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					                                                               2008 Red
                                                                 Book
  YEAR      Mintage       Estimated Grade   Notes   Price Paid   Value

 1909 VDB    27,994,580
 1909 VDB
 1909 VDB
 1909 VDB
 1909 VDB
 1909 VDB
 1909 VDB

     1909    72,700,420
     1909

    1909S     1,825,000




1909S VDB       484,000



     1910   146,798,813


     1910


     1910
    1910S     6,045,000
     1911   101,176,054
     1911

   1911S      4,026,000
   1911D     12,672,000
    1912     68,150,915

    1912S     4,431,000
    1912S

   1912D     10,411,000

     1913    76,529,504


    1913S     6,101,000

   1913D     15,804,000
    1914     75,237,067
1914D     1,193,000


1914S     4,137,000
1914S

 1915    29,090,970

1915S     4,833,000

1915D    22,050,000
1915D


 1916   131,832,627


1916S    22,510,000
1916S
1916S


1916D    35,956,000
1916D

 1917   196,429,785
 1917

1917S    32,620,000


1917D    55,120,000

 1918   288,104,634
 1918
 1918
1918S
1918S    34,680,000
1918D    47,830,000
 1919   392,021,000
 1919
1919S   139,760,000
1919S
1919S
1919D    57,154,000
 1920   310,165,000
1920S    46,220,000
1920S

1920D    49,280,000
 1921    39,157,000


1921S    15,274,000


1922D     7,160,000


1922D


1922D
1922D
1922D
1922D
1922D

 1923    74,723,000



1923S     8,700,000
1923S

 1924    75,178,000

1924D     2,520,000


1924S    11,696,000

 1925   139,949,000


1925S    26,380,000
1925D

1925D    22,580,000

 1926   157,088,000
 1926

1926D    28,020,000
1926D

1926S     4,550,000
 1927   144,440,000

1927S    14,276,000
1927D    27,170,000
 1928   134,116,000
 1928

1928S    17,266,000
1928S
1928S
1928S

1928D    31,170,000
1928D
 1929   185,262,000

1929S
1929S    50,148,000


1929D    41,730,000

 1930   157,415,000

1930S    24,286,000

1930D    40,100,000

 1931    19,396,000
 1931


1931S      866,000
1931S

1931D     4,480,000
 1932     9,062,000

1932D    10,500,000
1932D
 1933    14,360,000

1933D     6,200,000
 1934   219,080,000
 1934

1934D    28,446,000
 1935   245,388,000
 1935

1935S    38,702,000

1935D    47,000,000
 1936   309,632,000
 1936
1936S     29,130,000
1936D     40,620,000
 1937    309,179,320
1937S     34,500,000
1937D     50,430,000
 1938    156,682,000
1938S     15,180,000
1938S
1938D     20,010,000
 1939    316,479,520
1939S     52,070,000
1939D     15,160,000
 1940    586,810,000
1940S    112,940,000
1940D     81,390,000
 1941    887,039,100
 1941
1941S     92,360,000
1941D    128,700,000
 1942    657,828,600
1942S     85,590,000
1942D
 1943    684,628,670
1943S    191,550,000
1943D    217,660,000
 1943
 1944   1,435,400,000
 1944
 1944
 1944
1944S     282,760,000
1944D     430,578,000
 1945   1,040,515,000
1945S     181,770,000
1945D     226,268,000
1945D
 1946    991,665,000
1946S    198,100,000
1946S
1946D    315,690,000
1946D
 1947    190,555,000
 1947
1947S     99,000,000
1947D    194,750,000
 1948    317,570,000
 1948
1948S     81,735,000
1948D    172,637,000
 1949    217,775,000
1949S     64,290,000
1949D    153,132,000
 1950    272,686,386
1950S    118,505,000
1950D    334,950,000
 1951    295,633,500
1951S    136,010,000
1951S
1951S
1951D    625,355,000

 1952    186,856,980
1952S    137,800,004
1952S
1952D    746,130,000
1952D

 1953    256,883,800
1953S    181,835,000
1953D    700,515,000
1953D
 1954     71,873,350
1954S     96,190,000
1954S
1954S
1954S
1954D    251,552,500
1954D
 1955    330,958,000
 1955
 1955
1955S     44,610,000
1955S
1955S
1955D    563,257,200
1955D
1955D
 1956    421,414,384
 1956
 1956
1956D   1,098,201,100
1956D
 1957     283,787,652
1957D   1,051,342,000
1957D
1957D
 1958    253,400,652
1958D    800,953,300
 1959    610,864,291
 1959
1959D   1,279,760,000
 1960     588,096,602
 1960
1960D   1,580,884,000
1060D
1060D
1060D
 1961    756,373,244
 1961
1961D   1,753,266,700
1961D
1961D



 1962     609,263,019
1962D   1,793,148,400
 1963     757,185,645
1963D   1,774,020,400
 1964   2,652,525,762
1964D   3,799,071,500
 1965   1,497,224,900
 1966   2,188,147,783
 1967   3,048,667,100
 1968   1,707,880,970
 1968
1968D   2,886,269,600
1968D
1968S     261,311,510
 1969   1,136,910,000
 1969
1969D   4,002,832,200
1969D
1969S     547,309,631
 1970   1,898,315,000
 1970
1970D   2,891,438,900
1970D
1970S    693,192,814
1970S
 1971   1,919,490,000
 1971
1971D   2,911,045,600
1971D
1971S     528,354,192
 1972   2,933,255,000
 1972
 1972
1972D   2,665,071,400
1972D
1972S     380,200,104
 1973   3,728,245,000
 1973
 1973
1973D   3,549,576,588
1973D
1973S      319,937,634
 1974    4,232,140,523
 1974
1974D    4,235,098,000
1974D
1974S      412,039,228
 1975    5,451,476,142
 1975
1975D    4,505,245,300
1975D

 1976    4,674,292,426
 1976
1976D    4,221,592,455
1976D
 1977    4,469,930,000
 1977
1977D    4,149,062,300
1977D
 1978    5,558,605,000
 1978
1978D    4,280,233,400
1978D
 1979    6,018,515,000
 1979
1979D    4,139,357,254
1979D
 1980    7,414,705,000
 1980
1980D    5,140,098,660
1980D
 1981    7,491,750,000
 1981
1981D    5,373,235,677
1981D
 1982   10,712,525,000



 1982
 1982
 1982
1982D    6,012,979,368
1982D
1982D

 1983    7,752,355,000
1983D    6,467,199,428
 1984    8,151,079,000
 1984
1984D    5,569,238,906
1984D
 1985   5,648,489,887
 1985
1985D   5,287,399,926
1985D
 1986   4,491,395,493
 1986
1986D   4,442,866,698
1986D
 1987   4,682,466,931
 1987
 1987
1987D   4,879,389,514
1987D
 1988   6,092,810,000
 1988
1988D   5,253,740,443
1988D
 1989   7,261,535,000
 1989
 1989
1989D   5,345,497,111
1989D
 1990   6,851,765,000
 1990
 1990
1990D   4,922,894,533
1990D
1990D
 1991   5,165,940,000
 1991
 1991
1991D   4,158,442,079
1991D
 1992   4,648,905,000
 1992
 1992
1992D   4,448,673,300
1992D
 1993   5,684,705,000
 1993
 1993
1993D   6,426,650,571
1993D
 1994   6,500,850,000
 1994
1994D   7,131,765,000
1994D
 1995   6,411,440,000
 1995
 1995
1995D   7,128,560,000
 1996    6,612,465,000
 1996
1996D    6,510,795,000
 1997    4,622,800,000
1997D    4,576,555,000
 1998    5,032,155,000
 1998
 1998
1998D    5,255,353,500
 1999    5,237,600,000
 1999
 1999
 1999
1999D    6,360,065,000
 2000    5,503,200,000
 2000
 2000
 2000
 2000
 2000

2000D    8,774,220,000
2000D
 2001    4,959,600,000
 2001
2001D    5,374,990,000
 2002    3,260,800,000
2002D    4,028,055,000
 2003    3,300,000,000
 2003
2003D    3,548,000,000
 2004    3,379,600,000
2004D    3,456,400,000
 2005    3,935,600,000
2005D    3,764,450,500
 2006    4,290,000,000
2006D    3,944,000,000
 2007    3,800,000,000
2007D    3,666,000,000
 2008    2,600,000,000
2008D    2,800,000,000

Notes:
2009 Red   DEC 2008   CDN Value -
  Book     CDN Ask     Price Paid
  Value     Value       (profit)    CDN Note
Comments On Year
SUB-KEY, first struck Lincoln, Plentiful in all grades, highly hoarded, well struck, nice luster, usually
brassy color, can show alloy streaking, DDO's exist




Common in all grades, well struck, less common in higher grades than VDB, red BU very difficult to find

KEY Not too difficult in MS, slightly hoarded, GEM BU available, EF difficult to find, well struck,
counterfeits exist but same S as VDB


KEY The rarest Lincoln, desirable in all grades, usually well struck, common to see alloy streaking, widely
counterfeited. Look for raised dot in upper curve of S and a notch on upper serif on some issues, all
periods in VDB present and parallel serifs on S mint mark to authenticate
Common in all grades to CH BU by mintage, much harder to find in MS than suggested, red BU tough
and commands prices above book, tough to find in any red high grade condition, ignore book values as
buyers and sells pretty much do




SEMI-KEY Generally well struck, common in all grades thru GEM BU
Common in all grades to GEM BU

SEMI-KEY, Scarce date in all grades, well struck but not crisp, shallow rims, cleaned and retoned
popular, most MS are more BN than RD
Most softly struck esp in BU RD, cleaned and retoned popular
BU rare without spotting or other blemishes, well struck
SEMI-KEY, rare without problems such as corrosion or harsh cleaning, CH and GEM with any original
color are very rare, generally well struck,

Semi-key, moderately scarce, MS available but CH and GEM rare in RD, BN or RDBN, BU with pinkish
hue most common, RD or tangerine colors very rare, some die wear but well struck in center
Common thru EF, all MS grades available, BU GEM limited supply and usually not fully struck, other
grades usually well struck,
SEMI-KEY, scarce in better circulated grades and all unc grades, mediocre strike, BU rare and
widespread dipping occurred with subdued RD color, most BU barely make the cut to RD, most
examples are from worn dies
Common in all grades thru MS, BU GEM very scarce and well struck normally, most are poorly struck,
worn dies, shoulder weak due to metal displacement on reverse
Common in all grades to lower MS, all well struck, over-valued in 60's,
KEY date, scarce in all grades, generally better struck with full details, obv dies usually more worn than
rev dies, large population of counterfeit and altered coins, mintmark sits in a slight depression, no VDB
on bust truncation
SEMI-KEY (most scarce), tough in all grades, VF-AU tough MS short supply, reasonably well struck,
palnchet stock bad results in discoloration and spotting, uncleaned MS coins will be fairly dark, RD
designation almost impossible,

Slightly scarcer than previous P mints, low MS slightly scarce, CH and GEM very tough, superior detail in
hair and beard,
SEMI-KEY, Scarce to rare in all grades, MS up to 63 hard to obtain, CH and GEM nearly impossible, BU
will be deep red with good detail
Slightly scarce in lower grades, MS tough and BU very tough, usually well struck, but many from tired or
dies spaced too far apart


Common in MS, the finest coins are usually plagued with irremovable black spots, well struck, first year
for a new, superior master die the produced coins with excellent detail, mostly in the hair and beard
Common in all grades but MS (scarce), MS65 RD extremely rare, most are well struck, uncleaned MS
coins will show wood graining, beware cleaned and retoned coins they probably outnumber untouched
coins by a large number,


Common in lower circultated grades, VF-AU scarce, MS CH are scarce and GEM very rare, BU have
pinkish hue and usually weak strike, many cleaned and recolored coins exist, sharpness varies due to
some use of worn dies and excessive die spacing

Common in all grades to MS64 from BN to RD, well struck from new master die but not as good as 1916,
look for doubled die

Plentyful in lower grades, MS is scarce, fully RD rare, few sharply stuck with hair and beard detail, most
coins from worn dies, wood graining from poor alloy mix common
Common in low circulated grades, EF-AU available but may have been cleaned and retoned, in MS
sharpest stirkes are usually BN and the RD are a tad mushy, MS64 is about max grade, spotting a
problem, most minted from over-used dies, wheat stems usually merged with border
Common up to MS64, MS65 RD not rare, most well struck, MS often show spotting, first year for return of
VDB initials (on bust truncation)



Low grades plentiful, mushy coins from worn dies but 1918D worse, MS RD very rare
Advanced die wear, RD very rare, MS64 usually most advanced grade, EF is difficult to even obtain
Plenty MS RD grades to GEM and lower, well struck


Heavily worn dies, original red rare

Most are mod to heavy die wear, BU tend to spotty/blotchy, GEM is rare
Common in all grades, fully red 65-67 available
MS scarce, fully red gems very scarce, prob rarest fully struck, fully red GEM coin to be found

Worn dies MS60-62 common, CH and GEM very hard, perfect color and strike tough, BU pinkish,
blotchy, streaked usually
BU red easy, but usually spotty or indiffernt strike, sharpness usually absent, mod to heavy die wear esp
in mottos
SUB-KEYMintage premium, plenty in MS, fully red very tough, often wood grain due to poor alloy mix,
strong and distinct mint mark tough, most from mid to late die state with wear, often light definition on the
high points with worn dies, full details very rare


Coin is rarer than collectors suggest, the strong rev were highly hoarded
SUB-KEY, Moderate to heavy die wear, grades VF and higher scarce to rare, MS60-63 are common top
grades, RD 64 up fully struck examples very rare and usually have spotting with subdued RD color,




Common in all grades, fully red 65-67 available, slightly worn dies but plenty from fresh dies so pass on
worn examples
SUB-KEY, AU and MS tough, BU soft strike brassy color common, RED BU show soft strike, generally all
soft strike and mushy, worn dies, some have shallow mint marks, many have been cleaned and retoned,
filling in of wheatlines common, finding well struck and problem free coin almost impossible, AU can be
worth more than MS in nice shape

EF rising in price, RED BU GEM available pretty easy, look for distended doubled die on reverse top
motto (egg shaped dots between words instead of round)
SEMI-KEY, MS red very rare, varied die wear but better than other denver issues, most have defects,
right side weakness obv and rev due to non-parallel dies, O in one weak
SUB-KEY, VF-AU scarce, MS coins very rare, MS64RB more desired than MS65 RD, raised bar shaped
lump on neck is a variety (pretty common), no bright red known, subdued red, last year for prevalent
wood graining

Common in all grades thru MS65, most well struck, 5 is inconsistant, ignore poorly struck examples
MS usually mediocre quality, GEM is very rare, RD usually show soft strike and very rare with burnt red
color, look for RPM and doubled die with very thick date and mottos, next to the 1925D, it's one of the
worst in the series

Not many in VF up, MS coins are seldom pleasing, MS mediocre quality, RD are usually soft strikes,
GEM almost non-existant, one of the poorest made issues in the entire series

Most common issue GEM next to 1909VDB, be picky about BU common in MS65, most are good strikes

GEM BU very rare, most BU black spotted, advanced die wear for most, dark or dull red BU, color
irregularites

SEMI-KEY, scare in all grades, AU and MS very rare, MS red are soft and indistinct, well struck are BN
and RDRN and tough, worn dies
Common in all grades even in GEM, most are well struck
MS scarce regardless of quality, choice and gem very scarce, worn and erroded dies, AU is generally
prefered due to poor quality of MS, strike and sharpness usually poor
AU-MS are scarce, MS of mediocre quality fairly common, moderately worn dies but not bad, can be off-
color
Common in all grades, light red to brassy color in BU, well struck, good dies


MS very rare, BU very scarce, large and small S varieties, 4 RPM types, mushy coins from worn dies



Common in all grades, some die wear but generally good, most BU are dullish RD to RDBN, not
conserved well over time due to poor storage by collectors

Common in all grades, well struck, coppery red color in BU
Common in all grades, GEM RD scarce, most from moderate to heavily worn dies even in GEM BU, well
struck fairly rare, tough to find in red in any grade


EF-AU tough, moderate to heavy die wear, MS scarce to rare, indistinct lettering, distored wheat ears,
uncleaned coins are usually dark or spotted, usually weak areas however full details examples do exist
Common in all grades to MS67 RD, generally outstanding luster, most from early to mid state die easy to
obtain,
Common in most all grades, widely hoarded, quaility superior to previous S mints strikes since 1916, red
BU tough, most MS dark
Common in all grades, seek well struck coins as they do exist, color may be off a bit, some show
moderate die wear, widely hoarded, look for rare filled-in 0 variety
Fairly common up to Fine, EF-AU slighting tougher, GEM fairly scarce, mostly from fresh dies, BU
coppery red to brassy, often spotted from poor storage


KEY Scarce in all grades, usually well struck but not fully struck, cleaned or dipped prevalent, widely
hoarded so lots of good examples, some counterfeit coins, full details coins are in the minority

SUB-KEY, Fairly tough in circulated, MS scarce, MS63 and up rare, generally well struck, often spotted
with dull or unattactive toning. Harder to get in MS red than the 31S.
Common in all grades due to hoarding, slight to moderate die wear,
Slightly scarce in circulated grades, plenty of MS grades due to hoarding, slightly worn dies, lots of
sharply struck coins,

Generous quantity of MS grades, well struck GEM abundant
SUB-KEY, Scarce in circulation, common in upto MS64, sharp or only slightly worn dies, new larger D
mintmark started in this year
Common in all grades, almost all well struck (dies replaced often), millions hoarded by the roll

Common in all MS grades, strike and sharpness can be mixed, seek full details coins because plenty of
them exist



Quality varies, many weakly struck with irregular toning, finding a perfect gem with details can be difficult
Most are weakly struck, full details exist but are less plentiful, compared to others 30's cents, more
difficult to find a well struck example
Low mintage




Low mintage




Small and large mint mark varieties




Copper plated novelty coin only


Cracked die




Inverted mint mark, top of S is thicker than bottom
Difficult to find a clean one with no black spotting and O in one strong, dies were not treated properly and
cracked, chipped, and shattered after much fewer strikes than expected




Excessive die wear up thru 1955, wheat often poorly struck from over-used dies, left wheat often shows
die breaks
In 1962 the tin was dropped from the composition of the cent, leaving the composition 95% copper, 5%
zinc. Officially the 'bronze' cent had ended, and we went to a light alloy mixture of brass (which is copper
and zinc, but usually more than 5% zinc). Plagued with irremovable black spots, some are better than
others, but black spots seem to be consistently present




Steps from this issue are poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps


Steps from this issue are poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps


Steps from this issue are poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps
Steps from this issue are poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps

Steps from this issue are poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps

Tough in MS65, water stains and spotting common, even mint set spotted, Steps from this issue are
poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps

Usually spotted with hits, Steps from this issue are poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps

Steps from this issue are poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps

Steps from this issue are poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps

Steps from this issue are poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps

Steps from this issue are poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps

Steps from this issue are poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps

Steps from this issue are poorly defined, seek clear, well-defined steps

In 1980 the reverse design was changed to remove detail from the Memorial steps




Doubled die reverse, only 2 known
1982-1988 saw a large number of issues with the copper plating properly sticking to the zinc. They tried a
number of different types of wash to prepare the zinc for the copper bath, and finally rested with
something that worked somewhere around 1988 or 1989. 4 differenent types of 1982 of the cent were
made using copper and copper plated zinc with large and small dates


3 different types of cents were made for a total of 7 different types in 1982


Extra letters in motto IN GOD, parallel lines between N and G,
http://www.lincolncentresource.com/Featured/1983ExtraLetters.html
Usually spotted with hits, steps not finely defined like older issues
Close AM variety, watch for
Close AM variety, watch for
Look for Wide AM


Top of head typically flat from poor strike, seek full head/hair details
Look for Wide AM



Top of head typically flat from poor strike, seek full head/hair details
Look for Wide AM




Top of head typically flat from poor strike, seek full head/hair details, sharpness of mottos esp. obverse is
lacking on most




Top of head typically flat from poor strike, seek full head/hair details




Look for doubled ear variety
                                                  2008 Redbook TOTAL        $0.00

                                                  2009 Redbook TOTAL        $0.00




                                                       CDN ASK TOTAL        $0.00




From Q. David Bowers book, The Expert's Guide to Collecting &
Investing in Rare Coins : "For purposes of availability, I like to divide
Lincoln cents into four eras as follow:
* First Era (1909-1933) ...with relatively few exceptions, dealers,
collectors, and others did not set aside quantities for resale or
investment. This era contains ALL the keys to the series and was pre-
album/penny board days.
* Second Era (1934-1958) Each date and mint issue of this era was
saved in roll quantities. There were no key dates except the '55 Double
Die (a variety really).


* Third Era (1959-1982) Bronze with Memorial reverse.
* Fourth Era (1982-2008) Copper coated zinc with Memorial reverse.

				
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