3/00     Pat Hopkins                         “Purchase, Pooling, and Equity Analysts’ Valuation
           Indiana University                  Judgements”
4/7/00     Joseph Callaghan                    “A Mote Approach to AIS Curriculum Development”
           Oakland University
4/14/00    Dana Hermanson                      “Board Characteristics and Audit Fees”
           Kennesaw State University
9/15/00    William E. McCarthy                 “The Ontological Foundations of REA Enterprise
           Michigan State University           Information Systems”



 C-14                                                                    AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
                                          Exhibit C-6, continued

  Date        Presenter and Institution                         Title of Presentation
9/22/00    Marlys Gascho Lipe                  “The Balanced Scorecard: Judgmental Effects of
           University of Oklahoma              Information Organization”
11/3/00    Jan Barton                          “Do Firms Run Out of Discretion to Manage Earnings”
           Emory University
2/16/01    William Messier                     “Error Detection by Industry Specialists During the Audit
           Georgia State University            Review Process”
03/09/01   Uday S. Murthy                      “Audit Terms’ Performances on Hidden-Profile Tasks:
           Texas A&M University                An Investigation of the Effects of Alternative
                                               Communication Modes”
04-06-01   F. Todd DeZoort                     “Audit Committee Support for Auditors: The Effects of
           University of South Carolina        Materiality Justification and Accounting Precision”
04-11-01   Cynthia Frownfelter-Lohrke          “Graphics in Annual Reports: At What Level Does
           Samford University                  Distortion Impact Investors’ Decision”
11-02-01   Joe Carcello                        "Auditor Industry Specialization and Fraudulent Financial
           University of Tennessee             Reporting"
11-30-01   Paul Copley                         "The Association Between Accounting Measures and
           University of Georgia               Interest Cost on Municipal Bond Issues: A Test of Entity
                                               Relationships"
02-01-02   Tom Stober                          “Value and Glamour Strategy and the Accruals Anomaly”
           Notre Dame University
03-01-02   Dan Stone                           “Promotion and Performance Evaluation in Managerial
           University of Kentucky              Accounting”

 Each student entering the program is assigned a program committee whose task it is to advise and
 support the student throughout his or her pre-dissertation stage. On reaching the dissertation
 phase, the student, in consultation with the program director, chooses a further committee to
 oversee his or her work to the point of a successfully defended dissertation. The program
 coordinator, supported by an advisory committee of accounting faculty, regularly monitors each
 student's record, to determine whether or not substantial progress has been made toward
 completion of the degree.

 The main components of the Ph.D. program are described below. They are continually reviewed
 with the intention of appropriately amending their detailed content when change is deemed
 necessary in order to provide a relevant and state-of-the-art education.

 Introduction to accounting research. Two successive seminars that provide a detailed
 understanding of the development of research activity in financial accounting, auditing,
 management accounting, systems, and tax. The seminars introduce students to the nature, role,
 concepts, and principles of the practice of research in accounting.

 Contemporary research issues and methodologies. Two successive and linked seminars dealing
 with contemporary research in accounting. The emphasis is on identifying researchable issues,
 formulating relevant theoretical frameworks, and applying appropriate methodologies.

 Research in specialty areas. Seminars are offered in specialty areas according to student demand.

 Research self-study. Building on knowledge from the previous research seminars, this part of the
 program addresses the doctoral student’s need to independently develop a research program and




 Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                      C-15
topic, supervised by appropriate faculty. The self-study seminar is intended as preparation for the
production of a dissertation proposal.

Research papers. During each of the first two summers in the program, each student is required to
prepare and present to the faculty a research paper. As with the self-study seminar, the intention
of these papers is to assist in the successful defense of a dissertation proposal.

Minor field and other coursework. In conjunction with the required accounting seminars and
papers, doctoral students are required to take a number of graduate courses in statistics,
quantitative methods, and economics and to complete an approved program of courses in a minor
field such as economics, finance, psychology or production management. A doctoral student also
must demonstrate reading competency in a foreign language or complete additional courses
pertinent to the development of research skills.

Teaching skills development. Students participate in a non-credit workshop series each semester
that focuses on educational issues and the development of instructional skills. These workshops
often involve discussion of particular teaching approaches. All students are expected to obtain
teaching experience while in the PhD program. Most students begin as lab instructors or as
instructors in the introductory course. These activities are coordinated and monitored by faculty.
Non-native-English-speaking students are required to pass competency exams and, if necessary,
complete language training in the University’s English Language Institute. Students who are
teaching for the first time at the University must complete the University’s teaching seminar held
at the beginning of each semester.

Annual review. Each doctoral student is reviewed annually by the PhD advisory committee.
These reviews are intended to determine whether students are making suitable progress toward
completion of degree requirements. Students are counseled about deficiencies and adjustments
are made to the students’ programs as needed. If the committee determines that a student is not
making suitable progress, the student is terminated from the program. The University requires
graduate students to maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain eligible for the degree and for financial
assistance.

Financial assistance. Each student admitted to the program is offered and is required to accept
an assistantship. Currently, students are guaranteed a minimum of $20,000 a year plus waiver of
tuition and fees. This amount is often supplemented by scholarships and fellowships provided by
the College and University. Assistantships normally require a student to work 20 hours a week as
a research or teaching assistant.

PROGRAM SUCCESS

The program has been successful in graduating and placing students. Several students have
obtained positions in peer institutions or in prominent MBA-oriented programs. From 1991 to
2001, 19 students entered the PhD program. The average GMAT for these students was 652.
Their average undergraduate GPA was 3.48, and their average graduate GPA was 3.71. Ten of
these students have completed the program. Their initial and current positions are noted in
Exhibit C-7. Five students withdrew from the program, and four students are currently enrolled.




C-16                                                               AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
                                        Exhibit C-7
                                   PhD Student Placement

Name                            Initial Placement                Current Position
Archambeault, Debbie            U. of Albany-SUNY                U. of Albany-SUNY
Barton, Jan                     Emory U.                         Emory U.
Davis, Stan                     Wake Forest                      Wake Forest
DeZoort, Todd                   U. of South Carolina             U. of Alabama
Dillard-Egers, Jane             Austin Peay U.                   Belmont U.
Grice, Steve                    Troy St U.                       Troy St U.
Kopp, Lori                      U. of Manitoba                   U. of Manitoba
Magrath, Lorraine               Troy St U.                       Troy St U.
Polinski, Paul                  LSU                              Case Western
Smith, Tracy                    U. of Memphis                    U. of Memphis

Much of the success of a PhD program depends on its ability to attract and graduate quality
students. In recent years, the PhD program has had difficulty in attracting qualified candidates.
The number of students entering the program declined during the 1990’s. The faculty examined
the program in detail in 2001 and made changes in the structure of the program. Stipends were
increased, and an effort was made to recruit students to the program. Three students have been
admitted to the program for the coming year, and all have accepted positions. Plans are to admit
additional students and to attempt to maintain a steady state of 10-12 students in the program.

The program has developed a systems option for students interested in research and teaching in
the accounting systems area. Supporting areas in computer science and management information
systems have been developed. Additional support in MIS should become available in the near
future with the start of a PhD emphasis in that area. We expect to graduate our first student with
a systems emphasis during the coming year.


                           OTHER MEASURES OF SUCCESS

Exhibit C-8 provides results of a survey that was sent to accounting alumni in October 2001.
Responses were received from 522 people with degrees as follows: BSBA 453, MAcc 87, MTA
41, PhD 16. Some had more than one degree from UA.

These results indicate a high level of satisfaction among alumni with accounting programs.
These results are consistent with anecdotal information collected from discussions with the
Professional Advisory Board and employers.




Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                C-17
                                          Exhibit C-8
                              Satisfaction of Accounting Alumni

Use the 7-point scale provided and circle the appropriate response for each question:

Very Dissatisfied                                                        Very Satisfied
       1            2           3            4           5           6          7

1. How satisfied have you been with the accounting education you received at UA?
All responses 6.26
Bachelors      6.25
MAcc           6.07
MTA            6.48
PhD            6.38

2. How satisfied have you been with your overall education at UA?
All responses 6.08
Bachelors      6.06
MAcc           5.98
MTA            6.15
PhD            6.31

3. How satisfied have you been with your career development?
All responses 6.06
Bachelors      6.06
MAcc           5.85
MTA            6.08
PhD            6.25

4. How important has your accounting education been to your career development?
All responses 6.08
Bachelors     6.06
MAcc          6.00
MTA           6.45
PhD           6.56

Exhibit C-9 summarizes a survey that was sent to students graduating from the MAcc and MTA
programs during the three years ended in May 2001. These results also provide evidence of
general satisfaction with the master’s programs. Data from the survey are being used to assess
strengths and weaknesses of the programs and to determine future changes in the programs.




C-18                                                               AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
                                                Exhibit C-9
                                          MAcc/MTA Alumni Survey

A.   Identify the degree you received:

     52 MAcc       18 MTA

B.   I graduated from the program:

     21 Within the last 12 months
     30 Within the last 13 to 24 months
     19 Within the last 25 to 36 months

C.   Gender:

     26 Male       44 Female

D.   U.S. Ethnic Group or Nationality:

     65 White American
     5  Other

E.   Current Employment Status:

     68 Employed full-time
     2 Not employed, pursuing academic degree

F.   In the last 2 years have you (check all that apply):

     12 Attended an alumni event
     59 Visited campus
     39 Recruited graduates

G. Size of organization you are employed by (number of employees):

     4    Below 25
     14   26 to 100
     10   101 to 500
     5    501 to 10,000
     34   Greater than 10,000

H. Annual salary (including bonus) 1st year after graduation:

     1    $25,000 to $29,999
     5    $30,000 to $34,999
     17   $35,000 to $39,999
     32   $40,000 to $44,999
     8    $45,000 to $49,999
     5    $50,000 or more

I.   If employed full-time, what is your current annual salary
     (including bonuses):

     1    $25,000 to $29,999
     1    $30,000 to $34,999
     5    $35,000 to $39,999
     29   $40,000 to $44,999
     15   $45,000 to $49,999
     11   $50,000 to $54,999
     6    $55,000 or more




Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                       C-19
J.      Do you contribute financially to the school of accountancy?

      49 No            9 Yes: Annually               12 Yes: Periodically

                                      RESPONSE KEY FOR QUESTIONS 1 to 8
                                                        Please circle the correct response.

not at all                            moderately                                             extremely          not applicable
  1             2             3            4                5                6                 7                      NA

To what extent did your masters degree in accounting:
                                                                                 All                 MAcc             MTA
1.    Expand your career options...............................................6.09                  6.08             6.11
2.    Provide access to alumni...................................................4.07                4.00             4.24
3.    Provide access to employers .............................................5.97                  5.88             6.24
4.    Assist you in selecting a career .........................................4.49                 4.44             4.65
5.    Increase your earning potential .........................................5.67                  5.52             6.11
6.    Enhance your upward mobility .........................................5.74                     5.77             5.67
7.    Provide the knowledge necessary to succeed....................5.41                             5.29             5.72
8.    Provide skills necessary to succeed...................................5.57                     5.49             5.78

                                   RESPONSE KEY FOR QUESTIONS 9 and 10
   very                moderately             slightly                           slightly          moderately         very           not
dissatisfied           dissatisfied        dissatisfied         neutral          satisfied         satisfied       satisfied       applicable
   1                      2                      3                4                 5                 6               7              NA

Career Services
How satisfied were you with the:
                                                                                      All            MAcc             MTA
9.  Assistance you received securing a job after
    graduation while in the program .......................................6.04                      5.90             6.46
10. Level of responsibility of your first job
    after graduation .................................................................6.17           6.12             6.31

                                   RESPONSE KEY FOR QUESTIONS 11 TO 48
not at all                            moderately                                             extremely          not applicable
  1             2             3            4                5                6                 7                      NA

                                                                      How important are these                         To what extent did your
                                                                      skills and abilities to a                       degree enhance these
                                                                      successful career:                              skills and abilities:

                                                                        All         MAcc           MTA               All         MAcc     MTA
11-12.    One-on-one interpersonal skills                               6.54        6.58           6.44              5.01        5.18     4.56
13-14.    Written communication skills                                  6.33        6.25           6.56              5.43        5.58     5.00
15-16.    Oral presentation skills                                      5.93        5.88           6.06              5.71        5.88     5.18
17-18.    Listening skills                                              6.49        6.46           6.56              5.26        5.24     5.35
19-20.    Decision making skills                                        6.41        6.38           6.50              5.50        5.52     5.44
21-22.    Leadership skills                                             6.24        6.35           5.94              5.14        5.19     5.00
23-24.    Ability to deal with ambiguity                                6.35        6.54           5.76              5.45        5.50     5.29
25-26.    Ability to work in teams                                      6.44        6.54           6.17              6.29        6.38     6.00
27-28.    Ability to define business problems                           6.16        6.19           6.06              5.69        5.56     6.06
29-30.    Ability to apply a systematic approach
          to solving business problems                                  6.16        6.19           6.06              5.46        5.42     5.59
31-32.    Ability to think analytically                                 6.50        6.54           6.39              5.94        5.92     6.00
33-34.    Ability to think critically                                   6.40        6.37           6.50              5.79        5.75     5.89
35-36.    Ability to think creatively                                   5.71        5.65           5.89              4.93        4.81     5.28
37-38.    Ability to think strategically                                6.07        6.10           6.00              5.53        5.62     5.28
39-40.    Ability to apply business theory to practice                  5.89        5.81           6.11              5.36        5.40     5.22
41-42.    Ability to solve quantitative business


C-20                                                                                                        AACSB Self-Evaluation Report
       problems                                                   6.01        6.04      5.94               5.70    5.85     5.28
43-44. Ability to think globally                                  5.42        5.33      5.71               5.06    5.22     4.61
45-46. Ability to manage change                                   6.30        6.31      6.29               5.14    5.21     4.94
47-48. Ability to apply technology                                6.46        6.48      6.39               5.70    5.81     5.35

                                RESPONSE KEY FOR QUESTIONS 49 TO 51
dramatically                                no change                        dramatically      not applicable
      worse                                                                    better
       1            2           3             4          5         6            7                     NA

In comparison to when you received your degree, how has the quality of the program
changed on the following dimensions:
                                                                              All           MAcc            MTA
49.                 Reputation of the program                                 4.51          4.48            4.59
50.                 Reputation of the faculty                                 4.57          4.54            4.65
51.                 Reputation of the university                              4.59          4.57            4.65

                           THE BOTTOM LINE – OVERALL SATISFACTION
52. How would you rate the performance of your academic program in preparing you for success in your first
    job after graduation?

       very poor         poor        fair         good     very good excellent exceptional
            1             2           3             4         5        6        7         All               MAcc     MTA
                                                                                          5.26              5.27     5.24

53. How would you rate the performance of your academic program in preparing you for success in your
    current job?

       very poor         poor        fair         good     very good excellent exceptional
            1             2           3             4         5        6        7         All               MAcc     MTA
                                                                                          5.21              5.22     5.18

54. To what extent did your educational experience fulfill your expectations?

       far below        moderately          slightly       met        slightly moderately             far
                         below              below        expectations above     above                 above
              1             2                  3             4           5         6                     7 All       MAcc     MTA
                                                                                                           5.21      5.17     5.33

55. When you compare the cost (time, expense, effort, and lost income) to the contribution (job, income,
    promotions, mobility) the degree has made to your success, how do you rate its overall value?

       very poor         poor        fair         good     very good excellent exceptional
            1             2           3             4         5        6        7         All               MAcc     MTA
                                                                                          5.65              5.55     5.94

56. How inclined are you to recommend your program to a close friend?

       not at all                             moderately                        extremely
            1             2           3           4           5          6           7         All          MAcc     MTA
                                                                                               5.99         5.91     6.22




Culverhouse School of Accountancy, August 2002                                                                                     C-21

								
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