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					                            Curriculum and Learning Goals
                              of the English Department




                           Curriculum and Learning Goals
                      of the English Liberal Arts Major (ENGA)

                  Approved by the English Department April 16, 2003

The English Department at The College of New Jersey promotes an atmosphere in which
students, through active engagement with faculty and with one another, develop their
understanding of the history, structure, and artistry of language and literatures. This
understanding will enhance students’ understanding of their own cultures, promote
inquiry into those of others, and facilitate genuine cross-cultural interaction. Students
will know, understand, and practice the current conventions for writing and researching
in comparative literature, creative writing, film studies, gender studies, linguistics, and
literary studies. They will, furthermore, be expected to construct, integrate, and critique
cultural and historical frameworks for literature and language.

Learning Goals

At the end of their program of study, ENGA majors should be able to

      demonstrate an understanding of the power of words by reading critically,
       interpreting responsibly, writing and speaking with clarity and grace, reasoning
       intelligently, and arguing thoughtfully and persuasively for a range of audiences
       and purposes;
      exhibit the kind of intellectual independence and sustained, critical thought
       required for the production of high-quality literary, linguistic, textual and/or
       rhetorical scholarship, using the current resources available for conducting
       primary and secondary research in the discipline of English;
      discover, assert, and insert their own critical “voice” in ongoing dialogues,
       critiques, and debates – both oral and written, general and specific – that
       characterize the discipline of English, including debates over aesthetic value,
       literary historiography, and disciplinary politics;
      apply linguistic, literary, rhetorical, and cultural theory to texts and their contexts
       in order to elucidate complex issues and to suggest additional avenues of critical
       inquiry;
      demonstrate their understanding of major linguistic processes and subsystems,
       appreciating the importance of data collection in language study;
      bring their understanding of language to bear on their discussions of writing,
       whether literary or otherwise;
      recognize the impact of cultural environments upon language, respecting and
       understanding language diversity;
      demonstrate familiarity with a significant body of texts within – and on the
       margins of – a variety of literary traditions (e.g., British, American, continental
       European, Asian, African, and Latin American); and
      demonstrate sensitivity to the concrete historicity of texts and to the development
       of literary traditions, cultural values, modes of thought, and uses of language over
       time.

As a result of this course of study, English majors should gain skills which are
transferable to other fields, including the abilities to appreciate how identity, background,
motive, and belief systems all influence individual perception; to frame and evaluate
complex problems; to work comfortably with ambiguity and with the relations between
the details of a system and its overall design.

Three Foundational Courses

As the first step in the English major, students will be required to take three 200-level
foundational courses. In these three courses, students will be exposed to a.) basic literary
methodology, b.) basic linguistic concepts and methods, and c.) issues of canon
formation, disciplinary politics, and multicultural literature. Through these courses,
students will receive the essential literary and linguistic tools that they will need to carry
out more sophisticated forms of literary, linguistic, textual, and rhetorical interpretation in
their later courses in the English major. These foundational requirements emphasize the
commitment of TCNJ’s English Department to a.) self-conscious literary methodology,
b.) language study and the usefulness of linguistic knowledge in literary study, and c.) the
importance of the social, cultural, and political dimensions of literary study.

The required 200-level foundational courses are

1. LIT 201 (Approaches to Literature) – an introduction to reading, writing, and critical
   thinking within the discipline. Students will become conversant with the essential
   terms of literary analysis, refine close-reading skills, and investigate current critical
   theory and methodology. A writing-intensive course, Approaches to Literature
   engages writing as a process and a mode of analysis, with attention to precision,
   clarity, craft, and appropriate research. By emphasizing widely applicable skills, this
   course will equip entering majors with the tools necessary for success in mid-and
   upper-level English courses. LIT 201 will be the entrance course for the major.

2. one course chosen from LNG 201 (Introduction to the English Language), LNG 202
   (Structure and History of the English Language), or LNG 211 (Understanding English
   Grammar). These courses all provide an opportunity for students to develop a deep
   understanding of the history, structure, and artistry of language. The courses from this
   group teach students to understand English grammars (and understand why
   “grammars” is plural and not singular); understand phonology, morphology, syntax,
   semantics, and pragmatics; bring their understanding of language to bear on their
   discussions of writing, whether literary or otherwise; recognize the impact of cultural,
   economic, political, and social environments upon language; respect and understand


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   diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups,
   geographic regions, and social roles; understand the evolution of the English language
   and the historical influences on its various forms; understand how to engage non-
   native speakers of English, or speakers of non-standard English, in productive
   dialogue about their language use; deepen their understanding of language acquisition
   and development; discuss language development and change; demonstrate their
   understanding of major linguistic processes; and appreciate the importance of field
   research in language.

3. LIT 217 (Multicultural Literature) – an exploration of how literary texts within this
   changing field of study reflect and/or challenge issues of cultural dominance,
   canonicity, assimilation, and the subaltern. By problematizing terms of study such as
   “multicultural,” “literature,” “race,” and “ethnicity,” this course introduces students
   not only to multicultural texts but also to debates over aesthetic value, literary
   historiography, and disciplinary politics. In this way, the multicultural literature
   requirement provides transferable skills, preparing students to question, and therefore
   understand more deeply, the structure, goals, and social contexts of literary study.

Three Courses in Literary History

The next step in the English major will ask students to build on the basic knowledge and
skills gained in the three foundational courses by taking three 200- or 300-level courses
in literary history – namely, three courses from a menu of options with an emphasis on
reconstructing historical contexts and examining literary traditions. At least one of the
three courses must focus on literature before 1660. The 200-level courses in literary
history, including LIT 231 (World Literature to 1800), LIT 232 (World Literature 1800 to
Present), and LIT 251 (British Literature to the Restoration), will foster sensitivity to the
concrete historicity of texts, introduce basic lexical and historical research, and/or expand
the body of texts with which students are familiar. The 300-level courses, on the other
hand, will enrich and complicate the students’ sense of literary history by focusing
students’ attention on specific historical problems and issues in the particular time
periods, cultures, or texts covered in the course (e.g., by putting discordant voices from
the same time period in dialogue). Both 200- and 300-level courses in literary history
will focus on the development of literary traditions, cultural values, modes of thought,
and uses of language over time.

Three Electives

To explore their own interests and to develop their own areas of concentration within the
English major, students will choose three electives in consultation with an English faculty
advisor. Individual students might, for example, choose to refine their skills in critical
methodology and/or expand the body of texts with which they are familiar by taking an
additional literary history course, a course on a particular genre, or a course on a
particular author. Other students might choose to further their understanding of the
artistic process, the writer’s craft, and the aesthetics of contemporary literature by taking
creative writing courses. Still other students might choose to further their understanding



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of major linguistic processes and subsystems by taking additional courses in linguistics.
In order to promote interdisciplinarity, students may, with permission, fill one of these
electives with a course in literature, linguistics, aesthetics, cultural studies, film, or
writing from another program or department at The College of New Jersey.

Two Capstone Upper-Level Seminars

Each student will complete a capstone requirement consisting of two upper-level
seminars (numbered LIT 499 or LNG 499), one to be taken junior year and one senior
year. Students will select these courses from a single list of research-, writing-, and
theory-intensive seminars. Each seminar will focus on a particular issue, writer, question,
or theme, or deal with comparative historical and/or theoretical problems. The upper-
level seminar in the senior year may be replaced with an honors thesis.

The English Liberal Arts major requires two upper-level seminars because the
department feels that circumscribing the “capstone experience” within a single semester
or course limits student exposure to advanced work. The research skills, methodology,
and learning goals which characterize the English major constitute ongoing, lifelong
processes, and it is important to have students identify themselves as serious scholars and
critical thinkers at different points of their undergraduate career. By including what are,
in effect, two capstone courses in the major, the English Department significantly raises
the level of intellectual inquiry for all our upper-level students, encouraging both juniors
and seniors to immerse themselves in the rigors and excitement of advanced work. This
structural change should have a positive effect on all mid- and upper-level courses. In
addition, LIT 201 and the two upper-level seminars provide three convenient checkpoints
for future assessment of the ENGA program.

In upper-level seminars (and honors theses), students will be expected to demonstrate the
same skills and understandings as in their earlier courses in the major (but on an
advanced level and in a more sophisticated and self-reflective manner). The upper-level
seminars will challenge students to conduct advanced research in the humanities by
building upon the basic research skills first introduced in LIT 201; foster the kind of
intellectual independence and sustained, critical thought required for the production of
high-quality literary, linguistic, textual and/or rhetorical scholarship; enable students to
discover, assert and insert their own critical “voice” in the ongoing, and often
interdisciplinary, dialogues, critiques, and debates that frequently characterize the
humanities; encourage students to apply a range of critical theories – linguistic, literary,
rhetorical and/or cultural – to texts and their contexts in order to elucidate complex issues
and concerns in the discipline and suggest additional avenues of critical inquiry; help
students think theoretically, moving beyond issues of textual analysis into more abstract
modes of thinking; cultivate a sophisticated understanding of issues of canonicity and
disciplinary politics; encourage mastery of essential concepts and terms of literary,
linguistic, rhetorical and/or textual analysis; and teach students how to prepare and
conduct primary research of their own and communicate their ideas and their findings
with precision and clarity.




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Limitations and Prerequisites

To complete the major, students are required to take a minimum of six 300-400 level
courses. All 300-level English courses will have one or more of the three foundational
courses in the major (LIT 201, LNG 201/202/211, and/or LIT 217) as prerequisite(s).
The prerequisite for upper-level seminars will be the completion of a minimum of 6
English courses in the major.




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                           Curriculum and Learning Goals
           of the English Education Majors (ENGT, ELEN, ECEN, DHEN)
                                  Effective fall 2004
                                       DRAFT


All English/Education double-majors (English Secondary Education, English Elementary
Education, Early Childhood Education, and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education majors)
have the same literature, language, and rhetoric requirements and restrictions outlined
above for English liberal arts majors.

English Secondary Education Majors (ENGT)

English Secondary Education Majors are required to take an ENGL course in literature
for young adults as one of their three literature, language, and rhetoric electives, and are
advised to take Shakespeare either as an elective or an upper-level seminar. As part of
the Secondary Education program, English Secondary Education majors are required to
take ENGL390 Methods of Teaching Secondary English and ENGL492 Teaching
Writing.




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                           Curriculum and Learning Goals
              of the Journalism and Professional Writing Major (ENGB)
                                   Draft, 10/02/02

Required (8 courses):

Introduction to Journalism
Introduction to Professional Writing
Research Methods
Media Law
Media Ethics
News Editing and Production
Advanced Reporting: Beats and Deadlines
Internship

Options (choose 3):

Press History
Topics in Journalism
Desktop Publishing
Race, Gender, and News
Topics in Professional Writing
Magazine Writing
Feature Writing
Future of the News
Practicum (by permission)

Elective (1):
One course, by advisement, from outside the ENGB offerings (e.g., creative or advanced
writing, literature, business, design, political theory, science and technology, international
studies).


Learning Goals

The student will be able to:

1.     As a journalist, research, write and edit news reports according to the practices
       and standards of professional newspapers and other news agencies.
       a.     Understand the functioning of municipal and state governments so as to be
              able to report on them.
       b.     Understand the rudiments of press law and ethics, such matters as libel
              and proper relations with news sources, and other requirements of good
              journalistic practice.




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     c.     Perform the basic tasks of electronic editing, including but not limited to
            the revision of copy, writing of headlines and picture captions, and editing
            of photographs.
     d.     Perform entry-level work at a professional newspaper or as a professional
            writer, as demonstrated by completion of a media experience.

2.   Produce material of professional quality conforming to the standards of
     contemporary professional communications, including news stories, features,
     newsletters, technical and business documents.
            a. Distinguish between journalism, public relations, advertising,
                marketing and management communications.
            b. Identify sources and gather information through primary and
                secondary quantitative and qualitative research.
            c. Adapt a body of information to various uses, including public
                relations, advertising, marketing and management communications.
            d. Adapt a body of information to various media, including print,
                broadcast, Internet, interactive and immersive media.
            e. Make appropriate editorial, aesthetic, ethical and technical judgments
                about the best way to present a particular body of information to
                specific audiences.
            f. Demonstrate knowledge of production practices.

3.   Demonstrate a focused awareness of ethical conduct in journalism and
     professional writing.

4.   Demonstrate an awareness of the assumptions about culture and gender implicit in
     choice of media, representations and focus in journalism and professional writing.

5.   Demonstrate sensitivity to the craft of writing through knowledge of the literary
     roots and traditions of journalism and professional writing.

6.   Explain orally and in writing the structure, principles, and history of the English
     language.




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