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STANDARDS FOR

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 101

									 STANDARDS FOR

 LICENSURE AND
  ACCREDITION




  UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
 MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
COMMISSION FOR ACADEMIC
     ACCREDITATION



        2005
           1
                          FOREWORD
                   Quality in Higher Education

We live in a rapidly changing world in which knowledge conveys
power—the power to shape our economy, the power to shape our society,
and the power to shape our future. The colleges and universities of the
United Arab Emirates, governmentally- and privately- supported alike,
play an essential role as we seek to realize the tremendous potential of
this knowledge-based future. It is especially important, therefore, that
these institutions offer the highest quality academic programs that are
recognized both within the country and internationally for their
excellence.

To verify that the colleges and universities of the United Arab Emirates
operate at international standards of quality, the Commission for
Academic Accreditation of the Ministry of Education conducts a program
of licensure of colleges and universities and accreditation of each of their
academic programs. This revised edition of the Standards for Licensure
and Accreditation, 2005, has been prepared to match constantly evolving
world standards.

The 2005 edition of the Standards for Licensure and Accreditation is an
outcome of the continuous effort of the Ministry of Education to refine
the existing standards and procedures to ensure that newly established
institutions and programs—as well as existing ones—meet the highest
standards of quality and that graduates of accredited programs are
recognized by the Ministry of Education and by governments around the
world. As a result, students, graduates and their families can be confident
that accredited programs will deliver the high quality of education that
they expect and deserve.



Nahayan Mabarak Al Nahayan
Minister of Education
                                     2
The Standards for Licensure and Accreditation is fully the province of the
Commission for Academic Accreditation, which has the sole
responsibility for its contents.

Any question regarding the Standards should be addressed to:


               Commission for Academic Accreditation
                      Ministry of Education
                          P O Box 45133
                            Abu Dhabi
                         Tel. (02)6427772
                        Fax # (02) 6428488
                            www.caa.ae


This document is modified and revised from time to time to reflect
changing circumstances and conditions in the higher education
community. Each institution to which the Standards document applies is
obligated to meet all the requirements, regulations, and stipulations of the
most current edition.




                                     3
SECTION 1
Principles of Licensure and Accreditation
Providing educational opportunities in the U.A.E. is a privilege—not a
right—a privilege which is earned on a continuous basis and which
demands of each institution continuous high quality and an effective
system of institutional effectiveness and continuous improvement. The
Commission for Academic Accreditation uses two interrelated standards-
based quality assurance processes—institutional licensure and program
accreditation—to assess educational quality, thereby assuring members of
the public that the licensed institutions and the accredited programs they
offer indeed meet high standards. Further, the standards used have been
established so as to be at a level of quality acceptable to and recognized
by the academic community internationally. The standards are explained
in detail in this volume, Standards for Licensure and Accreditation
(2005), hereafter referred to as the Standards, published by the
Commission for Academic Accreditation of the United Arab Emirates.
The Standards and listings of licensed institutions and accredited
programs may be found on the web page of the Commission for
Academic Accreditation, www.caa.ae. The procedures and steps in the
licensure and accreditation processes are depicted in Figure 1, labeled
“Institutional Licensure and Program Accreditation Approval Process,”
are explained in the following sections of this chapter, and are described
in detail, step by step, in Appendices A and B.

Licensure signifies that the institution has a purpose statement appropriate
to higher education and possesses by-laws, regulations, policies,
procedures, resources, programs, quality assurance measures, personnel,
infrastructure, and facilities sufficient to accomplish its purpose initially
and on a continuous basis. Licensure, issued by the Ministry of
Education after successful review by the Commission for Academic
Accreditation, recognizes that students are graduating from an institution
of certified quality, academic rigor, distinction, and merit. The institution
so licensed is listed among the institutions recognized by the Ministry.
Institutions so listed are recognized internationally.

There are two stages in the Licensure process, and both demand the
highest quality from applicant institutions. The applicant institution first
applies for Initial Licensure. To be successful in this endeavor, it must
demonstrate that it has in place all policies, procedures, and human and
                                     4
physical resources required to begin to offer academic programs,
according to the steps described in detail in Appendix A.

If the institution is approved for Initial Licensure, then it may seek Initial
Accreditation for its academic programs. Only after it has achieved both
Initial Licensure and Initial Accreditation of the academic degree
programs it intends to offer may the institution begin to advertise its
programs and recruit and enroll students.

Initial Licensure is for a period of two years. The institution must apply
for and receive Licensure before the end of this two-year period in order
to be able to continue to offer academic programs. Licensure is for a
period up to five years and must continue to be renewed in order for the
institution to continue to offer academic degree programs in the UAE.

In addition to Initial Licensure and Licensure, the institution must achieve
and maintain accreditation of all academic degree programs that it offers.
Accreditation of an academic program attests to the overall quality of
each program and denotes that the program is demonstrating a
curriculum, faculty competence, faculty involvement and support,
pedagogical relevance, an environment conducive to learning, all
supported by adequate resources, such that the program meets
internationally accepted standards of quality. Successful completion of
an accredited program demonstrates the student’s intellectual, personal,
and professional ability to function effectively in a technological and
global society. The basic structure of the program, including its internal
evaluation system, assures that the program is continuing to contribute
significantly to the institutional purpose.

There are two stages to the program accreditation process. The first stage
is Initial Accreditation. An applicant institution is required to apply for
and be awarded Initial Accreditation of each academic degree program it
offers prior to advertising, recruiting students, or enrolling students for
the program. Once conferred, and as long as the program maintains a
high level of quality consistent with the Standards and verified by the
Commission for Academic Accreditation, Initial Accreditation applies to
the program until after it has graduates. Once the program has graduates,
the institution must apply for Accreditation of the program. Accreditation
is awarded for a period of five years. Both the process for Initial
Accreditation and the process for Accreditation require the review of the
program by a Visiting Committee of experts in the discipline, normally
drawn from outside the country in order to ensure that international
                                      5
standards of quality are being met.    Both stages of the accreditation
process are described in Appendix B.




                                  6
Institutional Licensure and Program Accreditation Approval Process



          Institutional Licensure                                                                                               Program Accreditation



  Step 1:Apply for Initial Licensure                                                                                   Step 1: Apply for Initial Accreditation


           Approved                    Receive Initial Licensure          Granted for 2 years
                                                                                                                       Schedule CAA Site-based Evaluation

            Denied                     Reapply after 1 year
                                                                                                                       CAA determines status of Initial Accreditation
                                                                                                                       application


                                                                                                                           Approved                 Start admitting students


                                                                                                                           Probation                Reapply within 6tmonths


                                                                                                                             Denied                   Do not start program


                    Step 2: Apply for Licensure                           Within two years of receiving Initial Licensure and if all eligible programs have
                                                                                             maintained their Initial Accreditation or Accreditation status


    Schedule CAA site-based Evaluation                                                                                       Step 2: Apply for Accreditation



           CAA determines status of Licensure                                                                                   Schedule CAA site-based Evaluation                   Within 2 yrs. of
                                                                                                                                                                                     grad.1st cohort

        Approved                         MOE public announcement of          Renew within 3 years                               CAA determines status of Accreditation Application
                                                 approved institution

                                                                                                                                Approved               Renew within 5 years
        Probation                      Stop admitting students: Correct      CAA reviews and
                                                             definition      determines time line                                                                                     CAA reviews and
                                                                                                                                Probation              Stop admitting students;      determines timeline
                                                                                                                                                       Correct deficiencies
          Denied                 Stop admitting Students                     Institution assists student
                                                                             enroll in other lic. Instit.                                                                            CAA determines if
                                                                                                                                  deineD               tgpittiDdnppniS students      application allowed
1.1     Licensure and Institutional Quality

Licensure, whether Initial Licensure or full Licensure, results from
thorough, careful, and continuous evaluation of the educational quality of
an institution, internally by the institution itself and externally by the
Commission for Academic Accreditation. Licensure is not granted lightly.
It presupposes that the institution has established a legal identity in the
UAE, has a governing entity responsible for the institution and its policies,
has primary responsibility for all programs its offers, offers its own
academic degrees in the UAE, conducts quantitative and qualitative
evaluation on a continuous basis, meets the requirements of the Standards,
and that the requirements of the Standards pervade the entire institution.
The awarding of Licensure presupposes that each program offered or to be
offered by the institution has achieved Initial Accreditation or
Accreditation by the Minister of Education through the review process of
the Commission for Academic Accreditation. Throughout this continuous
process, licensure:
     extends far beyond a simple and perfunctory audit of the
        minimum requirements of the Standards and
     insists on continuous quality assurance.

The requirements in each section of the Standards simply codify many of
the criteria generally accepted internationally and followed as measures of
quality. Each of these requirements is preceded by the word “MUST” and
is a requirement to be met.

For every requirement in the Standards mandating a policy or procedure,
the institution is required to ensure that the policy or procedure:
     exists in writing;
     has been approved through the appropriate institutional processes;
     is published in appropriate institutional documents accessible to
        those affected by the policy or procedure; and
     is implemented and enforced by the institution in a manner which
        can be documented and evidenced.

1.1.1   Applicability

Any institution located in the U.A.E. that provides in the U.A.E. regular,
theoretical, practical, or applied curricula of one academic year or longer
after the U.A.E. Secondary School Certification (or the equivalent) leading
to an academic degree is required to receive licensure in order to be
officially recognized by the U.A.E. Ministry of Education. The concept of
one academic year applies to any combination of programs (diplomas,
certificates, or courses) of any duration, if they yield what is equivalent to
a program of one academic year or longer.



                              8
Licensure is based on the requirements and the procedures of the
Standards. No institution can offer any course of study recognized by the
Ministry unless that institution has first obtained Initial Licensure or
Licensure and the programs it intends to offer have either been awarded
Initial Accreditation or Accreditation. It is the sole responsibility of the
institution to apply for licensure and accreditation and to adhere to the
requirements found in the Standards on a continuous basis.

The requirements of the Standards are applied equally, fairly, and
consistently to all institutions.

Initial Licensure is granted for two years. Licensure is granted for a
period of up to three years.

1.2     Accreditation and Program Quality

An institution having received Initial Licensure is required to begin the
program accreditation review process and receive, prior to offering any
courses leading to a degree, Initial Accreditation of each program it
intends to offer. No institution can offer an academic degree program or
any portion of such a program unless the Minister has first awarded that
program Initial Accreditation.

The determination of the accreditation status is made solely by the
Minister. The Commission is responsible for supervising the accrediting
process. The institution is responsible for attaining Initial Accreditation or
Accreditation for all of its programs and maintaining the status of
Accreditation. The institution is also responsible for bearing the costs of
international committee reviewing its programs, for complying with all
requirements of the Commission to supply documentation and related
information, for providing access to the institution and its faculty and staff
and records to the Commission and its Visiting Committees, and for
facilitating the scheduling of visits by the external experts and cooperating
fully with the review process.

1.2.1   Applicability

Every academic degree program proposed by an institution and all new
majors or concentrations that are recognized on a student’s graduation
certificate, diploma or transcript must have received, before being offered
to any student, the classification of Initial Accreditation. Before it applies
for Initial Accreditation status or seeks Accreditation, an institution is
required to have attained the status of Initial Licensure or Licensure as
noted above.




                              9
Initial Accreditation is applicable for a program in the planning stages of
development. This classification is based on the evidence that, at the time
of evaluation, the developing program has the potential for meeting the
requirements of an accredited program and the institution either has in
place, or has sufficiently documented that it will have in place, the
program effectiveness elements, the goals and objectives, the curriculum
and completion requirements, the appropriately qualified faculty, the
academic support services, the student support services, the administrative
and financial requisites, and other aspects of the program and its support
that meet all requirements of the Standards.

Once a program has achieved Initial Accreditation and within two years
following the graduation of its first cohort of students from the program,
the institution is required to apply for Accreditation classification. The
classification of Accreditation is for a period of up to five (5) years. After
the specified period following the approval of Accreditation, each
academic program is required to apply for renewal of Accreditation.

An institution offering a program that has not received and maintained
Initial Accreditation or Accreditation status is subject to losing its Initial
Licensure or Licensure, whichever is applicable, according to the
determination of the Minister.

1.3   Licensure and Accreditation Review Process

Final approval for Initial Licensure, Licensure, Initial Accreditation, or
Accreditation is granted by the Minister or by his authorized
representative. Evaluations for Initial Licensure and Licensure are
conducted by the staff of the Commission for Academic Accreditation,
with the assistance, as may be required, of external experts. Evaluations
for Initial Accreditation or Accreditation of academic programs are
conducted by an international committee of professional experts in the
discipline visiting the campus for this purpose, under the supervision of
the Commission staff. The Commission reserves the right, and has the
mandate, to make both scheduled and unscheduled visits to institutions to
assess the quality of their operations and their programs and to request,
and receive, any and all documentation and data that may required.

Detailed information about the licensure and program accreditation
processes are contained in Appendices A and B.




                              10
SECTION 2
Purpose, Planning, and Effectiveness
The concept of institutional effectiveness is central to all operations and
activities of an institution and is at the heart of the Commission’s licensure
and accreditation processes. Clearly articulated mission and vision
statements, goals, and measurable objectives (both educational and
operational) characterize an institution’s purpose. The purpose establishes
the foundation upon which an institution can assess and evaluate its
effectiveness and serves to inform the Commission’s actions and
decisions. It follows, therefore, that the Commission seeks clear and
detailed information about an institution’s purpose and requires the
institution to define its process for assessing and evaluating institutional
effectiveness in the context of its purpose.

2.1    Institutional Purpose

The institution is required to have a clearly defined purpose which is
appropriate to higher education and which articulates clearly and
accurately the institution’s specific educational role. The institution
MUST ensure that its purpose statement:
        describes accurately and truthfully the institution and its
           characteristics;
        includes goals and objectives (both educational and
           operational), where, at the very least, objectives are
           defined in measurable terms;
        reflects accurately and consistently the actual posture of
           the institution and its actual practice;
        is accurately described in appropriate publications;
        is approved by its governing entity; and
        is periodically reviewed to reflect any changes and
           differing responsibilities to its constituencies.

2.2   Institutional Planning and Evaluation

All evaluation activities of an institution, both educational and operational,
including educational programs (along with associated teaching and
advising), academic and administrative support services, and, where


                              11
applicable, research and outreach , must be well planned and there must be
a demonstration of how evaluation will be conducted regularly in the
interest of continuous improvement. The institution MUST:
         use planning as a base for the continuous evaluation
             and, consequently, the improvement of all its activities,
             including academic programs, teaching and advising,
             academic support services, student support services,
             administrative services, and, where applicable, research
             and public service;
         develop a strategic long-term plan that derives from its
             purpose statement, as well as detailed annual plans for
             the institution and each of its activities and services;
         have a timed action implementation plan that relates to
             its strategic and annual plans;
         involve all stakeholders in the planning process;
         use advisory panels, where appropriate and
             internationally practiced, to guide the planning process;
         ensure that the results of continuous evaluation are used
             as a main input in the planning process to guide budget
             planning and resource allocation; and
         develop a policy that governs the planning process and
             the periodic review of the institution's strategic plan.

2.3    Institutional Effectiveness

Institutional effectiveness requires that an institution be formally engaged
in evaluating its efficacy—and, consequently, its success in fulfilling its
purpose—and that it use this evaluation to drive a process of continuous
self-improvement. The expectations with respect to institutional
effectiveness herein pertain to all programs and all units of the institution.
An institution must provide a plan and indicate how it will address
institutional effectiveness in fulfilling its statement of purpose.
Specifically, an institution MUST:
     for the institution as a whole and for each of its academic
         programs and its academic and administrative support units,
         establish goals and objectives which derive from and support the
         purpose of the institution;
     develop a broadly based system to determine
         institutional effectiveness appropriate to the
         specific purpose of the institution;
     use the institutional purpose statement as the
         foundation of planning and evaluation;
     employ a variety of assessment methods to
         evaluate its success in achieving these goals
         and objectives;



                              12
       document the objectives of each method to
        be used, the time frame for its
        administration, the means to be employed to
        integrate the results of each method, and, on
        the basis of cumulative assessment results,
        the extent to which educational programs
        and services, as well as the educational and
        administrative support units, have been
        successful in realizing their respective
        objectives and, consequently, goals; and
       demonstrate the use of the results of
        planning and evaluation for making
        appropriate modifications in resources,
        programs, and services in the interest of
        continuous improvement.

2.3.1    Academic Programs and Academic Support Services

An institution MUST have in place and document its system for
evaluating the overall academic program and services and MUST collect,
maintain, and analyze the data supportive of this effort. This system
MUST include, but not be limited to:

       a model to assess the realization of the program or service
        goals and objectives by logically deriving the outcome
        statements in measurable terms that are pertinent to each
        objective;
       method of evaluation;
       instruments and the objectives of each instrument;
       a time-frame for the implementation of the instruments or
        administration of surveys;
       definition of the main responsible body/unit for
        implementing each instrument, the frequency and time of
        its implementation, and the target stakeholders involved;
       inter-relationship of instruments in determining overall
        program quality;
       process for authenticating data;
       means by which data will be analyzed;
       mechanism for integrating the results of each instrument;
       process for reporting data that includes both summary
        information and supporting raw data; and
       procedures for using data, on a schematic, regularly
        scheduled basis, to determine quality and to improve
        programs, curricula, courses, services, and operations.

As a component of this assessment system, each course that is offered


                             13
MUST be assessed. In designing the course evaluation system, an
institution MUST:
     ensure courses contain learning outcomes that address both
         content mastery and skills and can be described in
         observable, measurable, and achievable terms;
     ensure learning activities and modes of assessment are
         responsive to the needs of individual learners;
     document assessment of student achievement in each
         course and at the completion of the program, by comparing
         student performance to the intended learning outcomes;
     include a student evaluation component for every course to
         assess instruction and content;
     develop procedures for the ongoing review and updating of
         courses to ensure that each course is consistent with the
         academic program’s curriculum; and
     provide evidence for utilizing course evaluation data to
         identify significant indicators for improvement.

Relying upon quantitative and qualitative methodologies, the institution
MUST determine the performance-based assessment of course, teaching,
and program effectiveness by using such criteria and measures that
include, but are not limited to, the following:
     Student enrollment and retention rates with variations over time
       including:
        analysis of admissions and enrollment records;
        results of admissions tests for students applying to graduate or
           professional schools;
        completion rates;
        performance of student transfers at receiving institutions, where
           applicable;
        comparison with student satisfaction data; and
        analysis of advising services and the faculty/student advising
           relationship;
     The extent to which student learning matches intended outcomes
       including:
             evaluations of student performance at course- and
                program-levels;
             evaluation of internship or practical experience, where
                applicable; and
             review of student work and archive of student activities
                (portfolio) for program reviews;
     tMeasures of student competence in fundamental skills such as
       communication, comprehension, use of technology, and analysis
       including:
             assessment and evaluation of the general education
                program;


                            14
        assessment of students’ fundamental skills in
           communication, comprehension, and analysis through
           competency-based exams or LCMS statistics;
        results on standardized tests administered to assess specific
           professional competencies;
        results of students’ licensure examinations, where
           applicable;
        results of admission tests for students applying to graduate
           or professional schools;
        analysis of student program portfolios, where applicable;
        job placement rates;
        input from business and industry, as applicable, through
           program advisory board, surveys, and other sources; and
        evaluation by employers;
   Student satisfaction including:
        surveys of overall satisfaction with the experience of the
           offered programs and services with added focus on
           program communications, accessibility, reliability, stability
           of services and support, and developed sense of
           community;
        routine end-of course content and faculty evaluations,
           comprehensive end-of-program surveys, and periodic
           surveys focused on program services (i.e. post-admissions,
           post-registration, post-inquiry/use-of-any-service process);
           and
        follow-up with alumni;
   Faculty satisfaction including:
        surveys of overall satisfaction with professional
           development opportunities, instructional design and
           development services, technical support, compensation and
           incentives for developing courses, promotion and tenure
           considerations and
        formal and informal peer review processes; and
   Extent to which library and learning resources are used
    appropriately by students including:
        usage records concerning the use of library and learning
           resources and
        analysis of instructor assignments that require such usage;
           and
   Student satisfaction with the effectiveness of other academic
    support services including:
        adequacy and appropriateness of laboratory facilitates and
           equipment;
        appropriateness of technical support provided in laboratory
           or practical sessions;



                         15
            appropriateness of library collections, their currency,
             adequacy, and accessibility;
            appropriateness of library space, hours of operation, and
             services provided to students;
            effectiveness of academic advising; and
            appropriateness of IT facilities and services provided to
             students.

2.3.2   Student Support Services

An institution MUST have in place and document its system for
evaluating its overall student support services and MUST collect,
maintain, and analyze the data supportive of this effort. This system
MUST include, but not be limited to:
    admission services;
    registration services and accessibility to and protection of student
       records;
    personal counseling;
    career development;
    financial aid;
    health services;
    sport, social, and cultural activities; and
    residence halls, as appropriate.

2.3.3   Administrative Services

An institution MUST have in place and document its system for
evaluating its overall administrative services and MUST collect, maintain,
and analyze the data supportive of this effort. This system MUST include,
but not be limited to:
     governance and organizational structure;
     budget planning and control;
     facilities adequacy, maintenance, and services;
     safety and security; and
     alumni affairs.

2.4     Institutional Research

An institutional research unit traditionally has gathered, analyzed, and
disseminated to an institution’s constituents and publics data that represent
the success of the institution in fulfilling its purpose. That role has grown
now to encompass assurance of assessment and evaluation in support of
continuous improvement throughout the institution and its programs.

To fulfill this expanded role, the institution MUST:



                             16
       develop institutional research as an
        effective arm for assuring the
        collection and analysis of data and
        the dissemination of results for
        continuously improving, effective
        operation of the institution;
     incorporate institutional research as
        an integral part of the institution’s
        planning and evaluation process;
     assign administrative responsibility
        for conducting institutional research;
     allocate adequate resources and
        allow access to relevant information;
     incorporate into institutional research
        the following activities:
         ongoing timely data collection;
         analysis for and dissemination of results;
         use of external studies and reports;
         design and implementation of internal studies, including
             studies related to students, personnel, facilities, equipment,
             programs, services, and fiscal resources; and
         development of longitudinal databases suitable for
             statistical analysis for longitudinal effectiveness studies;
   provide institutional data to individual programs and units on a
    timely basis needed for the assessment of their respected units;
   provide annually a "Fact Book" or similar compendium of
    institutional and program effectiveness data and data related to
    students, faculty, student services, and administrative functions;
    and
   report data on the students, faculty, instruction, support
    services, administration, finances, continuous improvement
    results (consequent to assessments, evaluations, and
    changes), and other aspects of the institution to the
    Commission on a continuing basis, of a type, in a format
    and in accord with a schedule established by the
    Commission.




                          17
SECTION 3
Educational Program
This section requires the institution to focus its resources and energies on
the education of its students consistent with its purpose. The institution is
to demonstrate attention to curricular consistencies, pedagogical
competence, student accomplishment, intellectual inquisitiveness, personal
and professional development, ethical consciousness, appropriate methods
of instruction, faculty involvement and support, and an environment
conducive to learning. The institution is obligated to prepare its students
to function in an increasingly diverse, complex, and global society by
imparting to them a mastery of a body of knowledge and technical skills
and by providing opportunities for them to develop communication skills
appropriate to that society.

As a result, it is incumbent upon an institution’s faculty and administrative
officers to be actively engaged in a regular and systematic process of
review, assessment and revision of each component of its instructional
programs. The outcome of this effort is to ensure that the programs of
study consistently meet the highest standards of excellence possible and
are equivalent – irrespective of the instructional delivery approach being
used, be it face-to-face, at a distance or a combination thereof – in terms of
meeting internationally recognized standards for academic rigor, quality,
and effective pedagogical practices and for the quality of the educational
support services, instructional facilities, media, and technology under
which the program of study operates and is routinely delivered to students.

An educational institution is ultimately defined by the quality of its
teaching and learning environment. This quality is expressed through
effective strategic planning and measurable through discreet components
of the educational program, to include:
     academic rigor (intellectual standards, faculty preparation, learner
        readiness);
     models of delivery (traditional face-to-face, at a distance using new
        information media and electronic technologies, or blended/hybrid
        use of both print and electronic media, combining technology and
        face-to-face instruction); and
     institutional infrastructures including faculty development, student
        support, information tools and resources, facilities, and staff.




                              18
A defined accountability process that must include reflective evaluation
(portfolio-driven assessment grounded in quantitative and qualitative
measures) is essential to achieving and ensuring quality.

Regardless of delivery model, the essence of all instruction is linked to
standards of excellence in the process of curriculum design and
development and the appropriate integration of pedagogical best practices
for instruction. This process includes careful and deliberate attention to:
     developing an in-depth understanding of and integrating the
        characteristics of different learning styles into the curriculum and
        instructional design efforts;
     making allowances for the unique features of the instructional
        delivery system and instructional media that will come into play
        with the teaching-learning process; and
     being mindful of the currency and accuracy of the instructional
        content selected for delivery.
For those courses delivered through distance learning, it is particularly
important to tailor the distance education delivery system to the day-to-
day operating conditions under which students will access and work with
the instructional materials and media and the educational process will take
place.

3.1    Program Objectives

Of paramount importance to the area of curriculum and instruction is
assuring a level of quality in the instructional program commensurate with
the Standards.

The institution MUST ensure that:
    each of its undergraduate and/or programs has well-articulated
       goals and objectives;
    each objective is logically derived from a given goal of the
       program;
    program objectives are defined in measurable terms;
    all curricula are directly related and appropriate to:
        the purpose and goals of the operative educational
            context and the certificates or degrees awarded;
        the ability and preparation of the students admitted
            to the study programs; and
        the financial, human, and instructional resources of
            the educational institution; and
        all program goals and objectives are accurately
            described in appropriate publications.




                             19
3.2     Undergraduate Program

3.2.1   Undergraduate Admission

General admission policies and decisions regarding the size and character
of the student body MUST be established by the governing entity on
recommendation of the administration. However, the administration and
the faculty MUST implement the specific admission policies. The unit
responsible for administering the policies MUST be clearly identified. In
those institutions where various sub-divisions maintain separate admission
requirements, there MUST be institution-wide coordination of all
admission policies and procedures.

Admission policies MUST:
   be clearly defined and published for dissemination;
   be consistent with the educational purpose of the institution and
      program goals;
   include qualitative and quantitative requirements;
   admit only applicants who have graduated with a U.A.E Secondary
      School Certificate, or its equivalent, and who meet the minimum
      admission requirements set in the Ministerial Decrees No. 200/year
      2004 and No. 133/year 2005, in addition to other admission
      requirements for each academic program set by the institution to
      ensure that it admits only students with a record which predicts the
      applicant’s ability to make satisfactory progress at the institution;
   for programs using English as medium of instruction, require as
      part of the admission requirements a proficiency level of English
      language using a minimum TOFEL score of 500 or its equivalent
      of standardized English language test;
   specify criteria, including high school grades, for admission into a
      program that require higher proficiency in mathematics and/or
      sciences;
   include criteria regarding the amount of credit given for advanced
      standing;
   include conditions governing provisional or probationary
      admission, when appropriate;
   be followed consistently in the admission of all students;
   include safeguards whereby the institution admits only students
      whose interests and capabilities are consistent with the purpose of
      the institution and the program goals;
   clearly define for publication and dissemination transfer
      requirements listed below, while ensuring that they apply to
      students transferring from any institution in the U.A.E that is either
      a federal institution or licensed by the Ministry of Education as an
      institution of higher learning, or that is recognized foreign
      institution of higher learning:


                             20
        acceptance of students only from recognized
           institutions and programs;
        other specific requirements as may be appropriate to
           ensure success in the program;
        submission of official transcripts of credits earned;
        criteria or transfer articulation agreement, when
           appropriate;
        acceptance of transfer credit for those courses only
           that match in content the courses at the institution
           admitting the student;
        requirement that the student be in good academic
           standing—i.e., have a minimum cumulative grade
           point average, normally, of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale, or
           equivalent, for transfer to a similar program of
           study from that from which the student in
           transferring (if the student is not in good standing,
           he may be accepted in a probationary status to a
           different field of study, provided that only general
           education courses are accepted for transfer);
        a minimum cumulative grade point average of no
           less than 2.0 on a 4.0 scale or a grade of “C”, or
           equivalent, for each course to be transferred;
        a limit of total transferable credit hours of less than
           50% of the total hours required for the program
           completion requirements; and
        exclusion of duplicate credit for a given course; and
      ensure that all incoming students including transfer and re-
       admitted students, prior to their enrollment, are informed in writing
       of the credits earned from previous work and the course work to be
       completed in order to graduate;
      if distance learning programs are offered by the institution, provide
       criteria and processes for assessing student capability to succeed in
       those programs and apply this information to admission and
       recruitment policies and decisions; and
      be evaluated and assessed regularly.

The institution MUST ensure that its recruiting activities, materials, and
advertisements accurately and truthfully portray, without creating any
doubt about its autonomy, the institution and its licensure status with the
Ministry. An institution MUST show evidence that its admission and
retention policies and pertinent announcements are not compromised to
maintain or achieve a desired enrollment.

An institution MUST not award credit through experiential learning or
training provided by non-collegiate institutions or professional
certification.


                            21
3.2.2   Undergraduate Completion / Graduation Requirements

An institution MUST:
   be a U.A.E. licensed institution that has primary responsibility for
     awarding the degree recognized in the U.A.E. and for the integrity,
     rigor, outcome, and management of the academic program while
     ensuring compliance with the Commission’s requirements;
   in each degree program provide an appropriate sequence of courses
     leading to the degree;
   ensure that the total credit hours required for the degree completion
     is consistent with the international practice in the discipline;
   publish, for each of its programs, requirements appropriate to the
     program specifying the total credits, the number and distribution of
     credits in general education courses, major or area of concentration,
     and electives;
   publish standards for satisfactory progress such as a minimum
     cumulative GPA, minimum and maximum period allowed, and other
     pertinent degree requirements;
   provide policies governing probation and suspension of students
     who are unable to demonstrate satisfactory progress;
   provide a basic core of general education as specified in section
     3.2.3.2;
   demonstrate that, in accordance with the institutional purpose and
     program goals, its graduates of all degree programs have attained
     effective skills in reading and writing English, in oral
     communication in English, in mathematics, and in the use of
     computers;
   clearly define what is meant by a major, minor, or area of
     concentration and state the number of credits required for each,
     including an adequate number of hours with appropriate
     prerequisites required in courses above the elementary level;
   ensure that a minimum of 50 percent of the credit hours, including
     the majority of the final academic year course credit for the
     program, is earned through instruction by the institution located in
     the U.A.E. offering the program;
   require minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (C) on a 4.0
     points scale, or its equivalent; and
   ensure that each of its courses, except those clearly identified by the
     institution as remedial, is applicable as a requirement or elective in
     at least one of its degree or certificate programs.

3.2.3   Undergraduate Curriculum and Instruction

The institution MUST:
    prior to the development of any new degree program or
       specialization, complete a full scale needs assessment and identify


                            22
     resource requirements of support and proceed only after careful
     review by appropriate faculty and administrative bodies, approval
     by the governing entity, and attainment of Initial Accreditation
     from the Ministry;
    prior to the introduction of a minor ensure that the institution has a
     major or a degree program in the subject area of the minor;
    ensure that each program curriculum is directly related to and
     appropriate to institutional purpose and program goals and is
     applicable of the curriculum in the contemporary world;
    ensure that courses of study forming the program and the
     instructional design elements used in the course materials provide
     for timely and appropriate faculty-student and student-student
     interaction that facilitates effective learning;
    ensure that instructional media, techniques and policies operate in
     accordance with the stated purpose of the educational programs
     and be appropriate to the specific goals and objectives of the
     individual instructional courses forming the programs;
    have a clearly defined process by which each curriculum is
     established, regularly reviewed, evaluated, and updated as part of a
     systematic process which recognizes the various roles of the
     faculty, the administration, and the governing entity;
    use regular evaluations of all courses, instructional pedagogy, and
     the feedback and results obtained from the assessment process
     effectively in revising the curriculum to ensure quality and
     excellence in both the curriculum and instructional pedagogy;
    provide a frequent, systematic evaluation of instruction, revising –
     where appropriate – the instructional process based on the results
     of this evaluation;
    evaluate the effectiveness of the instruction of each course through
     student surveys and other means;
    ensure that each curriculum of applied oriented programs provides
     adequate practical or practicum/internship experience;
    assign for each major or concentration responsibility for program
     coordination, curriculum development, and review to a specific
     person who is employed full-time and is fully academically
     qualified;
    clearly and accurately describe its curricular offerings in published
     materials;
    ensure that each student enrolled in a course receives a syllabus on
     the first day of the class that includes the following:
     goals and objectives/outcomes of the course;
     course topics and contents distributed over a semester
       weeks;
     credit hours, specifying lecture and practical hours, as
       appropriate;
     pre-requisite(s) or co-requisite(s), as appropriate;


                           23
     methods for monitoring and authenticating student
         work, interactions, and examinations in distance
         learning;
     instructional materials and resources including
         required textbook, additional readings, software,
         websites, laboratory experiences, and field trips; and
     methods of evaluation including proportional
         distribution of marks assigned to tests, projects,
         practical work, reports, term papers, and other graded
         assignments;
   provide methods of monitoring students’ active participation in the
    learning process and of their taking of examinations to ensure the
    authenticity of their work, including on-site proctored examinations
    for distance learning students;
   ensure the instructional tools, technology, and media being used for
    the delivery of the curriculum are current and appropriate to the
    nature and objectives of the instructional programs;
   ensure a reasonable infusion of information technology into the
    curricula;
   ensure that methods of instruction including information technology
    and other resources used are appropriate to the goals, objectives,
    nature, and contents of each course;
   adequately support and critically evaluate all experimentation in
    teaching to improve instruction;
   use a variety of means to evaluate student performance, the
    evaluation to reflect concern for quality and to properly discern
    levels of student performance;
   publish its grading policies, including grading scales, and ensure that
    its grading practices are consistent with its policies;
   ensure the opportunity, in all courses offered in concentrated or
    abbreviated time periods, for preparation, reflection, and analysis
    concerning the subject matter by providing at least one calendar
    week of reflection and analysis for each hour of credit awarded and
    demonstrate that students completing such courses have acquired
    equivalent levels of knowledge and competencies to those acquired
    in traditional formats;
   exert ultimate control and supervision of all learning experiences
    including those conducted with outside agencies and for which
    credit is awarded;
   demonstrate that program length, clock hours or credit hours, and
    tuition and fee charges are appropriate for the curricula and the
    degrees and credentials offered;
   publish, and disseminate in appropriate publications its regulations
    and procedures whereby the student is given the opportunity to
    appeal for hearing his/her grievance regarding any matter dealing
    with instruction; and


                           24
   publish and disseminate in appropriate publications its regulations
    and procedures regarding the student’s re-sitting an examination;
    and
   provide specific guidelines for independent study, if offered, that
    ensures:
     adequate supervision and control;
     content and assessment that is comparable to regular
        courses;
     a limit of a maximum of nine semester hours during
        the entire span of a baccalaureate program and six
        semester hours for other undergraduate programs;
     a limit of three semester hours during a semester; and
     that such instruction occurs only during the later half
        of the program.

3.2.3.1 Remedial Programs/Courses

Remedial programs or courses are those that are designed to treat certain
deficiencies in a student's competencies that need to be addressed before
the student is qualified for study for academic credit at the post-secondary
level. An institution MUST not award credits for any remedial courses or
credits. An institution may design placement tests to identify a student’s
competencies in these areas. The institution MUST ensure that such
placement tests are evaluated regularly against standardized tests that are
recognized internationally. The institution MUST maintain accurate
records of students' performance on placement tests and students'
enrollment in and performance in remedial programs or courses. The
institution MUST evaluate regularly the effectiveness of its remedial
program or courses.

3.2.3.2 Core General Education Requirements

Each institution MUST develop a general education program consisting of
core general education courses. The institution MUST:
     describe the general education program and its requirements in its
       Catalog and other appropriate publications;
     have clearly defined outcomes of the program and describe these in
       its Catalog and other appropriate publications;
     have in place a system to evaluate regularly the general education
       program and the courses that comprise it and make improvements
       as may be required;
     provide an orientation to the program for faculty who teach courses
       in the program;
     include within the undergraduate academic degree program a
       minimum of



                             25
     30% of the total hours in the certificate, diploma,
       associate degree, or higher diploma program, or
     30 hours of the total semester hours required in the
       baccalaureate program;
    include within the undergraduate degree programs of two or more
     academic years the following three-credit courses:
     one or more courses in Islamic studies, history, or
       culture;
     one or more courses in humanities or arts;
     one or more courses in English or Arabic or other
       languages;
     one or more courses in social or behavioral sciences;
     one or more courses in natural or physical sciences;
       and
     one or more courses in mathematics, information
       technology, or both.

Exceptions to the immediately preceding bullets may be granted to
exclusively technical or occupational programs.

3.2.3.3 Practicum/Internship

Long accepted for its intrinsic educational value in disciplines such as
medicine and other health sciences, engineering, and education, the
practicum/internship is recognized in most academic disciplines as a vital
learning experience, enriching the undergraduate curriculum and bridging
program theory and its application in the work force, consistent with the
program objectives. Adequate practicum or internship opportunity MUST
be offered as an effective tool of instruction in such applied oriented
programs.

In providing the practicum/internship, the institution MUST:
     develop, publish, and disseminate to all involved with the
       practicum/internship specific guidelines stated in an Internship
       Manual indicating:
       the objectives, the learning experiences, and the
          expected outcomes to be derived;
       the responsibilities of the training supervisor, if
          appropriate, in supervising and evaluating the student;
          the amount of academic credit hours to be earned, if
          applicable;
       whether the practicum/internship is a curriculum
          requirement;
       when        in     the    student’s     curriculum    the
          practicum/internship should be taken;
       the total number of hours required;


                            26
         the method by which the student is evaluated; and
         the process of site selection;
       keep on file the justification for the total hours required; for the
        number of credit hours granted, if applicable; and for its being a
        requirement in the curriculum, if applicable;
       ensure that the practicum/internship is supervised by faculty
        responsible for the program to which the practicum/internship
        applies;
       document, keep current, and have on file the official agreement with
        each training site, defining the responsibilities and obligations of
        both the institution and the training site;
       assume full responsibility for the appropriateness of the training site
        and the educational quality of its environment;
       interweave the training experience of the practicum/internship with
        the theory taught in the program;
       and regularly evaluate the practicum/internship program, using the
        results to improve that program and, where appropriate, the total
        academic program to which the practicum/internship applies.

3.2.4    Undergraduate Academic Advising

Each institution is required to have a systematic, effective program of
undergraduate advising. Such a program MUST:
    assign early in the student’s program a qualified advisor to
       recognize the individuality and the particular needs and goals of
       each student;
    provide advisors who are proficient in using data to help determine
       students’ major fields of interest and academic capabilities, who
       have access to each advisee’s records, who have adequate
       knowledge of the student’s field of study, who remain current with
       the changes taking place in the student's area of study, and who
       have appropriate background, training, and experience to carry out
       their responsibilities effectively;
    ensure that the number of advisees assigned to faculty or
       professional staff is reasonable;
    include an effective orientation program available to all students;
    provide appropriate plan guiding students to complete the program
       in a timely manner; and
    be evaluated regularly and the results used to enhance assistance to
       students.

3.3      Graduate Program

Prior to introducing one or more graduate programs, an institution MUST
develop comprehensive academic policies and procedures that concern its
graduate programs.


                               27
The institution MUST:
   before embarking on any new graduate curriculum, demonstrate that
      it has conducted a thorough assessment of program needs, student
      availability, environmental factors, and resource requirements, and
      has determined the financial implications for the institution;
   before offering any new graduate program, obtain the Initial
      Accreditation from the Commission in advance of the admission of
      students;
   ensure that the administration and faculty are responsible for the
      development of new academic programs to be recommended to the
      governing entity;
   demonstrate that each of its graduate programs has curricula and
      resources substantially beyond those provided for each
      undergraduate program;
   include in its graduate studies, and support through adequate
      resources, research, scholarly activity, and advanced professional
      training; and
   provide competent and productive faculty who have adequate
      research experience, adequate computer and laboratory facilities, a
      library adequate to support graduate research of faculty and students,
      and an appropriate administrative organization.

3.3.1   Graduate Admission

An institution MUST:
  establish qualitative and quantitative requirements which
     result in the admission of students whose educational
     preparation indicates the potential for a high level of
     performance, based on performance in undergraduate degree
     programs and other indicators of ability and aptitude;
  require that the applicant has earned an
     appropriate recognized baccalaureate
     degree and submit, as part of the
     formal application process, official
     undergraduate transcripts of credit
     earned from all institutions of higher
     education previously attended and
     other appropriate documents pertaining
     to the readiness of an applicant for
     graduate work;
  publish all admission criteria for graduate work;
  clearly define for publication and dissemination transfer
     requirements listed below, while ensuring that they apply to students
     transferring from any institution in the U.A.E that is either a federal
     institution or licensed by the Ministry of Education as an institution


                             28
    of higher learning, or that is recognized foreign institution of higher
    learning:
     specific requirements that ensure success in the
         program
     acceptance of students only from recognized
         institutions and programs;
     submission of official transcripts of credits earned;
     accept for transfer toward a graduate degree only
         graduate course work relevant to the degree, with
         course content and level of instruction resulting in
         student competencies equivalent to those of students
         enrolled in the institution’s graduate programs;
     acceptance of students who are in good academic
         standing only; i.e., who have a cumulative grade point
         average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, or its equivalence;
     a minimum grade of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, or equivalent,
         (“B” or its equivalent) for each course to be
         transferred;
     a limit of total transferable credit hours to less than
         50% of the total credit hours required for the program
         completion requirements;
     exclusion of duplicate credits for a given course; and
     ensure that all incoming students including transfer and
         re-admitted students are informed, prior to their
         enrollment, of the credits earned for previous work and
         the course work to be completed in order to graduate;
     require for students entering a doctoral degree program completion
      of a Master degree in an appropriate discipline with a CGPA
      (cumulative grade point average) of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale;
     not award credit for experiential learning;
     formulate separate admission criteria for each level of graduate
      degree offered (graduate certificate, diploma, masters, doctoral);
     if distance learning programs are offered by the institution, provide
      criteria and processes for assessing student capability to succeed in
      those programs and apply this information in admission and
      recruitment policies and decisions;
     develop and publish policies which clearly define probationary or
      conditional admission, if any, including the requirements for being
      removed from that status and the time limits for how long a student
      may remain in that status;
     establish admission criteria policies and procedures with
      representation by faculty responsible for instruction in the given
      program;
     publish both the general criteria for admission and any special
      admission criteria for individual programs; and
     regularly evaluate its admission policies.


                           29
3.3.2   Graduate Completion Requirements

The institution MUST:
   provide policies governing probation and suspension of students
      who are unable to demonstrate satisfactory progress;
   be the institution that has primary responsibility for awarding the
      degree recognized in the U.A.E. and for the integrity, rigor,
      outcome, and management of the academic program while ensuring
      compliance with the Commission’s requirements;
   ensure that the total credit hours required for the degree completion
      is consistent with the international practice in the discipline; and
   in each degree program provide an appropriate sequence of courses
      leading to the degree.

Graduate completion requirements MUST:
   be formulated by the faculty teaching in the program and approved
     by an appropriate body representing the institution;
   for a master or postgraduate diploma program include a substantial
     proportion of taught course work;
   for a doctoral program include at least one year of taught course
     work;
   include the following:
       residency requirements;
       thesis requirements, as appropriate;
       minimum number of hours required for a degree;
       minimum and maximum time for degree
           completion;
       minimum “B” cumulative grade point average, or
           equivalent (a 3.0 on a 4 point scale, or equivalent);
       satisfactory academic progress standards; and
       the type of qualifying and exit examinations the
           student must pass;
     be appropriate to the degree and program being offered;
     be published in the official catalog and distributed to all incoming
       graduate students, with any special completion requirements of
       individual academic units; and
     ensure for transfer students that a minimum of 50 percent of the
       credit hours are earned through instruction at the U.A.E.
       institution offering the program, including the major components
       of the program such as the thesis.

3.3.3   Graduate Curriculum and Instruction

The institution MUST demonstrate that its curriculum of a given graduate
program is distinctive from and substantially superior to the curriculum of


                            30
undergraduate program in the same field.

The curriculum of a graduate program MUST demonstrate that it:
    is at a level of complexity that significantly extends the knowledge
       and intellectual maturity of the student;
    requires its students to analyze, explore, question, reconsider, and
       synthesize old and new knowledge and skills;
    affords the depth of education, the specialized skills, and the sense
       of creative independence allowing the graduate to achieve the
       outcomes anticipated in the program’s goals and objectives and to
       practice and contribute to a professional or scholarship field;
    has significant research component, appropriate to the program
       goals and objectives and design;
    does not permit combined instruction of graduate and
       undergraduate students;
    is carefully planned and directly related and appropriate to the
       purpose and goals of the institution and the goals and objectives of
       the degree program (see Section 3.1);
    ensures that courses and course materials provide for timely and
       appropriate faculty-student and student-student interaction that
       facilitates effective learning;
    utilizes instructional media, techniques, and policies that are in
       accordance with the stated purpose of the educational programs
       and that are appropriate to the specific goals and objectives of the
       individual instructional courses forming the programs; and
    distinguishes significantly in rigor and student expectations
       between a course of study leading to a master’s or high diploma
       degree (or equivalent) and a course of study leading to the
       doctorate.

The institution MUST:
    use regular evaluations of all courses, instructional pedagogy, and
       the feedback and results obtained from the assessment process
       effectively in revising the curriculum to ensure quality and
       excellence in both the curriculum and instructional pedagogy;
    have a clearly defined process by which the curriculum is
       established, regularly reviewed, evaluated, and revised as part of a
       systematic process which recognizes the various roles of the
       faculty, the administration, and the governing entity;
    provide a frequent, systematic evaluation of graduate instruction,
       revising – where appropriate – the instructional process based on
       the results of this evaluation;
    evaluate the effectiveness of the instruction of each course through
       student surveys and other means;




                            31
     ensure full control of its curricula, including curricular design and
      development, course content, course evaluation, student interaction
      and student evaluation;
     clearly and accurately describe its curricular offerings in published
      materials;
     provide graduate faculty members who are productive, creative
      research scholars and who are available to their students;
     ensure an environment which supports and encourages research,
      scholarly interaction and accessibility among faculty and students
      consistent with the qualitative intent of the Standards;
     provide instructional methods and delivery systems to allow
      students to achieve the stated objectives of a course or curriculum;
     ensure that its instructional methods utilize appropriate information
      technology and other resources;
     adequately support and critically evaluate experimentation in
      teaching methods to improve instruction;
     ensure that each student enrolled in a course receives a syllabus on
      the first day of the class that includes the following:
       goals and objectives of the course;
       course topics and contents;
       credit hours, specifying lecture and practical hours,
          as appropriate;
       pre-requisite(s), as appropriate;
       methods by which instruction will be delivered and,
          if instruction is delivered via technological means,
          the kind of technology and type and level of
          technological skills required of the student;
       instructional material and resources including
          required textbooks, additional readings, software,
          laboratory experiences, and websites; and
       methods of evaluation including proportional
          distribution of marks assigned to tests, projects,
          practical work, reports, term papers, and other
          graded assignments;
   publish grading policies including grading scales, ensuring that its
    grading practices are consistent with its policies;
   provide the instructional tools, technology and media being used for
    the delivery of the curriculum are current and appropriate to the
    nature and objectives of the instructional programs;
   ensure the opportunity, in all courses offered in concentrated or
    abbreviated time, for preparation, reflection, and analysis concerning
    the subject matter by providing one calendar week of reflection and
    analysis for each hour of credit awarded and demonstrating that
    students completing such courses have equivalent levels of
    knowledge and competencies to those acquired in traditional
    formats;


                           32
   ensure a system for assigning students to their advisors or directors,
    for appointing their graduate committees, and for monitoring their
    academic progress;
   provide methods for monitoring and authenticating student work,
    interactions, and examinations in distance learning, including on-site
    proctored examinations;
   establish and publish regulations and procedures whereby the
    student is given the opportunity to appeal for hearing his/her
    grievance regarding any matter dealing with instruction;
   provide appropriate publications pertaining to its regulations and
    procedures whereby the student is given the opportunity to re-sit an
    examination;
   provide policies and guidelines concerning supervision and
    examination of thesis;
   provide specific guidelines for independent study, if offered, that
    ensures:
       adequate supervision and control;
       content and assessment that is comparable to
          regular courses;
       a limit of a maximum of six semester hours, or
          equivalent, during the entire span of the graduate
          program, not including the thesis or research
          project; and
       ensure that such instruction occurs only during the
          later half of the program.

3.3.4   Distinction in Graduate Levels

A program leading to a master’s or high diploma degree (or equivalent)
MUST be the equivalent of at least one year of full time graduate study
and provide:
    an understanding of research and the way
       research is conducted;
    an understanding of the discipline—its
       subject matter, literature, theory, and
       knowledge;
    an association with resident faculty
       sufficient top permit their individual
       evaluation of the candidate’s capabilities;
    a demonstrated means of certifying the
       knowledge and skills which the candidate
       has acquired;
    a demonstrated effective relationship
       between curricular content and current
       practice in the field of specialization; and
    -in the case of a non-research oriented


                           33
       professional       master’s degree,  a
       demonstrated understanding of accepted
       practices in the field.
     
The institution MUST demonstrate that program length, credit hours, and
tuition and fees are appropriate for the master’s and high diploma degrees
(or equivalent) and any other credentials it offers.

A program leading to the doctoral degree MUST:
    provide for substantial mastery of the
       subject matter, theory, literature, research,
       and methodology of a significant part of the
       field, including language, statistical, or other
       skills necessary to its pursuit;
    provide for independent research as
       evidenced by a doctoral thesis;
    include a substantial period of residence to
       provide the student access to a wide range of
       support facilities including a research
       library; and well equipped laboratories for
       research in the discipline;
    include at least one year of taught course
       work;
    provide          significant       faculty/student
       interaction, opportunities for exposure to
       and engagement with cognate disciplines
       and their research scholars, and significant
       peer interaction among graduate students;
    provide the opportunity for a mentoring-
       apprentice relationship between faculty and
       students as well as adequate time for in-
       depth faculty evaluation of students;
    demonstrate that program length, credit
       hours, and tuition and fees are appropriate
       for its doctoral degree;
    conduct frequent, systematic evaluations of
       graduate       curricula      and       program
       requirements; and
    integrate research with instruction.

For appropriate professional doctoral programs, a project may be
substituted for the research thesis. In such cases, the institution MUST:
    demonstrate a substantial level of competency appropriate to a
        doctoral degree and
    demonstrate a clear relationship between curricular content and
        current practices in the field of specialization.


                              34
3.3.5   Graduate Academic Advising

The institution is expected to conduct a systematic, effective program of
graduate academic advising. Such a program MUST:
    assign early in the student’s program a qualified advisor to
       recognize the individuality and the particular needs and goals of
       each student;
    provide advisors who are proficient in using data to help determine
       students’ major fields of interest and academic capabilities, who
       have access to each advisee’s records, who are well familiar with
       the students’ fields of study, and who have appropriate
       background, training and experience to carry out their
       responsibilities effectively;
    ensure that the number of advisees assigned to faculty or
       professional staff is reasonable;
    include an effective orientation program available to all students;
       and
    be evaluated regularly and the results used to enhance assistance to
       students.

3.4     Publications and Announcements

The institution MUST ensure that its announcements and publications
accurately and truthfully portray, without creating any doubt about its
autonomy, the institution and its licensure and accreditation status with the
Ministry and depict only those programs that are either recognized by the
Ministry or have been granted written permission from the Ministry to be
announced.

The institution MUST:
   produce and distribute publications and announcements which, in
      content and design, accurately, truthfully, and consistently describe
      the institution—its by-laws, regulations, policies, and practices—as
      well as the actual programs that it currently offers and the status of
      the licensure and accreditation of its programs by the Commission;
   publish its current catalog, faculty handbook/manual, and student
      handbook/manual;
   make available its publications to the appropriate users;
   include in its current catalog the following information:
         institution’s purpose and goals;
         complete admission criteria;
         academic calendar;
         organizational structure of the institution with
            appropriate titles or names of its units and offices;
         degree programs that are recognized by the Ministry


                             35
       and that are offered, along with their curricula and
       course description;
    degree completion/graduation requirements;
    regulations governing academic standing and
       progress;
    student academic advising;
    tuition and other fees and their related policies;
    refund policies;
    a roster of full-time faculty, listing their ranks, all
       their earned degrees, institutions from which their
       degrees were earned, and the years they earned their
       degrees;
    methods used for instruction;
    methods for assessing student participation in the
       learning process;
    educational support services available; and
    other items pertinent to attending the institution or
       withdrawing from it;
 include in its student handbook/manual the following information:
    an institutional guide to student behavior;
    statement on students rights and responsibilities;
    disciplinary policies;
    appeals process for airing student grievances;
    student counseling services;
    student career planning services;
    student support services including transportation,
       dormitories, food services, sport facilities, social
       activities, and entertainment;
    policies governing student associations, alumni
       associations, and publications;
    spiritual facilities;
    student health services; and
    financial aid; and
  include in its faculty handbook/manual the following information:
    policies governing faculty recruitment
      and appointment;
    definition of academic ranks and the
      minimum qualifications required for
      rank;
    faculty        roles,      rights,   and
      responsibilities;
    policies and procedures pertinent to
      faculty promotion;
    salary ranges for each academic rank
      and criteria for salary increases;
    professional development policies


                        36
           providing guidance and adequate
           resources;
          policies governing teaching loads;
          processes for faculty evaluation;
          definition,    role,     responsibilities,
           rights, and teaching load of part-time
           faculty;
          policies on intellectual property rights;
          disciplinary procedures and appeals;
          grievance procedures;
          key provision of faculty contract
           including probation period, terms of
           contract;
          various benefits and allowances, and
           terms of renewal and termination;
           procedures of contract renewal; and
           grounds and procedure for contract termination.

3.5    Distance Learning

Those institutions that engage in both distance education and traditional
education MUST comply with the requirements of the current edition of
the Standard for Licensure and Accreditation for its traditional program
and the current edition of the e-Learning/Distance Learning Standards of
Licensure and Accreditation for its distance education courses and
programs.

Distance learning involves teaching and learning that takes place with the
student and instructor physically separate from one another but interacting
primarily through the use of telecommunications, digital, or other
electronic communication technologies. Assuring a level of quality
commensurate both with the standards of the institution and those
prescribed by the Commission is of paramount importance to the area of
curriculum and instruction, as applied to distance learning delivery media,
methods and approaches. As such, the instructional program, the courses
of study that form the program, and the instructional design elements used
in the course materials MUST provide for timely and appropriate faculty-
student and student-student interaction that facilitates effective learning.
To this end, faculty engaged in the delivery of distance learning programs
MUST assume responsibility for and exercise oversight of the curriculum
and instruction, ensuring both the rigor of the programs and the quality of
instruction. The outcome of this effort, uppermost, is designed to ensure
that the programs of study meet the highest standards of excellence in
terms of meeting the varied internationally recognized expectations for
academic rigor, quality, best pedagogical practices and educational
program support services important to the long-term success of the


                             37
students being served via these new instructional delivery modalities.

Should an institution, therefore, become engaged in distance learning
delivery, it MUST:
    be fully responsible for the courses and programs offered, the faculty
        who teach them, the support services provided for them, and their
        assessment and evaluation;
     formulate clear and explicit goals for its distance learning
        programs;
     demonstrate that its distance learning programs are consistent with
        the institution’s stated purpose;
     ensure that its faculty in residence are fully aware of course
        content and delivery of those courses offered by distance learning;
     demonstrate that its distance learning programs comply with all
        applicable Standards requirements;
     develop distance education policies concerning ownership of
        materials, faculty compensation and workload, copyright issues,
        and the utilization of revenue derived from the creation and
        production of software, courses or other media products;
     have methods by which institutions ensure consistently high
        quality in content, pedagogy, and educational experiences in cases
        in which a course is offered both by distance learning and
        traditional delivery;
     have in place methods that ensure monitoring and authenticating of
        student work, interactions, and examinations, including on-site
        proctored examinations for distance learning students;
     provide appropriate training for faculty who teach in the distance
        education programs in the best practices of pedagogy and facilitate
        the technological proficiency essential for them to work effectively
        with the course/program instructional delivery media; and
     provide appropriate support and training for students to develop
        proficiencies with the technology that are essential for their active
        participation in the learning process;
     provide guidance to students in their selection of courses
        appropriate to their preparation, including their mastery of the
        technology required to complete course requirements satisfactorily;
        and
     ensure security and confidentiality of all assessments of all
        students' performance in a course.

3.6    Continuing, Professional, Outreach, and Service Programs

The changing nature of the workplace environment driven by such
external factors as the information and knowledge-base explosion places
special requirements on individuals to remain current in some form of
both formal and non-formal life-long learning and a continuing education


                             38
program designed to periodically upgrade and assist them to remain
current in their knowledge base, skills and abilities, or what international
educational experts are calling “life journey” workplace competencies. As
a result, most institutions of higher education have incorporated into their
mission and purpose a continuing and professional education role, which
also is referenced as extension and public service instruction to provide for
life-long learning opportunities that as a rule do not carry requirements or
expectations for the award of academic credit, titles or degrees. Rather, the
successful completion of the study program or modularized courses of
instruction are focused on the acquisition of pre-established threshold
levels of proficiency or demonstrable technical competencies, skills or
abilities. These opportunities are often referred to as continuing or
extension education, professional development, outreach, or public and
community service programs. Such programs may be credit or non-credit
bearing, may be offered both in campus and off-campus, and more often
than not may also include the integration a variety of instructional delivery
systems that include technology-based distance education components.
Given the growing importance of these types of instructional programs in
the socio-economic evolution of communities and individual lives, it is the
Commission’s policy to provide guidance and oversight important to the
development, implementation and expected outcomes of these efforts to
provide a level of qualitative standards important to both the providers and
consumers of these educational program services.

To these ends, continuing and professional education, outreach, and
service programs of this nature that are linked to lifelong learning
expectations MUST have clearly defined goals and objectives, which
MUST be clearly related to the purpose of the institution and the students
being served.

Furthermore, an institution of higher education, either alone or as part of a
partnership or consortium, which seeks to offer a continuing education,
outreach, or service program of one academic year or more leading to an
academic or professional degree, either in an on-campus or off-campus
setting, or integrating a combination of face-to-face and print or electronic
communication media with a distance learning component, MUST consult
with the Commission about its initial plan and obtain the Commission’s
written permission to submit its application for Accreditation-Eligible
classification. It is further incumbent upon an institution engaged in
continuing and professional development programs to be actively engaged
in a regular and systematic process of review, assessment, and revision of
each of its instructional programs to ensure that these programs of study
consistently meet the highest standards of excellence for student learning
success.

All continuing and professional development, outreach, and service


                             39
programs offered for some form of certification or academic credit MUST
also comply with the requirements of the these Standards in their totality.

All such credit-bearing programs MUST be reviewed and approved by the
Commission, prior to announcing and implementing the program, and
MUST on a periodic and regular basis be evaluated and the results thereof
be used to revise and improve the instructional program as appropriate, as
detailed in other sections of the Standards.

And finally, an institution MUST not award academic credit or
certification for continuing and professional development, outreach or
service educational programs of studies undertaken on a non-credit basis.

3.7    Student Records

The institution MUST have adequate student records for credit courses.
Official and original student academic records MUST be maintained and
stored in one central office at the institution. Complete back-up files, such
as facsimiles, microfilm or electronic data banks, MUST be maintained
continually, one set stored in a secure area outside the records office,
preferably in a different building or at an off-site location accessible to the
designated institution’s personnel. The institution MUST take all steps
necessary to ensure the security of its student records, including storage in
a secure vault or fireproof cabinet. Since computer generated and stored
records present unique security problems, the institution MUST have in
place special security measures to protect and back up the data.

The institution MUST have a coherent student record keeping policy that
includes statements addressing what constitutes the permanent record of
each student, who has access to student records, and who has the right to
manage and update student records, as well as statements concerning
retention and disposal of records. It MUST establish and publish
information-release policies that respect the rights of individual privacy,
the confidentiality of records, and the best interests of the student and
institution.

3.8    Faculty

The selection, development and retention of a competent faculty attracted
from a variety of diverse educational, and cultural backgrounds at all
academic levels is of major importance to the educational quality of an
institution.   The commitment of faculty to institutional purposes
determines in large measure the effectiveness of the total educational
program. An institution provides evidence that it has employed faculty
members qualified to accomplish its purpose. Because of the importance
of the faculty, during all program and institutional evaluations the


                              40
Commission will give special attention to all criteria pertaining to faculty.

Irrespective of the teaching environment (traditional or distance learning),
institutions are required to demonstrate attention to issues of faculty
workload, compensation, ownership of course-related intellectual
property, and professional evaluation. The institution MUST provide
participating faculty with technical, design, and production support
services and ongoing training and professional development programs to
ensure proficiency in utilizing and managing a variety of instructional
technologies. In addition, the institution MUST provide ongoing training
and evaluation programs to ensure faculty effective use of instructional
strategies and appropriate technologies to engage interactive student
learning.

3.8.1   Selection of Faculty

An institution MUST show that it has an orderly process for advertising
for faculty positions and for recruiting and appointing its faculty. This
process will normally involve developing a pool of qualified candidates
through advertising and proper screening and interviewing those who
appear to be best qualified. Institutions are encouraged to recruit and
select faculty with terminal degrees earned from a broad representation of
institutions. Institutions MUST validate the authenticity of all degrees and
other reported credentials before faculty are employed and MUST
maintain accurate records of the process used for employing each faculty
member and the correspondence and other communication between the
faculty member and the institution during the process of filling the faculty
position.

An institution MUST employ faculty members who are from a variety of
educational and cultural backgrounds and whose highest earned degree
presented as the credential qualifying the faculty member to teach in the
specialized discipline of the institution is from an internationally known
institution broadly respected throughout the academic community.

Institutions MUST ensure that, as appropriate to the purpose of the
institution, each faculty member employed is competent in the use of
English.

The institution MUST document and justify the academic and professional
preparation of all faculty members with respect to the specialized
discipline they teach.

The institution MUST define and publish in its faculty handbook and other
relevant publications the various academic ranks and the minimum
qualifications required for appointment in each rank.


                               41
3.8.2   Academic and Professional Preparation

For the purpose of applying the Standards, a full-time faculty member is
one whose major employment is with the institution that is being
considered for licensure or program accreditation, whose primary
assignment is in teaching and/or research, and whose employment is based
on a contract for full-time employees. A part-time faculty member is one
whose major employment is not with the institution and whose teaching
load is six hours or less per semester.

Both full-time and part-time faculty MUST meet, for academic and
professional preparation, the criteria below. The institution MUST keep on
file for all full-time and part-time faculty members documentation of
original or officially attested documents of their academic preparation,
original signed contracts, copy of their passports, and other documents
required by the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs in the U.A.E.
Faculty involved in distance learning MUST have preparation and training
directly related to distance learning and its required technologies.

3.8.2.1 Remedial Programs

Faculty members who teach in remedial programs (as defined in Section
3.2.3.2) MUST hold minimally a bachelor’s degree in a discipline related
to their teaching assignment and have either teaching experience in a
discipline related to their assignment or graduate training in remedial
education or in a discipline related to their assignment.

3.8.2.2 Certification, Diploma, and Associate Degree Programs

In any program leading to a certificate or diploma involving one or two
academic years of study following secondary school certificate, full time
and part time faculty members MUST have completed the minimum of a
master’s degree with a major in the discipline in which they teach and
MUST have:
     at least five years experience teaching in the field of instruction,
       five years work experience related to the teaching field, or a
       combination of five years experience in teaching and work related
       to the field of instruction; or
     have completed academic study beyond the master’s degree at a
       recognized higher education institution equivalent to 18 credit
       hours in the teaching field; or
     hold an internationally recognized professional certification in the
       teaching field such as Certified Public Accountant.




                            42
In any associate degree program offered in conjunction with a higher
diploma of three academic years or a baccalaureate degree program at the
same institution, the institution MUST comply with the requirements for
faculty credentials under Baccalaureate Degree Programs, section 3.8.2.3.

In any program leading to a higher diploma involving three years of study
or more following the secondary school certificate, the full and part time
faculty members MUST meet the requirements for Baccalaureate Degree
Programs, section 3.8.2.3.

Each full time and part time faculty member teaching credit courses in
professional, occupational, and technical areas that are components of
certificate or diploma programs and are not claimed to be accepted either
for college transfer or in the continuation of students in senior institutions
MUST possess appropriate academic preparation or academic preparation
coupled with work experience. The minimum academic degree for faculty
teaching in these professional, occupational, and technical areas MUST be
minimally at the same level at which the faculty member is teaching. The
typical combination is a baccalaureate degree with appropriate work
experience and, if available, relevant professional certification.

An institution offering the two-year diploma or two-year associate degree
MUST ensure that at least one of its faculty members teaching in each
degree program area (business, computer science, liberal arts, etc.) holds a
terminal degree in his or her teaching field.

3.8.2.3 Baccalaureate Degree Programs

Faculty members teaching certain of the core general education courses
may teach these introductory level courses if they do not hold the terminal
degree. These courses are:
    the first two courses in English, Arabic, or other language and
    the first course only in:
              Islamic studies, history, or culture;
              humanities or arts;
              social or behavioral sciences;
              natural or physical sciences: and
              mathematics and/or information technology.
However, minimally each full and part time faculty member teaching
these courses MUST have completed the master’s degree with a major in
the discipline in which he or she teaches and MUST have:
     at least five years experience teaching in the field of instruction,
        five years work experience related to the teaching field, or a
        combination of five years experience in teaching and work related
        to the field of instruction; or




                              43
      have completed academic study beyond the master’s degree at a
       recognized higher education institution equivalent to 18 credit
       hours in the teaching field; or

Faculty members holding such credentials may be appointed at the faculty
rank of lecturer, instructor, or adjunct faculty, but MUST not be appointed
at professorial rank.

Each full-time and part-time faculty member teaching courses other than
at the “remedial” or certain “core general education” courses MUST hold
an earned terminal degree in the teaching discipline, unless clearly
justified as an exception according to the guidelines that follow. Usually
the doctoral degree is considered the terminal degree; however, in some
disciplines, a master’s degree is considered terminal. For example, in art,
design and design-related disciplines an MFA, Master of Architecture, or
other master’s degree that is studio-based may be considered the terminal
degree. In social work, the Master of Social Work is considered the
terminal degree. A faculty member teaching vocational/technical courses
for which a doctoral degree is not offered is exempted from the terminal
degree requirement.

In some limited circumstances, an institution may make exceptions to the
terminal degree requirement, provided the exceptions are restricted to
special cases and are fully justified and reported each term to the
Commission for Academic Accreditation. The exceptions MUST be
limited to applied disciplines such as business administration for a faculty
member who has a master’s degree in the teaching field or a PhD in a
related field, and who also has:
    extensive senior level experience in the applied field (such as
        corporate management or senior accountant), or
    experience in the applied field coupled with internationally recognized
        professional association certification (as in medical board
        certificate or Certified Public Accountant).

The percentage of exceptions based on applied experience MUST not
exceed 10% of the full time faculty teaching in the program, unless
specifically authorized by the Commission.

The institution MUST ensure that its exceptions to the terminal degree
requirement are in fact exceptional cases and that the faculty member is
especially qualified to meet the needs of the program and the course that
he or she is teaching. The institution MUST report to the Commission for
Academic Accreditation at the beginning of each semester or term the
faculty members who are scheduled to teach that term and who are
exceptions to the terminal degree requirement. This report MUST include
the faculty member’s name, highest degree, institution from which the


                             44
highest degree was earned, area of specialization, category of exception
from those listed above, justification for the exception, and a brief
description of the courses he or she is scheduled to teach.

Institutions wishing to involve in their programs other practitioners who
may not hold the terminal degree and who do not qualify as exceptions
may do so, provided these persons serve as guest speakers on an
occasional basis and do not serve as course instructors.

3.8.2.4 Graduate Degree Programs

The institution MUST:
    appoint faculty to teach in graduate programs who have
       exceptionally strong preparation and experience;
    ensure that faculty have a strong record of research and scholarly
       activity or, in the case of newly appointed faculty, excellent
       potential for research and scholarly activity;
    ensure for applied disciplines that faculty have significant
       professional experience as practitioners in the discipline and/or a
       strong record of research or scholarly activity related to the
       discipline;
    clearly define and publicize eligibility requirements for faculty
       members teaching graduate courses, including those supervising
       theses;
    have adequate resources and research facilities to attract and retain
       qualified faculty;
    employ qualified faculty members responsible for the direction of
       research and independent study;
    employ for teaching any graduate course only faculty members
       who hold the terminal degree in the teaching discipline;
    ensure that each graduate degree program at the diploma or master
       level employs a significant number of faculty at the rank of
       associate professor or professor; and
    develop mechanisms whereby all policies and regulations affecting
       graduate curricula, as well as requirements affecting graduate
       certification and degrees, are formulated by the graduate faculty or
       a representative group of the graduate faculty.

3.8.2.5 Distance Learning Courses

Those institutions that engage in both distance education and traditional
education MUST comply with the faculty related requirements of the
current edition of the Standards for Licensure and Accreditation for its
traditional program and the current edition of the e-Learning/Distance
Learning Standards of Licensure and Accreditation for its distance
education courses and programs. Institutions offering courses for credit


                            45
through distance learning programs MUST:
     develop policies and agreements specifically addressing faculty
       workload, compensation, program or course-related intellectual
       property ownership, and professional evaluation in accordance
       with institutional processes customarily used to address
       comparable issues;
     provide appropriate and adequate support services and staff to
       faculty responsible for preparing distance learning courses or
       programs;
     have qualified instructional designers involved in distance learning
       course and program design, development and evaluation to ensure
       incorporation of appropriate and effective pedagogy for the
       information technologies employed;
     ensure faculty involved in distance learning have preparation and
       training directly related to distance learning and its required
       technologies;
     provide faculty with appropriate and adequate ongoing training and
       professional development programs to ensure proficiency in
       utilizing and managing course technologies and incorporation of
       appropriate and effective pedagogy for the information
       technologies employed;
     provide faculty with appropriate hardware and software and ensure
       reliable connectivity from office, home or elsewhere to support
       instruction;
     ensure faculty engage students through access to structured,
       interactive communications; and
     evaluate the effectiveness of faculty in using instructional
       strategies, pedagogical practices, and technologies that facilitate
       appropriate levels of interactivity for student learning success.

3.8.3   Part-Time Faculty

The institution MUST:
    employ in each of its curricula a minimum of 75 percent full-time
       fully qualified faculty;
    limit the number of part-time faculty members (as defined in
       Section 3.8.2) to ensure that the institution employs the number of
       full-time faculty members adequate to provide effective teaching,
       advising, and scholarly activity; and to participate in curriculum
       development, policy-making, and institutional planning;
    limit the teaching load of part-time faculty to the maximum of six
       hours per week;
    ensure part-time faculty are subject to the same requirements for
       professional, experiential, and scholarly preparation as full-time
       counterparts;
    ensure that the part-time faculty are granted professional privileges


                            46
        and compensation that are adequate and parallel to those awarded
        to full-time faculty;
       establish and publish comprehensive policies concerning the
        employment of part-time faculty;
       provide for appropriate orientation, supervision, and evaluation of
        all part-time faculty members; and
       state clearly and publicize procedures to ensure student access to
        part-time faculty.

3.8.4   Graduate Teaching Assistants

An institution MUST not use graduate assistants who fail to meet
academic and professional preparation as outlined in Section 3.8.2 to
conduct classroom or laboratory instruction. The institution may assign
graduate assistants to be engaged in activities such as assisting in
course/laboratory preparation. If graduate students are so assigned, the
institution MUST provide a published set of guidelines for institution-
wide graduate assistantship administration, appointment criteria,
remuneration, rights and responsibilities, evaluation, and reappointment.

3.8.5   Faculty Compensation

An institution MUST:
    provide adequate salaries and benefits to attract and retain highly
       qualified faculty members;
    publish criteria and salary ranges for each academic rank and for
       salary increases;
    ensure that faculty compensation is comparable to those offered for
       faculty in the same discipline by other institutions in the U.A.E.;
       and
    make special provision to ensure attracting qualified faculty in
       specializations that are in high demand.

3.8.6   Faculty Appointment, Promotion, and Tenure

An institution MUST:
    adopt and publish the requirements for faculty members to carry
       out their duties in a professional, ethical, and collegiate manner
       that enhances the purposes of the institution;
    provide contracts, letters of appointment, or similar documents to
       faculty members clearly describing the terms and conditions of
       their employment, with reference made to the policies published in
       the institution’s faculty handbook;
    adopt and publish procedures and criteria for faculty promotion
       from one rank to another and, if applicable, for the awarding of
       tenure or extended contracts; and


                             47
       publish and distribute to the faculty the current faculty handbook.

The institution MUST, after it successfully completes the probationary
appointment, provide faculty members with contracts lasting for a period
appropriate for them to maintain a strong and positive commitment to their
students, their discipline, and the institution.

3.8.7   Professional Faculty Development

The institution MUST:
    have policies that provide faculty with adequate resources and
       opportunities for professional development, which includes among
       others: research opportunities; participating in national, regional,
       and international conferences; publishing and presenting research
       papers; organizing and participating in workshops, seminars, and
       exhibitions; and having available sabbatical leaves and training
       programs;
    publish its professional faculty development policies in its faculty
       handbook;
    demonstrate that appropriate and effective faculty development
       occurs;
    ensure faculty involved in distance learning have preparation and
       training directly related to distance learning and its required
       technologies; and
    provide ongoing evaluation programs to ensure faculty effectively
       use instructional strategies (and, where appropriate technologies)
       to engage interactive student learning.

3.8.8. The Role of the Faculty

The institution MUST clearly define and publish the extent of the
participation and jurisdiction of the faculty in the educational program.

3.8.9   Faculty Loads

An institution MUST provide for each academic program an adequate
number of faculty to cover the teaching and other requirements of each
specialized area of the program by assuring that:
    it has procedures for the equitable and reasonable assignment of
        faculty responsibilities—including classroom instruction, academic
        advising, committee membership, guidance of student
        organizations, and, where applicable to the purpose of the
        institution, research and service to the public;
    the calculation of instructional loads takes into account such
        factors as number of preparations; number of students taught;
        nature of the subject; delivery mode (traditional or distance); help


                             48
          available from secretaries, teaching assistants, and staff; and
          administrative duties assigned;
         the maximum teaching load for a full-time instructor who is
          holding a Master degree where Master degree is not a terminal
          degree in the discipline and for teaching in undergraduate
          certificate, diploma, and associate degree programs is15 credit
          hours per semester;
         the maximum teaching load for baccalaureate programs is 12 credit
          hours per semester; and for graduate programs is 9 credit hours per
          semester;
         faculty holding academic administrative positions such as program
          coordinators or department chairs have a minimum release time of
          3 hours and deans at least 6 hours; and
         faculty teaching distance learning courses online have a teaching
          load that recognizes the time required to develop and sustain these
          courses and that is appropriate to the institution’s general workload
          policies for faculty.

3.8.10 Faculty Evaluation

An institution MUST:
    conduct periodic evaluations of the performance of each of its full-
       time and part-time faculty members and utilize the evaluation
       results to establish a professional development plan;
    publish and disseminate the criteria and procedures upon which the
       periodic evaluation is built; and
    demonstrate that it uses the results of this evaluation for improving
       its educational program and faculty development initiatives.

3.8.11 Faculty Grievance

An institution MUST provide, publish, and disseminate in faculty
handbook and appropriate publications its regulations and procedures
whereby the faculty member is given the opportunity to appeal for hearing
his/her grievance.

3.9       Contractual Agreements

An institution MUST:
   regardless of any contractual agreement or memorandum of
     understanding, maintain full control of all its operations including
     admissions, records, curricula and course development; instruction,
     course delivery; degree completion requirements, tests and
     examinations, faculty appointments while ensuring that it is the
     institution that has primary responsibility for awarding the degree
     recognized in the U.A.E. and for the integrity, rigor, outcome, and


                               49
       management of the academic program while ensuring compliance
       with the Commission’s requirements;
      define clearly and precisely in writing and publish the exact
       agreement which it claims with any other educational entity in the
       U.A.E. or abroad and provide the Commission an original copy of
       each agreement;
      obtain approval from the Commission for each contractual
       agreement prior to signing such an agreement;
      avoid, for the purpose of promoting its student enrollment, utilizing
       its consortial or contractual agreement in a manner which may create
       doubt about its institutional autonomy and control of its instruction;
       and
      evaluate regularly any consortial contract or agreement.

Agreements between an institution in the U.A.E. and other institution(s) in
the U.A.E. or abroad may cover many activities including among others:
cooperation in planning and developing of academic programs, courses,
and instructional material; exchange of faculty, students, and academic
administrators; cooperation in research activities; and assessing the
effectiveness of the institution, its academic programs, and support
services.

If the external institution with which the U.A.E. institution is seeking a
contractual arrangement is not fully licensed in the U.A.E. or well known
and respected throughout the international higher education community,
such approval will be denied. The requesting institution takes the
responsibility for offering proof of the quality of the institution with which
it is establishing a contractual relationship. Investigation of the validity of
the contractual arrangement may involve an on-site visit by a committee
of experts, under the supervision and direction of the Commission, whose
expenses are borne by the requesting institution. A contractual
arrangement does not remove from the requesting institution the
obligation to attain its own licensure as a separate institution.

The institution MUST:
    be held responsible for the quality of each course or program
       offered;
    demonstrate that each course and program so offered is related to
       the teaching purpose of the institution and is fully under the control
       of the institution; and
    demonstrate that each course and program so offered does comply
       with the Standards.




                              50
3.9.1 Agreements for Educational Services

There is a wide range of education services that may be subject to
contractual arrangement. Course material and course development may be
outsourced in whole or in part. Course content that is licensed by another
educational provider may be used in whole or in part under contract with
the U.A.E. institution. Internship opportunities and clinical training may
involve contractual relationships with entities external to the institution.
Library services and databases may be provided under contractual
agreement. Bookstore operations may likewise be outsourced, as well as
certain administrative and student service functions.

Whatever the nature of contractual agreement and the extent of the
outsourcing, the institution MUST maintain ultimate responsibility for the
timely delivery of and the quality of the service. The institution MUST
demonstrate, for each educational service offered through a contractual
agreement, that it has in place procedures to ensure that the service:
     meets the requirements of the Standards and ELDL
       Standards, as appropriate;
     supports the teaching purposes of the institution;
     includes appropriate security measures to protect
       confidential information;
     provides for adequate backup of data that is maintained off-
       site or electronically;
     is provided with a high degree of reliability;
     maintains the high quality of service anticipated in the
       contractual agreement and expected by the Ministry of
       Education and the Commission for Academic
       Accreditation; and
     is evaluated regularly and the results thereof used for
       program revisions and improvement in service delivery.




                             51
SECTION 4
Educational and Student Support Services

The principles of institutional effectiveness referenced throughout the
Standards address the importance of an institution’s support services for
students. For these reasons the institution must establish for its support
services clearly defined goals, derived from the purpose of the institution,
and must continually evaluate its success in achieving these goals. These
support services include: library and related learning resources;
instructional technology resources and technical support; convenient and
reliable structures for a variety of student transactions (e.g., purchasing
textbooks, to paying tuition and fees, and similar transactions); and
academic advising, tutoring, and admissions, registration and related
student record services.

In the case of distance learning programs, an institution must also ensure
that these services are made available to the distance learner in a manner
that is reliable and that supports the learning goals and objectives in a way
that is comparable to the learning conditions in face-to-face classroom
settings. Institutions MUST accommodate the distance learner by
providing on-site test proctoring, access to electronic databases, and
related online services. In all instances, it is incumbent upon an
institution’s faculty and administrative officers to be actively engaged in a
regular and systematic process of review, assessment and revision of each
component of its instructional programs. It is incumbent on the institution
to ensure that the program of study is routinely delivered to students in a
manner that promotes optimum learning through sound pedagogical
practices and the effective use of technology.

Because of the changing nature of the student demography in higher
education, institutions worldwide, colleges and universities need to be
concerned with assuring student success in their academic program
offerings. This requires that academic tutorial services be made available
to students who are deficient in their preparation for study or who
encounter difficulty in the courses of instruction, and that these services
are clearly identified for students, including specific information about the
terms and conditions for accessing them.



                             52
4.1     Library and Other Learning Resources

4.1.1   Purpose and Scope

Because adequate library and other print and electronic learning resources
and services are essential to teaching and learning in modernized society,
an educational institution needs to ensure that the requisite resources are
available to all faculty members and students wherever the programs or
courses are located and however they are delivered.

Each institution MUST:
    develop an operative purpose statement for its library and other
       learning resource services that realistically addresses the learning
       support needs of both faculty and students;
    evaluate the library holdings and other learning resources and
       services regularly and systematically to ensure that they are
       meeting the needs of their users and are supporting the programs
       and purpose of the institution;
    ensure that learning resources and services, including those
       required by students studying at a distance, are adequate to meet
       their prescribed learning needs; and
    provide appropriate training and services for students in the use of
       technologies that are required as they pursue their academic
       studies and research.

4.1.2   Learning Resource Services

Each institution ensures that all students and faculty members have access
to a broad range of learning resources to support its purpose and programs
at both primary and, if applicable, distance learning sites.

Basic library services MUST include an orientation program designed to
teach all new users how to access bibliographic information and other
learning resources and information in diverse formats, with emphasis
placed on the variety of contemporary instructional tools and technologies
used for accessing and effectively using learning resources.

Libraries and learning resource centers MUST provide:
    point-of-use instruction, personal assistance in conducting library
        research, and reference service consistent with the goal of helping
        students develop information literacy and the ability to locate,
        evaluate, and appropriately use such knowledge and information;
    adequate hours of operation to ensure student and faculty
        accessibility to these resources, which should include access for
        distance learners, as appropriate;
    adequate physical facilities, with appropriate space, lighting, and


                             53
        ventilation, to house, service, and make library collections and
        electronically accessed information easily available;
       modern equipment in good condition for using print and non-print
        materials;
       inter-library loan services designed to ensure timely delivery of
        materials;
       an efficient and appropriate circulation system; and
       adequate electronic access, from both on-campus and off-campus,
        capable of identifying promptly materials available within their
        own systems as well as materials available elsewhere, including
        electronically.

Library collections MUST be cataloged and organized in an orderly, easily
accessible arrangement following accepted bibliographical standards and
conventions to provide students and faculty with convenient, effective
access to library resources, including electronic bibliographic databases,
whether on-site or remote.

4.1.3   Collections

An institution MUST:
    provide sufficient access to the library collection to support the
       educational, research, and public service programs of the
       institution;
    provide adequate library collection, including books, periodicals,
       databases, and other learning resources in both traditional and
       electronic forms to support the educational research, and public
       services programs of the institution;
    provide, for graduate study, library resources substantially beyond
       those required for undergraduate programs;
    provide policies and procedures defining substantial involvement
       of librarians, teaching faculty, and researchers in the continuous
       development of collections and the regular evaluation of the policy
       itself;
    supplement its traditional library with an electronic library,
       journal, database and digital repositories of instructional resources,
       allowing access to the electronic information and knowledge-
       based resources important to the achievement of the prescribed
       goals and objectives;
    use, where appropriate, technology to expand access to
       information for users at remote sites, such as extension centers,
       branch campuses, laboratories, clinical sites, or students’ homes;
    provide adequate training in technologies and electronic resources
       to enable students and faculty to access collections and databases
       efficiently; and
    provide adequate budget that ensures continuous development of


                             54
        its library.

Each library or learning resource center MUST have both a policy
governing resource material selection reflecting and their priorities for
acquisition and for systematic elimination of outdated material or material
that is no longer relevant, and a procedure providing for the preservation,
replacement, or removal of deteriorating materials in the collection.

4.1.4 Cooperative Agreements

Cooperative agreements with other libraries and agencies are permissible
and strongly encouraged to expand the quality and scope of resources. In
any cooperative arrangement, the institution MUST:
    avoid using the cooperative arrangement to replace its
        responsibility to provide adequate and readily accessible library
        resources and services and
    ensure that the arrangement is formalized, published, regularly
        evaluated and that is follows the requirements specified in Section
        3.9 of the Standards.

4.1.5   Staff

Libraries and other learning resources MUST be adequately staffed by
professionals who hold appropriate degrees in library and information
sciences. The number of library support staff members MUST be
adequate for the size and scope of the institution’s program, number of
students, and level and type of degree programs. Qualifications or skills
needed for these support positions MUST be defined by the institution and
MUST include degrees in library sciences or information resources and
training and experience in electronic access to information and data bases.
The institution MUST ensure that the staff includes:
     a head librarian who holds, minimally, a master’s degree or
        equivalent in library sciences and has substantial
        experience in library and learning recourse administration;
     other professional staff with degrees in library science or
        information resources; and
     staff sufficient so that trained librarians/learning resources
        professionals are available at all times that the facilities are
        in use.

Additionally, the institution MUST have in place policies and procedures
for the professional development of library and information resource staff
and the annual evaluation of the performance of such staff.

Organizational relationships, both external and internal to the library,
MUST be clearly specified. Institutional policies concerning professional


                            55
status, salary, and contractual security for library personnel MUST be
clearly defined and made known to all personnel at the time of
employment.


4.1.6   Resources for Distance Learning

For distance learning activities, an institution MUST ensure the provision
of and ready access to adequate library/learning resources and services to
support the courses, programs, and degrees offered. The institution
MUST own the library/learning resources, provide access to electronic
information available through either existing technologies, or provide
them through formal agreements. Such agreements MUST include the use
of books, periodicals, other materials, and services. The institution MUST
assign responsibility for providing library/learning resources and services
and for ensuring continued access at each site.

Formal agreements established for the provision of library resources,
including those in electronic form, and services MUST ensure access to
library resources pertinent to the curricula offered by the institution and
include provisions for services and resources which support the
institution’s specific curricula in the field of study and at the degree level
offered. Such agreements follow the requirements specified in Section
3.9.

4.2     Instructional Support

To support its curriculum, each institution MUST provide a variety of
adequate facilities and instructional support services. These include:
     adequate number of classrooms with appropriate size to
       accommodate the projected number of students in all
       programs offered by the institution;
     appropriate digital projection equipment and other audio-
       visual equipment for all classrooms;
     computer laboratories, specialized laboratories, studios,
       learning skills centers, and clinical training facilities, that
       are equipped with modern equipment appropriate to the
       programs offered and carefully planned and managed to
       ensure user's safety;
     adequate         number        of    qualified      laboratory
       assistants/technicians to ensure effective utilization of
       laboratory sessions, providing support for "trouble
       shooting" problems in use of equipment, and ensuring
       their continuous maintenance; and
     adequate resources, research facilities, and equipment to
       ensure effective research work, as part of graduate


                              56
        programs, as appropriate, consistent with the nature and
        objectives of the program.
An institution MUST ensure that instructional support facilities are
organized and administered so as to provide “user friendly” and reliable
access for faculty and student users.

The institution MUST provide for the maintenance of data on its
instructional facilities and instructional support services. This data MUST
be adequate to support the goals of the institution’s system of institutional
and program effectiveness and continuous improvement and MUST
include:
     number, size, and capacity of all instructional and
        instructional support spaces, by category as defined by the
        institution;
     usage levels by students and faculty of such facilities;
     accessibility to those spaces and equipment at times of that
        provide convenience to faculty and students;
     students’ evaluation of the adequacy of such spaces,
        equipment, and accessibility to support their learning; and
     faculty’s evaluation of the adequacy of such spaces,
        equipment, and accessibility to support their teaching, as
        well as their scholarly activity and service.

4.3    Information Technology Resources and Systems

Information technology resources and systems are essential components in
higher education. An institution MUST provide evidence that it is
incorporating technological advances into its operations on an on-going
basis.

Information technology resources MUST support the planning function,
educational programs, and educational and administrative support services
of the institution at appropriate levels. These resources include computer
hardware and software, databases, communication networks, computer
laboratories, audio-visual equipment, and a trained technical and user
services staff.

Although the diversity of educational programs and goals will be a major
determining factor in the selection of information technology resources by
an institution, there MUST be a reasonable infusion of information
technology into the curricula so that students graduate with the
fundamental knowledge and basic ability to use these resources.
Institutions MUST provide the means by which students acquire basic
competencies in the use of computers and related information technology
resources. A reliable information network MUST be available so that
students, faculty, and staff become accustomed to electronic


                             57
communication and familiar with accessing national and global
information resources. There MUST be provisions for ongoing training of
faculty and staff members so that they may make skillful use of
appropriate application software. These requirements MUST be in place
for all programs wherever located or delivered in the U.A.E.

Policies for the allocation and use of information technology resources
MUST be clearly stated and consistent with an institution’s purpose, goals,
and objectives. These policies MUST be evaluated regularly to ensure
that academic and administrative needs are adequately addressed.
Appropriate security measures MUST be installed and monitored to
protect the confidentiality and integrity of academic systems,
administrative systems, and institutional networks.

There MUST be a clearly defined program for maintaining and replacing
equipment and software so that they remain consistent with current
technology. Such policies and procedures MUST include:
     schedules for the replacement/upgrading of hardware and
       software;
     the availability of trained and experienced staff on-site at
       appropriate times to ensure that hardware and software are
       installed and monitored appropriately and problems are
       solved in a timely fashion;
     input from students to assess the adequacy of hardware and
       software to support their learning; and
     input from faculty and staff to assess the adequacy of
       hardware and software to support teaching and the delivery
       of services.

4.4    Student Development Services

Student development services are essential to the achievement of the
educational goals of the institution and contribute to the cultural, social,
moral, intellectual, and physical development of students. To ensure
effectiveness, the institution MUST develop goals for the student services
program consistent with student needs and with the purpose of the
institution. Appropriate student development services MUST be provided
for distance learning programs, if appropriate, as well as on campus
programs.

The institution MUST clearly designate an administrative unit responsible
for planning and implementing student development services. This unit
MUST be staffed by individuals who have academic preparation and
experience consistent with their assignments, including a head of student
services with an academic degree in counseling or student services or
related field or substantial experience in student affairs administration.


                             58
Student development services and programs MUST be evaluated
regularly. This evaluation MUST include, but not be limited to, input
from students on the adequacy of services.



4.4.1   Programs and Services

The following programs and support services enhance the learning
environment for students and MUST be made available and be well
publicized to students, including distance learners:
    Admissions: The institution clearly states its admissions
       requirements and the data it will use in admissions decisions and
       make this information available in its catalog and on-line;
    Registration and Records: The institution maintains a registration
       and records system that will support all students’
       enrollment/registration and have policies regarding student access
       to their records that are clearly stated;
    Academic Advising: The institution provides and clearly describes
       its academic advising services for students in degree programs;
       and
    Career Development: The institution makes available adequate
       career development services to assist students in locating jobs
       suitable for their preparation.

4.4.2   Student Financial Aid

Where applicable, the institution MUST provide for institution-wide
coordination of all financial aid awards, including information about
available scholarships, the processing of applications, and the
administration of financial aid and scholarship awards.

All funds for financial aid programs MUST be audited in compliance with
all legal requirements of the U.A.E.

4.4.3   Counseling and Career Development

An institution MUST provide personal counseling services for students
administered by professional counselors.

An institution MUST provide an effective career development program
that includes career information and planning, placement services, career
counseling, testing services, and follow-up activities. There MUST be
clearly specified policies regarding the use of career development services
by students, alumni, and employers. The institution MUST ensure that the
effectiveness of services is assessed regularly and that this assessment


                            59
includes, but is not limited to, input from students who have used the
services. Such services MUST be made available from the time of initial
enrollment of any program.



4.4.4   Student Transactions

A variety of student transactions are essential in support of the academic
program. Such transactions include but may not be limited to such
transactions as purchasing textbooks, course, laboratory and computer
materials and the like. Institutions MUST have well-designed processes
for conducting these transactions, with particular emphasis on the distance
learner who may undertake these transactions away from campus.

4.4.5   Student Activities and Publications

The institution MUST have a student activities program appropriate to its
purpose and encompassing student interests. The institution MUST
develop policies and procedures governing the supervisory role of the
institution over student activities.

When student publications or other media exist, the institution MUST
provide a clearly written statement of the institution’s responsibilities for
them.

4.4.6    Student Behavior

The institution MUST publish a statement of student rights and
responsibilities and make it available to the campus community. The
jurisdiction of judicial bodies, the disciplinary responsibilities of
institutional officials, and all disciplinary procedures MUST be clearly
defined and broadly distributed.

4.4.7   Student Grievance

An institution MUST provide, publish, and disseminate in appropriate
publications its regulations and procedures whereby the student is given
the opportunity to appeal for hearing his/her grievance.

4.4.8   Residence Halls

If an institution has residence halls, it MUST develop policies and
procedures governing them and MUST take reasonable precautions to
provide a healthy, safe, and secure living environment for the residents
with special consideration given to the safety of female students. The


                             60
learning environment in the residence halls MUST support the educational
mission of the institution. An adequate staff organization MUST be given
responsibility for the administration of the residence hall system. The
staff MUST have sufficient academic training and experience to enhance
the learning environment in the residence halls.

4.4.9   Health Services

An institution MUST:
    provide access to effective health services and education
       consistent with the needs of its constituents and
    inform its constituents of the availability of its health
       services.




                           61
SECTION 5
Administrative Process
The institution is obligated to have governance and administrative
structures appropriate to higher education and financial and physical assets
adequate to support the purpose of the institution. Stability and security
are crucial to institutional well being, as are effective resource
procurement, deployment, and accountability. Planning for and garnering
necessary support are also integral to the accomplishment of institutional
purpose.

The principles of institutional effectiveness, as outlined in Section II,
pertain to the governance, organization, administration, and
financial/physical management of the institution. Each office, function, or
unit establishes goals that derive from and support the purpose of the
institution evaluates its success in achieving these goals, and uses the
evaluation in making appropriate modification in resources, programs, and
services.

5.1     Organization and Administration

The administration of an institution of higher education brings together its
various resources and allocates them effectively to accomplish
institutional goals.        The functions, roles, responsibilities, and
organizational and reporting structures of the institution MUST be clearly
stated in the institution policies and procedures documents.

5.1.1    Titles and Terms

The name of an institution, the titles of all administrators, the designations
of administrative and academic divisions or units, the terms used to
describe academic offerings and programs, and the names of degrees
awarded MUST be accurate, descriptive, consistent, and appropriate.

5.1.2    Governing Entity

Although titles and functions vary, the governing entity or board is the
legal body responsible for the institution and for policy making.

The governing entity MUST be established and have in place proper
procedures to ensure that it is appropriately involved in the approval of the
financial status and is adequately informed about the stability of the
institution, as well as the effectiveness of its leadership and its teaching,


                              62
research, and public service, as appropriate. The governing entity must:
     Consist of duly appointed or elected members in accordance with
       the institution’s policies and procedures;
     meet at least once annually;
     maintain official records of all meetings;
     establish broad institutional policies;
     approve the institutions by-laws;
     approve the institution’s mission and goals;
     secure financial resources to support adequately the institutional
       goals;
     approve the annual budget;
     ensure that the institution is subject to an annual audit;
     approve the selection of an external auditor;
     receive the report of the external auditor;
     confer, or authorize the conferring of, academic degrees;
     approve major facilities, contracts, and campus plans unless
       otherwise delegated;
     appoint the chief executive officer; and
     evaluate the performance of the chief executive officer and
       approve his or her contract and continuance in office.

There MUST be a clear distinction, in writing and in practice, between the
policy-making and fiduciary functions of the governing entity and the
responsibility of the administration and faculty to administer and
implement policy.

5.1.3   Official Policies

The institution MUST publish official documents, usually in its Policies
and Procedures Manual or similar publication, which contain, but are not
limited to, the following information, as well as other policies and
procedures as may be called for in the Standards or to meet the specific
needs of the institution:
     the duties and responsibilities of the governing entity or board;
     the duties and responsibilities of the chief administrative and
       academic officers, including deans and department heads;
     the patterns of institutional organization, as displayed in
       organizational chart(s);
     policies related to facilities, use of facilities, and student, faculty,
       and staff safety;
     policies regarding annual and longer term planning;
     basic policies regarding institutional and program effectiveness,
       which may be amplified in the institution’s Institutional
       Effectiveness Manual or similar document, including the
       relationship between effectiveness analyses and institutional and


                              63
        academic planning and budgeting to maintain continuous
        improvement;
       the role of the faculty in academic affairs and curriculum;
       academic procedures for the approval or revision of the
        curriculum;
       basic policies regarding students, which may be amplified in the
        Student Manual or similar document;
       financial policies governing:
             revenues;
             receipting;
             deposits;
             purchase authorizations;
             expenditures;
             authority to enter into contracts;
             bank reconciliation;
             production of regular (usually monthly)
                 financial reports;
             distribution of financial reports; and
             internal auditing; and
       statements governing personnel issues for faculty and non-faculty
        staff, including:
             appointment;
             terms of contract;
             promotion;
             compensation and benefits;
             due process; and
             grievance.

5.1.4   Administrative Organization

The administrative organization MUST reflect the purpose and philosophy
of the institution and enable each functional unit to perform its particular
responsibilities expeditiously and efficiently and as defined by the stated
purpose of the institution.

Administrative responsibility and authority for all educational offerings
and functions of the institution MUST be clearly identified. Each
institution MUST develop, publish, and make available an organizational
chart, accompanied with a proper policy statement, clearly delineating
lines of responsibility and authority.

These lines of authority of the administrative and academic officers
MUST be clearly defined, including:
    the chief executive officer;
    the chief academic officer;
    the academic deans;


                             64
       academic department chairs;
       the head librarian;
       the registrar;
       the head of information technology;
       the chief students development officer;
       the chief financial officer;
       the officer responsible for receivables;
       the officer responsible for purchases;
       the chief human relations officer; and
       other persons responsible for major functions on the institution,
        including health and safety.
These officers’ responsibilities MUST be made known to faculty,
students, and staff. Administrative officers MUST possess credentials,
experience, and/or demonstrated competence appropriate to their areas of
responsibility. The effectiveness of all administrators, including the chief
executive officer, MUST be evaluated periodically. Academic officers
MUST hold appropriate credentials and have sufficient experience such
that they could be appointed at faculty rank. Administrative officers must
have credentials and experience to justify their appointments to their
positions.

5.2       Institutional Relations

Institutional relations may include development and fund raising, internal
and external communications, media relations, and alumni affairs, among
other responsibilities. Any institution must address some or all of these
issues, whether through one office or the roles of several offices. If there
is an institutional relations office or program, it MUST;
     be directly related to the purpose of the institution;
     have clear policies, procedures, roles, and responsibilities;
     be staffed by qualified persons;
     be truthful in its representation of the institution and its mission,
         goals, and accomplishments;
     operate in accordance with the provisions of the Standards;
         and
     be evaluated regularly.

5.2.1      Alumni Affairs

The relationship between the institution and its alumni MUST be such as
to assist in the evaluation of institutional effectiveness and in the
institutional advancement. This means that the institution MUST, to the
maximum extent possible, maintain records that are updated at least
periodically of its alumni’s:
     location;


                                65
          occupation;
          continued education; and,
          at time frames identified in the institutional effectiveness
           procedures, assessment of its experience at the institution.

5.2.2      Fund Raising

If the institution is involved in fund raising activities, all fund raising
MUST be related to the purpose of the institution and be incorporated into
the planning process and evaluated regularly. An institution involved in
fund raising MUST develop policies and procedures for fund raising and
ensure that such policies are appropriately disseminated and followed.
Such policies MUST include:
     the relationship of fundraising entities to the institution;
     the purposes of the activity;
     the financial integrity of the fundraising process and its auditing
        provisions;
     the accuracy of its representations of the institution and its needs
        and the stated goals of the fund raising activities; and
     comparative costs of the fund raising activities in relation to the
        funds raised.

5.3       Financial Resources

Because the financial resources of an institution influence the quality of its
educational program, each institution MUST demonstrate that it possesses
sufficient financial resources, beyond the revenues generated by its tuition
and fees, to support all of its programs and demonstrate the financial
stability essential to its successful operation that guarantees sufficient
opportunity for completion of academic programs by the maximum
number of students projected to be enrolled in the institution. The
adequacy of financial resources will be judged in relation to the basic
purpose of the institution, the scope of its programs, and its number of
students.

A newly proposing institution MUST, according the requirements of the
Standards, make available a financial guarantee, in the form of a bank
guarantee or escrow account, equal to the average annual operating cost of
the institution during its first four years. These funds can only by accessed
with permission of the Ministry of Education and serve to ensure that
students can complete their programs and that other obligations of the
institution can be met. In addition, the institution MUST be prepared to
show its financial feasibility and financial capacity as part of its
application for Initial Licensure. Any institution may be subject to a
review of its financial status at the request of the Commission. An
institution MUST maintain, and provide upon request of the Commission:


                                66
       budgets for the institution and for its departments and
        programs;
       monthly and annual reports of expenditures to budget;
       audited financial statements;
       statements of its current accounts and financial capacity;
        and
       other financial information as may be requested by the
        Commission.

5.3.1   Financial Organization

All business and financial functions of the institution MUST be
centralized under a business office, consistent with the purpose of the
institution, the size of the institution, and the volume of transactions of a
business or financial nature. The chief business officer MUST report to
the chief executive officer of the institution. The chief executive officer
MUST report regularly to the governing entity on the financial and
business operations of the institution.

5.3.2   Budget Planning

An institution MUST outline a budget planning process and annually
prepare an appropriately detailed budget—a statement of estimated
income and expenditures for a fixed period of time, usually the fiscal year
of the institution. The budget MUST:
     be based on conservative assumptions regarding enrollment and
        other sources of revenue and include contingency funds;
     be preceded by sound educational and administrative planning that
        is an integral component of the preparation and execution of the
        annual budget;
     include details on the budgets for individual administrative and
        academic departments and for academic programs; and
     take into account in the budget planning process the results of the
        institution’s and the programs’ effectiveness analysis.

The annual budget MUST be presented by the chief executive officer
through proper channels to the governing entity for final approval.

5.3.3   Budget Control

After the budget has been approved by the chief executive officer and
adopted by the governing entity, a system of control MUST be
established. This ensures that the budgetary plans of the governing board
and the chief executive officer will be implemented. The business officer
MUST render interim budget statements on a periodic basis, usually
monthly, to department/unit heads for their guidance in staying within


                             67
budgetary allocations.

Necessary budget revisions MUST be made when actual conditions
require such change and MUST be communicated to those affected within
the institution.

Once funds have been appropriated, creating a budget, establishing
priorities, and controlling expenditures MUST become the responsibility
of the institution operating under the jurisdiction of the governing entity
and subject to its policies. Thus the governing board MUST approve
annual budgets and authorize expenditures as part of the implementation
of those budgets, rather than approving each individual expenditures.

5.3.4   Accounting and Auditing

An institution MUST:
    adopt an accounting system that follows generally accepted
       principles of institutional accounting;
    have well qualified personnel to administer the financial
       accounting and related functions of the institution;
    have in place appropriate hardware and software to ensure that
       accounts can be maintained accurately and regular reports
       generated in a timely fashion; and
    provide revenue/expenditure reports either independently certified
       in the audit report or included as supplemental data in the audit
       report.

The chief business officer MUST prepare financial reports for appropriate
institutional officers, the governing entity, and, as requested, the
Commission. An annual fiscal year audit MUST be made by independent
certified public accountants. This external audit process MUST include
provision for:
     approval of the external auditor by the governing entity;
     open access for the external auditor to all financial records and all
         persons within the organization who are involved in financial
         transactions;
     inclusion of a management letter as part of the auditor’s report;
     freedom from interference or intrusion into the auditing process by
         officials of the institution or others;
     reporting directly to the governing entity or to a committee formed
         for this purpose by the governing entity; and
     providing a copy of the audited financial statements and
         management letter to the Commission upon request.

All such audits MUST be conducted in accordance with generally
accepted accounting principles.


                            68
The auditors MUST not be directly connected with the institution either
personally or professionally and MUST not serve the dual role of
accountants to the institution and external auditors for it. An effective
program of internal auditing and financial control MUST be maintained to
complement the accounting system and the annual external audit.

5.3.5   Purchasing and Inventory Control

An institution MUST maintain proper control over purchasing and
inventory management. These controls MUST include procedures, forms,
and appropriate authorization levels and signatory requirements for:
    authorizing purchases;
    ensuring competitive pricing;
    receipting purchases;
    adding purchases to inventories;
    maintaining and updating inventories;
    producing reports on purchases and inventories as may be
       required; and
    assessing the effectiveness of the procedures and controls.

5.3.6   Refund Policy

The institution MUST adhere to a published policy and procedure for
refunding fees and charges to students who withdraw from enrollment, in
keeping with generally accepted refund practices in the higher education
community, applicable to all students, and clearly stated in appropriate
official publications.

5.3.7   Cashiering

There MUST be a suitable organization and adequate procedures for the
management of all funds belonging to the institution.

The cashiering function MUST be centralized in the business office, in a
carefully developed system for the receipt, deposit, and safeguarding of
institutional funds. This system MUST include:
     handling of cash receipts by authorized persons only;
     use of duplicate receipt forms and maintenance of hard copies of
         records, or in the case of electronic transaction maintenance of
         backup files;
     maintenance of electronic files of hard copy receipts;
     secure holding of receipts prior to deposit;
     regular depositing of receipts within approved time frames;
     reconciliation of receipts and deposits; and
     maintenance of the privacy and security of information.

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5.3.8   Risk Management

The institution MUST have a comprehensive risk management program
that includes:
     evaluation of risks;
     development of strategies to avoid or reduce risks;
     valuation of facilities and equipment and maintenance of insurance
        consistent with that valuation; and
     maintenance of liability and other insurance to protect the
        institution and its constituencies.

Appropriate levels of insurance—or otherwise designated financial
resources—must be maintained to provide adequate replacement
protection for all physical facilities and liability of personnel.

5.3.9   Auxiliary Enterprises

Activities that may have a significant impact on the operation of the
institution (such as bookstores, residence halls, food service operations,
printing/duplicating services, child care, and transportation service), when
operated by or for the institution, MUST be documented and operated in a
safe and fiscally responsible manner. Revenues and costs from such
enterprises MUST be accounted for separately and included in regular
financial reporting. Revenues in excess of expenses for such operations
MUST be used in a manner consistent with institutional policies to
improve student and academic services—such as scholarships, support for
student activities, and the like.

5.4     Physical Resources

Physical resources, including buildings, appropriateness of space for
instructional and support services, and equipment both on and off campus,
MUST be adequate to serve the needs of the institution in relation to its
stated purpose, programs, activities, and its projected enrollment for the
entire duration of its academic programs. There MUST be adequate and
appropriate space to accommodate individual faculty offices, library,
laboratories, classrooms, seminar and meeting rooms, study space, and
administrative and student services space to support the educational and
support functions of the institution. The physical environment of the
institution MUST take into consideration location, accessibility, including
accessibility for the handicapped, parking facilities, space for dropping off
and picking up students, and contribute to an atmosphere for effective
learning.

In the case of new institutions that are to be established, the institution
MUST document the allocation of buildings, or the land necessary for the


                             70
buildings, as approved by the appropriate local authorities in the Emirate
concerned, before the institution can begin to offer programs. The
Commission MUST, according to its policies and procedures, approved all
physical locations and architectural drawings for facilities, including all
administrative and academic space.

5.4.1   Space Management

Space allocated to any institutional function MUST be adequate for the
effective conduct of that function. Effective space management is closely
linked with planning and with projections of enrollments, faculty, and
academic and student support needs. Thus space management MUST be a
component of the annual planning and budgeting cycle and the annual
effectiveness system.

5.4.2   Upkeep

An institution MUST have a plan and implement the components of the
plan for the upkeep of its property, including all grounds, parking areas,
sports and student activity areas, buildings, and equipment. The updating
of this plan MUST be part of the annual planning and budgeting process,
be assessed as part of the effectiveness system of the institution, and
include as a minimum routine, preventative, and deferred maintenance.

5.4.3   Safety

The institution MUST take reasonable steps to provide a healthy, safe, and
secure environment for all members of the campus community.
Administrative responsibility for environmental health and safety
programs MUST be assigned. Such programs MUST meet all laws and
regulations of the U.A.E. A comprehensive safety plan MUST be
developed, implemented, and evaluated regularly. The plan MUST give
special attention to the adequate provision and use of safety equipment in
laboratories and other hazardous areas; to easy exit from buildings in the
event of fire or other emergency; and to familiarizing all building
occupants with safety precautions and emergency evacuation procedures.

Safety consideration MUST take into account the provision of adequate
safety for students with handicaps.

Safety planning MUST include the provision of security guards and other
personnel at times when students or faculty and staff in on the campus,
and MUST include control of entrance and exit points.

Institutions undertaking the obligations of providing education to female
students have a special responsibility of providing safety for their students


                             71
and, therefore, MUST ensure that special care on a continuous basis is
planned for and provided for the special considerations of female students.

5.4.4    Intellectual Property and Copyright

The institution MUST provide written policies regarding copyright and
ownership of intellectual property, in printed or electronic form, and
ensure that these policies are published in appropriate documents. These
policies MUST address ownership of intellectual property and
dispersement of revenues produced from intellectual property created by
faculty or staff while in service to the institution. Such policies MUST not
be written in such a fashion that they discourage or hinder the pursuit of
knowledge and academic freedom. Policies and procedures MUST be
included in appropriate documents of the institution such as the Faculty
Manual and the Policies and Procedures Manual.

5.4.5. Facilities Master Plan

The institution MUST maintain a current written physical facilities master
plan that provides for orderly development of the facilities of the
institution and relates facilities development to other institutional planning
efforts. The institution MUST update the plan periodically and provide
copies of the updated plan to the Commission as requested.

5.5     Externally Funded Grants and Contracts for Research

Externally funded research grants and contracts MUST be related to the
stated purpose of the institution. The institution’s policy on such grants
and contracts MUST provide for an appropriate balance between grant and
contract activity and instruction, and guarantee institutional control over
the administration of research projects. The researcher’s freedom to
investigate and report results MUST be preserved. Research support from
outside agencies MUST not undermine these basic research principles.

The institution MUST:
     establish a clear policy concerning a faculty member’s division of
         obligations between research and other academic activities;
     ensure that this policy is published in such documents as the
         faculty handbook and made known to all faculty members; and
     where applicable, develop and publish policies regarding summer
         salaries paid from grant and contract funds, salary supplements
         paid from grants during the regular academic year, and fees for
         consulting services provided by faculty members.
In accepting funds from outside agencies, the institution MUST ensure
that it maintains control over research and instruction.



                              72
Continuity of support for general institutional activities MUST not be
endangered by acquisition of research grants and contracts. Grants MUST
be awarded and contracts MUST be made for specified periods of time.
When the institution becomes even partially dependent upon such funds
for faculty salaries and/or graduate student stipends, termination of grants
and contracts can jeopardize an entire education program. An institution
MUST not become dependent upon indirect cost allowances from grants
and contracts to support its regular operating budget.

5.6   Related Corporate Entities

Institutions are sometimes associated with separately incorporated units,
such as radio or television stations, research foundations, scholarship
foundations, hospitals, for-profit enterprises, corporations, publications,
and insurance trusts. When an institution is involved with such an entity,
documentation MUST:
     outline the mutual relationship and benefits maintained by
         the institution; and
     include the following:
              a description of the separately-incorporated
                 unit‘s activities;
              a statement demonstrating the manner in
                 which the activities relate to the purpose of
                 the institution;
              a current roster of board members of the
                 unit, including institutional personnel and
                 board members who have responsibilities
                 with both the institution and the
                 incorporated entity, whether they are
                 additionally compensated by the entity or
                 not;
              a copy of the separately incorporated unit’s
                 annual financial audit report for the most
                 recently completed year; and
              copies of the charter and bylaws of the unit.

If such entities are reliant upon the institution for fulfillment of their
purposes, the institution MUST ensure that they complement, rather than
detract from, the institution’s purpose, and that they are subject to proper
operating controls and risk-liability containment.




                             73
APPENDIX A
Institutional Licensure Process
Licensure is concerned with the total institution and with each academic
program offered by the institution and represents endorsement by the
Ministry of Education in the United Arab Emirates. Figure 1 at the front
of the Standards publication illustrates the licensure process and its
relationship to academic program accreditation. There are two types of
license—Initial Licensure for an institution that is seeking to begin
operations and has demonstrated that it has met, through its required
documentation, that it meets the relevant requirements of the Standards
and is prepared to begin to enroll students, and Licensure for an institution
that has been in operation under Initial Licensure or seeks to renew its
Licensure and has continued to meet all relevant requirements of the
Standards.

To apply for Initial Licensure, the proposing institution, before it
advertises its intended existence or the existence of any intended academic
programs, contacts the Commission for the purpose of beginning the
Initial Licensure preparation and review process as outlined in section A-
1. To continue to be licensed, an institution must uphold all requirements
for Licensure and all requirements for Initial Accreditation or
Accreditation or its programs and must follow the steps outlined in section
A-3.

For Initial Licensure and for Licensure and renewal of Licensure, the
Commission reserves the right, when it deems appropriate, to invite at the
institution’s expense experts to assist in the licensure process. The
Commission will schedule reviews as quickly as reasonably possible, but
institutions should be aware of the Commission’s schedule of application
deadlines, which it publishes annually, and should plan the submission of
applications and documentation accordingly

In order to offer an academic program, the institution must hold Initial
Licensure or Licensure and must, for each program it intends to offer, hold
either Initial Accreditation or Accreditation status. The processes for


                             74
obtaining Initial Accreditation and Accreditation are outlined in Appendix
B.



A-1 Steps for Initial Licensure

To attain Initial Licensure, an institution MUST follow these steps in sequence:
        First: Schedule at least one meeting with the staff of the
        Commission to review all procedures and requirements for
        licensure prior to the submission of an application or supporting
        documentation;

        Second: Submit and receive approval of a preliminary information
        form, available, when requested in person, from the Commission;

        Third: Submit, prior to the Commission's deadlines, all required
        documents as described in the Documents Required for Initial
        Licensure in section A-2, including a completed form entitled
        Application for Licensure;

        Fourth: Review with the Commission, at one or more licensure
        review conferences scheduled by the Commission, all documents
        as specified in section A-2;

        Fifth: Submit all requested additional documentation and re-submit
        revised documents as may be required by the Commission;

        Sixth: Arrange with the Commission for one or more on-site
        inspections of the location of the proposed institution together with
        meetings with the architect, as may be required; and

        Seventh: Comply with all requirements of the Standards and the
        Commission.

The proposing institution understands that the Commission’s official
acceptance of the Application for Initial Licensure and the
accompanying documentation by the Commission in no way implies
official or unofficial commitment to program accreditation; rather it is
but one step in the licensure process.
The proposing institutions also understands that an Application for
Initial Licensure that does not address each of the “MUST” statements
of Sections 2 through 5 of the Standards or does not include the
required supporting documentation will be returned to the institution
not accepted and will be reviewed only if the applicant resubmits the
Application containing all appropriate information and documentation.


                               75
The proposing institution further understands that if the Commission
reviews an application and it is denied, the proposing institution is not
allowed to resubmit its application, under the same name or under a new
name, for at least one year from the date of the official letter of rejection.

Once it has accepted the Application for Initial Licensure, the Commission
will work with the institution to schedule appropriate meetings and on-site
visits, as may be required, for evaluation purposes. The Commission will
schedule meetings and visits as quickly as reasonably possible, but may
not be able to respond more quickly than the time frame indicated on the
Commission’s published schedule of deadlines. Generally, a complete
and acceptable application submitted by November 1 is reviewed during
the following spring term; a completed and accepted application submitted
by May 1 is reviewed the following fall term.

Scheduled meetings and visits may include external evaluator(s), arranged
for by the Commission, as well as Commission staff. In such cases, the
institution will be responsible for the costs associated with external
reviews.     Following the visit, the Commission will make its
recommendation to the Minister, and the Minister’s decision will be
conveyed to the institution. If approved, the status of Initial Licensure is
granted for a maximum of two years. At the end of this period, the
institution must apply for Licensure. Through the period of either Initial
Licensure or Licensure, the Commission will make unscheduled visits to
ensure that the institution is in compliance with the Standards and the
conditions upon which the licensure was granted.

A-2    Documents Required for the Application for Initial Licensure

The Application for Initial Licensure must include the following:

1. Feasibility Study: The proposing institution submits a detailed
feasibility study that includes, at minimum, the following:
     analysis of availability of students projected
        for the next five years taking into
        consideration the geographical area of the
        proposed institution;
     analysis of opportunities available for
        students at competitive institutions and their
        impact on potential enrolment;
     needs assessment of each program the
        institution proposes to offer during the initial
        two years based on market survey of
        prospective students and of prospective
        employers of graduates; and



                              76
      detailed financial analysis over at least five
       years of operation including all foreseen cost
       elements, including costs of meeting
       licensure and accreditation requirements,
       and a contingency element, and sources of
       income/revenue, with full details of bases of
       calculations. (Note: The financial analysis
       should be done with different scenarios of
       different levels of student intake—optimal,
       minimal, and average—and these levels
       should be supported by the analysis of
       available students and the competition for
       them.

2. Application for Licensure Form: The Application for Licensure form
includes a spread sheet for the proposing institution to use to demonstrate
whether or not it is in compliance with each of the applicable “MUST”
statements in the Standards and, if so, where specifically (which page
number) in the various supporting documents compliance with that
“MUST” statement is demonstrated.

3. Catalog/Prospectus: The proposing institution submits a draft of its
Catalog or Prospectus including, among other elements, the items
described in Section 3.4 of the Standards.

4. Faculty Handbook: The proposing institution submits a draft of its
Faculty Manual including all faculty personnel policies and procedures
and the items described in Section 3.4 of the Standards.

5. Student Handbook: The proposing institution submits a draft of its
Student Handbook that includes policies and procedures related to
students and their enrollment including the items described in Section 3.4
of the Standards.

6. Policies and Procedures Manual: The proposing institution submits a
draft of its Policies and Procedures Manual that includes all by-laws,
descriptions of its governance, organizational, academic, and
administrative reporting structures and the roles and responsibilities of key
positions; and all policies, regulations, and procedures governing students,
educational programs, human resources, financial affairs, support services,
and facilities.

7. Organizational Charts: The proposing institution submits
organizational charts that show, year by year, the administrative and
academic structure of the institution for each of the first five years of
operation.


                             77
8. Institutional Effectiveness Manual: The proposing institution submits
a draft of its Institutional Effectiveness Manual that explains in detail the
system for collecting and analyzing data and assessing the effectiveness of
the institution, its academic programs, and its educational and
administrative support functions—as well as the instruments/tools/forms
to be used for this purpose, including those items required in section 2 of
the Standards, and the methods and time fames for linking quality
assessment with planning, budgeting, and decision-making.

9. Timed Action Plan: The proposing institution submits a detailed and
specific timed action plan for the provision of all human and physical
resources required to support the institution’s mission and the delivery of
its proposed programs, extending from the time of initial application
through the first full year of operation of the proposed campus. The timed
action plan must include each faculty and non-faculty position required to
plan, organize, and operate the campus and its programs, with the dates of
planned appointments. It must include all steps required to have in place
the necessary facilities, infrastructure, programs, services, and human
resources prior the institution’s intended date to enroll students.

10. Architectural Design: Either at the time of the submission of the
Application, or at a point prior to the Commission’s final analysis of the
Application and its accompanying documents, the proposing institution
submits architectural drawings of the campus buildings and campus
layout. If a temporary location is to be used initially, followed by a
purpose built campus, plans for both locations should be included.

11. Documentation of the Financial Resources: The proposing institution
submits documentation of its financial resources sufficient for the
establishment and the operation of the institution.

12. Proposed Financial Guarantee: The proposing institution submits
documentation of how it will provide the required financial guarantee—in
escrow account or bank guarantee. The guarantee must be equivalent to
the average annual operating costs of the institution for the first four years
of operation, assuming maximum enrolment of students in all proposed
programs.

A-3    Steps for Licensure

Once an institution has obtained Initial Licensure, which remains in effect
for up to two years, it applies for Licensure at the beginning of its second
year of operation. Likewise, an institution that already has Licensure,
which remains in effect for up to five years, applies to renew its Licensure
prior to its expiration. In either case the applying institution follows these


                              78
steps:

1) Twelve months prior to the termination of its current licensure status,
  ttthe institution submits to the Commission:
      a letter from the chief executive officer or
         chair of the board requesting renewal of its
         licensure and verifying that it has maintain
         Initial Accreditation or Accreditation of its
         academic degree programs;
      an updated Application for Licensure
         spreadsheet indicating whether or not the
         institution is in compliance with each of the
         “MUST” statements in the Standards and
         citing the appropriate page number in the
         supporting documentation that verifies
         compliance; and
      four copies of its current catalog, student
         handbook, faculty handbook, policies and
         procedures          manual,      institutional
         effectiveness manual, internship manual,
         and any other document(s) pertinent to any
         criteria noted in the Application, together
         with electronic copies.

2) The Commission reviews the Application and either
   accepts it or refers it back to the institution for
   revision or for additional information.

3) If the Application is accepted, the Commission
   schedules one or more meetings with institutional
   representatives and on-site visits to the campus for
   evaluation purposes.

4) The Commission requests additional documentation
   as may be required.

5) Once the Commission has completed the
   evaluation, it makes a recommendation to the
   Minister.

6) The Minister determines if the institution’s
   application is approved, delayed, or denied.

7) The Commission notifies the institution of the
   determination.



                             79
Licensure is awarded for up to three years and is dependent upon the
maintaining of Initial Accreditation status or Accreditation status of all
programs that are offered and is also dependent on the institution’s
continuing to meet all relevant criteria in the Standards and all reporting
requirements of the Commission and the Ministry.

An institution cannot assume that its Application will be automatically
approved simply because it received Initial Licensure. The burden of proof
is on the individual institution. However, the institution remains
recognized until the Minister has made his determination on the
institution's application.

A-4    Steps for Renewal of Licensure

The institution should monitor its licensure status, as well as the
accreditation status of each of its programs, and must request through a
letter to the Commission renewal of its license, following the same steps
as outlined for the application for licensure in Section A-3.

A-5    Licensure Determination

Licensure determination falls into three categories: Approved, Probation,
Denied.

Approved: The institution receiving the approved determination is
permitted to offer in the U.A.E. programs that hold Initial Accreditation or
Accreditation status as approved by the Minister. All licensed institutions
will receive frequent unscheduled visits from the staff of the Commission
to ensure that each is continuing to meet the requirements of the
Standards. Failure to do so may result in immediate loss of licensure,
according to the determination of the Minister.

Probation: The institution receiving the probation determination is
obligated to correct, within the specified time limit, any deficiencies
noted. The Commission staff will validate the corrections of the
deficiencies and make an appropriate recommendation to the Minister for
his determination. Accordingly, the institution may be requested to stop
admitting students to its programs for a period to be specified by the
Commission. Should the deficiencies not be corrected during the
specified time limit, the institution’s licensure determination will be
changed to “denied.”

Denied: The institution receiving the denied determination, by definition,
is given no license, or, in the case of a licensure renewal application, the
existing license is revoked. A previously licensed institution receiving the
denied determination will stop admitting students to any of its programs,
stop offering its program within the time specified by the Commission,


                             80
and inform all of its students of the denial status. Furthermore, the
institution is obliged to guide its students to seek admission in other
recognized institution of higher education. Funds held as a financial
guarantee will be used to assist student in completing their educational
programs and to meet other institutional obligations.

A-6    Representation of Licensure Status

The Ministry of Education will recognize no program offered to any
student unless the institution in the UAE offering the program has Initial
Licensure or Licensure from the Ministry and the program has Initial
Accreditation or Accreditation status. Continued licensure presupposes
that all programs have Initial Accreditation or Accreditation status.

Institutions receiving probation or denied determination are not authorized
to report in any of their materials, official or unofficial, that they have any
recognition of licensure by the Ministry. The Ministry will not list those
institutions has being among those higher education institutions in the
United Arab Emirates that are recognized by the Ministry of Education.
The Ministry will announce to the public and to government agencies in
the country and internationally the names of those institutions that do hold
Initial Licensure or Licensure. The Ministry of Education will officially
recognize those institutions.

Only a higher education institution possessing Initial Licensure or
Licensure has the right to include in its catalog, brochures, press releases,
and advertisements statements that indicate that it is recognized by the
Ministry of Education as a licensed institution of higher education in the
United Arab Emirates.         When it announces this designation, the
institution, so approved, is authorized to describe its approved status in its
official publications such as its catalog or prospectus with this statement:

       “(Name of Institution), located at (physical address), is
       officially licensed from (day, month, year) to (day, month,
       year) by the Ministry of Education of the United Arab Emirates
       to award higher education degrees.”
In advertisements, brochures, and other notices, the institution, so
authorized, may refer to its status as either “licensed” or “recognized” by
the Ministry of Education.

No institution can announce higher education degree programs unless
those programs have been granted Initial Accreditation or Accreditation
by the Ministry of Education. When the institution announces programs
that hold Initial Accreditation or Accreditation, the institution is
authorized to describe their status in its official publications such as its
catalog or prospectus as holding either “Initial Accreditation” or


                              81
“Accreditation,” whichever is applicable, and may refer to programs that
hold either Initial Accreditation or Accreditation as being “recognized” by
the Ministry of Education of the United Arab Emirates. Similar phrasing
may be used in advertisements, brochures, press releases, and similar
notices. An institution may not advertise programs that have not been
awarded Initial Accreditation or Accreditation. Appendix B describes to
processes and requirements for Initial Accreditation and Accreditation of
academic programs.

A-7    Role and Responsibility of Each Institution

Any institution involved in the licensure process:
    accepts seriously its obligation to provide to
       its students an education of quality;
    is fully committed to the licensure process;
    continuously assesses every aspect of its
       total operations, involving personnel from
       all segments of the institution, faculty, staff,
       students, administration, and governing
       entity;
    keeps available for the Commission staff a
       comprehensive analysis of the institution,
       identifying its strengths, its weaknesses, its
       plans to correct its weaknesses, and the
       subsequent results of those plans;
    agrees to keep the Commission apprised of
       its operations and programs and to provide
       on a regular and on-going basis all
       information requested by the Commission;
       and
    accepts the assessment of its strengths and
       weaknesses by the Commission.

Participation in the licensure process commits the total institution to
integrity. Any violation of institutional integrity results in the immediate
removal of the institution from the licensure process.

In maintaining integrity, an institution:
     is committed to the search for, and to the
       dissemination of, knowledge;
     is responsible for ensuring integrity in all its
       dealings with its constituencies, the
       Commission, the Ministry, all governmental
       and private agencies, and the public;
     provides the Commission access to all
       reports of its operations and accurate


                              82
                     information about the institution’s affairs,
                     including reports from any other accrediting,
                     licensing, and auditing agencies, and access
                     to budgets, personnel information, audited
                     financial statements, and other information
                     as the Commission may request;
                    provides, in a timely fashion, all information
                     requested by the Commission, including
                     regular reporting of data on students and
                     faculty according to the schedules of the
                     Commission and the Ministry;
                    cooperates fully with the Commission in
                     preparing for and conducting site visits and
                     other meetings; and
                    maintains an atmosphere of openness and
                     cooperation with the Commission and the
                     Ministry of Education.




                Appendix B: Program Accreditation Process
Figure 1 at the front of the Standards publication outlines the process for Program
Accreditation and the inter-relationship between Program Accreditation and Licensure.
In order to offer academic programs of one academic year or more beyond the secondary
school level, an institution MUST have obtained Initial Licensure or hold Official
Certificate of Licensure or Licensure Renewal AND all of its academic programs MUST
have been awarded Initial Accreditation or be accredited.


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B.1    Accreditation Criteria

The following will be used in reviewing an academic program:
     the Application document submitted by the institution and
     the requirements of the Standards as they apply to the specific program
        being evaluated.
In addition, the Commission may elect to use the criteria published by the internationally
recognized discipline accrediting association of the program being evaluated. In those
cases in which the discipline association has no criteria for that discipline, commonly
accepted principles of good educational practice will be followed.

B.2    Steps for Initial Accreditation

In order to apply for Initial Accreditation of a proposed program, an institution is
required to:
    have received Initial Licensure or a current Official Certificate of
       Licensure;
    apply at least six months prior to the intended date of the inception of the
       program and according to the deadlines published annually by the
       Commission;
    submit to the Commission four (4) copies of a properly completed
       Application for Initial Accreditation of a Proposed Program and four (4)
       copies of its catalog/draft catalog, faculty handbook, student handbook,
       and any other documents pertinent to any criteria in the Application;
    receive, where judged necessary by the Commission staff, a program
       review on campus by the Commission staff;
    receive official notice that the institution’s Application has been accepted
       by the Commission; and
    if the institution’s formal Application has not been accepted by the
       Commission, not resubmit its Application for six months from the date of
       official letter of rejection.

The Initial Accreditation is valid for up to two years after the institution graduates the
first cohort of students from the program, provided that the program begins to be offered
no later than one year after it receives its Initial Accreditation.


B.3    Application for Initial Accreditation of a Proposed Program

The Application for Initial Accreditation of a Proposed Program MUST include
accurate, clear and detailed evidence with appropriate documentation that the institution
and the proposed program to be reviewed are meeting the requirements of the Standards
by addressing each of the relevant MUST statements listed in the Application form and
found in the following sections of the Standards:
       Section II.    Purpose, Planning, and Effectiveness


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       Section III.   Educational Program
       Section IV.    Educational Support Services
       Section V.     Administrative Process

In those cases where, with respect to the proposed program to be reviewed, the institution
is failing to meet a MUST statement, the institution:
 specifically includes the section number followed by the full text of the MUST
     statement in the Application;
 clearly indicates why it is failing to meet the MUST statement; and
 clearly indicates how it plans to correct this deficiency, and in what time frame.

The Application for Initial Accreditation of a Proposed Program contains all the
documentation as required below in the following order:

      A copy of the institution’s most recent Certificate of Licensure or notice of Initial
       Licensure, as appropriate;

           A letter from the CEO or Chairperson of the Board to the Commission for
            Academic Accreditation verifying that:
ttttttttttttttt
                 the proposed program has been approved at the highest level of
                     the institution;

            it is consistent with the purposes, goals, and objectives of the
             institution;

            the information in the supporting documentation is accurate and
             complete; and

            the institution is committed to provide all needed human and
             physical resources required to support the program.

      Supporting documentation responding to all points in items 1-18 below, in
       the order in which they are listed, and to any other requirements of the
       current edition of the Standards that are specific to the proposed program,
       along with four (4) copies of the institution’s current catalog, submitted in
       both printed and electronic form.

   1. Needs assessment: The needs assessment MUST demonstrate that the
      program fills a need both for students and for society. It MUST be based
      on conservative assumptions that are clearly stated and supported, and
      MUST include:

                  market survey of employment opportunities in the region,
                   nation, and locale of the institution;


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             analysis of similar competing programs at both public and
              private institutions in the U.A.E. and their impact on the
              proposed program and on the need the proposed program seeks
              to meet;
             rationale of the proposed program in relation to other programs
              at the proposing institution and in relation to other existing
              areas of academic excellence;
             market survey of students who are available and who would
              select the program, including an analysis of why they would
              choose it; and
             projected enrollments year by year for the first five (5) years of
              the program, with three scenarios of enrollment numbers
              including a “worst case” scenario.


2. Resources, capacity, and commitment: The proposing institution MUST
   project resources, including both human and physical resources, needed to
   support the program at a level of quality that would be recognized
   internationally. These needs must be assessed in detail, including startup
   resources and year-by-year operating requirements for each of the first
   five (5) years the program is offered. The proposing institution MUST
   also clearly document, with all necessary supporting detail, its capacity
   and its commitment to meet each of these needs year-by-year. Included in
   this detailed analyses of resources required and capacity and commitment
   to meet these needs MUST be the following:

             the provision of a program chair, coordinator, or other
              academic administrator to lead the program’s development;
             current teaching faculty who can teach courses in the program
              and their areas of specialization;
             faculty who will need to be appointed and their areas of
              specialization;
             technical support personnel required, current and projected;
             other staff needed, current and projected, to support the
              program;
             instructional technology and other equipment and software
              needed to support the program, both currently available and
              projected;
             laboratories, studios or other specialized facilities, including
              furnishings and equipment, both currently available and
              projected;
             individual office space for newly appointed faculty members,
              and research space and equipment as may be required for them
              and for current faculty;
             provision of “release time” and other support for faculty,
              including newly appointed faculty, to allow them sufficient

                                        86
               time and resources to oversee the development of courses,
               establish the program, and also establish their own programs of
               teaching and research/scholarly activities in relation to the
               program; and
              practical training opportunities for internships and practicum
               experiences for students in applied fields such as for medicine,
               engineering, business, and education.


3. Finances, costs, and capacity: The proposing institution MUST provide a
careful analysis of the projected costs for each need and commitment identified in
item 2 above and MUST document its ability to meet the attendant costs,
including:

              initial capital costs associated with the program such as
               renovation and construction and equipment purchases and the
               financial resources sufficient to meet the initial capital costs;
              other start-up costs of the program including both the initial
               faculty appointments and other human and physical resources
               and the financial resources to meet these other initial costs;
              operating costs year-by-year for the first five (5) years of the
               program for all human and physical resources taking into
               account an inflationary factor and the costs of recruiting
               faculty and replacing or adding to equipment and the financial
               resources sufficient to meet operating costs for the first five (5)
               years of the program, year-by-year;
              revenue projections year-by-year for the first five (5) years of
               the program using “worst case” enrollment estimates identified
               in item 1 above; and
              contingency amounts of no less that 20% of the total costs.


   4. Timed action plan: The proposing institution MUST provide a timed human
   and physical resource action plan that is sufficiently detailed to map out stage by
   stage the provision of resources both for the startup of the program in its first year
   and for its delivery in each succeeding year for a total of five (5) years, taking into
   account each element in items 2 and 3 above. The action plan MUST include the
   appointment of the program chair, coordinator, or other academic administrator
   no later than 6 months prior to the anticipated time of the inauguration of the
   program to oversee the acquisition of required human and physical resources.

 5. Goals and outcomes of the program: The proposing institution MUST provide
    a detailed statement of the goals, objectives, and intended learning outcomes of
    the program consistent with the goals and objectives of the institution.




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 6. Admission requirements: The proposing institution MUST provide a detailed
    statement of admission requirements for students entering the program,
    consistent with Ministry of Education requirements.


 7. Curriculum and instruction: The proposing institution MUST provide detailed
    information on the content of the program, including:

             the full curricular offerings, detailed syllabi of all courses, including
              required and elective courses so designated; the goals, objectives and
              learning outcomes of each course that support the goals, objectives,
              and outcomes of the program; detailed course content specified week
              by week, the texts and other learning resources to be used in each
              course; a full description for each course, including the designate and
              course number of each; all pre-requisites and co-requisites for each
              course detailed and justified; and the manner by which student
              achievement in each course will be assessed;
             a term-by-term study plan indicating which courses a student would be
              advised to take and when he or she would be expected to take them;
             a manual or similar document detailing policies for practicum,
              internship, or practical application experiences; and
             if any portion of the proposed program is to be offered by distance
              education or e-Learning, the proposing institution MUST address in
              detail all relevant sections of the Standards related to this mode of
              delivery and to all relevant sections of the e-Learning/Distance
              Learning Standards.


8. Degree completion requirements: The proposing institution MUST explain the
   specific requirements for the completion of the degree program including credits
   hours, required general education or institution-wide courses, required program
   courses, required internship or practicum experiences, grade point average, and
   minimum and maximum duration of study.


9. Faculty: The institution MUST provide information concerning the faculty who
    will have responsibility for the program and its courses, including:

             curriculum vitae of the program chair, coordinator, or other
              academic administrator responsible for the program and of faculty
              who are currently appointed and available and who will teach in
              the program;
             qualifications, areas of specialization, and proposed academic rank
              for faculty and academic administrators who will be appointed for
              the program;



                                       88
              in cases in which a faculty position in a current program is being
               used to support the proposed program, a justification and
               explanation of how this assignment will affect the institution and
               the program that had been supported by this faculty position;
              plans to ensure diversity in faculty for the program;
              Analysis of the use of faculty to teach all courses, term by term, as
               identified in item 7 above;
              projected use of part time faculty;
              time line for the appointment of new faculty including the different
               stages of the advertising, recruitment, interviewing, appointment,
               arrival, and orientation processes; and
              planned use of teaching assistants, lab assistants, or other staff who
               directly support instruction.


10. Library and learning resources: The proposing institution MUST specify
    those learning resources that directly support the proposed program,
    including:

          current library holdings, with a listing of titles and including software;
          access to information electronically, including access to databases and
           journal articles with a listing of electronically accessed databases and
           journals related to the proposed area of study;
          a timed plan to add to the library collection and to other learning
           resources year by year to support the program during its first five (5)
           years; and
          budget to support the program’s library and learning resources from
           startup of the program through the first five (5) years.


11. IT and instructional support: The proposing institution MUST provide
    detailed plans to meet the program’s needs for instructional technology,
    including computers as well as other required instructional support
    specific to the proposed program.


12. Counseling and career development: The proposing institution MUST explain
    how any increased demands created by the program on the institution’s
    counseling and career development functions will be met.


13. External relations: The institution MUST explain how the program will
   receive the benefits of external review and advice and how students and
   faculty will engage with the external professional and academic
   communities in ways that support the goals of the program, which may, as
   appropriate, include:


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              plans for a program advisory board or similar means of program
               oversight, feedback, and coordination with the external community;
              plans for exchange information with peer institutions or programs and
               input from them;
              development of opportunities for program faculty to be active as
               professionals in the community;
              plans for students in the program to apply their knowledge and skills
               in work environments and community organizations;
              opportunities for program faculty to participate in professional
               meetings and associations that support their professional growth and
               development; and
              opportunities for students in the program to be active in student
               organizations that support their academic and professional careers.

14. Organization and decision making: The institution MUST document where the
    program will be placed within the institution’s academic and administrative
    decision making structures and who will be responsible for academic decision
    making, including:

              organizational chart;
              role of faculty in curriculum and instructional decisions regarding the
               program and in the appointment of additional faculty for it;
              role of the program coordinator or chair and other academic
               administrators with regard to the program and to its development,
               including faculty hiring and evaluation; and
              in the case where the institution has more than one campus, and in
               which the institution proposes to offer the program in more than one
               location, the way in which the institution will ensure the academic
               control of the program and the coordination among its different
               locations.


15. Safety: The institution MUST explain how any safety issues specific to the
    program will be addressed.


16. Contractual agreements: Any contracts, memoranda of understanding, or other
    agreements, as appropriate, regarding the delivery of or support for the proposed
    program MUST be explained and copies of any such existing agreements MUST
    be included.


17. Program effectiveness: The proposing institution MUST explain in detail how
    the institution’s effectiveness system will support the assessment and



                                        90
         improvement of the proposed program in meeting its stated goals, objectives and
         outcomes. Included must be:

                    matrix indicating program and course objectives and outcomes and the
                     assessment instruments to be used to evaluate effectiveness of
                     individual courses and the program as a whole and its educational and
                     administrative support services;
                    description of the instruments to be used to obtain program-specific
                     data and the mechanism by which these data are analyzed and this
                     analysis is used to reach decisions intended to improve the program
                     and its outcomes; and
                    the role of the faculty and program coordinator in assessing the
                     effectiveness of the program, making decisions regarding it based on
                     an assessment of this data, and implementing changes to improve the
                     program and its outcomes.


      18 Teach-out provision: The institution MUST provide a clear and specific
         explanation of how it will provide for the rights and protection of any student
         enrolled should the proposed program, through the accreditation process,
         eventually be allowed to be offered and later be cancelled.

The institution understands that:
    an Application incomplete or submitted in an order other than that
       specified by the Commission will be returned to the institution with the
       request automatically not accepted;
    official acceptance of the Application by the Commission in absolutely no
       way implies any sort of official or unofficial commitment to Initial
       Accreditation; rather it is but one step in the program accreditation
       process;
    if the fully completed Application is not officially accepted by the
       Commission, the institution will be so informed of this fact together with
       whether it may again make application and, if so, within what time-frame;
       and
    if the Application is officially accepted by the Commission, the institution
       has the obligation to arrange with the Commission staff to begin planning
       for the on-site visiting committee.

Institutions should be aware of the deadlines for applications, published annually by the
Commission.


B.4      Steps for Program Accreditation and Re-Accreditation

If an institution is seeking Accreditation for a program, that program must previously


                                              91
have been granted Initial Accreditation for the time specified by the Commission.

If an institution is seeking Re-Accreditation for a program, that program must previously
have been granted Accreditation classification within the last five years.

The institution that has met these requirements (that is, its program has been designated
Initial Accreditation status or is accredited) is responsible for beginning the accreditation
or re-accreditation process by officially notifying the Commission that the institution
intends to seek Accreditation or Re-Accreditation of the program, and communicating
with the staff of the Commission to initiate the Accreditation or Re-Accreditation
process, beginning with the preparation of the institutional documents and the
Application for Program Accreditation.

In the case of Accreditation, this process MUST begin within two years after the first
class graduates from a program with Initial Accreditation.

An institution cannot assume that accreditation will automatically follow. The burden of
proof of compliance with the Standards rests on the individual institution and on those
responsible for teaching in, administering, and supervising the specific program to be
evaluated.

Upon the Commission’s acceptance of the Application, a visiting committee is brought to
the campus for a fact-finding evaluative review of the program. The Commission will
schedule a visit as quickly as possible, but the institution should be aware of the
Commission’s deadlines for applications, which are published annually, and plan
accordingly.

The Commission staff then reviews the visiting committee report and makes a
recommendation to the Minister for his determination.

B.5       Application for Program Accreditation and Re-Accreditation

An application for Accreditation/Re-accreditation requires:

         a letter from the CEO or Chairperson of the Board to the Commission
          verifying that the information in the supporting documentation is accurate
          and complete; and
          a self-study of the program and its effectiveness that includes supporting
          documentation responding to all points in items 1 –18 below, in the order
          in which they are listed, and to any other requirements of the current
          edition of the Standards that are specific to the program, along with four
          (4) copies of the properly completed Application and four (4) copies of its
          current catalog, faculty handbook, student handbook, and all other
          documents pertinent to any criteria noted in the Application,

The Application for Program Accreditation/Re-Accreditation MUST contain all the


                                              92
information as required below in the following order:

   1. Goals and outcomes of the program: The institution MUST provide a detailed
      statement of the goals, objectives, and learning outcomes of the program
      consistent with the goals and objectives of the institution, and indicate if these
      goals, objectives, and outcomes have changed since the program was last
      reviewed by the Commission and if so the nature of those changes and an
      explanation of why they were made.


   2. Admission requirements: The institution MUST provide a detailed statement of
      admission requirements for students entering the program, consistent with
      Ministry requirements, and indicate if these requirements have changed since the
      program was last reviewed by the Commission and if so why these changes were
      made.

   3. Curriculum and instruction: The institution MUST provide detailed information
      on the current content of the program, including:

                  ●    changes in the curriculum, if any, since the program was last
                      reviewed by the Commission;
                  ● a term-by-term study plan indicating which courses a student would
                      be advised to take and when he or she would be expected to take
                      them;
                  ● the full curricular offerings, detailed syllabi of all courses, including
                      required and elective courses so designated; the goals and
                      objectives and learning outcomes of each course that support the
                      goals, objectives, and outcomes of the program; detailed course
                      content specified week by week, the texts and other learning
                      resources to be used in each course; a full description for each
                      course, including the designate and course number of each; all pre-
                      requisites and co-requisites for each course detailed and justified;
                      and the manner by which student achievement in each course will
                      be assessed;
                  ●  a manual or similar document detailing policies for practicum,
                     internship, or practical application experiences; and
                  ● if any portion of the program is offered by distance education or e-
                     Learning, the institution must address in detail all relevant sections
                     of the Standards related to this mode of delivery and to all relevant
                     sections of the e-Learning/Distance Learning Standards.

   4. Degree completion requirements: The institution MUST explain the specific
      requirements for the completion of the degree program including credits hours,
      required general education or institution-wide courses, required program courses,
      required internship or practicum experiences, grade point average, minimum and
      maximum duration of study, and residency requirements.


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5. Students and graduates: The institution MUST provide data since the program
   started to include:
                 new student enrollment into the program year by year;
                 the total enrollment in the program year by year;
                 the year by year attrition from the
                            program; and
                 the number of graduates from the program year by year.


6. Faculty: The institution MUST provide information concerning the faculty who
   have responsibility for the program and its courses, including:

              curriculum vitae of the program chair, coordinator, or other
               academic administrator responsible for the program;
              curriculum vitae of both full-time and part-time faculty who
               currently teach the program specific courses and                  their
               qualifications, areas of specialization, teaching load and courses they
               teach in the current and last semester, and those taught in the
               previous semester;
              qualifications, areas of specialization, and proposed academic rank
               for faculty and academic administrators who will be appointed for
               the program, in case of new faculty to be added;
              the use of teaching assistants, lab assistants, or other staff who
               directly support instruction;
              faculty development support provided for faculty in the program
               during the previous four years with details on programs, conference
               attendance, and other professional development activities;
              provision of “release time” and other support for faculty, including
               newly appointed faculty, to allow them sufficient time and resources
               to oversee the development of courses, and also implement their
               own programs of teaching and research/scholarly activities in
               relation to the program;
              class rosters of current and preceding semesters and, if available, of
               the forthcoming semester;
              role of faculty in curriculum revision and development, and in
               faculty recruitment and promotion; and
              opportunities that have been used by program faculty to participate
               in professional meetings and associations that support their
               professional growth and development.

 7.    Resources, capacity, and commitment: The institution MUST describe the
   available resources, including both human and physical resources, that are
   utilized to support the program. The institution MUST also clearly document the
   following, with all necessary supporting detail:



                                      94
           technical support personnel currently available;
           other staff currently utilized to support the program;
           summary of current library and other learning resources including
            titles of all collections relevant to the program and listing of
            electronically accessed journals and databases that support the
            program;
           instructional technology including computers and other equipment and
            software currently available to support the program;
           laboratories, studios or other specialized facilities, currently available
            for the program; and

           practical training opportunities for internships and practicum
            experiences that have been used for students in fields such as
            medicine, engineering, and education.

8. Organization and decision making: The institution MUST document where the
  program is placed within the institution’s academic and administrative decision
  making structures and who is responsible for academic decision making
  including:

           organizational chart;
           role of faculty in curriculum and instructional decisions regarding the
            program and in the appointment of additional faculty for it; and
           role of the program coordinator or chair and other academic
            administrators with regard to the program and to its development,
            including faculty hiring and evaluation.

9. Finances, costs, and capacity: The institution MUST provide the financial
  analysis of the costs and revenue of the program in the last academic year.

10. Counseling and career development: The institution MUST explain how the
 institution’s counseling and career development functions are carried out, with
 statistics on job opportunities that have been secured for the program graduates
 through this service.

11. External relations: The institution MUST explain how the program has
  received the benefits of external review and advice and how students and faculty
  engage with the external professional and academic communities in ways that
  support the goals of the program, which may, as appropriate, include:

          program advisory board or similar means of program oversight,
           feedback, and coordination with the external community;
          exchange information with peer institutions or programs and input from
           them;
          development of opportunities for program faculty to actively engage
           them as professionals in the community;


                                      95
             plans that have been implemented for students in the program to apply
              their knowledge and skills in work environments and community
              organizations; and
             opportunities that have been utilized by students in the program to be
              active in student organizations that support their academic and
              professional careers.

12. Consortial and contractual agreements: Any contracts, memoranda of
  understanding, or other agreements, as appropriate, regarding the delivery of or
  support for the program MUST be explained and copies of any such existing
  agreements MUST be included.


13. Safety: The institution MUST explain how any safety issues specific to the
  program are addressed.

14. Program effectiveness: The institution MUST explain in detail how the
  institution’s effectiveness system has supported the assessment and improvement
  of the proposed program in meeting its stated goals, objectives and outcomes.
  Included MUST be:
         matrix indicating program and course objectives and outcomes and the
            assessment instruments that are used to evaluate effectiveness of
            individual courses and the program as a whole;
         description of the instruments that are used to obtain program-specific
            data and the mechanism by which these data are analyzed and this
            analysis is used to reach decisions intended to improve the program and
            its outcomes;
         description of the instruments that are used to obtain data on the
            effectiveness of each of the educational and administrative units
            supporting the program and its outcomes;
         the role of the faculty and program coordinator in assessing the
            effectiveness of the program, making decisions regarding it based on an
            assessment of this data, and implementing changes to improve the
            program and its outcomes;
         detailed results of the evaluations made through various instruments;
            and
         documentation demonstrating how the institution has used the results of
            these evaluations to improve the program and its curriculum, courses,
            learning outcomes, and the effectiveness of its supporting units.


15. Program improvement: The institution should identify and assess any issues,
  problems, questions, new directions, and improvements that it is exploring, or
  would like to explore, related to the program. These may include, as appropriate:

             curriculum changes including course sequencing, additions, deletions,


                                       96
                  or pre- requisites;
                 additional or new completion requirements such as practicum
                  experiences, minimum GPA, or capstone course;
                 changes in internship or other practicum experiences for students;
                 additional areas of faculty expertise for which the institution may
                  recruit faculty;
                 areas of needed professional development for current faculty;
                 additional resources that will be required in library holdings, databases,
                  software, hardware, laboratory equipment, etc; and
                 related programs, tracks, or concentrations that the institution is
                  considering to provide.

     16. the location(s) where the program is offered;

     17. analysis of opportunities as well as problems and difficulties involved
         with offering the program; and

     18. accurate, clear, and detailed evidence with appropriate documentation that the
         institution and the program being reviewed are meeting the requirements of the
         Standards by addressing each of the relevant MUST statements listed in the
         Application form.

In those cases where, with respect to the program being evaluated, the institution reports
that it is failing to meet a MUST statement listed in the Application, the institution:
     specifically includes the section number followed by the full text of the MUST
         statement in the Application;
     clearly indicates why it is failing to meet the MUST statement; and
     clearly indicates how it plans to correct this deficiency, and in what time frame.

The institution understands that:
    it is to submit to the Commission four (4) copies of the properly completed
       Application and four (4) copies of its current catalog, faculty handbook, student
       handbook, and all other documents pertinent to any criteria noted in the
       Application, and have the Application document accepted by the Commission at
       least six (6) months before the time the specific program is subject to
       accreditation/re-accreditation;
    an incomplete Application will automatically call for stopping admission to the
       specific program;
    official acceptance of the Application by the Commission in no way implies any
       sort of official or unofficial commitment to program accreditation; rather it is but
       one step in the program accrediting process;
    if the submitted Application is officially not accepted by the Commission, the
       Commission will not schedule an on-site committee visit and will inform the
       institution of its options (The options may include the initiation of actions to close
       the program, with full institutional consideration given to the rights and
       protection of students currently enrolled in the program, in which case the


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          institution discusses with and then is officially informed by the Commission
          when the institution will again be allowed to apply for accreditation of the denied
          program);
         if the Application is officially accepted by the Commission, the institution has the
          obligation to communicate with the Commission staff to begin planning for the
          on-site visiting committee, the visit to be conducted under the full supervision of
          the Commission staff; and
         if an Application has been officially accepted and an on-site visiting committee
          review has taken place, a program can be approved, placed on probation, leading
          to admission being placed on hold for one year, or denied, leading to its closure.


B.6       The On-Site Visitation

An on-site visitation will not be scheduled until the Commission has received and
officially accepted the Application. The Commission staff will closely coordinate the
visit of the on-site committee with the institution as part of the accrediting process. Staff
of the Commission will review plans for the visit of the committee according to a
prescribed agenda sent to the chief executive officer in advance of the visit. It is
understood that the following principals and procedures govern the on-sire visit:

         Just as it has taken very seriously its preparation of the Application, so
          also is the institution to take very seriously preparation for the committee
          visit and the visit itself by making available to the committee all
          documents of the institution, and, where appropriate, all faculty and staff
          involved with the program being reviewed. The entire campus needs to be
          informed of the reason for this visit, and all students enrolled in the
          program, where appropriate, are to be available for discussion with the
          committee, should the committee so wish.

         The tone reflected by the institution, the Commission staff, and the
          visiting committee is, of course, courteous, friendly, and professional.
          Likewise all concerned realize and respond to the opportunity for direct
          and honest evaluation of the program. To attempt to hide any weakness in
          the program, or to define only its strengths but not its weaknesses, is
          viewed as a serious violation of professional ethics and a lost opportunity,
          never again to be recaptured, of strengthening a specific academic
          program.

         The Commission has the sole and complete authority to supervise the
          visits of all committees brought to the U.A.E. for the purpose of providing
          to the Minister an evaluative, fact-finding report of any academic program.

         The institution will bear the total responsibility of financing the visit of the
          committee, including the honoraria provided to each member. However,
          the Commission will facilitate all expenses of the committee visit,


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    including honoraria, and will charge in advance the institution involved.
    Absolutely no money nor any article of value above AED 200 will be
    given by any institution or association or associate thereof to any member
    of the committee under penalty of immediate denial of the program’s
    accreditation, as determined by the Minister. The Commission will
    facilitate all travel of the visiting committee, all housing, and all meals.
    The only exception to this rule will be the on-campus meal(s) provided by
    the institution to the committee as part of working sessions attended by
    committee members and the Commission staff only.

   Committee membership will be determined by the Commission staff from
    seasoned experts with outstanding credentials in their fields. Where there
    is need, the Commission staff will seek the advice and counsel of
    discipline accrediting organizations and accrediting associations
    recognized by the international community. Care will be given to assure
    that no committee member selected has had any affiliation or association
    with the institution or any of its programs within the past ten (10) years of
    the site visit.

   The Commission will furnish each committee member with a copy, in
    advance of the visit, of the Standards, the Application document submitted
    by the institution; and the institution’s current catalog.

   The schedule of the visiting committee on campus will be announced to
    the institution’s chief executive officer well in advance of the visit. The
    normal visit on campus will begin with a meeting with the chief executive
    officer and those whom that officer chooses to invite. The Commission
    staff is responsible for providing each committee with an orientation; and
    the chief executive officer, at the first meeting on-site, will provide the
    committee with an orientation to the institution and to the program.

   The Commission staff member(s) will sit with the visiting committee
    during its deliberations so that the staff is privy to the full and best
    thinking of the committee. All deliberative meetings of the committee are
    confidential in nature and open only to members of the staff of the
    Commission.

   The report of the visiting committee will be fact-finding and evaluative in
    its nature and will contain no recommendation regarding Initial
    Accreditation/Accreditation/Re-Accreditation and will be delivered only
    to the staff of the Commission who, after careful review of the report, will
    make         appropriate      recommendation         regarding       Initial
    Accreditation/Accreditation/Re-Accreditation to the Minister for his
    determination.

   The institution MUST refrain from making direct contact with the visiting


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       committee members after the visit, until the Minister makes a final
       determination on the program.


B.7    Accreditation Determination

The Commission will report to the institution the Initial Accreditation/ Accreditation/Re-
Accreditation determination. Such determination falls into three categories: Approved,
Probation, Denied.

Approved. That program approved for Initial Accreditation will be permitted to be
offered in the U.A.E. for a period until it graduates its first three cohorts of students from
the program, provided that students are enrolled in the program no later than the second
academic year after the program receives its Initial Accreditation, and its graduates will
be recognized by the Ministry, provided that the institution retains its Certificate of
Licensure. After the program has had graduates and prior to the graduation of its third
academic year cohorts, in order for the program to continue, Application for Program
Accreditation should have been submitted to and have been accepted by the Commission.

That program approved for Accreditation or Re-Accreditation classification will be
permitted to be offered in the U.A.E. for a period of up to five (5) years and the Ministry
will recognize its graduates, provided the institution offering this curriculum retains its
Certificate of Licensure.

During the specified period the program has been approved to operate, either under
Accreditation-Eligible or Accreditation/Re-Accreditation classification, the institution
will receive frequent unscheduled visits by the Commission staff to ensure that the
program is continuing to meet the requirements of the Standards. Failure to continue to
meet the Standards requirements may result in loss of program approval, according to the
determination of the Minister.

Probation. That program applying for Accreditation-Eligible, Accreditation, or Re-
Accreditation classification that is placed on probation by the Ministry is obligated,
within the specified time, to correct any deficiencies noted.

While the program is on probation, the institution may be sanctioned not to admit new
students into the program. The Commission staff will validate the correction of the
deficiencies and make an appropriate recommendation to the Minister for his
determination. Should the deficiencies noted not be corrected during the specified time
limit, the program’s determination will be changed to denied. Admission of new students
will be stopped and the institution will immediately initiate actions to close the program,
with full institutional consideration given to the rights and protection of the students who
are enrolled in the program.


Denied. That program denied Initial Accreditation will not be permitted to start.


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That program denied Accreditation or Re-Accreditation will immediately initiate actions
to close the program, with full institutional provision given for the rights and protection
of any student enrolled in the program.

An institution that has been denied Initial Accreditation, Accreditation, or Re-
Accreditation classification for a program will not re-apply for that program for a period
specified by the Commission.

The above actions taken upon receiving the denied determination are required, under
penalty of the institution’s losing its candidacy status or its certificate of licensure.




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