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DOWLING COLLEGE STUDENT TEACHER CANDIDATE

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					 DOWLING COLLEGE
 STUDENT TEACHER CANDIDATE HANDBOOK - Contents

 Introduction                                                            1
 Office of Student Teacher Placement & Certification                     2
 Mission of School of Education                                          3
 Student Teaching Policies and Procedures
    General Policy                                                        4
    Ethics                                                                6
    Activities and Expectations of Field Experiences                      7
    Role and Responsibility:
    Elementary Fieldwork                                                  9
    Special Education Fieldwork                                          12
    Secondary Education Fieldwork                                        14
    Physical Education Fieldwork                                         18
    Attendance Policy                                                    23
    School District Regulations and Protocol                             23
 Lesson Planning
    Lesson Planning                                                      24
    Questions Designed to Assist Lesson Preparation & Delivery           26
    Suggested Format for Lesson Plan (Childhood)                         28
    Suggested Format for Lesson Plan (Early Childhood)                   29
    Suggested Format for Lesson Plan (Secondary)                         30
    Suggested Format for Lesson Plan (Special Education)                 31
    Suggested Format for Lesson Plan (Physical Education)                32
    Sample Teacher Expectation & Evaluation Info. (Physical Education)   33
    Student Teacher Assessment Form                                      42
    PASS-PORT Overview:
    Sample Copy Field Supervisors SBO                                    43
    Student Teacher Candidate’s Midterm Reflection Form                  44
    Student Teacher Candidate’s Final Reflection Form                    48
    Student Response Form Field Supervisors Assessment                   53
    Student Response Form Cooperating Teachers Assessment                56
Elementary Education Supplement
    Philosophy, Elementary Education Seminars                            59
    Elementary – General Competencies                                    60
    Master List of Student Teaching Competencies                         60
    Student Teaching Tasks/Full Semester                                 63
    Professional Portfolio                                               66
Guide to the Framework for Teaching:
    Four Domains of Teaching                                             68
Introduction


This Student Teaching Handbook is designed for student teacher candidates’ who will be teaching in
schools during their teacher-preparation programs, either in pre-student teacher practicum courses or as
actual teachers of students.

Student teaching is a professional practicum experience, the foundation of which is a three-way
cooperative partnership between the college faculty (field supervisor and college professor and/or seminar
leader), student and cooperating teacher. In order for this triad to be effective, all three partners must
clearly understand their respective responsibilities and the policies of the School of Education.

The function of the professional triad is outlined in this guide so that each partner may be fully aware of his
or her role in this cooperative relationship. It is essential for each member of the triad to effectively
communicate, cooperate, coordinate and collaborate to assure success. Please read this guide carefully
so that you may effectively fulfill role expectations, responsibilities and recommendations.

It is our hope that your cooperative experiences will provide you with personal, professional growth and
satisfaction.

Thank you for accepting this challenge! We hope that you will find student teaching to be a rewarding and
enjoyable experience. The School of Education trusts that you will find this guide to be helpful in answering
many of your questions. Thank you and good luck in your professional endeavors.


                                                                                     Dr. Clyde I. Payne, Dean
                                                                                          School of Education

                                                                                         Dr. Patrick Johnson
                                                                                       Academic Chairperson
                                                                                         School of Education




Revised 11-11
K:edual/placement/studentteacherhandbook




                                                                                                             1
Office of Student Teaching Placement and Certification

The Office of Student Placement and Certification is located in the School of Education South Building on
Idle Hour Blvd. Oakdale Campus. The telephone number is (631) 244-3310. Kindly contact your Field
Supervisors directly at the phone number they give you. If you are unable to reach your Field Supervisors
you may leave a message at (631) 244-3310.

PROGRAM OF STUDY
Each certification program has a selection of particular courses and a sequence, which has been approved
by the state accreditation and/or certification agency. The student teacher candidate must follow the
approved program in order to be eligible to be recommended to receive certification. Undergraduate and
graduate students must obtain approved program information from their education and/or major advisors.
All undergraduate and graduate student teacher candidates’ seeking certification should meet with their
education and subject area/major advisors to discuss their program. Undergraduate student teacher
candidates will be assigned a full-time faculty advisor in their discipline. Please check with the School of
Education if you are unsure of your advisor’s name. Current graduate students are to see a graduate
advisor located in the Student Services Center, Racanelli Building, room 101 - Monday through Thursday
evenings (4:00-7:30 pm). New students must see graduate advisors at Fortunoff Hall, room 228.

CERTIFICATION: Teacher certification is a function of the New York State Education Department,
NOT Dowling College. The college’s role is to prepare students to be eligible to receive certification from
the New York State Education Department’s Bureau of Teacher Certification. The New York State website
for the Office of Teaching Home Page is www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/
REQUIRED NEW YORK STATE TESTS: LAST, ATS-W, and CST in all certification areas. Required
Workshops: Fingerprinting Workshop, Child Abuse & Neglect Workshop, Violence Prevention Workshop,
and Drug Prevention Workshop.

Who should be applying through Dowling College? 1. All student teacher candidates’ seeking
certification in Childhood 1-6 must apply through the college. 2. All undergraduate student teacher
candidates’ completing a degree in education must apply through the college. 3. A graduate student
teacher candidates’ who has completed the entire degree, or is projected to graduate by the end of the
semester the application is submitted. 4. A graduate student enrolled in the Childhood Program with
Professional Studies Options for Early Childhood Option can apply after 24 credits and their full time
student teaching (it is not necessary to have the degree awarded, but all grades must be in). Applications
are filed through DOWLING COLLEGE (TEACH ON LINE) with New York State to obtain Initial
Certification. Applications are available in the School of Education online www.dowling.edu - current
students - announcements. However, if student teaching is waived by the state, the student must apply
directly to the State Department.

Who should apply through BOCES of Albany? 1. Any student NOT completing student teaching
through Dowling College but has enough credits to be certified. 2. Any student NOT completing the entire
MSD, with the exception of the above-mentioned students in the 24 credit certificate program in Childhood
Education. 3. Any student applying for an extension or renewal of certifications. All questions should be
directed to the Certification Officer at (631) 244-3476.

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Mission, School of Education

The mission of the School of Education is to prepare educators who possess cognitive, affective, moral-
ethical attributes, which will empower them to take an active role in shaping and re-shaping the education
of children. The faculty of the School of Education will take an active role in supporting the education of
teachers by assuming the responsibility for establishing a program of study that includes:

           knowledge and competence in pertinent subject matter; a sound knowledge base.

           knowledge and understanding of content-specific and student-specific pedagogy.

           an applied knowledge and understanding of social issues, which emerge in a culturally diverse
            environment.

           a link among subject matter, critical reasoning, critical thinking and practical knowledge.

           knowledge of education technology and its implications.

           knowledge of theoretical foundations, which derive from research.

           knowledge of historical foundations of education.

           an applied knowledge of problem solving strategies.

           curricula that are responsive to today’s educational needs and reflect issues of the evolution of
            change.

           an opportunity to develop a professional capacity for continued self-learning.

           sensitivity to the academic, social and economic needs of children.

           the development of sensitivity to the use of language and how we talk to students, both in
            addressing personal issues and academic concerns.

           the development of the ability and confidence to take risks.

           a respect for all human beings and the integrity of others, including those of diverse
            populations and cultures.

           the acceptance of responsibility for our actions and their impact on the immediate environment.

           the recognition of the impact of moral issues on teaching behavior.



                                                                                                           3
General Policy

1.   The undergraduate student teacher candidate is required to have a 2.5 grade point average before
     going into the field. The graduate student teacher candidate is required to have a 3.0 grade point
     average before going into the field. The field assignment is for the full public or in some cases private
     school semester.

2.   Generally, a full-time student teacher candidate is not encouraged to carry any additional course
     work during this experience. However, there may be one or two courses still required for graduation.

3.   The full-time student teacher candidate will spend the full day, every day, in the classroom when the
     public or private school is in session.

4.   The full-time student teacher candidate is to sign in and sign out at the same clock time as the
     cooperating teacher does, and (whenever possible) encouraged remaining after school to help
     students who require extra attention or help the cooperating teacher. However, class/course
     schedules dictate fieldwork schedules.

5.   The student teacher candidate is expected to take advantage of opportunities to attend general
     faculty meetings. Decisions relative to the meetings and activities to which a student teacher may be
     invited rest with the administrator and cooperating teacher.

6.   While the needs of school children always have precedence over our teacher-training program, it is
     hoped that after a period of observation, the student teacher candidate will be able to assume the
     responsibilities of teaching two to three classes or lessons on a regular basis, under the guidance
     and direction of the cooperating teacher.

7.   During the student teaching experience, the student teacher candidate will report weekly to seminars
     in general methods and/or foundations and specific methods in the subject areas.

8.   The student teacher candidate is expected to conduct him or herself in a professional manner at all
     times and to conform to all of the rules and regulations of the assigned school and district.

9.   In relating to cooperating teachers, the student teacher candidate is expected to:

       a.    Accept suggestions, seek and act upon constructive criticism
       b.    Prepare lesson plans and submit them for suggestions and approval.
       c.    Seek information about students which will aid in understanding and guiding them in their
             learning activities.
       d.    Aid the cooperating teacher in all activities related to instruction and the total school
             program.




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10.   In relating to students, the student teacher candidate is expected to:

        a.    Maintain a professional relationship with the students both within and without the classroom.
        b.    Plan, prepare, and conduct classes in a manner sensitive to students’ needs and responses.
        c.    Maintain definite standards; be firm, fair, and consistent in matters of student discipline.
        d.    Treat all students with equal respect.
        e.    Demonstrate to students a sincere interest in their learning progress and offer
              additional help during free periods and after school.

11.     The student teacher candidate will be closely supervised by their cooperating teachers.
        Administrators are invited and encouraged to visit and observe the student teacher candidate in the
        classroom setting.

12.     The College provides regular supervision during the student teaching experience. Field supervisors
        from Dowling College will be making a minimum of four (4) observational visits. Observations may
        be more frequent depending upon particular needs and problems that arise. A post-observation
        conference and a written report will follow each visitation.

13.     If a student teacher candidate is unable to report to the assigned school, the following people
        should be contacted as soon as possible: cooperating teacher, college field supervisor, and the
        Director of Educational Placements.

14.     The student teaching progress is continuously and cooperatively evaluated throughout the
        experience by the college field supervisor and cooperating teacher. The college field supervisor will
        hold conferences with cooperating teachers to seek their judgment relating to the student teacher
        candidate’s progress. Cooperating teachers will be asked to complete and submit a mid-term
        progress report. Their progress report should note needs for improvement so the student teacher
        candidate may work on recommendations before the required final evaluation.

15.     Both cooperating teachers and field supervisors are requested to submit letters of recommendation
        for the student teacher candidate placement folder.

16.     the student teacher candidate may be invited to participate in recruitment activities in April of each
        academic year. These are official College activities, and student teacher candidate should be
        excused from their field experiences for the appropriate interview(s).

17.     Should any questions or difficulties arise during the student teaching experience contact the
        college field supervisor, or the Director of Student Placement and Certification, at (631) 244-3310.




                                                                                                            5
Student Teaching Ethics

As a student teacher candidate, you are a representative of the college you attend, the school in which you
do your student teaching, and the teaching-profession. Therefore, you have a responsibility not only to
yourself, but also to your students and your colleagues. The Code of Ethics outlined below is a standard to
be followed by student teachers.

1. Remember at all times that your main concern is the health, safety and welfare of your students.

2. Be responsible for the learning, growth and development of your students.

3. Do not demean, degrade, exclude from activities, or grant advantages to any student because of

    political or religious beliefs, race, color, gender or ethnicity.

4. Guide your students academically by regular classroom instruction exposing them to various points of

    view and providing an opportunity for the pursuit of independent learning.

5. Maintain a constructive and cordial attitude toward your students and fellow teachers.

6. Respect the authority of those in supervisory and administrative positions.

7. Do not disclose confidential information about your students that has been obtained in the fulfilling of

    professional duties, unless the disclosure of such information is required by law.

8. Accept counsel from colleagues whenever the occasion permits.

9. Accept the suggestions and constructive criticisms of your cooperating teacher and college field

    supervisor openly and in a professional manner.

10. Consistently strive for knowledge and growth within the teaching profession.




                                                                                                         6
Activities and Expectations of Field Experiences

Developmental Nature of Assignments
The field assignments and experiences preceding the full-time supervised student teaching assignment
present the student teacher candidate with the opportunity to learn the competencies needed to
successfully confront the challenges of teaching. The full-time supervised student teaching experience
presents the opportunity for students to demonstrate that they have, indeed, learned those competencies.

Necessarily, the student teacher candidate in their early field assignments must spend a considerable
amount of the time observing and assisting, whereas students in their full-time assignments can be
expected to spend more of their time taking on full responsibility for teaching. Decisions about the time to
be spent observing, assisting, and taking responsibility in pre-practicum field assignments, practicum’s and
clinical experience assignments should be made cooperatively among the student, the cooperating teacher,
and the college supervisor.

Each early field experience should be shaped by the cooperating teacher to help the student become
familiar with every facet of a teacher's role and every aspect of school life. The student teacher candidate
should become acquainted with the library, guidance, instructional support situations, administration, etc.,
as well as particular classrooms.

Early field assignments are usually taken in conjunction with one or more methods or other preparatory
courses at the college and, therefore, the student teacher candidate may occasionally have particular
assignments from their courses to carry out at the school site. Such assignments are never intended to be
intrusive on the school curriculum, personnel, or resources, and the cooperation of the classroom teachers
and others in helping to arrange for the completion of such assignments - when possible - is appreciated by
Dowling College. Any questions in this regard should be referred to the college supervisor as soon as
possible.

Supervised Student Teaching Activities and Expectations

Practicum and clinical experience students should be able to move rather quickly from observing and
assisting the cooperating teacher to taking responsibility for instruction. Responsibility should be light at first
and then gradually increase as the semester progresses.

While decisions about the rate of involvement of each individual student teacher candidate are made by the
cooperating teacher, college supervisor, and student teacher candidate together, elementary education
program student teacher candidates’ typically begin taking responsibility by teaching one or two subject
lessons a day and move toward the full day's teaching soon after the mid term. Secondary Education
Program student teacher candidates’ typically begin taking responsibility for teaching one class and then
add others as the semester progresses, usually being responsible for three classes after the mid-term. All
student teacher candidates’ should also be helped to take responsibility for all of the other features of a
teacher's day, including, for example, bus duty, homeroom, study hall, recess, and lunchroom. They should
also attend faculty and department meetings, IEP planning meetings, and parent meetings.



                                                                                                                 7
Field experience activities that relate specifically to academic programs, (Elementary, Special Education,
Secondary Education), and that are appropriate for the site, may be required by college supervisors. The
activities enumerated below may be considered suitable experiences.

        1. Plan and teach a unit.

        2. Develop a case study.

        3. Develop a graphic organizer for a text.

        4. Administer/score standardized tests.

        5. Design/administer informal assessment.

        6. Develop a learning center.

        7. Audiotape and self critique a lesson.

        8. Develop an IEP.

        9. Develop a portfolio of instructional devices.

        10. Prepare an outline for parent/teacher conference.

        11. Prepare an annotated bibliography of literature read and taught during the practicum.

Logs and Journals

The student teacher candidate is required to keep an ongoing log or maintain a journal of experiences in
the classroom. These may be submitted throughout the semester to the college teacher or seminar leader
who reads them and shares comments and reactions with the student. The log or journal is meant to be an
ongoing dialogue between student teacher candidate and supervisor and an instrument for reflection upon
the field experience.

Lesson Plans

The student teacher candidate who is involved in field experiences must submit lesson plans to cooperating
teachers before taking responsibility for instructing students. At a minimum, lesson plans must include
objectives, materials, procedures, assignments, and evaluation. Cooperating teachers and college
supervisors may require additional information, as well as provide input and feedback regarding lesson
plans. (See Appendix A)

*Lesson plans should clearly reflect the integration of the New York State standards.




                                                                                                        8
Videotaping of Student Teachers
Videotaping may not be conducted without securing special permission from the Office of Student Teaching
Placement and Certification. There are serious considerations which must be given to legal issues related
to confidentiality and signed releases from all participants. It is therefore recommended that professors
and/or supervisors do not require their student teacher candidate to videotape themselves teaching.

Substitute Teaching
Since substitute teaching is performed without benefit of a cooperating teacher, it is inappropriate as a field
experience activity. In an emergency, and/or a special situation, and with the full approval of the building
principal, a student teacher candidate may assist the school by substitute teaching, but not under ordinary
circumstances.

Teaching off School Premises
It is expected that activities for the student teacher candidate will occur on school premises. The student
teacher candidate involvement in activities, which occur off school premises, such as field trips, workshops,
conventions, etc., must be sanctioned in writing by the building administrator.

Use of School and College Materials
The student teacher candidate is encouraged to use materials available at the school and at the college to
enhance instruction, but must be certain to return them at the end of the field assignment. The field course
grade may be withheld if such materials are not returned.

Length of Field Assignments
Program differences and differences in accreditation requirements sometimes dictate differences in length
of field assignments, but as a general rule, all field experiences are scheduled for a full semester.


Student Teacher Candidate - Role and Responsibility - Elementary Fieldwork

Kindly note that the student teacher candidate must be fingerprinted PRIOR to their first field
experience. The undergraduate education student teacher candidate plan of study includes three field
experiences. At the undergraduate and the graduate level the field experience is one full semester per
experience. Field experiences provide the student teacher candidate with the opportunity to learn the
competencies necessary to obtain a teaching certificate. The student teaching assignment presents the
prospective candidates with the opportunity to demonstrate that they have, indeed, learned those
competencies. In the process of learning and demonstrating teaching competencies, students need to
observe practitioners in action, assist practitioners, and personally attempt the practices they have
observed and with which they have assisted. All undergraduate student teacher candidates are
required to obtain a Grade Point Average of 2.5 or higher. All graduate student teacher candidates
are required to obtain a Grade Point Average of 3.0 or higher.

               Elementary Program in the Human Development & Learning Department
                           Undergraduate Field Experience Requirements

The first undergraduate field experience EDH 3104 is an opportunity for the student teacher candidate to
observe and participate in a primary grade (1-3). Active participation for three mornings a week for a


                                                                                                             9
college semester is required. The student teacher candidate is expected to work with individual pupils, to
work with small groups, and to teach lessons to the entire class. This experience is in conjunction with a
co-requisite class EDL 3146. After approximately three weeks, observations of the student teacher
candidate will begin. Prior to this observation the student teacher candidate will become familiar with
writing lesson plans with proper behavioral objectives. Observations of student created lesson plans in
(language arts or social studies) at the third and fourth field supervisory visit. The student teacher
candidate is required to present a total of four lessons, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field
supervisor. The cooperating teacher will be requested to complete two evaluations, and will receive a one
and one-half tuition remission credits.

The second undergraduate field experience EDH 4113 is an opportunity for the student teacher candidate
to observe and participate in an intermediate grade (4-6). Active participation of three mornings a week for
a college semester is required. The student teacher candidate is expected to work with individual pupils, to
work with small groups and to teach lessons to the entire class. The experience is in conjunction with
teaching courses. The student teacher candidate is required to present a total of four lessons, which will be
evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. The cooperating teacher will complete two evaluations,
and will receive a one and one-half tuition remission credits.

The third undergraduate field experience EDH 4197 is full-time student teaching. The student teacher
candidate is to follow the teaching schedule of a cooperating teacher every day for an entire semester. The
student teacher candidate will participate in the normal daily teaching schedule. The more opportunities a
student teacher candidate is given to teach, the better educator he/she will become. Their experience is in
conjunction with a weekly teaching methods seminar. The student teacher candidate is required to present
a total of four lessons, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. The cooperating
teacher will complete two evaluations and will receive 3 tuition remission credits.

                           Early Childhood Undergraduate Program - Birth - 2

EDH 3160 – To fulfill certification requirements, the first undergraduate field experience is for an entire
semester, along with co-requisite class EDL 3146. This field experience requires the student to complete 9
hours of fieldwork in Pre-kindergarten /Kindergarten settings (total of 117-125 hours). An accompanying
seminar has modules in the following areas: (1) the development of thematic and activity plans; (2)
developmentally appropriate practice (NAEYC), as well as, the Learning Standards for Pre-k through Grade
2; (3) guidance for observation and participation during the field experiences, including student teaching
ethics and the development of positive interpersonal relations with students and teachers; (4) learning
processes, motivation, and classroom management; (5) developing successful strategies for teaching
children with diverse needs, including high need children, socio-economically disadvantaged children,
English language learners, and children with disabilities. The student teacher candidate is required to
present a total of four lessons, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. The
cooperating teacher will complete two evaluations and receive a 1.5 tuition remission credits.

EDH 4106 – To fulfill certification requirements, this second field experience is for an entire semester, along
with co-requisite classes EDH 4160 & EDH 4161 & EDL 4149. This is a continuation of EDH 3102 (Early
Childhood), which requires three half days of fieldwork, 9 hours per week (approximately 125 hours) in
grades 1-2. The student teacher candidate is required to present a total of four lessons, which will be




                                                                                                            10
evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. A cooperating teacher will complete two evaluations and
receive a 1.5 tuition remission credits.

EDH 4200 – To fulfill certification requirements, the third field experience is a full-time placement for an
entire semester. Students are required to follow a full-time teaching schedule in a New York State
approved private or public school setting five days per week for 15 weeks (over 500 hours) at two early
childhood settings. The first setting will cover the first seven weeks of the semester in Pre-k/Kindergarten
and the second setting will cover the last eight weeks of the semester in Grades 1 or 2. The co-requisite
class for the fieldwork is EDH 4201. The student teacher candidate is required to present a total of four
lessons, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. The cooperating teacher will
complete two evaluations and receive 3 tuition remission credits.

               Elementary Program in the Human Development & Learning Department
                             Graduate Field Experience Requirements

EDH 6378-6511 - Co-requisite EDH 6511 - to fulfill certification requirements, placement is required in
grades (1-6). Emphasis will be on integrating science and mathematics activities with other common branch
subjects (2 lecture hours and 3 mornings of student teaching fieldwork each week for a college semester).
The student teacher candidate is required to present a total of four lessons, which will be evaluated by a
Dowling College field supervisor. The cooperating teacher will complete two evaluations, and will receive
1.5 tuition remission credits.

EDH 6390 - to fulfill certification requirements, placement is required in a primary grade (1-3) for half of a
semester, and in an intermediate grade (4-6) for the second half of the semester. Students are to follow
the teaching schedule of a cooperating teacher. They are to teach three lessons a day, each day, for the
entire semester, and to participate in normal daily teaching activity. This experience is in conjunction with a
weekly teaching methods seminar. The student teacher candidate is required to present a total of four
lessons, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. Each cooperating teacher will be
requested to complete one evaluation, and will each receive 1.5 tuition remission credits.

       Professional Studies Graduate Program - Human Development & Learning Department

EDH 6371 - To fulfill certification requirements, placement is required in grades (Birth-2). One morning of
observation is required.

EDH 6372 - To fulfill certification requirements, placement is required in grades (Birth-2). One morning of
observation is required.

EDH 7357 and a seminar class - To fulfill certification requirements, placement is required three mornings a
week for an entire semester, grades 1-6 in a gifted setting. As the semester progresses the student
teacher candidate will work with small groups of students, work with student activities and introduce
lessons to the class. The student teacher candidate is required to present a total of four lessons, which will
be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. The cooperating teacher will be requested to make two
evaluations and will receive 1.5 tuition remission credits.




                                                                                                               11
EDH 7397 and seminar class - To fulfill certification requirements, placement is required three days a week
for an entire semester in Birth –2nd grades. As the semester progresses the student teacher candidate
should work with small groups of students, work with student activities and introduce lessons to the class.
The student teacher candidate is required to present at least four lessons, which will be evaluated by a
Dowling College field supervisor. The cooperating teacher will complete two evaluations and will receive 2
tuition remission credits.

                  Special Education Undergraduate Field Experience Requirements

All undergraduate student teacher candidates are required to obtain a Grade Point Average of 2.5 or
higher. Student Teacher Candidates must choose one of the following tracks:

       Childhood Education Certification in grades 1-6.
       Middle Childhood Education Certification in grades 5-9 (must have a subject area i.e. Math,
        Science, Social Studies, English, Foreign Language).
       Adolescence Education Certification in grades 7-12 (must have a subject are i.e. Math, Science,
        Social Studies, English, Foreign Language).

The first field experience EDS 2108 is designed to offer the student teacher candidate a part-time field
experience in a special education classroom setting (self-contained, resource room or inclusion classroom).
This field experience is in conjunction with a seminar course. There are 9 contact hours per week of active
participation - 3 hours/3 days per week for an entire semester. The student teacher candidate is required
to present four lesson plans, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. The
cooperating teacher will complete two evaluations and receive 1.5 tuition remission credits.

The second field experience EDS 3110 is designed to offer the student teacher candidate a part-time field
experience in a general education classroom setting or inclusion classroom. This field experience is in
conjunction with a seminar course. There are 9 contact hours per week of active participation - 3 hours/3
days per week for an entire semester. The student teacher candidate is required to present four lesson
plans, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. The cooperating teacher will complete
two evaluations and receive 1.5 tuition remission credits.

The third field experience EDS 4190 is accomplished in a special education classroom setting, (self-
contained, resource room or inclusion setting). This field experience is in conjunction with a co-requisite
teaching methods seminar course EDS 4193. This is a full-time field experience, which follows the
cooperating teacher’s daily schedule of 5 full days a week for an entire semester. The student teacher
candidate is required to present four lesson plans, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field
supervisor. The cooperating teacher will complete two evaluations and receive 3 tuition remission credits.




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                    Special Education Student Teaching Assignments – Graduate

All graduate student teacher candidates are required to obtain a Grade Point Average of 3.0 or
higher. Student Teacher Candidates must choose one of the following tracks:

       Childhood Education Certification in grades 1-6.
       Adolescence Education Certification in grades 7-12 (must have a subject are i.e. Math, Science,
        Social Studies, English, Foreign Language).

There are three options under the Graduate Program:

Option I: For Applicants seeking certification in Special Education who have completed a Baccalaureate
Degree at Dowling College with a MINOR in Special Education with at least one introductory course in
Special Education OR who hold a New York State Teaching Certification. This is a 30-credit program
requires two field experiences.

EDS 7424 - part time field experience in a general education or inclusion setting. There are 9 contact
hours per week, 3 hours/3 days a week for an entire semester. In conjunction with this field experience
there is a co-requisite teaching methods seminar class. The student teacher candidate is required to
present four lesson plans, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. The cooperating
teacher will complete two evaluations and receive 1.5 tuition remission credits.

EDS 7425 - full time field experience in a special education setting (self-contained, resource room or
inclusion classroom). This field experience is 5 full days a week for an entire semester. In conjunction with
this field experience there is a co-requisite teaching methods seminar class. The student teacher candidate
is required to present four lesson plans, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. The
cooperating teacher will complete two evaluations and receive 3 tuition remission credits. Other degree
requirements are completion of EDS 7497 Introduction to Research in Special Education and EDS
7498 Research in Special Education.

Option II: Applicants seeking certification in Special Education who holds a Bachelors Degree may
complete a 45-credit program (Liberal Arts Requirements), which requires two field experiences.

EDS 7424 - part time field experience in a general education or inclusion setting. There are 9 contact
hours per week, 3 hours/3 days a week for an entire semester. In conjunction with this field experience
there is a co-requisite teaching methods seminar class. The student teacher candidate is required to
present four lesson plans, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. The cooperating
teacher will complete two evaluations and receive 1.5 tuition remission credits.

EDS 7425 - full time field experience in a special education setting (self-contained, resource room or
inclusion classroom). This field experience is 5 full days a week for an entire semester. In conjunction with
this field experience there is a co-requisite teaching methods seminar class. The student teacher
candidate is required to present four lesson plans, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field
supervisor. The cooperating teacher will complete two evaluations and receive 3 tuition remission credits.



                                                                                                          13
Other degree requirements are completion of EDS 7497 Introduction to Research in Special
Education and EDS 7498 Research in Special Education.

Option III: Applicants seeking certification that hold a New York State Certification in Special Education
(Provisional/Initial Certification) may complete a 30-credit program. This program requires completion of
EDS 7496 Seminar Class in Severe Disabilities, which is a replacement course for fieldwork. Other
degree requirements are completion of EDS 7497 Introduction to Research in Special Education
and EDS 7498 Research in Special Education.


                Secondary Education Student Teaching Assignments – Undergraduate

All undergraduate student teacher candidates are required to obtain a Grade Point Average of 2.5 or
higher.

EDA 3127 - part time- 10 hours per week for an entire semester.

EDA 4196 - full time – five days per week for the entire school day for a semester.

EDA 3127 and its co-requisite EDA 3128 provide the student teacher candidate with their initial
experiences in curriculum development, methodology, and classroom management with topics ranging
from lesson plan development through lesson presentations to managing chronic misbehavior.

Since these courses provide the student teacher candidate with and introduction to methodology, it is
expected that during the field experience the student teacher candidates will be immersed gradually into
the practice of teaching. The part-time field experience consists of 10 hours per week (two hours each day)
for an entire semester. During this time the student teacher candidate work closely with field supervisors
and cooperating teachers at participating schools. It is here that the student teacher candidate is provided
with the opportunity to observe, discuss and practice those skills that are discussed in the course. During
the initial weeks of the term it is expected that the field experiences for candidates will primarily consist of
observing their cooperating teachers, as well as, other highly regarded teachers at the assigned schools.
The course requires focused observations that are coordinated with specific course topics and the student
teacher candidate is required to complete observation forms while in the field.

Since the student teacher candidate will not have received sufficient training to conduct complete lessons
UNTIL after the sixth week, it is recommended that they engage in small group work, and one-to-one
tutoring during the first few weeks. At the end of the fourth week, after the topic of the Anticipatory Set has
been discussed in EDA 3127 cooperating teachers are encouraged to provide the student teacher
candidate with the opportunity to develop the anticipatory set portion of lesson plans and to teach the
opening portion of a classroom lesson. By the end of the sixth week, after the topic of closure, it is
recommended that cooperating teachers and field supervisors provide the student teacher candidate with
the opportunity to take a more active role in teaching larger segments of a lesson. It is recommended that
the final two formal observations involve teaching complete lessons. However, the student teacher
candidate is required to present a total of four lesson plans, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College
field supervisor. Through the timely integration of course topics with field experiences, seminar discussions
become richer and more meaningful while providing the student teacher candidate with the opportunity to


                                                                                                             14
practice those skills that are addressed in the course. The cooperating teacher will complete two
evaluations and receive 1.5 tuition remission credits.

EDA 4196 - This experience consists of following the cooperating teacher’s schedule every day, five days
per week for an entire semester:

                2 Periods of Observation
                3 Periods of Teaching (If Science – two periods Teach/Lab)
                1 Period of Preparation
                1 Period of Duty
                1 Period of Lunch

EDA 4194 student teaching seminar class and EDA 4195 subject methods seminar class is attached to this
field experience. The student teacher candidate is required to present a total of four lesson plans, which
will be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. The cooperating teacher will submit two
evaluations on the student teacher candidate’s performance and receive 3 tuition remission credits.

                 Secondary Education Student Teaching Assignments - Graduate
All graduate student teacher candidates are required to obtain a Grade Point Average of 3.0 or
higher.

EDA 5306 This field experience will provide the student teacher candidate with their initial experiences in
curriculum development, methodology, and classroom management with topics ranging from lesson plan
development through lesson presentations to managing chronic misbehavior.

Since these courses provide the student teacher candidate with an introduction to methodology, it is
expected that during the field experience the student teacher candidate will be immersed gradually into the
practice of teaching. The part-time field experience consists of 9 hours per week (two hours each day) for
an entire semester. During this time the student teacher candidate will work closely with their field
supervisor and cooperating teacher at participating schools. It is here that student teacher candidate is
provided with the opportunity to observe, discuss and practice those skills that are discussed in the course.
During the initial weeks of the term it is expected that the field experiences for the student teacher
candidate will primarily consist of observing their cooperating teacher (s), as well as, other highly regarded
teachers at the assigned schools. The course requires focused observations that are coordinated with
specific course topics and the student teacher candidate will be required to complete observation forms
while in the field.

Since student teacher candidates will not have received sufficient training to conduct complete lessons
UNTIL after the sixth week, it is recommended that the student teacher candidate engage in small group
work, and one-to-one tutoring during the first few weeks. At the end of the fourth week cooperating
teachers are encouraged to provide the student teacher candidate with the opportunity to develop the
anticipatory set portion of lesson plans and to teach the opening portion of a classroom lesson. By the end
of the sixth week, after the topic of closure, it is recommended that cooperating teachers and field
supervisor provide student teacher candidate with the opportunity to take a more active role in teaching
larger segments of a lesson. It is recommended that the final two formal observations involve
teaching complete lessons. However, the student teacher candidate is required to present a total of four


                                                                                                              15
lesson plans, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. Through the timely integration
of course topics with field experiences, seminar discussions become richer and more meaningful while
providing the student teacher candidate with the opportunity to practice those skills that are addressed in
the course. The cooperating teacher will complete two evaluations and receive 1.5 tuition remission credits.
EDA 6362 - Advanced Methods of Teaching in Classrooms Grades 5-9. This part-time field experience
will provide the student teacher candidate with their initial experiences in curriculum development,
methodology, and classroom management with topics ranging from lesson plan development through
lesson presentations to managing chronic misbehavior. The part-time field experience consists of 8 hours
per week for an entire semester. During this time the student teacher candidate will work closely with their
field supervisor and cooperating teacher (s) at participating schools.

EDA 6392 - This field experience consists of following the cooperating teacher’s schedule every day, five
days per week for an entire semester:
            2 Periods of Observation
            3 Periods of Teaching (If Science – two periods Teach/Lab)
            1 Period of Preparation
            1 Period of Duty
            1 Period of Lunch

The student teacher candidate is required to present a total of four lessons, which will be evaluated by a
Dowling College field supervisor. The cooperating teacher will complete two evaluations and receive 3
tuition remission credits.

The following timetable is suggested as a guide for both the cooperating teachers and field supervisors:

        Weeks                                              Field Experiences
        1-3                                                Observations of cooperating teachers
        4-5                                                Continued observations, small group work,
                                                           opening of a lesson
        6-7                                                Opening and closing of a lesson
        7-9                                                Questioning skills, differentiating instruction
      10-13                                                Lesson presentations and assessment

Please note: a detailed descriptions of courses can be found in the Dowling College catalog.

                                 Mathematics (EDA 4196 and EDA 6392)

As a result of the requirements as set forth by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the School
of Education is requiring, effective the fall 2004, that an emphasis be placed on the development of the
assessment and differentiated instructional skills of all student teacher candidates seeking certification in
mathematics.

Assessment
The student teacher candidate will use formative assessment to monitor student learning and to adjust
instructional strategies. Formative assessment includes, but is not limited to, questioning strategies,
student writing, student products, and student performance.


                                                                                                             16
The student teacher candidate will use summative assessment to determine student achievement and to
evaluate the mathematics program. Summative assessment includes, but is not limited to, teacher-
designed tests, criterion-referenced tests, norm-referenced tests, portfolios, projects, and other open-ended
student products.

The emphasis for at least one of the formal observations must be on the use of formative and summative
methods to determine the classroom students’ understanding of mathematics and for the student teacher
candidate to monitor their own teaching effectiveness. Prior to the observation field supervisors are
required to conduct a pre-observation conference and to discuss the assessment objectives of the lesson.
During the post-observation conference the student teacher candidate will receive a detailed written report
that addresses the formative and summative assessment skills observed during the lesson. A copy of this
report must be submitted to the Director of Student Teacher Placement and Certification.


Diverse Learners

Teachers of mathematics use their knowledge of student diversity to affirm and support full participation
and continued study of mathematics by all students. This diversity includes gender, culture, ethnicity,
socioeconomic background, language, special needs, and mathematical learning styles.

The emphasis for at least one of the formal observations must involve the demonstration of the student
teacher candidates’ skills in teaching diverse learners. Prior to the observation field supervisors are
required to conduct a pre-observation conference and to discuss the differentiated instructional objectives
of the lesson. During the post-observation conference, student teacher candidates will receive a detailed
written report that addresses the skills to engage all diverse learners as observed by the field supervisor. A
copy of this report must be submitted to the Director of Student Teacher Placement and Certification.

Through the timely integration of course topics with field experiences, seminar discussions become richer
and more meaningful while providing the student teacher candidate with the opportunity to practice those
skills that are addressed in the course.




                                                                                                            17
                                           Physical Education

 Movement Science Department Physical Education Teacher Preparation Program Undergraduate
                              Field Experience Requirements

The first undergraduate field experience SMP 3812 is an opportunity for the student teacher candidate to
observe and participate in an elementary physical education program, typically grades (K – 5). Active
participation with a minimum of three hours a week for a college semester is required totaling 45 hours. The
student teacher candidate is expected to be involved in working with the teacher in the daily instructional
lessons. This field experience is only partial requirement for completion of this course. Additional
assignments and course requirements will disseminated in class by the assigned college professor. The
cooperating teacher will be requested to complete two evaluations, and will receive a one-half credit tuition
remission. Additional expectations and recommendations are provided (See Student Expectations
Elementary)

The second undergraduate field experience SMP 3822 is an opportunity for the student teacher candidate
to observe and participate in a secondary experience either middle or intermediate school or high school
grades (7 – 12) Active participation with a minimum of three hours a week for a college semester is
required totaling 45 hours. The student teacher candidate is expected to be involved in working with the
teacher in the daily instructional lessons. This field experience is only partial requirement for completion of
this course. Additional assignments and course requirements will disseminated in class by the assigned
college professor. The cooperating teacher will be requested to complete two evaluations, and will receive
a one-half credit tuition remission. Additional expectations and recommendations are provided (See
Student Expectations Secondary)

The third undergraduate field experience SMP 4832 is an opportunity for the student teacher candidate to
observe and participate in an adaptive physical education program for grades (K – 12). Active participation
with a minimum of three hours a week for a college semester is required totaling 45 hours. The student
teacher candidate is expected to be involved in working with the teacher in the daily instructional lessons.
This field experience is only partial requirement for completion of this course. Additional assignments and
course requirements will disseminated in class by the assigned college professor. The cooperating teacher
will be requested to complete two evaluations, and will receive a one-half credit tuition remission. Additional
expectations and recommendations are provided (See Student Expectations Adaptive)

The fourth undergraduate field experience SMP 4891 is full-time student teaching experience that is split
into two placements. One placement will take place at an elementary level grades (K – 5) for
approximately 7.5 weeks and the second placement a secondary level grade (7 – 12) for 7.5 weeks. The
order of the two placements is at the discretion of the school placement and/or college administration. The
student teacher candidate is to follow the teaching schedule of a cooperating teacher every day for the
entire placement. This field experience is in conjunction with a co-requisite teaching methods seminar
course EDH 4199. Additional expectations and requirements are provided (See Student Expectations
Student Teaching) The student teacher candidate will participate in the normal daily teaching schedule or a
minimum of 4 lessons per day in addition to any other administrative duties. The student teacher candidate
is required to present four lesson plans, which will be evaluated by a Dowling College field supervisor. Each
cooperating teacher will complete two evaluations and receive a one and one-half tuition remission credits.



                                                                                                             18
                                Dowling College
SMP 3812 Instructional Methods for Teaching Physical Education, Elementary

                Student Expectations Elementary Experience

Students are expected to:

Observe the organizational educational atmosphere
Describe the walls – bulletin boards posters floor design and facilities
Observe professional attire, demeanor, voice action, delivery, and student interaction
Observe class entrance procedures, attendance, instruction, and closure routines
Observe methods of instruction, verbal cues, teacher monitoring, feedback, assessment
Observe classroom management techniques, safety procedure, established rules, routines
Observe methods of transition, time of activity, types of activities
Identify the purpose of activity, identify the type of assessment

Students are encouraged to:

Converse with the teacher and ask questions concerning the lesson and general student characteristics
Inquire the developmental appropriate sequences for skills within the different grade levels
Inquire instructional strategies and modifications for low skilled students
Inquire classroom management tips and techniques
Converse with the teacher about school policies and procedures including grading, accident reports, school
safety etc.
Discuss administrative duties and community service projects or involvement
Discuss curriculum goals and objectives
Discuss methods of assessment and strategies to meet the needs of the student
Inquire about inclusion issues

Students are recommended to:

be involved with the lesson as directed by the teacher
be an assistant to the teacher as needed or requested
be professional and not a distraction to the teacher or students




                                                                                                       19
                                  Dowling College
     SMP 3822 Instructional Methods for Teaching Physical Education, Secondary

        Student Expectations Middle School or High School Experience

Students are expected to:

Observe the organizational educational atmosphere
Describe the walls – bulletin boards posters floor design and facilities
Observe and assist with class entrance procedures, attendance, instruction, and closure routines
Observe and assist teacher monitoring, feedback, assessment
Observe and assist with classroom management techniques, safety procedures
Identify the purpose of activity, identify the type of assessment
Identify the instructional methods used with respect to gender issues, competition, scoring, etc.

Students are encouraged to:

Converse with the teacher and ask questions concerning the lesson and general student characteristics
Inquire the developmental appropriate sequence of skills within a unit of instruction
Inquire instructional strategies and modifications for low skilled students
Inquire classroom management tips and techniques
Converse with the teacher about school policies and procedures including grading, accident reports, school
safety etc.
Discuss administrative duties and community service projects or involvement
Discuss the progression of the curriculum from elementary to secondary with respect to goals and
objectives
Discuss methods of assessment and strategies to meet the needs of the student
Inquire about inclusion issues

Students are recommended to:

be involved with the lesson and assist and lead a segment of an activity as directed by the teacher
be an assistant to the teacher as needed or requested
be involved with equipment set up, distribution of equipment and clean up.
be involved with the planning and assessment of students
be professional and not a distraction to the teacher or students




                                                                                                       20
                                   Dowling College
            SMP 4832 Instructional Methods of Adapted Physical Education
        Student Expectations Adapted Physical Education and practice teaching

Elementary and Secondary Placement Required
Students are expected to:

Observe the interaction and educational atmosphere of an adaptive PE environment
Observe and assist with student tasks and participation
Observe and assist teacher monitoring, feedback, assessment
Observe and assist with classroom management techniques, safety procedures
Identify the needs, goals and objectives of the types of students serviced
Identify the methods of adaptations used to accommodate student’s abilities
Converse with the teacher and ask questions concerning the lesson and student characteristics regarding
IEP
Inquire the development of IEP goals objectives and assessments
Inquire instructional strategies and modifications for various types of students
Inquire classroom management tips and techniques
Assist in instructional presentation, task monitoring and assessment
Assist with classroom management issues

Students are encouraged to:

Converse with the teacher in the planning and assessment of an IEP for an inclusion student
Converse with the teacher about appropriate modifications for students with various capabilities
Converse with the teacher about various safety procedures for students demonstrating harmful or
disruptive behaviors
Prepare and present warm up activities or fitness activities appropriate for the unit of instruction
Prepare and present an instructional skill complete with developmentally appropriate verbal cues
Prepare and present an assessment item for a specified task
Prepare an after school or recess activity or program to promote physical activity




                                                                                                       21
                                      Dowling College
                        SMP 4891 Student Teaching, Physical Education
                           Student Expectations Student Teaching

Elementary and Secondary Placement Required

Students are expected to:

1 Prepare daily lessons plans in conjunction with the district curriculum

2 Create an educational atmosphere that is sensitive to diverse learners

3 Provide age appropriate instructional tasks with appropriate progression and assessments

5 Competently monitor student behavior

6 Competently utilize appropriate classroom management techniques and safety procedures

7 Prepare developmentally appropriate lessons to address the needs, goals and objectives of the types of
students serviced

8 Appropriately design methods of adaptations to be used to accommodate student’s abilities

9 Utilize appropriate instructional strategies and modifications for various types of students

10 Develop an educational unit of instruction (approximately 6 – 8 lessons) complete with skills assessment
and grading criteria for evaluation

11 Create an informational or motivational bulletin board for the school Gymnasium

12 Demonstrate an act of community service by creating an educational flier or plan an event to advocate
awareness and promotion of physical activity




                                                                                                        22
Attendance Policy

The student teacher candidate is expected to be punctual for all field assignments. The school district
calendar is followed for all field experiences. Seminar classes, however, will follow the Dowling College
calendar. The student teacher candidate is required to sign in and sign out each day and to follow any and
all routines related to attendance procedures established by the cooperating school district.

In the event of an absence caused by illness or by other emergency, the student teacher candidate is
required to notify both the cooperating teacher and their field supervisor, giving as much advance notice as
possible. Absences are limited to (3) three during the semester. Absences exceeding three days must be
reported to the Director of Student Teaching Placement. Approval must be obtained from the Director of
Student Teacher Placement for any absences that are considered a special circumstance.

In the full-time student teaching experience, the student teacher candidate is required to be on duty at their
assigned school for the complete school day during the entire semester. Complete school day is defined
as the duty day for teachers in the building where the assignment is made. For example, if teachers are
expected to report to school from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., the same expectations are made for the student
teacher candidate. It should be noted that, in many districts teachers are required to be in the building
before and/or after the students report to school. The professional day also includes staff development
activities, faculty meetings, grade level or department meetings, and parent conferences.

CAUTION: The full-time student teacher candidate semester demands, and should receive, full attention.
The student teaching experience will require the student teacher candidate to be a teacher five days a
week, eight hours a day, for a minimum of 15 weeks. However, it will soon be discovered that the teacher’s
day does not end at 4:00 p.m. Preparation of lesson plans and the assessment of student work may
require continued attention far beyond the eight-hour day. To be successful in this apprenticeship, the
student teacher candidate may need to curtail other employment and/or coursework sharply. The office of
Student Teacher Placement and Certification requests that the student teacher candidate’s time and
energy be focused on this demanding but most exciting and rewarding experience.

School District Regulations and Protocol

The student teacher candidate is expected to adhere to the school district policies, rules and regulations
with respect to the following:

           Promptness – observing the hours required of the classroom teacher.
           Appearance and dress – in keeping with the generally accepted standards of the placement
            school community.
           Oral Expression – using exemplary diction, grammar and vocabulary to communicate
            effectively with teachers, supervisors, students, and parents.
           Attitude and work ethic – remaining open to direction from the district professionals.


                                                                                                           23
           Maintaining a professional and appropriate relationship with the students.

Professional Competencies

           Design lesson plans and unit plans (See Appendix A for a Lesson Plan Guide) to facilitate
            learning consistent with the diverse needs and interests of all students. Including students who
            present special needs and challenges.

           Teach lessons which demonstrate an ability to: provide subject matter instruction through
            diverse modes (including new technologies) appropriate to the age, learning styles and
            developmental stage of the learner; and to make curricular content relevant to the experiences
            of students from diverse racial, socioeconomic, linguistic, and cultural backgrounds.

           Organize and manage a classroom to support the growth and learning of diverse students.

Student Teacher Candidate - Student Interaction

Treat students with courtesy and respect

           Provide leadership
           Enforce rules and discipline equally
           Encourage responsibility and independence
           Facilitate varied motivational techniques
           Demonstrate varied questioning techniques
           Make direct eye contact
           Boost students’ self-esteem
           Model positive behavior
           Offer specific appropriate praise
           Allow all students opportunities to respond in class
           Communicate high expectations


Lesson Planning

Research has provided evidence that lessons that are organized with the following steps in mind lead to
better student learning. It is important to keep in mind that these steps are general and will not be present
in every lesson.


1. Select an objective at an appropriate level of difficulty and complexity, as determined through task
   analysis, diagnostic testing, and congruence with Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy.

2. Motivate instruction by emphasizing the learning task, its importance, and the learning that led to this
   objective (anticipatory set).



                                                                                                          24
3. Identify and teach main concepts and skills, emphasizing clear explanations, frequent use of examples
   and diagrams, and active student participation.

4. Check for understanding by observing and interpreting student reactions (active interest, boredom) and
   by frequent formative evaluations with immediate feedback. Adjust instruction as needed and reteach
   if necessary.

5. Provide guided practice following instruction by having students answer questions, demonstrate skills,
   or solve problems. Monitor and give immediate feedback and reteach if necessary to prevent students
   from practicing errors.

6. Assign independent practice to solidify skills and knowledge when students have demonstrated
   understanding.

7. Provide closure by involving students in summarizing what has been learned. Tie today’s learning in
   sequence with past and future learning.
                                                                                                   Source:
                                                                                      Madeline Hunter - ITIP




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Questions Designed to Assist Lesson Preparation and Delivery

These lists are offered as guides to assist the student teacher candidate and field supervisor to evaluate
lessons taught by the student teacher candidate.

THE LESSON
1. Does the lesson appear to have a particular purpose?
2. Is the purpose of the lesson defensible in light of an acceptable educational theory?
3. Is the purpose of the lesson clear to both you and your students?
4. Was the beginning of the lesson effective in establishing the purpose?
5. Do you vary activities without losing the aim of the lesson?
6. Are the outcomes of the lesson that the students achieve in agreement with those you had in mind?
7. Do you introduce the lesson in a way that quickly captures the students' interest and immediately
    involves them in the lesson as active participants?
8. Does the lesson possess unity?
9. Does the lesson challenge the students?
10. Does the lesson develop with reasonable continuity?
11. What methods of teaching did you choose to employ and why?
12. What alternative methods could you have employed and why did you choose not to employ them?
13. What was your overall strategy and how does it fit into your philosophy of teaching?
14. What effects do your teaching strategy and methods have upon your students?
15. How well planned was the lesson?
16. How did you maintain student interest throughout the lesson?
17. Did the students help to develop the lesson?
18. How effective and creative was the use of various instructional aids and materials?
19. How skillful were you in employing various methods and materials?

THE STUDENTS
1. What evidence is there that you are sensitive to the needs and interests of your students?
2. What evidence is there that you understand the developmental nature of your students' learning?
3. Do your students work cooperatively with one another and with you?
4. Are the students attentive?
5. Do the students actively participate in the lesson?
6. What evidence is there that you understand your students as individuals?
7. What do you do to facilitate learning for youngsters with disabilities?
8. What do you do to facilitate learning for youngsters from culturally diverse backgrounds?
9. What do you do to facilitate learning for youngsters from homes in which English is not spoken?
10. What do you do to facilitate learning for youngsters who are gifted and talented?
11. How do you teach to meet the individual differences that exist among your students that are related to
    learning?
12. Is there mutual respect among students and between you and your students?
13. How would you react to the lesson if you were a student in this classroom?




                                                                                                       26
THE STUDENT TEACHER CANDIDATE
1. Are you enthusiastic about your work?
2. Do you present evidence of thoroughly planning and preparing beforehand?
3. How did you develop the lesson so the students' interest was an inherent part of the lesson?
4. Have you established a pleasant working relationship with your students? How have you done this?
5. Do you have control of the classroom situation? What examples can you offer?
6. Do you implement effective teaching practices such as providing sufficient wait time after asking a
    question, maintaining students on task, etc.?
7. Are your questions thought provoking?
8. Do you encourage thinking of various sorts (convergent, divergent, evaluative, etc.) whichever and
    whenever appropriate?
9. Do you promote student discussion about ideas being developed?
10. Are your questions well worded?
11. Do you build upon your students' ideas?
12. Do you encourage students to question one another and discuss with each other?
13. Is your voice clear and well modulated?
14. Do you use instructional materials to promote critical thinking?
15. Are your teaching techniques and methods best suited for the teacher-learning circumstances
    involved?
16. Do you employ a variety of participatory methods?
17. Are assignments given with clarity?
18. Are assignments intended to reinforce or extend learning beyond the classroom?
19. What evidence is there that your practices are consistent with your verbalized beliefs?

THE SUBJECT MATTER
1. Does your knowledge of the subject extend beyond that of the textbook?
2. Do you relate the subject matter to other disciplines where appropriate?
3. Is the nature and structure of the discipline reflected in the organization and presentation of the subject
   matter?
4. Does the subject matter as taught have value for this class?
5. Are the concepts to be learned related to the students' past and future experiences?
6. Is subject matter presented in ways such that students critically examine and think through the subject?
7. Do you thoroughly understand the subject so you can apply the concept (make connections)?

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
1. Are routine matters, such as handling papers and taking attendance, reduced to minimum of time?
2. Is the room adequately lighted, ventilated, and attractive?
3. Was the room arranged in a way to facilitate the accomplishment of the objectives?
4. If available, were teachers' aides effectively employed?




                                                                                                           27
Dowling College - Suggested Format for Childhood Lesson Plan

The following components can be used for planning by the student teacher candidate; all are not essential
to every lesson but should be considered and utilized when applicable.

GRADE LEVEL:____________________________________ DATE: ___________________

SUBJECT:_________________________________________ COURSE:_________________

OBJECTIVES: The teacher states what is expected to be learned by the end of the lesson and understand
why it is important and/or useful.

NEW YORK STATE STANDARDS – State standards applicable to the lesson. In addition, include
standard that are addressed by cross curricular elements of the objective.

MATERIALS: Include any resources, text, equipment and / or type of technology.

PROCEDURES - This section outlines the procedures (steps) you will use to reach the lesson’s objectives.
This section should be fairly detailed.

1. MOTIVATION:      Anticipatory Set
                    Activates prior knowledge
                    Involves all learners
                    Connects lesson to the instructional objectives
                    Arouses curiosity

2. LESSON (include plans for differentiation/adaptation)
               Teacher input
               Modeling
               Student participation
               Check for understanding
               Guided practice
               Independent practice
               Reinforcement (possibly homework)

3. CLOSURE
                    Recap the lesson objectives
                    All students are actively involved

ASSESSMENT/METHOD OF EVALUATION - What evidence that objectives were met?

EXTENSION – What is the next step?
Lesson Plan Reflections – prior to presentation of lesson – what questions come to mind?



                                                                                                      28
Dowling College - Suggested Early Childhood Activity Plan Format

                                ACTIVITY PLAN FORMAT - Early Childhood


NAME: ____________________________________________________ DATE:___________________


ACTIVITY: ____________________________________________________________________________


INTENDED AGE GROUP: ______________________________________________________________

Whole class / small group / individual activity?

(Circle appropriate grouping)


OBJECTIVE (S): What is the purpose of the activity?

NEW YORK STATE STANDARDS:

RATIONALE: What has happened to bring the group/individuals to the present activity?


MOTIVATION: What will you do to attract the interest of the children and set the scene?

MATERIALS: What materials will you use to meet your objective(s)?

PROCEDURE: What steps will you follow to meet your objective(s)?


ASSESSMENT: How do you know if your objectives have been met with each child?


FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITES: What next?


TEACHER REFLECTIONS: What worked? What would you do differently?




                                                                                          29
Dowling College - Suggested Format for Secondary Education Lesson Plan

DATE:

TOPIC:


OBJECTIVES:


RELATED STANDARDS:


(Content:)


MATERIALS:

(Motivation:)


PROCEDURES:


INTRODUCTION


LESSON


CLOSURE


ASSIGNMENTS:


ASSESSMENT:


REFLECTION: (This is completed after the presentation)




                                                                         30
Dowling College - Suggested Format for Special Education Lesson Plan

NAME________________________________                      DATE__________________


SUBJECT      TOPIC


CONCEPT      GRADE LEVEL



NEW YORK STATE STANDARD(S)



BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES



MATERIALS NEEDED



MOTIVATION (ANTICIPATORY SET)



PROCEDURE



(INPUT---MODELING---CHECK FOR UNDERSTANDING---GUIDED PRATICE)



CLOSURE



INDEPENDENT PRACTICE


EVALUATION




                                                                               31
Dowling College - Suggested Lesson Plan for Physical Education

Movement Science Department Physical Education Teacher Preparation

The following components should be used for planning by the student teacher
candidate.

GRADE LEVEL:___________________                       DATE: _________________

UNIT OF INSTRUCTION____________                      SKILL___________________

LESSON NUMBER            ____________        # OF LESSONS IN UNIT__________

OBJECTIVES: The teacher states what is expected to be learned by the end of the
lesson and understand why it is important and/or useful. Include all three learning
domains.

NEW YORK STATE STANDARDS – State standards applicable to the lesson. In
addition, include standard that are addressed by cross curricular elements of the
objective.

MATERIALS: Include any resources, text, equipment and / or type of technology.

Lesson            Class set up              Procedure             Teaching Cues
Sequence
List the lesson   Diagram of the            Explanation of each   Instructional cues /
activities        student & teacher         activity (detailed)   feedback
                  location


CLOSURE:

                     Recap the lesson objectives

       All students are actively involved

ASSESSMENT/METHOD OF EVALUATION - What evidence that objectives were
met? Review procedures or review of lesson activity

TEACHER REFLECTIONS: What worked? What would you do differently?




                                                                                         32
            Teacher Expectations: Physical Education Elementary Experience

               Movement Science Department Physical Education Teacher Preparation

For the first experience pre-service teachers are expected to gain an awareness of the physical education
learning environment.

Teacher expectations:

1 Acquaint student with the philosophy of the gymnasium as a learning environment.

2 Provide the rationale for establishment of rules, for student safety and management.

3 Orient the pre-service teacher with effective classroom procedures such as but not limited to entrance,
attendance, distribution of equipment, and collection.

4 Demonstrate instructional task presentation consistent with developmental age of the student.

5 Demonstrate effective methods of transition from one activity to the next.

6 Assist in the identification of the lesson objective and assessment.

7 Converse with the pre-service teacher and encourage the procedure of asking questions to further the
learning experience.

8 Assist the pre-service teacher with appropriate sequencing of tasks that are appropriate for various grade
levels.

9 Assist the pre-service teacher understand the various learning styles of students and various ways
students learn.

10 Assist the pre service with understanding the various clerical and “duty” responsibilities that may be
required.

11 If appropriate, allow student to assist with instructional monitoring of games or game-like situations.

12 Encourage pre-service teacher to reflect on instructional practices observed for purposes of continuous
improvement.

13 Encourage pre-service teacher to become involved in continuous professional development.




                                                                                                             33
            Teacher Expectations: Physical Education Secondary Experience

Movement Science Department Physical Education Teacher Preparation

For the secondary placement pre-service teachers are expected to gain experience in lesson planning and
presentation

Teacher expectations

1 Acquaint student with the philosophy of the gymnasium as a learning environment.

2 Provide the pre-service teacher with effective classroom procedures such as but not limited to locker
room behavior and observation, attendance, distribution of equipment, and collection.

3 Provide pre-service teacher with grading criterion and assessment items.

4 Demonstrate instructional task presentation consistent with developmental age of the student.

5 Demonstrate various instructional methods that address sensitivity toward students with varied skills
abilities and maturity levels.

6 Assist in the identification of the lesson objective and assessment items used for grading.

7 Converse with the pre-service teacher and encourage the procedure of asking questions to further the
learning experience.

8 Assist the pre-service teacher with appropriate sequencing of tasks that are appropriate for various grade
levels and maturity levels.

9 Assist the pre-service teacher understand the various learning styles of students and various ways
students learn.

10 Discuss classroom management issues and motivational opportunities for students that do not
participate.

11 Assist the pre service with understanding the various clerical and “duty” responsibilities that may be
required.

12 Allow the pre-service teacher to assist with instructional monitoring of games or game-like situations.

13 Allow the pre-service teacher to plan and implement instructional segment of a lesson.

14 Allow pre-service teacher to assist in the assessment of student learning.




                                                                                                             34
15 Encourage pre-service teacher to reflect on way to improve instructional practices observed for
purposes of continuous improvement.

16 Provide feedback for the pre-service teacher and articulate methods of improvement.

17 Encourage pre-service teacher to become involved in continuous professional development.




                                                                                                     35
          Teacher Expectations: Physical Education Adapted Field Experience

Movement Science Department Physical Education Teacher Preparation

(Idealistically an Elementary and Secondary Placement is required)

For the adapted placement pre-service teachers are expected to gain experience in appropriate lesson
planning, presentation, assessment and evaluation of student learning.

Teacher expectations

1 Acquaint student with the philosophy of inclusion and self-contained classroom.

2 Provide the pre-service teacher with effective classroom procedures such as but not limited to student
safety, IEP goals, distribution of equipment, and collection.

3 Provide pre-service teacher with evaluation criterion and assessment opportunities.

4 Demonstrate instructional task presentation consistent with the varied abilities.

5 Demonstrate various instructional methodology that address sensitivity to the varied abilities.

6 Assist in the planning of a sequenced lesson for students with varied abilities.

7 Converse with the pre-service teacher and encourage the procedure of asking questions to further the
learning experience.

8 Assist the pre-service teacher with appropriate classroom management procedures.

9 Assist the pre-service teacher with understanding the various learning styles of students and various
ways students learn.

10 Discuss safety procedures if a child displays an episode of self abuse.

11 Assist the pre service with understanding the various clerical and “duty” responsibilities that may be
required.

12 Allow the pre-service teacher to assist with instructional monitoring of instructional tasks.

13 Allow the pre-service teacher to plan and implement instructional segment of a lesson.

14 Allow pre-service teacher to assess student learning.




                                                                                                            36
15 Encourage pre-service teacher to reflect on way to improve instructional practices observed for
purposes of continuous improvement.

16 Provide feedback for the pre-service teacher and articulate methods of improvement.

17 Encourage pre-service teacher to become involved in continuous professional development.




                                                                                                     37
 Teacher Evaluation Form for Student Observation Elementary - Physical Education

               Movement Science Department Physical Education Teacher Preparation

Name of Student_____________________________________________

Cooperating Teacher__________________________________________

Directions: Please take a moment to comment on the attendance, attitude and actions of the Dowling
College Student. In addition please comment or elaborate on any situation that you may have concerns or
compliments. Your assistance is greatly appreciated.



Attendance 1 – not typically 2 – typically 3 - always

Observing student is present and prompt for arranged times for observation              1     2    3

Observing student is dressed professionally                                             1     2    3

Observing student is attentive to the surrounding                                       1     2    3

Attitude and Demeanor

Observing student appears to be interested in the learning environment                  1     2    3

Observing student appears to be concerned with proper instructional presentation        1     2    3

Observing students displays a good sense of professionalism when students

are present                                                                             1     2    3

Observing student maintains a good sense of professionalism toward school officials     1     2   3

Observing student maintains proper personal hygiene and is well groomed                 1     2    3

Observing student demonstrates observable concern to others                             1     2    3

Actions

Observing student demonstrates a willingness to be involved with the

learning process                                                                        1    2    3


                                                                                                       38
Observing student demonstrates an eagerness to extend the learning

environment                                                                      1   2   3

Observing student demonstrates a desire to reflect on the learning environment

for purposes of continuous improvement                                           1   2   3

Comments :



Upon Completion Please Return to:

                                            Dowling College

                                            Dr. Maria Macarle

                                          School of Education

                                             Idle Hour Blvd

                                           Oakdale NY 11796




                                                                                             39
Teacher Evaluation Form for Student Observation Physical Education

Secondary /Adapted

Movement Science Department Physical Education Teacher Preparation

Name of Student_____________________________________________

Cooperating Teacher__________________________________________

Directions: Please take a moment to comment on the attendance, attitude and actions of the
Dowling College Student. In addition please comment or elaborate on any situation that you may
have concerns or compliments. Your assistance is greatly appreciated

Attendance                      1 – not typically 2 – typically 3 - always

Student is present and prompt for arranged times                                  1     2   3

Student is dressed professionally                                                 1     2   3

Student is attentive during class time and seeks ways to become

involved in the learning experience                                               1     2   3

Attitude and Demeanor

Student takes initiative to be involved as an instructional assistant             1     2   3

Student takes initiative to be involved with clerical and managerial tasks        1     2   3

Students displays a good sense of professionalism toward students                 1     2   3

Student demonstrates action consistent with a genuine concern for others          1     2   3

learning capabilities

Actions

Student take initiative to plan an appropriate activity for an instructional

segment of the lesson                                                             1     2   3




                                                                                                 40
Student makes a conscientious effort to present an instructional activity.   1   2   3

Student demonstrates an acceptance of feedback for purposes of improvement   1   2   3

Comments :



Upon Completion Please Return to:

                                               Dowling College

                                              Dr. Maria Macarle

                                             School of Education

                                                Idle Hour Blvd

                                             Oakdale NY 11796




                                                                                         41
Student Teacher Candidate Assessment Form

Name:________________________________________                 Date:____________

Observation Number:_____________________________              Course:___________


PLANNING AND PREPARATION: (Objective for lesson, Plan for Instruction, Standards Met, Teaching
Methods Employed, Resources Used Beyond Text, Cross Curricular Element, Concrete Plan for those who
Finish, Plan for Closure, Plan for Differentiation, Criteria for Assessment and Lesson Extension.)




CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT: (Anticipatory Set, Activating Prior Knowledge and Arousing Curiosity,
Children’s Receptiveness to Teacher and Response to Lesson, Teacher Flexibility and Responsiveness to
Children.)




INSTRUCTION: (Higher Level Questions Asked, Communicates Clearly and Accurately, Classroom
Management Skills, Evidence of Classroom Control, Use of Creativity, Teaching Style and Achievement of
Objective, Use of Technology.)




PROFESSIONALISM: (Dresses and Acts in a Professional Way, Interesting in Teaching, Acceptance of
Constructive Suggestions, and Communication with Supervisor.)




HIGHLIGHTS OF LESSON:




AREAS TO FOCUS ON IN LESSON AND GROWTH AS A TEACHER:




                                                                                                   42
PASS-PORT Overview

Dowling College School of Education has elected to utilize PASS-PORT, a web-based system for collecting
data on our student teacher candidates’ performance in the field. Field Supervisors, Cooperating Teachers
and Student Teacher Candidates will use PASS-PORT to complete their evaluation forms. These forms
make up the necessary components in Dowling College School of Education and as a student teacher
candidate your input is pivotal in order to gain as much valuable information as possible. These forms will
be attached to your student’s profile. The information is also being stored in a data pool for Dowling
College to access at anytime.

You are required to open your Dowling College e-mail and follow the instruction letter to log on to the
PASS-PORT System. You are also required to e-mail the “link” to you Cooperating Teacher and complete
the Candidate Midterm and Final Self-Reflection Forms. These Self-Reflection Forms are to be completed
two weeks prior to completion of your field experience. In addition, you are required to complete the
Student Evaluation Forms of your Cooperating Teacher and Field Supervisor.

If you have problems accessing or filling out the forms, please e-mail helpdesk@pass-port.org with a
description of the problem you are experiencing.




                                                                                                        43
File




       44
    DOWLING COLLEGE STUDENT TEACHER PLACEMENT AND CERTIFICATION
                  CANDIDATE’S MIDTERM REFLECTION

Candidate: ___________________________________ Course #: _______Subject:___________

Cooperating Teacher:___________________________ School District:____________________

Field Supervisor: _______________________________ Date:___________________________

Please describe yourself in terms of your knowledge and understandings as a facilitator of student learning
(descriptors provided below).

Key Knowledge and/or Understandings of Facilitators of Student Learning
    1.    Working knowledge and understanding of human learning and development
    2.    Working knowledge of diverse populations of students
    3.    Working knowledge and understanding of learning theories and concepts
    4.    Working knowledge and understanding of credible evidence and assessment of student learning and achievement
    5.    Working knowledge of conceptualizations of teaching and the teaching-learning process
    6.    Working knowledge of the role of the teacher as a facilitator of student learning and achievement
    7.    Working knowledge of technology and the uses of technology in facilitating learning and achievement
    8.    Working knowledge of techniques-tactics for managing digital and classroom environments
    9.     Knowledge of inquiry-based pedagogy
    10.    Knowledge of the development of students as lifelong learners
    11.    Knowledge of content areas (subject matter) and related standards
    12.    Knowledge of researched models of teaching-learning
    13.    Awareness of ways of working with families, students, administrators and colleagues
    14.    Awareness of circumstances and/or contextual factors or situations that affect and effect peoples’ lives and their ability
          to learn




                                                                                                                                 45
Please describe yourself in terms of your key skills, abilities, and pedagogical actions as a
facilitator of student learning (descriptors provided below).

Key Skills, Abilities, and Pedagogical Actions:

       1.    Observes, describes, analyzes, evaluates, and documents work
       2.    Critically reflects on work with peers, students, colleagues and parents
       3.    Identifies what is relevant and irrelevant in designated situations
       4.    Identifies and diagnoses errors and/or problems -- corrects errors, provides feedback, and assesses and
             evaluates performances
       5.    Designs generic and subject - specific tasks and environments to facilitate learning
       6.    Manages both active digital and classroom environments directed at stimulating student interest and student
             learning*
       7.    Assists and engages students to find, select, evaluate, make judgments about information and digital sources
       8.    Maintains social and intellectual climate to encourage learning in both classroom and digital environments*
       9.    Organizes and presents ideas and concepts in a logical and coherent manner
       10.   Provides and solicits via questions - explanations, rationales, credible evidence and justifications
       11.   Works in groups and with teams of individuals, as well as, works independent of others
       12.   Conducts critiques, reflections and evaluations
       13.   Interprets and translates research, facts, concepts, and ideas into actions
       14.   Learns something new or unfamiliar
       15.   Anticipates problems, obstacles, situations or events and designs or demonstrates
       16.   Ways to effectively achieve successful outcomes or solve problems




Judgment

       1.    Knows that about the process of reasoning and use of learned intuition in situations of uncertainty or situations
             that require judgment
       2.    Knows how to reason and use learned intuition in situations of uncertainty or situations that require judgment
       3.    Knows when to reason and use learned intuition in situations of uncertainty
       4.    Reasons and uses learned intuition in situations of uncertainty
       5.    Distinguishes what is relevant and irrelevant
       6.    Perceives situations from many different perspectives
       7.    Knows what constitutes credible evidence and makes judgments concerning the quality and trustworthiness of
             something or information
       8.    Discerns credible evidence, or discerns what is authentic, truthful or reasonably accurate




                                                                                                                             46
        9.   Renders good judgment and good educational judgments in classroom and digital environments




Please describe yourself in terms of your key traits and dispositions as a facilitator of student learning
(descriptors provided below).

Compassion

        1.   Sensitive to the thoughts and feelings of others
        2.   Thoughtful about the consequences of actions and the effect on others
        3.   Empathizes with others, commiserates, and sympathizes*
        4.   Shows kindness and forgiveness when appropriate
        5.   Pays close attention to the needs of others
        6.   Connects and relates professionally with the emotional lives of others
        7.   Establishes, on a consistent basis, relations of care/compassion in an array of situations and in an array
             environments with all students, parents, and colleagues*




Innovation

        1.   Creates, invents or synthesizes in simple ways and/or in conceptually complex ways and assists other to do so
        2.   Searches to find something that is deemed relevant or meaningful to a situation and uses it in a new way
        3.   Sees, perceives and/or does something in a different way to improve a situation or make something better
        4.   Explores, experiments and discovers, as well as, assists others to do so
        5.   Makes metaphors and analogies, as well as, assists others in similar acts or activities




                                                                                                                             47
        6.    Designs or creates a new product




Leadership

        1.    Takes initiative, responsibility and accepts level of accountability
        2.    Builds trust and rapport with others
        3.    Demonstrates confidence in self and others
        4.    Undertakes classroom diagnosis through analysis
        5.    Organizes and leads peer review and analysis of teaching practices
        6.    Provides and contributes knowledge and support
        7.    Participates or leads in classroom level decision making and curriculum development
        8.    Engages others in collaborative action planning, learning, reflection and research
        9.    Plays different roles (e.g., leader, participant) and teams up in different ways
        10.   Encourages other to take on leadership roles




______________________                                                       __________________
Signature of Candidate                                                       Date




                                                                                                    48
    DOWLING COLLEGE STUDENT TEACHER PLACEMENT AND CERTIFICATION
                    CANDIDATE’S FINAL REFLECTION

Candidate: ___________________________________ Course #: _______Subject:___________

Cooperating Teacher: ___________________________ School District:____________________

Field Supervisor: _______________________________ Date:___________________________

Please describe yourself in terms of your knowledge and understandings as a facilitator of student learning
(descriptors provided below).

Key Knowledge and/or Understandings of Facilitators of Student Learning
        1.    Working knowledge and understanding of human learning and development
        2.    Working knowledge of diverse populations of students
        3.    Working knowledge and understanding of learning theories and concepts
        4.    Working knowledge and understanding of credible evidence and assessment of student learning and achievement
        5.    Working knowledge of conceptualizations of teaching and the teaching-learning process
        6.    Working knowledge of the role of the teacher as a facilitator of student learning and achievement
        7.    Working knowledge of technology and the uses of technology in facilitating learning and achievement
        8.    Working knowledge of techniques-tactics for managing digital and classroom environments
        9.    Knowledge of inquiry-based pedagogy
        10.   Knowledge of the development of students as lifelong learners
        11.   Knowledge of content areas (subject matter) and related standards
        12.   Knowledge of researched models of teaching-learning
        13.   Awareness of ways of working with families, students, administrators and colleagues
        14.   Awareness of circumstances and/or contextual factors or situations that affect and effect peoples’ lives and their
              ability to learn




                                                                                                                            49
Please describe yourself in terms of your key skills, abilities, and pedagogical actions as a
facilitator of student learning (descriptors provided below).

Key Skills, Abilities, and Pedagogical Actions:

       1.    Observes, describes, analyzes, evaluates, and documents work
       2.    Critically reflects on work with peers, students, colleagues and parents
       3.    Identifies what is relevant and irrelevant in designated situations
       4.    Identifies and diagnoses errors and/or problems -- corrects errors, provides feedback, and assesses and
             evaluates performances
       5.    Designs generic and subject - specific tasks and environments to facilitate learning
       6.    Manages both active digital and classroom environments directed at stimulating student interest and student
             learning*
       7.    Assists and engages students to find, select, evaluate, make judgments about information and digital sources
       8.    Maintains social and intellectual climate to encourage learning in both classroom and digital environments*
       9.    Organizes and presents ideas and concepts in a logical and coherent manner
       10.   Provides and solicits via questions - explanations, rationales, credible evidence and justifications
       11.   Works in groups and with teams of individuals, as well as, works independent of others
       12.   Conducts critiques, reflections and evaluations
       13.   Interprets and translates research, facts, concepts, and ideas into actions
       14.   Learns something new or unfamiliar
       15.   Anticipates problems, obstacles, situations or events and designs or demonstrates
       16.   Ways to effectively achieve successful outcomes or solve problems




Judgment

       1.    Knows about the process of reasoning and use of learned intuition in situations of uncertainty or situations that
             require judgment
       2.    Knows how to reason and use learned intuition in situations of uncertainty or situations that require judgment
       3.    Knows when to reason and use learned intuition in situations of uncertainty
       4.    Reasons and uses learned intuition in situations of uncertainty
       5.    Distinguishes what is relevant and irrelevant
       6.    Perceives situations from many different perspectives
       7.    Knows what constitutes credible evidence and makes judgments concerning the quality and trustworthiness of
             something or information
       8.    Discerns credible evidence, or discerns what is authentic, truthful or reasonably accurate




                                                                                                                             50
       9.    Renders good judgment and good educational judgments in classroom and digital environments




Please describe yourself (candidate) in terms of your key traits and dispositions as a facilitator of
student learning (descriptors provided below).

Compassion

       1.    Sensitive to the thoughts and feelings of others
       2.    Thoughtful about the consequences of actions and the effect on others
       3.    Empathizes with others, commiserates, and sympathizes*
       4.    Shows kindness and forgiveness when appropriate
       5.    Pays close attention to the needs of others
       6.    Connects and relates professionally with the emotional lives of others
       7.    Establishes, on a consistent basis, relations of care/compassion in an array of situations and in an array
             environments with all students, parents, and colleagues*




                                                                                                                          51
Innovation

        1.    Creates, invents or synthesizes in simple ways and/or in conceptually complex ways and assists other to do so
        2.    Searches to find something that is deemed relevant or meaningful to a situation and uses it in a new way
        3.    Sees, perceives and/or does something in a different way to improve a situation or make something better
        4.    Explores, experiments and discovers, as well as, assists others to do so
        5.    Makes metaphors and analogies, as well as, assists others in similar acts or activities
        6.    Designs or creates a new product




Leadership

        1.    Takes initiative, responsibility and accepts level of accountability
        2.    Builds trust and rapport with others
        3.    Demonstrates confidence in self and others
        4.    Undertakes classroom diagnosis through analysis
        5.    Organizes and leads peer review and analysis of teaching practices
        6.    Provides and contributes knowledge and support
        7.    Participates or leads in classroom level decision making and curriculum development
        8.    Engages others in collaborative action planning, learning, reflection and research
        9.    Plays different roles (e.g., leader, participant) and teams up in different ways
        10.   Encourages other to take on leadership roles




                                                                                                                              52
How have you been able to effect or positively impact students’ learning and achievement in the standards’
areas associated with the content and developmental level of the program for which they are enrolled (e.g.,
childhood, adolescence-English education)?




_________________________                                        __________________
Signature of Candidate                                           Date




                                                                                                        53
            DOWLING COLLEGE
         STUDENT RESPONSE FORM

Please Print:
Field Supervisor’s Name:__________________________________

Semester:________________________________Year:___________

Today’s Date:____________________________________________



To our students:

It is the responsibility of the Director of Student Teacher
Placement and Certification to monitor all field supervisors.
Dowling College is committed to excellence in teaching,
however, we cannot fulfill that commitment without your
assistance in completing this form.

Your answers to these questions are completely confidential.
Please DO NOT put your name on this form.




Thank you for taking the time to complete this form.

                                                               Dowling College
                                                            School of Education
                                       Student Teacher Placement & Certification




                                                                             54
              DOWLING COLLEGE - STUDENT TEACHER CANDIDATE
                     FIELD SUPERVISOR ASSESSMENT FORM
Field Supervisor’s Name:_________________________

DIRECTIONS:
NA = Not Applicable.             The statement does not apply to this field experience.
SA = Strongly Agree.             You strongly agree with the statement as it applies to this field
                                 experience.
A = Agree.                       You agree more than you disagree with the statement as it applies to
                                 this field experience.
D = Disagree.                    You disagree more than you agree with the statement as it applies to
                                 this field experience.

SD = Strongly Disagree.          You strongly disagree with the statement as it applies to this field
                                 experience.

Please mark the appropriate response.
    1. The Field Supervisor’s expectations are clear as to what the student teacher candidate’s field
       experience should cover.
                                                                 NA      SA      A       D         SD

    2. The Field Supervisor is fair in his/her evaluation of the student teacher candidate.
                                                                    NA      SA      A       D    SD

    3. There are adequate and timely evaluations for the student teacher candidate to know how well he
       or she is learning during the field experience.
                                                                NA      SA      A       D      SD

    4. The Field Supervisor is available for on-going communication.
                                                                NA        SA       A       D     SD

    5. The Field Supervisor uses conference time well.
                                                                  NA      SA       A       D     SD

    6. The Field Supervisor seems to know when the student does not understand something.

                                                                  NA      SA       A       D     SD

    7. The Field Supervisor offers constructive suggestions.
                                                                  NA      SA       A       D     SD

    8. The Field Supervisor has high expectations.
                                                                  NA      SA       A       D     SD



                                                                                                        55
                         DOWLING COLLEGE - STUDENT TEACHER CANDIDATE
                              FIELD SUPERVISOR ASSESSMENT FORM

     9. The Field Supervisor seems knowledgeable about his/her field of expertise.
                                                     NA        SA        A       D         SD

     10. The Field Supervisor explains the teaching/learning process clearly.
                                                           NA     SA       A       D       SD

     11. The Field Supervisor seems genuinely concerned with student teacher candidate’s progress.

                                                          NA       SA      A       D       SD

     12. In conferences the student teacher candidate feels free to ask questions or express his/her
         viewpoints.
                                                          NA       SA      A        D      SD

     13. The Field Supervisor treats the student teacher candidate with respect.
                                                           NA     SA       A       D       SD

     14. The Field Supervisor supports the implementation of the candidate’s knowledge, skills and
         disposition in the student teaching field experience.
                                                            NA    SA      A       D       SD

     15. I would recommend this Field Supervisor to other students.
                                                          NA      SA       A       D       SD

     16. I would rate the quality of this Field Supervisor’s overall performance as:
                                             (e) Excellent (g) Good (a) Average (f) Fair (p) Poor

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________

K:edual/placment/forms




                                                                                                       56
                      DOWLING COLLEGE
                   STUDENT RESPONSE FORM
Please Print:
Cooperating Teacher’s Name:_______________________________

Semester:________________________________Year:___________

Today’s Date:____________________________________________



To our students:

It is the responsibility of the Director of Student Teacher
Placement and Certification to monitor all cooperating teachers.
Dowling College is committed to excellence in teaching,
however, we cannot fulfill that commitment without your
assistance in completing this form.

Your answers to these questions are completely confidential.
Please DO NOT put your name on this form.



Thank you for taking the time to complete this form.

                                                                    Dowling College
                                                                 School of Education
                                            Student Teacher Placement & Certification



                                                                                  57
                          DOWLING COLLEGE - STUDENT TEACHER CANDIDATE
                            COOPERATING TEACHER ASSESSMENT FORM
Cooperating Teacher’s Name:__________________________________________
DIRECTIONS:
NA = Not Applicable.        The statement does not apply to this field experience.
SA = Strongly Agree.              You strongly agree with the statement as it applies to this field
                                  experience.
A = Agree.                        You agree more than you disagree with the statement as it applies to
                                  this field experience.
D = Disagree.                     You disagree more than you agree with the statement as it applies to this
                                  field experience.

SD = Strongly Disagree.           You strongly disagree with the statement as it applies to this field

                                  experience.
Please mark the appropriate response.
1. The Cooperating Teacher gives the student teacher candidate advice in planning.
                                                                     NA        SA     A    D       SD

2. The Cooperating Teacher gives the student teacher candidate feedback after lessons.
                                                                     NA        SA      A   D       SD

3. The Cooperating Teacher offers concrete suggestions and advice.
                                                                     NA       SA      A    D       SD

1. The Cooperating Teacher models innovative ways to teach.
                                                                     NA       SA      A    D       SD

2. The Cooperating Teacher helps the student teacher candidate with classroom management.
                                                                    NA      SA     A      D        SD

3. The Cooperating Teacher gives the student teacher candidate ample time to teach in:
                  Large group settings                                   NA     SA     A       D       SD
        .         Small group settings                                   NA     SA     A       D       SD
                  Individual tutoring                                    NA      SA    A       D       SD
4. The Cooperating Teacher gives the student teacher candidate adequate time to conference.
                                                                         NA     SA     A       D       SD
5. The Cooperating Teacher encourages the student teacher candidate to become part of the school community
    and interact with the school families.
                                                                         NA     SA     A       D       SD
6. I would rate the quality of this Cooperating Teacher’s overall performance as:
                                                     (e) Excellent (g) Good (a) Average (f) Fair (p) Poor
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
K:edual/placement/forms




                                                                                                         58
Elementary Education Supplement

The Elementary Education Program provides a sequence of course work and activities, which set the stage
for student teaching and field experience(s). At this time, the student teacher candidate has completed the
introductory background and method courses. The observations and experience required in the courses
were designed to demonstrate the variety of approaches and settings essential to meet the needs of
students from diverse backgrounds.

Student teaching consists of several critical phases. The first phase involves the assignment of the student
teacher candidate to a host program. The orientation of the student teacher candidate to the assigned
school community is another important phase of the process. The cooperating teacher is encouraged to
incorporate the use of maps and community handbooks to convey information about the surrounding
community and indicate how community characteristics influence curriculum planning.

Still another important phase involves the field experience. While working closely with the cooperating
teacher, the student teacher candidate should gain experience at using a variety of instructional
approaches and strategies, class management techniques, creative activity content, and several evaluative
procedures. The Dowling College Student Teaching Handbook includes a recommended format for daily
lessons plans to increase the likelihood that the daily instruction will be presented in a logical and
progressive order as an outgrowth of the students’ long-term goals and short-term objectives.

The opportunity to participate in a full range of school’s activities provided to student teacher candidate is
also a critical phase in the teacher induction process. Although it may be difficult to be exposed to all that
is offered, these additional experiences can greatly broaden the student teacher candidate’s concept of the
role of a teacher.

The final and most critical phase of the student teaching experience is evaluation. The cooperating teacher
is instrumental in assisting the student teacher in his or her self-evaluation. With the added assistance of
the field supervisor and/or college faculty and student self-study through the use of journals, reflection on
performance, reading and interactions with professionals, parent/guardian and students, the self-evaluative
skills can serve as a progressive basis for continuous growth.

Dowling College’s Elementary Education faculty links the campus, the schoolroom, and the beginning
professional educator. They share responsibility for assisting student teacher candidates to develop their
knowledge, skills, attitudes and beliefs in professionally productive ways within the framework of the college
program. Further information regarding the policies and procedures of the Dowling College Student
Teaching Program may also be obtained from the Elementary Education Discipline Coordinator.




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Philosophy, Elementary Education

The philosophy of the elementary education discipline is process oriented. The underlying philosophy is
that student teacher candidates should be actively involved in the interrelated processes of planning and
presenting inductive and deductive learning experiences to their students. They will be able to assess their
teaching abilities by observing the implementation of behavioral objectives.

A role conception of the elementary school teacher has emerged from the cumulative experience of the
elementary education faculty. It reflects a common philosophic framework, which stresses humanization
and personalization. The program is based upon the belief that the student represents the focal point of the
education process; the emergence of an authentic self is the basic goal for which this professional
curriculum has been planned. The goal of self-development is the pivotal bond for continuity in the
curriculum. Underlying all of the component elements are the following fundamental assumptions:

            1.      A teacher knows himself/herself, his/her strengths and limitations, and is aware of how
                    he/she functions with others. He/she is committed to a continuing process of
                    developing those emotional resources which allow him/her to be open, caring,
                    accessible and accepting.
            2.      A teacher guides students toward self-discovery, self-direction and healthy self-
                    concept.
            3.      A teacher is an effective communicator and facilitator of communication.
            4.      A teacher sees the whole world as a learning laboratory; he/she takes a major role in
                    fashioning a curriculum that is meaningful, appropriate, and joyful.
            5.      A teacher orchestrates meaningful classroom discourse.
            6.      A teacher is a skillful manager who organizes people, space, time and resources into
                    an environment that is conducive to learning.
            7.      A teacher is competent in planning, implementing and evaluating cognitive, affective,
                    and psychomotor learning experiences.


Elementary Education Seminars

The Elementary Education faculty believes that the student teaching seminar should be a place where the
student teacher candidates have the opportunity to learn about effective instructional practices, classroom
management techniques, models of successful methodology/curricula, and assessment. Seminars should
provide the student teacher candidate with an opportunity to observe and critically evaluate his/her own
teaching, to participate constructively in the development of his/her fellow student teacher candidates and
to share the teachings of the expert teachers with whom they work in the schools.

The student teacher candidate is expected to work with individual pupils, to work with small groups and to
teach lessons to the entire class. The experience is in conjunction with a co-requisite teaching methods
seminar. A Dowling College field supervisor will make a minimum of four observations. The cooperating
teacher will be requested to make at least three evaluations, and will receive a one and one-half credit
tuition remission.



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Elementary Education General Competencies

To obtain a certificate to teach common branch subjects in lower and upper elementary grades
(1-6), student teacher candidates must demonstrate the following competencies:

    1. The ability to create a productive learning environment.
    2. The ability to plan and execute instructional activities in each curricular area and in interdisciplinary
       instructional activities.
    3. The ability to monitor and assess student learning.
    4. The ability to address the special developmental and educational needs of students in lower and
       upper elementary grades.
    5. The ability to collaborate effectively with co-workers as a productive member of school
       improvement teams of faculty, administration, parents and specialist-teachers in the interest of
       improved student achievement.
    6. The ability to communicate, plan, and work effectively with children’s families.
    7. The ability to use community resources, programs and services appropriately.
    8. The ability to work effectively with students from minority cultures, students of both sexes, students
       from homes where English is not spoken, students with handicapping conditions, and gifted and
       talented students.

                                  Based upon Amendments to the Regulations of the Commissioner
                                  Of Education Pursuant to Sections 207, 305 and 3004 of
                                  Education Law, Elementary, 80.15

Master List of Student Teaching Competencies

To teach common branch subjects in lower and upper elementary grades (1-6) in New York State, student
teacher candidates must demonstrate specific competencies to obtain certification. These competencies
are outlined on the previous page. The field experiences present student teacher candidates’ with an
opportunity to demonstrate that they have, indeed, learned those competencies. In the process of
acquiring and demonstrating teaching competencies, student teacher candidates’ need to observe
practitioners in action, assist practitioners, and personally attempt the practices they have observed and
with which they have assisted. This section entitled “Master List of Student Teaching Competencies” is
a description of student teaching activities, experience and demonstrations, which relate to those
competencies which may be useful for student assessment. A record of such activities will be maintained
by the student teacher candidate and substantiated by the cooperating teacher and supervisor to indicate
the existence of these competencies.
    1. The ability to create a productive learning environment.
Assessment: To meet this competency, the student teacher candidate should
         Demonstrate the ability to:
          Integrate knowledge of subject matter, methodology, human development and individual
             differences to enhance instruction for all students.
          Maintain a sense of order and purpose in the classroom.


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          Use inquiry methods to address complexities of student learning and create effective learning
           environments.
       Use instructional resources, including the arts and technology that foster students’ creative and
           analytical thinking skills to effectively and creatively solve instructional and management
           problems.
       Group children in a variety of ways that promote social and academic growth.
       Deal openly with children in non-judgmental ways.
       Provide opportunities for children to express their feelings and ensure that their comments and
           responses are dignified so that the student feels that he or she has made an important
           contribution to the class.
       Plan and carry out class activities and projects that draw from and celebrate the multicultural
           backgrounds, history and cultures of children’s families.
   2. The ability to plan and execute instructional activities in each curricular area and in interdisciplinary
      instructional activities.
Assessment: The lessons presented will be evaluated in terms of:
            Preparation of lesson and units that are well defined, sequenced, and coordinated with
               each other in terms of mastery of skills and concepts.
            Appropriateness to curricular goal.
            Relevancy of curricular content to the experiences and needs of the children.
            Use of instructional strategies to facilitate learning consistent with the diverse needs and
               interests of all students.
            The effective use of educational materials and resources, including audio-visual materials,
               computer-based technology, and the arts appropriate to the subject matters and to the
               age, learning styles, developmental stage, special needs and social, racial and linguistic
               backgrounds of individual learners and the class as a group.
            Use of verbal and non-verbal communication (writing, speaking, visual arts, music, drama
               and movement), and academic knowledge to enhance teaching as appropriate to the age,
               learning style and developmental stage of the learner.
   3. The ability to monitor and assess student learning.
Assessment: To meet this standard, the student teacher candidate should demonstrate the ability to:
            Participate in the administration and evaluation of standardized and non-standardized tests
               and procedures for the class under the direct supervision and support of the cooperating
               teacher.
            Design and use various informal and formal evaluative procedures to assess student
               learning.
            Interpret the results of evaluative procedures and use these results to improve instruction
               both for the class as a whole and for individual students.
            Identify learners’ strengths and use these strengths to enhance academic learning.
            Use methods of systematic observation and recording of student behavior and teacher-
               child interaction and use this information to improve instruction.
            Encourage students’ assessment of their own learning and instruction.
            Evaluate his or her own role; behavior and performance in the classroom through the
               analysis of a personal reflective log documenting these experiences.
   4. The ability to address the special developmental and educational needs of students in lower and
      upper elementary grades.



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Assessment: To meet this competency a record of observed lessons will be maintained demonstrating the
student teacher candidate’s ability to:
                  Organize the children for the purpose of modifying the curriculum and /or designing
                      and implementing alternative instructional strategies to meet student needs.
                  Implement appropriate learning experiences in the classroom that incorporate a variety
                      of techniques designed to accommodate students’ diverse needs and learning styles,
                      such as, individualized instruction, small-group learning, learning centers, simulations
                      and cooperative learning.
                  Evidence of, in classroom behavior, a commitment to a teaching relationship with
                      children which, while maintaining high expectations, is open, caring, accessible,
                      accepting and encourages the development of self-esteem for all children.
    5. The ability to collaborate effectively with co-workers as a productive member of school
        improvement teams of faculty, administration, parents, guardians and specialist-teachers in the
        interest of improved student achievement.
Assessment: To meet this competency the student teacher candidate should demonstrate the ability to:
                  Fulfill all assigned responsibilities of the field experience.
                  Learn from experience and supervision.
                  Work productively with teachers, supervisors and administrators.
                  Use relevant support systems within and outside the school in order to optimize
                      opportunities for teaching and learning.
                  Attend and participate in school and community meetings.
                  Engage in activities that promote professional growth.
                  Actively participate in his/her evaluation by maintaining a continuous record of self-
                      evaluation of lesson taught.
                  Maintain a record of evaluations given by both the college supervisor and the
                      cooperating teacher and show evidence of a willingness and ability to accept
                      constructive criticism and improve accordingly.
                  Act in a responsible and collegial manner within and beyond his/her own school
                      setting.
    6. The ability to communicate, plan and work effectively with children’s families.
Assessment: to meet this competency, the student teacher candidate should demonstrate the ability to:
              Acknowledge that families provide the first educational involvement and strongly influence
                 the child’s intellectual growth, achievement and attitude about schooling.
              Recognize that the most consistent predictors of parent/guardian involvement at school
                 and at home are specific teacher practices that encourage and guide this involvement.
              Understand and master effective strategies to involve parents/guardians in the educational
                 process.
              Continually learn from students and parents/guardians about their backgrounds,
                 experiences and culture, and incorporate their contributions into the curriculum.
              Develop meaningful ways to share information about class activities and individual student
                 performance with parents.
              Participate with the classroom teacher in giving parents/guardians, through both formal
                 and informal vehicles, specific information regarding their child’s performance and
                 progress in school.




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   7. The ability to use community resources, programs and services appropriately.
Assessment: To meet this competency, the student teacher candidate should demonstrate the ability to:
              Recognize that each student should be viewed as an extension of a family unit that
                belongs to a “learning community.”
              Actively seek to involve students in the many educational opportunities that bound in each
                community – Library, Museums, Post Office, Fire and Police Department, Local
                Governments, Drug Awareness Programs and Summer Recreational Programs.
              Take advantage of area business programs that stimulate and motivate children.
              Understand that there are many connections to community agencies that meet families’
                educational needs i.e. the social worker, home-school coordinator, ESL resource
                specialist, nurse and maintain close ties to agencies and community programs that serve
                families’ financial, emotional, parenting, health and legal needs.
   8. The ability to work effectively with students from minority cultures, students of both sexes, students
        from homes where English is not spoken, students with disabilities and gifted and talented
        students.
Assessment: To meet with this competency, the student teacher candidate should demonstrate the
capacity to:
              Understand the unique developmental and cultural needs of and challenges facing, special
                needs children, linguistic minorities and other minorities and the ability to work toward
                effectively integrating these students into the classroom and school and community
                settings.
              Possess an attitude of acceptance of individual differences among children.
              Deal equitable and responsibly with all learners.
              Understand the impact of diverse backgrounds, experiences and cultures and use this
                knowledge to develop appropriate teaching strategies.


            Student Teaching Tasks/Full-Time

Suggested student teaching tasks at the elementary school level.

                                      BEGINNING/ON-GOING TASKS

Task 1 – Complete an Orientation Inventory
At the beginning of the full-time student teaching experience complete one copy of an Orientation Inventory
requiring you to find out general information about the district, school and elementary education programs,
personnel and policies. Submit the inventory to the cooperating teacher to be checked, then include it in
your student teaching reflective journal.
Task 2 – Follow Safety Standards
This is something you should do from the moment you first walk into each school. Make sure you find out
and understand any safety standards, which are part of school policy and/or procedures. In particular: fire
drill procedures; bus boarding and bus drill procedures; security measures i.e. visitors to the school, locked
exterior doors; and the sign-in and sign-out process.




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Task 3 – Participate in Faculty Responsibilities/Duties
Share your cooperating teachers’ routine non-teaching responsibilities, such as holding parent-teacher
conferences; preparing and maintaining written reports/records; serving as hall, lunchroom, recess, or bus
duty monitor; and so on. Attend school functions, such as athletic events, parent/teacher association
meetings, plays or other student performances and the like.
Task 4 – Observe Classrooms to Note Implementation of Specific and/or Innovative Practices
During each month the student teaching experience make at least two observations of grade-level classes
at another grade level to observe the implementation of an innovative curriculum practice (i.e.
manipulatives in mathematics, portfolio assessment, integration of computer technology, learning centers,
multiage classroom). Activity: Develop a learning center for a mathematical concept that will provide
hands-on examples with concrete materials and place problems in real-world contexts to help the students
construct useful meanings for the mathematical concepts.
Task 5 – Observe a Variety of Special Area Classroom Settings And Styles
During the second month of the student teaching experience, make a least two observation of classes in
special area subjects. The primary purpose of the observation is to help you become more aware of
different methods used in teaching and classroom management and to learn more about students by
observing them in various environments.
Task 6 – Observe Classrooms to Note the Physical Environment
Observe several classrooms and note the physical setting with respect to the following: floor space
(seating, arrangement of work and activity areas, special centers, special-effects area, traffic patterns), wall
space (chalkboards, bulletin boards, display areas, and prints/maps/charts), countertop space (science
projects, globes/kits/models), shelf space (textbooks, reference books, library, special materials), closet
space (supplies worksheets, audiovisual equipment, special materials collections) and ambiance (art
objects, background music, themes, other special touches). Activity: Design a classroom in which the
physical environment is organized so as to accommodate and further a variety of learning styles and
instructional strategies (i.e. cooperative learning, learning centers, and a variety of grouping formats [large
group, small group, individual instruction], hands-on experiences, and technology).
Task 7 – Use Interdisciplinary Teaching
Incorporate content and/or concepts from disciplines other than language arts – such as math, science, art,
music and social studies –into your lesson plans or unit plan.
Task 8 – Implement a Multicultural Activity
At least once during each half of the student teaching experience, incorporate into your lesson an activity,
which helps students gain a better understanding and/or appreciation for the cultures of others. This
should be in a meaningful context such as the study of a country, region, holiday or celebration. Literature,
dances, sports or games developed by, or popular in, different cultures might be the focus of such
activities. Activity: Develop an age-appropriate bibliography of multicultural literature centered on a
theme or topic of study in the grade level curriculum.
Task 9 – Attend District/Building Meetings Reflecting Professional Out-of-Classroom
Responsibilities
Attend both a meeting of the building’s Shared Decision Making Committee and the Board of Education
and react to the issues discussed in the reflective journal kept as a part of the seminar. Reactions to these
two experiences will be shared with the cooperating teacher, building principal and student teaching
seminar instructor in a meeting.




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Task 10 - Write and Submit Lesson Plan
As of the second week, prepare written lesson plans and submit them to the cooperating teacher for review
and approval. Normally, plans for each week should be submitted for review no later than Friday of the
preceding week. Keep the plans in your student teaching notebook and submit them to the seminar
instructor at the end of the experience.
Task 11 – Develop and Use Visual Aids
Design, prepare, and use written handouts, posters, overhead transparencies, and other visual aids as part
of your lessons and units. Type or carefully print written formation, making sure that spelling and grammar
are correct. Activity: Develop an interactive bulletin board for use in the classroom.
Task 12 – Evaluate Plans and Lessons
As soon as possible after implementing each written lesson plan, prepare a written analysis of the lesson
and the plan. Write the analysis on the back or at the bottom of the written plan. The analysis should
include an evaluation of what went well, what did not go well, what worked, and what did not work, and
what would be done differently the next time. Discuss the analyses with the cooperating teacher during
each weekly conference. The college supervisor will review the analyses periodically.
Task 13 – Provide Remediation for Individual Students
Identify and observe a student who requires individual intervention to overcome an identified weakness in
language arts or mathematics. Develop a plan for helping the student overcome the weakness. After
review with cooperating teacher, implement the plan. Evaluate the student’s progress before your
experience at the school is concluded.
                                                    WEEK THREE

Task 14 – Design and Implement a Management /Discipline Plan
After consulting with the cooperating teacher and reviewing school policies, prepare a written management
plan including proactive strategies for preventing and dealing with management and discipline problems,
which could occur. Submit this plan to your cooperating teacher and seminar instructor for review.

                                                   WEEK FOUR

Task 15 – Write an Information Letter to Parents
At least once, write and send a letter home to parents/guardians (or a short piece which may be
incorporated into the cooperating teachers’ regular newsletter), which describes some aspect of your unit or
instructional program in the classroom. Proofread the letter carefully; have the collaborating teacher
proofread it as well. Spelling should be perfect, and the letter should be typed. Receive approval from the
cooperating teacher and the principal (may be required by school policy) before sending any written
information to parents/guardians. Activity: Create a letter about an upcoming project or a weekly
summary of the class’ accomplishments.

                               END OF SECOND MONTH/BEGINNING OF THIRD

Task 16 – Develop and Administer a Strategy and/or Skill Assessment
Design an assessment tool (i.e., observational checklist, rubric, prompt, and/or test) to assess student
achievement of one or more of your unit objectives within the language arts curriculum area. Design the
assessment from scratch, or modify an existing one. After review by the cooperating teacher, administer
the tool to the class or an instructional group. Activity: Skill Assessment Tool




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Task 17 – Develop a Technique for Assigning a Grade or Reporting to Parents/Guardians
As part of a unit or topic of study, establish and implement the procedures for assigning a grade (or
narrative report) to each student. This should be done even if the grade will only be one part of the overall
report grade. You might, in fact, prepare “unit report cards” for each student and distribute them at the
conclusion of the unit. Activity: Complete report cards independent of the classroom teacher and
compare the grades and narrative portion with that which your cooperating teacher has written.

                                               MID-SEMESTER

Task 18 – Participate in a Job Interview with the Principal
Make an appointment for a simulated (or actual) job interview with the building principal. After the
interview, the rationale for including specific questions throughout the interview will be discussed. The
process will provide an opportunity of the prospective teachers to practice interview skills and prepare for
future interviews.

Professional Portfolio

        Guidelines for Developing A Professional Portfolio
        Professional portfolios are an increasingly common way for teachers to display their pedagogical
        competence. Similar to artists’ portfolios, these are a way for you to demonstrate your
        competencies, skills, enthusiasm, and problem solving abilities as a teacher. They are an
        opportunity for you to present yourself as a capable professional who is both knowledgeable and
        creative; who brings a variety of resources to the instructional process. Your first audience for this
        portfolio will be prospective employers (directors of personnel and principals). This portfolio should
        create for them a vivid image of what your classroom will be like. Just as artists present
        themselves through a portfolio of their work, you will present yourself in this portfolio. Ultimately,
        the portfolio should demonstrate your continuing growth as a teacher and serve as a basis for
        recognizing your accomplishments as a teacher.

More specifically, the portfolio should provide examples of your ability to do the following:

                Plan exciting lessons appropriate to the level of the students and the curricular content.
                Plan units, which integrate mathematics and language arts skills with other areas of the
                 curriculum.
                Use a variety of instructional strategies and materials.
                Diagnose and meet the individual needs of the students.
                Organize and manage a classroom for effective instruction.
                Use a variety of evaluation techniques to assess student progress.
                Use a variety of ways to group student for instructions.
                Be reflective about your teaching skills and your classroom environment.

Some suggestions for materials that might be included in your portfolio are listed below. The materials,
however, cannot stand alone; rather they need to be accompanied by your comments, reflections, analyses
and future plans. We will work on developing some of these commentaries in class. Some examples of
materials that your portfolio might contain are as follows:



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       Sample lesson plans with a discussion of how these demonstrate effective teaching strategies or
        with suggestions for improving the lesson
       Material developed for and used by students with comments about their effectiveness.
       Student papers, work, evaluative instruments, or projects accompanied by an analysis of student
        difficulties and how to work with them.
       Photographs with captions explaining the context, perhaps describing your philosophy.
       Written descriptions of individual children which address the learning process, time on task
        behavior, and/or behavior in social context of the classroom.
       Written communications, especially those for parents/guardians.
       Diagrams showing the organization of your classroom with a discussion of how the space works
        well and how it might be improved.
       The classroom schedule with a discussion of the reasons for its present organization and how it
        might be improved.
       Innovative instructional practices which you implemented or in which you participated.
       Examples of your creative abilities and contributions to the classroom.
       Your philosophy about the following concerns:

                 1.   Classroom discipline.
                 2.   Grading students.
                 1.   Homework.
                 2.   Grouping.
                 3.   Your responsibilities as a teacher.
                 4.   Continuing professional development.

This list is not intended to be exhaustive. Be creative! Consider those materials that can demonstrate to
others the kind of individual you are and the types of instructional strategies and teaching practices you are
able to implement in a classroom. Also, be selective. Do not overwhelm your audience with duplication
and excessive detail. For example, one lesson plan per subject area should be sufficient.




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                                 A Guide to the



  Framework for Teaching: Four Domains of
                 Teaching*


                                       And



Profile of Facilitators of Student Learning and
    Achievement in Classroom and Digital
                 Environments



*From: Danielson, C. 1996. Enhancing Professional Practice: A Framework for Teaching.
Alexandria, VA: ASCD.




                                                                                    69
Framework for Teaching: Four Domains of Teaching
1.     Planning and Preparation
          a.     Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy
          b.     Demonstrating Knowledge of Students
          c.     Selecting Instructional Goals
          d.     Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources
          e.     Designing Coherent Instruction
          f.     Assessing Student Learning

2.     The Classroom Environment
          a.     Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport
          b.     Establishing a Culture for Learning
          c.     Managing Classroom Procedures
          d.     Managing Student Behavior
          e.     Organizing Physical Space

3.     Instruction
          a.     Communicating Clearly and Accurately
          b.     Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques
          c.     Engaging Students in Learning
          d.     Providing Feedback to Students
          e.     Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness

4.     Professional Responsibility
          a.     Reflecting on Teaching
          b.     Maintaining Accurate Records
          c.     Communicating with Families
          d.     Contributing to the School and District
          e.     Growing and Developing Professionally
          f.     Showing Professionalism

CITE Danielson




                                                                   70
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
1.   Planning and Preparation
        a. Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy
                   i. Knowledge of Prerequisite Relationships
                  ii. Knowledge of Content- Related Pedagogy
                 iii. Knowledge of Content
        b.   Demonstrating Knowledge of Students
                   i. Knowledge of Students' Interests and Cultural Heritage
                  ii. Knowledge of Students' Skills and Knowledge
                 iii. Knowledge of Students' Varied Approaches to Learning
                 iv. Knowledge of Characteristics of Age Group
        c.   Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources
                   i. Resources for Teaching
                  ii. Resources for Students
        d.   Designing Coherent Instruction
                   i. Learning Activities
                  ii. Instructional Materials and Resources
                 iii. Instructional Groups
                 iv. Lesson and Unit Structure
        e.   Selecting Instructional Goals
                   i. Balance
                  ii. Suitability for Diverse Students
                 iii. Value
                 iv. Clarity
        f.   Assessing Student Learning
                   i.   Use for Planning
                  ii.   Criteria and Standards
                 iii.   Congruence with Instructional Goals




                                                                               71
1. Planning and Preparation
        a. Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy
           i. Knowledge of Prerequisite
Teacher displays little      Teacher indicates some        Teacher's plans and             Teacher actively builds on
understanding of             awareness of prerequisite     practices reflect               knowledge of prerequisite
prerequisite knowledge       learning, although such       understanding of prerequisite   relationships when describing
important for the student    knowledge may be               relationships among topics     instruction or seeking causes
learning of the content.     incomplete or inaccurate.     and concepts.                   for student misunderstanding.

           ii. Knowledge of Content- Related Pedagogy

Teacher displays little      Teacher displays basic        Pedagogical practices reflect   Teacher displays continuing
understanding of             pedagogical knowledge but      current research on best       search for best practice and
pedagogical issues           does not anticipate student   pedagogical practice within     anticipates student
involved in student          misconceptions.               the discipline but without      misconceptions.
learning of the content.                                   anticipating student
                                                           misconceptions.


           iii. Knowledge of Content

Teacher makes content        Teacher displays basic        Teacher displays solid          Teacher displays extensive
errors or does not correct   content knowledge but         content knowledge and           content knowledge, with
content errors students      cannot articulate             makes connections between       evidence of continuing pursuit
make.                        connections with other        the content and other parts      of such knowledge.
                             parts of the disciplines or   of the discipline and other
                             with other disciplines.       disciplines.


        b. Demonstrating Knowledge of Students

           i. Knowledge of Students' Interests and Cultural Heritage
Teacher displays little      Teacher recognizes the        Teacher displays knowledge      Teacher displays knowledge
knowledge of students'       value of understanding        of the interests or cultural    of the interests or cultural
interests or cultural        students' interests or        heritage of groups of           heritage of each student.
heritage and does not        cultural heritage but         students and recognizes the
indicate that such           displays this knowledge for   value of this knowledge.
knowledge is valuable.        the class only as a whole.

           ii. Knowledge of Students' Skills and Knowledge
Teacher displays little      Teacher recognizes the        Teacher displays knowledge      Teacher displays knowledge
knowledge of students'       value of understanding        of students' skills and         of students' skills and
skills and knowledge and     students' skills and          knowledge for groups of         knowledge for each student,
does not indicate that       knowledge but displays this   students and recognizes the     including those with special
such knowledge is             knowledge for the class      value of this knowledge.        needs.
valuable.                    only as a whole.

           iii. Knowledge of Students' Varied Approaches to Learning
Teacher is unfamiliar with   Teacher displays general      Teacher displays solid          Teacher uses, where
the different approaches     understanding of the          understanding of the            appropriate, knowledge of
to learning that students    different approaches to       different approaches to         students' varied approaches
exhibit, such as learning    learning that students        learning that different         to learning in instructional
styles, modalities, and      exhibit.                      students exhibit.               planning.
different "intelligences."




                                                                                                                            72
           iv. Knowledge of Characteristics of Age Group
Teacher displays minimal      Teacher displays generally       Teacher displays thorough          Teacher displays knowledge
knowledge of                  accurate knowledge of            understanding of typical           of typical developmental
developmental                 developmental                    developmental                      characteristics of age group,
characteristics of age        characteristics of age           characteristics of age group       exceptions to the patterns,
group.                        group.                           as well as exceptions to           and the extent to which each
                                                               general patterns.                  student follows patterns.


        C. Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources
           i. Resources for Teaching
Teacher is unaware of         Teacher displays limited         Teacher is fully aware of all      In addition to being aware of
resources available           awareness of resources           resources available through        school and district resources,
through the school or         available through the            the school or district.            teacher actively seeks other
district.                     school or district.                                                 materials to enhance
                                                                                                  instruction, for example, from
                                                                                                   professional organizations or
                                                                                                  through the community.

           ii. Resources for Students
Teacher is unaware of         Teacher displays limited         Teacher is fully aware of all      In addition to being aware of
resources available to        awareness of resources           resources available through        school and district resources,
assist students who need      available through the            the school or district and         teacher is aware of additional
them.                         school or district.              knows how to gain access           resources available through
                                                               for students.                      the community.

        d. Designing Coherent Instruction
           i. Learning Activities
Learning activities are not   Only some of the learning        Most of the learning               Learning activities are highly
 suitable to students or      activities are suitable to       activities are suitable to         relevant to students and
instructional goals. They     students or instructional        students and instructional         instructional goals. They
do not follow an organized    goals. Progression of            goals. Progression of              progress coherently,
 progression and do not       activities in the unit is        activities in the unit is fairly   producing a unified whole and
reflect recent                uneven, and only some            even, and most activities          reflecting recent professional
professional research.        activities reflect recent        reflect recent professional        research.
                              professional research.           research.

           ii. Instructional Materials and Resources
Materials and resources       Some of the materials and        All materials and resources        All materials and resources
do not support the            resources support the            support the instructional          support the instructional
instructional goals or        instructional goals, and         goals, and most engage             goals, and most all engage
engage students in            some engage students in          students in meaningful             students in meaningful
meaningful learning.          meaningful learning.             learning.                          learning. There is evidence
                                                                                                  of student participation in
                                                                                                  selecting or adapting
                                                                                                  materials.

           iii. Instructional Groups
Instructional groups do       Instructional groups are         Instructional groups are           Instructional groups are
not support the               inconsistent in suitability to   varied, as appropriate to the      varied, as appropriate to the
instructional goals and        the instructional goals and     different instructional goals.     different instructional goals.
offer no variety.             offer minimal variety.                                              There is evidence of student
                                                                                                  choice in selecting different
                                                                                                  patterns of instructional
                                                                                                  groups.




                                                                                                                                   73
           iv. Lesson and Unit Structure
The lesson or unit has no    The lesson or unit has a        The lesson or unit has a          The lesson's or unit's
clearly defined structure,   recognizable structure,         clearly defined structure that    structure is clear and allows
or the structure is          although the structure in        activities are organized         for different pathways
chaotic. Time allocations    not uniformly maintained        around. Time allocations are      according to student needs.
are unrealistic.             throughout. Most time           reasonable.
                             allocations are reasonable.


        e. Selecting Instructional Goals
           i. Balance
Goals reflect only one       Goals reflect several types     Goals reflect several             Goals reflect student initiative
type of learning and one     of learning but no effort at    different types of learning        in establishing important
discipline or strand.        coordination or integration.    and opportunities for             learning.
                                                             integration.

           ii. Suitability for Diverse Students
Goals are not suitable for   Most of the goals are           All the goals are suitable for    Goals take into account the
the class.                   suitable for most of the        most of the students in the       varying learning needs of
                             students in the class.          class.                            individual students or groups.

           iii. Value
Goals are not valuable       Goals are moderately            Goals are valuable in their       Not only are the goals
and represent low            valuable in either their        level of expectations,            valuable, but teacher can also
expectations or no           expectations or conceptual      conceptual understanding,          clearly articulate how goals
conceptual understanding     understanding for students      and importance of learning.       establish high expectations
for students. Goals do       and in importance of                                              and relate to curriculum
not reflect important        learning.                                                         frameworks and standards.
learning.

           iv. Clarity
Goals are either not clear   Goals are only moderately       Most of the goals are clear       All the goals are clear, written
or are stated as student     clear or include a              but may include a few             in the form of student
activities. Goals do not     combination of goals and        activities. Most permit           learning, and permit viable
permit viable methods of     activities. Some goals do       viable methods of                 methods of assessment.
assessment.                  not permit viable methods       assessment.
                             of assessment.

        f. Assessing Student Learning
           i. Use for Planning
The assessment results       Teacher uses assessment         Teacher uses assessment           Students are aware of how
affect planning for these    results to plan for the class   results to plan for individuals   they are meeting the
students only minimally.      as a whole.                     and groups of students.          established standards and
                                                                                               participate in planning the
                                                                                               next steps.

           ii. Criteria and Standards
The proposed approach        Assessment criteria and         Assessment criteria and           Assessment criteria and
Contains no clear criteria   standards have been             standards are clear and have      standards are clear and have
Or standards.                developed, but they are          been clearly communicated        been clearly communicated to
                             either not clear or have not    to students.                       students. There is evidence
                             been clearly communicated                                         that students contributed to
                              to students.                                                     the development of the
                                                                                               criteria and standards.

           iii. Congruence with Instructional Goals
Content and methods of       Some of the instructional       All the instructional goals are   The proposed approach to
assessment lack              goals are assessed through      nominally assessed through        assessment is completely
congruence with               the proposed approach,         the proposed plan, but the        congruent with the
instructional goals.         but many are not.               approach is more suitable to      instructional goals, both in
                                                             some goals than to others.        content and process.




                                                                                                                                  74
Domain 2: The Classroom Environment

2.   The Classroom Environment
        a. Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport
                   i. Teacher Interaction with Students
                  ii. Student Interaction
        b.   Establishing a Culture for Learning
                   i.   Importance of the Content
                  ii.   Student Pride in Work
                 iii.   Expectations for Learning and Achievement
        c.   Managing Classroom Procedures
                   i. Management of Instructional Groups
                  ii. Management of Transitions
                 iii. Management of Materials and Supplies
                iv. Performance of Non-instructional Duties
                  v. Supervision of Volunteers and Paraprofessionals
        d.   Managing Student Behavior
                   i. Expectations
                  ii. Monitoring of Student Behavior
                 iii. Response to Student Misbehavior
        e.   Organizing Physical Space
                   i. Safety and Arrangement of Furniture
                  ii. Accessibility to Learning and Use of Physical Resources




                                                                                75
2. The Classroom Environment
      a. Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport
            i. Teacher Interaction with Students
 Teacher interaction with at   Teacher-student                  Teacher-student interactions    Teacher demonstrates
  least some students is       interactions are generally       are friendly and demonstrate    genuine caring and respect
 negative, demeaning,          appropriate but may reflect       general warmth, caring, and    for individual students.
 sarcastic, or inappropriate    occasional                      respect. Such interactions      Students exhibit respect for
  to the age or culture of     inconsistencies, favoritism,     are appropriate to              teacher as an individual,
 the students. Students         or disregard for students'      developmental and cultural      beyond that for the role.
 exhibit disrespect for        cultures. Students exhibit       norms. Students exhibit
 teacher.                      only minimal respect of          respect for teacher.
                               teacher.

            ii. Student Interaction
 Student interactions are      Students do not                  Student interactions are        Students demonstrate
 characterized by conflict,    demonstrate negative             generally polite and            genuine caring for one
 sarcasm, or put-downs.        behavior toward one              respectful.                     another as individuals and as
                               another.                                                         students.

         b. Establishing a Culture for Learning
            i. Importance of the Content
 Teacher or students           Teacher communicates             Teacher conveys genuine         Students demonstrate through
 convey a negative             importance of the work but       enthusiasm for the subject,      their active participation,
 attitude toward the           with little conviction and       and students demonstrate        curiosity, and attention to
 content, suggesting that      only minimal apparent buy-       consistent commitment to its    detail that they value the
 the content is not            in by the students.               value.                         content's importance.
 important or is mandated
 by others.

            ii. Student Pride in Work
 Students demonstrate          Students minimally accept        Students accept teacher         Students take obvious pride
 little or no pride in their   the responsibility to "do        insistence on work of high      in their work and initiate
 work. They seem to be         good work" but invest little     quality and demonstrate         improvements in it, for
 motivated by the desire       of their energy in the           pride in that work.             example, by revising drafts
 to complete a task rather     quality of the work.                                             on their own initiative, helping
 than do high-quality work.                                                                     peers, and ensuring that
                                                                                                 high-quality work is displayed.

            iii. Expectations for Learning and Achievement
 Instructional goals and       Instructional goals and           Instructional goals and        Both students and teacher
 activities, interactions,     activities, interactions, and    activities, interactions, and   establish and maintain
 and the classroom             the classroom environment        the classroom environment       through planning of learning
 environment convey only        convey inconsistent             convey high expectations for    activities, interactions, and
  modest expectations for      expectations for student          student achievement.           the classroom environment
 student achievement.          achievement.                                                     high expectations for the
                                                                                                learning of all students.


         c. Managing Classroom Procedures
            i. Management of Instructional Groups
 Students not working with     Tasks for group work are         Tasks for group work are        Groups working independently
 the teacher are not           partially organized, resulting   organized, and groups are       are productively engaged at
 productively engaged in       in some off-task behavior        managed so most students        all times, with students
 learning.                     when teacher is involved         are engaged at all times.       assuming responsibility for
                               with one group.                                                  productivity.




                                                                                                                                   76
            ii. Management of Transitions

Much time is lost during      Transitions are sporadically     Transitions occur smoothly,         Transitions are seamless, with
transitions.                  efficient, resulting in some     with little loss of instructional    students assuming some
                              loss of instructional time.      time.                               responsibility for efficient
                                                                                                   operation.

            iii Management of Materials and Supplies

Materials are handled         Routines for handling            Routines for handling               Routines for handling
inefficiently, resulting in   materials and supplies           materials and supplies occur        materials and supplies are
loss of instructional time.   function moderately well.        smoothly, with little loss of       seamless, with students
                                                               instructional time.                 assuming some responsibility
                                                                                                    for efficient operation.

            iv. Performance of Non-instructional Duties
Considerable instructional    Systems for performing           Efficient systems for               Systems for performing
time is lost in performing    noninstructional duties are      performing noninstructional         noninstructional duties are
noninstructional duties.      fairly efficient, resulting in   duties are in place, resulting      well established, with students
                              little loss of instructional     in minimal loss of                   assuming considerable
                              time.                            instructional time.                 responsibility for efficient
                                                                                                   operation.

            v. Supervision of Volunteers and Paraprofessional
Volunteers and                Volunteers and                   Volunteers and                      Volunteers and
Paraprofessionals have        Paraprofessionals are            Paraprofessionals are               Paraprofessionals make a
no clearly defined duties     productively engaged             productively and                    substantive contribution to
or do nothing most of the     during portions of class         independently engaged               the classroom environment.
time.                         time but require frequent        during the entire class.
                              supervision.

         d. Managing Student Behavior
            i. Expectations
No standards of conduct       Standards of conduct             Standards of conduct are            Standards of conduct are
appear to have been           appear to have been              clear to all students.              clear to all students and
established, or students      established for most                                                 appear to have been
are confused as to what       situations, and most                                                 developed with student
the standards are.            students seem to                                                     participation.
                              understand them.

            ii. Monitoring of Student Behavior
Student behavior is not       Teacher is generally aware       Teacher is alert to student         Monitoring by teacher is
monitored, and teacher is     of student behavior but          behavior at all times.              subtle and preventive.
unaware of what students      may miss the activities of                                           Students monitor their own
 are doing.                   some students.                                                       and their peers' behavior,
                                                                                                   correcting one another
                                                                                                   respectfully.

            iii. Response to Student Misbehavior

Teacher does not respond      Teacher attempts to              Teacher response to                 Teacher response to
 to misbehavior, or the       respond to student               misbehavior is appropriate          misbehavior is highly
response is inconsistent,     misbehavior but with             and successful and respects         effective and sensitive to
overly repressive, or         uneven results, or no             the student's dignity, or          students' individual needs, or
does not respect the          serious disruptive behavior      student behavior in generally       student behavior is entirely
student's dignity.            occurs.                           appropriate.                       appropriate.




                                                                                                                                     77
         e. Organizing Physical Space
            i. Safety and Arrangement of Furniture
The classroom is unsafe,       The classroom is safe, and       The classroom is safe, and       The classroom is safe, and
or the furniture                classroom furniture is          the furniture arrangement is     the students adjust the
arrangement is not suited      adjusted for a lesson, or if     a resource for learning          furniture to advance their own
to the lesson activities, or   necessary, a lesson is           activities.                       purposes in learning.
 both.                         adjusted to the furniture,
                               but with limited
                               effectiveness.

            ii. Accessibility to Learning and Use of
Teacher uses physical          Teacher uses physical            Teacher uses physical            Both teacher and students
resources poorly, or           resources adequately, and        resources skillfully, and all    use physical resources
learning is not accessible     at least essential learning is   learning is equally accessible   optimally, and students
to some students.               accessible to all students.      to all students.                ensure that all learning is
                                                                                                 equally accessible to all
                                                                                                 students.




                                                                                                                                  78
 Domain 3: Instruction
3.   Instruction
        a. Communicating Clearly and Accurately
                  i. Directions and Procedures
                 ii. Oral and Written Language
        b.   Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques
                  i.    Quality of Questions
                 ii.    Discussion Techniques
                iii.    Student Participation
        c.   Engaging Students in Learning
                  i. Representation of Content
                 ii. Activities and Assignments
                iii. Grouping of Students
                iv. Instructional Materials and Resources
                 v. Structure and Pacing
        d.   Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness
                  i.    Lesson Adjustment
                 ii.    Response to Students
                iii.    Persistence
        e.   Providing Feedback to Students
                  i.    Quality: Accurate, Substantive, Constructive, and Specific.
                 ii.    Timeliness




                                                                                      79
3. Instruction
       a. Communicating Clearly and Accurately
           i. Directions and Procedures
Teacher directions and      Teacher directions and          Teacher directions and            Teacher directions and
procedures are confusing    procedures are clarified        procedures are clear to           procedures are clear to
to students.                after initial student           students and contain an           students and anticipate
                            confusion or are                appropriate level of detail.      possible student
                            excessively detailed.                                             misunderstanding.

           ii. Oral and Written Language
Teacher's spoken            Teacher's spoken language       Teacher's spoken and written      Teacher's spoken and written
language is inaudible, or   is audible, and written          language is clear and            language is correct and
written language is         language is legible. Both       correct. Vocabulary is            expressive, with well-chosen
illegible. Spoken or        are used correctly.             appropriate to students' age      vocabulary that enriches the
written language may        Vocabulary is correct but       and interests.                    lesson.
contain many grammar        limited or is not appropriate
and syntax errors.          to students' ages or
Vocabulary may be           backgrounds.
inappropriate, vague, or
used incorrectly, leaving
students confused.

        b. Using Questioning and Discussion
       i. Quality of Questions
Teacher's questions are     Teacher's questions are a       Most of teacher's questions       Teacher's questions are
virtually all of poor       combination of low and high     are of high quality.              uniformly high quality, with
quality.                     quality. Only some invite      Adequate time is available        adequate time for students to
                            a response.                     for students to respond.           respond. Students formulate
                                                                                               many questions.

           ii. Discussion Techniques
Interaction between         Teacher makes some              Classroom interaction             Students assume
teacher and students is     attempt to engage students      represents true discussion,       considerable responsibility for
predominately recitation     in a true discussion, with     with teacher stepping, when        the success of the
style, with teacher         uneven results.                 appropriate, to the side.         discussion, initiating topics
mediating all questions                                                                       and making unsolicited
and answers.                                                                                  contributions.

           iii. Student Participation
Only a few students         Teacher attempts to             Teacher successfully              Students themselves ensure
participate in the          engage all students in the      engages all students in the       that all voices are heard in
discussion.                 discussion, but with only       discussion.                       the discussion.
                            limited success.

        c. Engaging Students in Learning
       i. Representation of Content
Representation of content   Representation of Content       Representation of content is      Representation of content is
 is inappropriate and       is inconsistent in quality:     appropriate and links well with   appropriate and links well with
unclear or uses poor        Some is done skillfully,         students' knowledge and          students' knowledge and
examples and analogies.     with good examples; other       experience.                       experience. Students
                            portions are difficult to                                         contribute to representation of
                            follow.                                                            content.




                                                                                                                                80
           ii. Activities and Assignments
Activities and               Some activities and             Most activities and              All students are cognitively
assignments are              assignments are                 assignments are appropriate      engaged in the activities and
inappropriate for students   appropriate to students and     to students. Almost all          assignments in their
 in terms of their age or     engage them mentally, but      students are cognitively         exploration of content.
backgrounds. Students         others do not.                 engaged in them.                 Students initiate or adapt
are not engaged mentally.                                                                     activities and projects to
                                                                                              enhance understanding.

       iii. Grouping of Students
Instructional groups are     Instructional groups are        Instructional groups are         Instructional groups are
inappropriate to the         only partially appropriate to   productive and fully             productive and fully
students or to the            the students or only           appropriate to the students or   appropriate to the instructional
instructional goals.         moderately successful in         to the instructional goals of    goals of a lesson. Students
                             advancing the instructional     the lesson.                      take the initiative to influence
                             goals of the lesson.                                              instructional groups to
                                                                                              advance their understanding.

       iv. Instructional Materials and Resources
Instructional materials      Instructional materials and     Instructional materials and      Instructional materials and
and resources are            resources are partially         resources are suitable to the    resources are suitable to the
unsuitable to the            suitable to the instructional   instructional goals and          instructional goals and engage
instructional goals or do    goals, or students' level of    engage students mentally.         students mentally. Students
not engage students          mental engagement is                                              initiate the choice,
mentally.                    moderate.                                                        adaptation, or creation of
                                                                                              materials to enhance their
                                                                                              own purposes.

       v. Structure and Pacing
The lesson has no clearly    The lesson has a                The lesson has a clearly         The lesson's structure is
 defined structure, or the   recognizable structure,         defined structure around         highly coherent, allowing for
pacing of the lesson is      although it is not uniformly    which the activities are         reflection and closure as
too slow or rushed, or       maintained throughout the       organized. Pacing of the         appropriate. Pacing of the
both.                        lesson. Pacing of the           lesson is consistent.            lesson is appropriate for all
                             lesson is inconsistent.                                          students.


        d. Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness
       i. Lesson Adjustment
Teacher adheres rigidly to   Teacher attempts to adjust      Teacher makes a minor            Teacher successfully makes
 an instructional plan,      a lesson, with mixed results.   adjustment to a lesson, and      a major adjustment to a
even when a change will                                      the adjustment occurs            lesson.
clearly improve a lesson.                                    smoothly.

       ii. Response to Students
Teacher ignores or           Teacher attempts to             Teacher successfully             Teacher seizes a major
brushes asides students'     accommodate students'           accommodates students'           opportunity to enhance
questions or interests.      questions or interests. The     questions or interests.          learning, building on a
                              effects on the coherence                                        spontaneous event.
                             of a lesson are uneven.

           iii. Persistence
When a student has           Teacher accepts                 Teacher persists in seeking      Teacher persists in seeking
difficulty learning, the     responsibility for the          approaches for students who      approaches for students who
teacher either gives up or   success of all students but      have difficulty learning,       need help, using an extensive
 blames the student or        has only a limited             possessing a moderate             repertoire of strategies and
the environment for the      repertoire of instructional     repertoire of strategies.        soliciting additional resources
student's lack of            strategies to use.                                               from the school.
success.




                                                                                                                                 81
        e. Providing Feedback to Students
       i. Quality: Accurate, Substantive, Constructive, and Specific.

Feedback is either not     Feedback is inconsistent in   Feedback is consistently       Feedback is consistently high
provided or is of           quality: Some elements of    high quality.                   quality. Provision is made
uniformly poor quality.     high quality are present;                                   for students to use feedback
                           others are not.                                              in their learning.

       ii. Timeliness
Feedback is not provided   Timeliness of feedback is     Feedback is consistently       Feedback is consistently
in a timely manner.        inconsistent.                 provided in a timely manner.   provided in a timely manner.
                                                                                        Students make prompt use of
                                                                                         the feedback in their
                                                                                        learning.




                                                                                                                        82
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities
4.   Professional Responsibility
        a. Communicating with Families
                   i. Information About Individual Students
                  ii. Engagement of Families in the Instructional Program
                 iii. Information About the Instructional Program
        b.   Contributing to the School and District
                   i. Participation in School and District Projects
                  ii. Service to the School
                 iii. Relationships with Colleagues
        c.   Growing and Developing Professionally
                   i.    Service to the Profession
                  ii.    Enhancement of Content Knowledge and Pedagogical Skill
        d.   Maintaining Accurate Records
                   i.    Student Progress in Learning
                  ii.    Student Completion of Assignments
                 iii.    Non-instructional Records
        e.   Reflecting on Teaching
                   i.    Accuracy
                  ii.    Use in Future Teaching
        f.   Showing Professionalism
                   i.    Service to Students
                  ii.    Advocacy
                 iii.    Decision Making




                                                                                  83
4. Professional Responsibility
         a. Communicating with Families
        i. Information About Individual Students
 Teacher provides minimal    Teacher adheres to the          Teacher communicates with       Teacher provides information
  information to parents     school's required               parents about students'         to parents frequently on both
 and does not respond or     procedures for                  progress on a regular basis     positive and negative aspects
 responds insensitively to   communicating to parents.       and is available as needed to    of student progress.
 parent concerns about        Responses to parent             respond to parent concerns.    Responses to parent
 students.                   concerns are minimal.                                           concerns is handles with great
                                                                                              sensitivity.

            ii. Engagement of Families in the Instructional Process
 Teacher makes no            Teacher makes modest and        Teacher's efforts to engage     Teacher's efforts to engage
 attempt to engage            inconsistently successful      families in the instructional   families in the instructional
 families in the             attempts to engage              program are frequent and        program are frequent and
 instructional program, or   families in the instructional   successful.                     successful. Students
 such attempts are           program.                                                        contribute ideas for projects
 inappropriate.                                                                              that will be enhanced by
                                                                                             family participation.

        iii. Information About the Instructional Program
 Teacher provides little     Teacher participates in the     Teacher provides frequent       Teacher provides frequent
 information about the       school's activities for         information to parents, as       information to parents, as
 instructional program to    parent communication but        appropriate, about the           appropriate, about the
 families.                   offers little additional        instructional program.           instructional program.
                             information.                                                     Students participate in
                                                                                              preparing materials for their
                                                                                              families.

         b. Contributing to the School and District
        i. Participation in School and District
 Teacher avoids becoming     Teacher participates in         Teacher volunteers to           Teacher volunteers to
 involves in school and      school and district projects    participate in school and       participate in school and
 district projects.          when specifically asked.        district projects, making a     district projects, making a
                                                             substantial contribution.       substantial contribution, and
                                                                                             assumes a leadership role in
                                                                                             a major school or district
                                                                                             project.

        ii. Service to the School
 Teacher avoids becoming     Teacher participates in         Teacher volunteers to           Teacher volunteers to
 involved in school          school events when              participate in school events,   participate in school events,
 events.                     specifically asked.             making a substantial            making a substantial
                                                             contribution.                   contribution, and assumes a
                                                                                             leadership role in at least
                                                                                             some aspect of school life.

            iii. Relationships with Colleagues
 Teacher's relationships     Teacher maintains cordial       Support and cooperation         Support and cooperation
 with colleagues are         relationships with              characterize relationships      characterize relationships with
 negative or self-serving.   colleagues to fulfill the       with colleagues.                 colleagues. Teacher takes
                             duties that the school or                                       initiative in assuming
                             district requires.                                              leadership among the faculty.




                                                                                                                               84
         c. Growing and Developing Professionally
        i. Service to the Profession
Teacher makes no effort       Teacher finds limited ways      Teacher participates actively    Teacher initiates important
to share knowledge with       to contribute to the            in assisting other educators.    activities to contribute to the
others or to assume           profession.                                                      profession, such as
professional                                                                                   mentoring new teachers,
responsibilities.                                                                              writing articles for
                                                                                               publications, and making
                                                                                               presentations.

           ii. Enhancement of Content Knowledge
Teacher engages in no         Teacher participates in         Teacher seeks out                Teacher seeks out
professional development      professional activities to a    opportunities for professional   opportunities for professional
 activities to enhance        limited extent when they         development to enhance          development and makes a
knowledge or skill.           are convenient.                 content knowledge and            systematic attempt to
                                                              pedagogical skill.               conduct action research in his
                                                                                                classroom.

         d. Maintaining Accurate Records
        i. Student Progress in Learning
Teacher has no system         Teacher's system for            Teacher's system for             Teacher's system for
for maintaining               maintaining information on      maintaining information on       maintaining information on
information on student        student progress in learning    student progress in learning     student progress in learning is
progress in learning, or       is rudimentary and             is effective.                     fully effective. Students
the system is in disarray.    partially effective.                                             contribute information and
                                                                                               interpretation of the records.

        ii. Student Completion of Assignments
Teacher's system for          Teacher's system for            Teacher's system for             Teacher's system for
maintaining information       maintaining information on      maintaining information on       maintaining information on
on student completion of      student completion of           student completion of            student completion of
assignments is in             assignments is rudimentary      assignments is fully             assignments is fully
disarray.                      and only partially             effective.                       effective. Students
                              effective.                                                       participate in the maintenance
                                                                                                of records.

           iii. Noninstructional Records
Teacher's records for         Teacher's records for           Teacher's system for             Teacher's system for
noninstructional activities   noninstructional activities     maintaining information on       maintaining information on
are in disarray, resulting    are adequate, but they          noninstructional activities is   noninstructional activities is
in errors and confusion.      require frequent monitoring     fully effective.                 highly effective, and
                              to avoid error.                                                  students contribute to its
                                                                                               maintenance.

         e. Reflecting on Teaching
        i. Accuracy
Teacher does not know if      Teacher has a generally         Teacher makes an accurate        Teacher makes a thoughtful
a lesson was effective or     accurate impression of a        assessment of a lesson's         and accurate assessment of
 achieved its goals, or       lesson's effectiveness and      effectiveness and the extent     a lesson's effectiveness and
profoundly misjudges the       the extent to which             to which it achieved its        the extent to which it
success of a lesson.          instructional goals were met.   goals and can cite general       achieved its goals, citing
                                                              references to support the        many specific examples from
                                                              judgment.                         the lesson and weighing the
                                                                                               relative strength of each.




                                                                                                                                 85
        ii. Use in Future Teaching
Teacher has no            Teacher makes general          Teacher makes a few             Drawing on an extensive
suggestions for how a     suggestions about how a        specific suggestions of what    repertoire of skills, the
lesson may be improved    lesson may be improved.        he may try another time.        teacher offers specific
another time.                                                                            alternative actions, complete
                                                                                         with probable successes of
                                                                                         different approaches.

        f. Showing Professionalism
        i. Service to Students
Teacher is not alert to   Teacher's attempts to          Teacher is moderately active    Teacher is highly proactive in
students' needs.          serve students are             in serving students.            serving students, seeking out
                          inconsistent.                                                   resources when necessary.

           ii. Advocacy

Teacher contributes to    Teacher does not knowingly     Teacher works within the        Teacher makes a particular
school practices that      contribute to some            context of a particular team    effort to challenge negative
result in some students   students being ill served by   or department to ensure that    attitudes and helps ensure
being ill served by the    the school.                   all students receive a fair     that all students, particularly
school.                                                  opportunity.                    those traditionally
                                                                                         underserved, are honored in
                                                                                         the school.

        iii. Decision Making
Teacher makes decisions   Teacher's decisions are        Teacher maintains an open       Teacher takes a leadership
based on self-serving     based on limited though        mind and participates in team   role in team or departmental
interests.                genuinely professional         or departmental decision        decision making and helps
                          considerations.                making.                         ensure that such decisions
                                                                                         are based on the highest
                                                                                         professional standards.




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Profile of Facilitators of Student Learning and
    Achievement in Classroom and Digital
                 Environments
As Facilitators of student learning and achievement in classroom and digital environments, candidates at
the completion of the initial level of teacher education demonstrate a balance between the technical and
scientific components of teaching with the humanistic and artistry aspects of the teaching-learning process.
They demonstrate a greater understanding of human learning and development coupled with a concern for
the moral and social significance of their interactions with learners. They show concern and respect for all
students in holistic or integrative ways; and their facilitative interactions with learners represent high levels
of principled actions that foster in caring and compassionate ways, the development of learners as lifelong
learners. As exemplary facilitators of student learners, they speak and write English fluently. They are
confident in their acquired abilities and present themselves in an enthusiastic and self-assured manner.
They are responsible professionals who demonstrate good work ethics. As facilitators, they successfully
implement a repertoire of traditional and newer researched models of teaching based on selected learning
theories and educational concepts included in the programs. For example, such theories and concepts
based on the works of John Dewey (1916, 1937, 1960); Jerome Bruner (1961); Jean Piaget (1952, 1960),
Carl Rogers (1969, 1971, 1982), Lev Vygotsky (1962, 1978), and Howard Gardner (1999) are highlighted in
the various programs. The theories provide the facilitators with conceptual frameworks from which they
design effective lessons and innovative units of instruction. As facilitators, they demonstrate that they can
successfully design and orchestrate well-managed classroom and digital learning environments for different
types of learners and at varying levels of achievement. They promote a deeper understanding of content.
They assess student learning as well as critically analyze, evaluate and reflect on their professional work
with students. In short, candidates and completers of all programs demonstrate that they are able to teach
well i.e., engage in exemplary practice, conduct effective pedagogy, favorably impact student learning and
provide credible evidence of such work. They know subject matter, know and understand learners, work
well with families and colleagues, and are quite adept at teaching diverse populations of students. As
newer facilitators of student learning and achievement, they use technology in appropriate and innovative
ways. They take a leadership role when appropriate; use good judgment in difficult situations, and
demonstrate that they are able to orchestrate all the complex dimensions that operate during a teaching-
learning situation. The new professional role of facilitator of student learning serves, in many cases, as the
candidate’s foundation for other professional roles designed for the education arena. Becoming a newer
facilitator of student learning in a technologically, knowledge-producing era is emphasized at the initial level
of the candidate’s education and developed further at the professional level.

With regard to our newer conceptualization of the facilitator’s role, advances in technology have
transformed what teachers do on a daily basis with students. The teacher is no longer a dispenser of
information, but rather a facilitator of student learning in both classroom and digital environments. The
teacher of today, and in the future, is a facilitator of human development. He or she is also a facilitator of
skills that are needed by students to become lifelong learners and producers of knowledge in a
technologically oriented era. For poor and minority students, the acquisition of technological competences
can be the ultimate equalizer in this society. Their acquired abilities to access, analyze and produce new
knowledge are critical to everyone functioning effectively and successfully in the 21st century. Thus, as we


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enter a new era in education, the teacher’s role as a facilitator of student learning is also defined differently
than in the past, that is --

        he or she is a facilitator of human development and a facilitator of skills that develop students as
        lifelong learners. In a newer conceptualization of the facilitator’s role, the teacher acts in accord
        with good practice and conducts effective pedagogy in classrooms and digital environments that is
        directed at and supported by evidence of student learning and achievement.



Sample knowledge, skills, traits and dispositions that
underlie the role of facilitator of student learning and
achievement in classroom and digital environments.
Key Knowledge and/or Understandings:

        1.    working knowledge and understanding of human learning and development
        2.    working knowledge of diverse populations of students
        3.    working knowledge and understanding of learning theories and concepts
        4.    working knowledge and understanding of credible evidence and assessment of student
              learning and achievement
        5.    working knowledge of conceptualizations of teaching and the teaching-learning process
        6.    working knowledge of the role of the teacher as a facilitator of student learning and
              achievement
        7.    working knowledge of technology and the uses of technology in facilitating learning and
              achievement
        8.    working knowledge of techniques-tactics for managing digital and classroom environments
        9.    knowledge of inquiry-based pedagogy
        10.   knowledge of the development of students as lifelong learners
        11.   knowledge of content areas (subject matter) and related standards
        12.   knowledge of researched models of teaching-learning
        13.   awareness of ways of working with families, students, administrators and colleagues
        14.   awareness of circumstances and/or contextual factors or situations that affect and effect
              peoples’ lives and their ability to learn

Key Skills, Abilities, and Pedagogical Actions:

        17. observes, describes, analyzes, evaluates, and documents work
        18. critically reflects on work with peers, students, colleagues and parents
        19. identifies what is relevant and irrelevant in designated situations
        20. identifies and diagnoses errors and/or problems -- corrects errors, provides feedback, and
            assesses and evaluates performances
        21. designs generic and subject-specific tasks and environments to facilitate learning*
        22. manages both active digital and classroom environments directed at stimulating student
            interest and student learning*


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        23. assists and engages students to find, select, evaluate, make judgments about information and
            digital sources
        24. maintains social and intellectual climate to encourage learning in both classroom and digital
            environments*
        25. organizes and presents ideas and concepts in a logical and coherent manner
        26. provides and solicits via questions- explanations, rationales, credible evidence and
            justifications
        27. works in groups and with teams of individuals as well as works independent of others
        28. conducts critiques, reflections and evaluations
        29. interprets and translates research, facts, concepts, and ideas into actions
        30. learns something new or unfamiliar
        31. anticipates problems, obstacles, situations or events and designs or demonstrates
        32. ways to effectively achieve successful outcomes or solve problems
        33. predicts situations, outcomes or consequences of actions with reasonably accurate probability
            tags

[*Selected items adapted from Kay Vandergrift’s “Cyber City Education: A Future of Wonder,” and Jere
Brophy’s book entitled Subject-Specific Instructional Methods and Activities. List partially based on and
adapted from Brooks & Brooks, 1999 and von Glaserfeld, 1995]

Key Traits and Dispositions (across 4 areas):

Judgment

        10. knows that about the process of reasoning and use of learned intuition in situations of
        11. uncertainty or situations that require judgment
        12. knows how to reason and use learned intuition in situations of uncertainty or situations that
            require judgment
        13. knows when to reason and use learned intuition in situations of uncertainty
        14. reasons and uses learned intuition in situations of uncertainty
        15. distinguishes what is relevant and irrelevant
        16. perceives situations from many different perspectives
        17. knows what constitutes credible evidence and makes judgments concerning the quality and
            trustworthiness of something or information
        18. discerns credible evidence, or discerns what is authentic, truthful or reasonably accurate
        19. makes good judgment and good educational judgments in classroom and digital environments

[List is partially based on and adapted from Lee Shulman’s “six common places of a profession” (CPS,
1999); John Seely Brown’s view of judgment (Brown 1999a); and David Coulter and John Wiens’
discussion of Educational Judgment (Coulter & Wiens, 2002).

Compassion

        8. sensitive to the thoughts and feelings of others*
        9. thoughtful about the consequences of actions and the effect on others
        10. empathizes with others, commiserates, and sympathizes*


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        11. shows kindness and forgiveness when appropriate
        12. pays close attention to the needs of others*
        13. connects and relates professionally with the emotional lives of others*
        14. establishes, on a consistent basis, relations of care/compassion in an array of situations and in
            an array
        15. environments with all students, parents, and colleagues*

[* Item is adapted from Joseph Burger’s essay on “Diversity... Students’ Perception of How ‘Being
Different’ Interferes with Their Ability To Learn and Perform Well in School,” (in review); and Nel Noddings,
The caring teacher. In Virginia Richardson (Ed.), Handbook of research on teaching. Washington, DC:
American Educational Research Association.]

Innovation

        7. creates, invents or synthesizes in simple ways and/or in conceptually complex ways and
            assists other to do so
        8. searches to find something that is deemed relevant or meaningful to a situation and uses it in a
            new way
        9. sees, perceives and/or does something in a different way to improve a situation or make
            something better
        10. explores, experiments and discovers as well as assists others to do so
        11. makes metaphors and analogies as well as assists others in similar acts or activities
        12. designs or creates a new product

[List is partially based on and adapted from John Seely Brown’s book Seeing Differently: Insights on

Innovation and a chapter entitled “Synetics,” in Bruce Joyce and Marcia Weil’s Models of Teaching.

Leadership

        11.   takes initiative, responsibility and accepts level of accountability
        12.   builds trust and rapport with others
        13.   demonstrates confidence in self and others
        14.   undertakes classroom diagnosis through analysis
        15.   organizes and leads peer review and analysis of teaching practices
        16.   provides and contributes knowledge and support
        17.   participates or leads in classroom level decision making and curriculum development
        18.   engages others in collaborative action planning, learning, reflection and research
        19.   plays different roles (e.g., leader, participant) and teams up in different ways
        20.   encourages other to take on leadership roles

[List is partially based on and adapted from Barth (1999), Daniel (1998), Harris & Muijs (2002) and
Patterson (2001) discussions of leadership and leadership qualities.




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