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WWII_Pacific_Theatre_Movie_Lessons

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					VETERANS NATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM: MOVIE LESSON PLANS


           TABLE OF CONTENTS

      THEIR SACRIFICE OUR FREEDOM-
           WW II IN THE PACIFIC

   a. Lesson #16: Introduction to WWII in the Pacific


   b. Lesson:#17: The American Character


   c. Lesson #18: Causes of American Involvement in WWII


   d. Lesson #19: War Propaganda


   e. Lesson #20: Should We Have Dropped the Bomb?
                       Lesson #16: Introduction to WWII in the Pacific

Standards:
      8.1.12C Evaluate historical interpretation of events.
      8.4.12 Identify and evaluate the political and cultural contributions of individuals and
      groups to United States history from 1890 to Present.
      7.1.12B Analyze the location of places and regions.

Objectives:
      1. The students will be able to analyze the actions of American troops stationed in the
      Pacific during WWII.
      2. The students will be able to empathize with the soldiers and the conditions they
      endured in the islands of the Pacific.
      3. The students will be able to create a well-organized outline of the lecture and power
      point presentation.

Subject Matter: POWs, “island hopping”, leadership, atomic weapons, veterans

Materials:
   Chalkboard
   Chalk
   Computer
   PowerPoint presentation
   Television
   Media: Their Sacrifice, Our Freedom: WWII in the Pacific

Procedure:
      1.Set: Students will copy down the essential question upon entering the
             classroom:
                   What were some of the struggles and obstacles the American soldiers had
                     to overcome while being stationed in the Pacific during WWII?
      2.Media (optional):
             Students will view the film Their Sacrifice, Our Freedom: WWII in the Pacific. It
             is to be assumed that the instructor has already viewed this film and is familiar
             with its content. Students will be asked to take notes on this film that will later be
             used for classroom activities and discussion.

       3.PowerPoint Presentation:
             a. The PowerPoint presentation will supplement the lecture/discussion provided to
             students.
               b. Students will be expected to take notes on the PowerPoint. Few/limited
               wording on the PowerPoint is to encourage students to focus on the lecture, while
               writing key ideas and phrases listed on the slide.
               c. The instructor will begin the PowerPoint presentation by reviewing the main
               events/ideas covered by the video.

       4. Mapping Activity:
             a. Students will be given a map and asked to identify some of the important places
             mentioned in the film.
             b. Students will be given colored pencils to differentiate topographical differences
             on the map.

       5.Close:
              a. The instructor will ask the students to list some of the most important events
              that occurred in the Pacific theatre during WWII.

Assessment:
      1. The teacher will informally observe the students taking notes from PowerPoint.
      2. The teacher will formally assess the students’ performance on the map activity.




                            Lesson #17: The American Character

Standards:
      8.1.12C Evaluate historical interpretation of events.
      8.3.12A Identify and evaluate the political and cultural contributions of individuals and
      groups to United States history from 1890 to Present.
      5.2.12C Interpret the causes of conflict in society.

Objectives:
      1. The students will be able to analyze the struggles and obstacles overcome by the Medal
      of Honor Winners, Navy Cross winners, as well as POWs.
      2. The students will be able to compose a letter home as if they were a soldier stationed in
      Okinawa.
      3. The students will be able to empathize with the sense of patriotism and perseverance
      exhibited by members of the military, government, and American public.

Subject Matter: POWs, patriotism, gender, Medal of Honor, Navy Cross, character

Materials:
   Chalkboard
      Chalk
      Letter Home prompt worksheet
      Television
      Media: Their Sacrifice, Our Freedom: WWII in the Pacific
      Classroom notes
      Textbook

Procedure:
      1.Set: Students will copy and brainstorm the following question written on the board or
      overhead:
                  What do you consider to be the “American character”?

       2.Media (optional):
             Students will view the film Their Sacrifice, Our Freedom: WWII in the Pacific. It
             is to be assumed that the instructor has already viewed this film and is familiar
             with its content. Students will be asked to take notes on this film that will later be
             used for classroom activities and discussion.


       3.Letter Home Activity:
                  a. The instructor will begin the activity by explaining the idea of perseverance,
                  emphasizing on the “American character” during the war and how this
                  reflected on the military, government, and the American public as a whole.
                  b. The instructor will continue to explain how the United States had been
                  viewed as a “sleeping giant”.
                       What does this mean?
                       What was the outcome of ‘waking the giant’?
                       How did this reflect the view of the United States in the eyes of the
                          rest of the world?
                  c. Students will be given a writing prompt explaining the following situation:
                       You are a soldier stationed in Okinawa. You hear information on the
                          news about the events that are taking place all around you in the
                          Pacific. Write home to your family, friends, and/or loved ones about
                          the events that are taking place and about the perseverance of the
                          Americans throughout the war.

       4.Close: Check for understanding –
                  a. The students will give short, brief answers to the following questions:
                      What is the “American character”?
                      Do you feel as though we have that same feeling today?
                         In what events have you witnessed this?
                         What are some examples of the American perseverance during WWII
                          in the Pacific?

Assessment:
      1. The instructor will informally observe the students taking notes on the video.
      2. The instructor will informally observe the students completing the Letters Home
      activity.
      3. The instructor will formally collect and assess the Letters Home activity.




                   Lesson #18: Causes of American Involvement in WWII

Standards:
      8.1.12C Evaluate historical interpretation of events.
      8.4.12B Evaluate historical documents, material artifacts and historic sites important to
      world history since 1450.
      8.4.12D Evaluate how conflict and cooperative among social groups and organizations
      impacted world history from 1450 to Present in Africa, Americas, Asia, and Europe.
      5.2.12C Interpret the causes of conflict in society.

Objectives:
      1. The students will be able to compare and contrast the events of Pearl Harbor and
      September 11, 2001.
      2. The students will be able to analyze the reactions of the American public as well as
      government officials to the attacks.
      3. The students will be able to work together in a group to complete a role play activity.

Subject Matter: Conflict, cooperation, naval power, fleet, diplomacy

Materials:
   Chalkboard
   Chalk
   Computer/Internet
   Group Activity worksheet
   Television
   Media: Their Sacrifice, Our Freedom: WWII in the Pacific

Procedure:
1.Set: Students will copy, brainstorm, and think-pair-share the following question written
on the board or overhead:
            What do you already know about the attacks on Pearl Harbor and 9/11?

2.Media (optional):
      Students will view the film Their Sacrifice, Our Freedom: WWII in the Pacific. It
      is to be assumed that the instructor has already viewed this film and is familiar
      with its content. Students will be asked to take notes on this film that will later be
      used for classroom activities and discussion.


3.Informal Lecture:
       a. Using their notes from the Set/Brainstorming/Think-pair-share activity, the
           classroom as a whole will use the overhead or blackboard to compare and
           contrast the attacks on Pearl Harbor and 9/11.
            How are these attacks alike?
            How are they different?
            Who were the attackers?
            What was the reasoning behind the attacks?
            What was the American reaction?

4.Internet Presentation:
        a. Students will view President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s radio address following
        the attacks on Pearl Harbor as a primary source to understand the American
        reactions following the attacks.
        b. Students will then view various links to media and video clips showing the
        public’s as well as President George W. Bush’s reaction to the attacks on 9/11.

5.Group Role Play Writing Exercise:
      a. In groups of 3 or 4, students will complete a worksheet as they try to imagine
      themselves as a group of Americans trying to comprehend the impact of the attack
      on Pearl Harbor.
      b. Ask students, “How does this relate to the public’s feelings today towards the
      War on Terrorism?”

6.Close: Check for understanding –
       a. The class will end with a brief discussion on student responses to the
          aforementioned questions.
       b. The instructor will collect the students’ responses before they exit the
          classroom.
Assessment:
      1. The instructor will informally observe the students taking notes on the video.
      2. The instructor will informally observe the students participating in the discussion about
      the attacks and the response of the American public and its leaders.




                                 Lesson #19: War Propaganda

Standards:
   8.1.12C Evaluate historical interpretation of events.
   8.3.12D Identify and evaluate conflict and cooperation among social groups and
   organizations in United States history from 1890 to the Present.
   5.2.12C Interpret the causes of conflict in society.

Objectives:
      1. The students will be able to analyze the different types of propaganda used throughout
      the war by the Americans, Japanese, and Germans.
      2. The students will be able to differentiate between an argument, a persuasion, and
      propaganda.
      3. The students will be able to form a well written response to the essential question of
      the lesson.

Subject Matter: propaganda, stereotypes, conflict, causation, persuasion, argument

Materials:
   Chalkboard
   Chalk
   WWII Propaganda poster power point
   Television
   Media: Their Sacrifice, Our Freedom: WWII in the Pacific

Procedure:
      1.Set: Students will copy and brainstorm the following question written on the board or
      overhead:
                  How do we tend to ‘dehumanize’ our enemy in times of war or conflict?

       2.Media (optional):
             Students will view the film Their Sacrifice, Our Freedom: WWII in the Pacific. It
             is to be assumed that the instructor has already viewed this film and is familiar
             with its content. Students will be asked to take notes on this film that will later be
             used for classroom activities and discussion.
       3.Propaganda Activity:
              a. The instructor will discuss the idea of propaganda and its impact on
                 stereotypes and social conflict during times of war and conflict.
              b. The students will view a power point showing different forms of propaganda
                 used during WWII by both sides of the war.
              c. The students will be asked to explain what they see and how it relates to
                 common stereotypes.
              d. The instructor will ask the students to write a concise, well thought-out
                 response to the following questions:
                     a. Do we have stereotypes in modern day warfare?
                     b. How do we dehumanize our enemies today?
              e. Students will be reminded that this writing will be collected. They should use
                 specific information and details to support their arguments.

       4.Close: Check for understanding –
              a. The class will end with a brief discussion on student responses to the
              aforementioned questions.
              b. The instructor will collect the students’ responses before they exit the
              classroom.

Assessment:
      1. The instructor will informally observe the students taking notes on the video.
      2. The instructor will informally observe the students participating in the discussion about
      propaganda.
      3. The instructor will formally collect student responses to the modern day propaganda
      questions.
      4. The instructor will informally assess the students as they answer questions during their
      check for understanding.




                      Lesson #20: Should We Have Dropped the Bomb?

Standards:
      8.1.12C Evaluate historical interpretation of events.
      8.4.12B Evaluate historical documents, material artifacts and historic sites important to
      world history since 1450.
      5.2.12C Interpret the causes of conflict in society.

Objectives:
       1. The students will be able to analyze the effects of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima
       and Nagasaki.
       2. The students will be able to predict the outcome of the war had the decision to drop the
       bombs not been made.
       3. The students will be able to form a well written response to the essential questions of
       the lesson.

   Subject Matter: patriotism, leadership, weapons of mass destruction, collateral damage

Materials:
   Chalkboard
   Chalk
   Writing Prompt Task Sheet
   Picture Slideshow
   Television
   Media: Their Sacrifice, Our Freedom: WWII in the Pacific

Procedure:
      1.Set: Students will copy and brainstorm the following question written on the board or
      overhead:
                  Should the U.S. ever exercise the use of nuclear weapons? If so, why? Of
                    not, why not?

       2.Media (optional):
             Students will view the film Their Sacrifice, Our Freedom: WWII in the Pacific. It
             is to be assumed that the instructor has already viewed this film and is familiar
             with its content. Students will be asked to take notes on this film that will later be
             used for classroom activities and discussion.

       3.Informal Lecture/Picture Slideshow:
              a. The instructor will discuss the idea of using nuclear weapons in warfare and the
              decisions leading up to the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
              b. The students will view a power point slideshow showing the devastation caused
              by the atomic bombs.
              c. The students will be asked to explain what they see and how it makes them feel.
              d. The instructor will lead a classroom discussion focusing on the following
              questions:
                       What were the positives of dropping the bombs?
                       What were the negatives?
                       What options did President Harry Truman face at the time?
                       What were the reasons behind dropping the bombs?
               e. Students will be asked to consider the outcome of the war had the bombs not
               been dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

       5.Writing Exercise: Students will be asked to write a well written response to the
       question “Do you agree with the use of nuclear weapons? Why or why not?”
                      Students must clearly state their view and use detailed facts and
                         information to support their argument.
                      This assignment will be collected for student assessment.

       4.Close: Check for understanding –
              a. Exit slips –
                       Students will be asked to write a simple yes or no as to whether or not
                           they agree with the use of nuclear weapons in warfare. These
                           anonymous ballots will be tallied and can be used to begin the next
                           class period’s discussion.
                       The class will end with a brief discussion on student responses to the
                           aforementioned questions.
                       The instructor will collect the students’ responses before they exit the
                           classroom.

Assessment:
      1. The instructor will informally observe the students taking notes on the video.
      2. The instructor will informally observe the students participating in the discussion about
      the use of nuclear technology.
      3. The instructor will formally collect students’ responses regarding the use of nuclear
      weapons.

				
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