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Census of Mineral Industries
MIC92-A-2

GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

Middle Atlantic States
New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania

U.S. Department of Commerce
Economics and Statistics Administration
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

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Census of Mineral Industries
MIC92-A-2

GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

Middle Atlantic States
New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania

+

+

U.S. Department of Commerce Ronald H. Brown, Secretary
David J. Barram, Deputy Secretary Economics and Statistics Administration Everett M. Ehrlich, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS Martha Farnsworth Riche, Director

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Acknowledgments
Many persons participated in the various activities of the 1992 Census of Mineral Industries. The overall planning and review of the census operations were performed by the Economic Census Staff of the Economic Planning and Coordination Division. Manufacturing and Construction Division prepared this report. Barry A. Rappaport, Assistant Chief for Construction and Mineral Censuses, was responsible for the overall planning, management, and coordination of the census of mineral industries. Planning and implementation were under the direction of Patricia L. Horning, Chief, Construction and Mineral Census Branch, assisted by M. Susan Bucci, Section Chief, with primary staff assistance by Susan L. DiCola, Nancy I. Higgins, John F. Roehl, Eva J. Snapp, and Robert A. Wright. Brian Greenberg, Assistant Chief for Research and Methodology Programs, assisted by Stacey Cole, provided the mathematical and statistical techniques as well as the coverage operations. Baruti A. Taylor, under the direction of A. William Visnansky, Chief, Special Reports Branch, performed overall coordination of the publication process. Julius Smith, Jr. and Andrew W. Hait provided primary staff assistance. The Economic Planning and Coordination Division provided the computer processing procedures. Shirin A. Ahmed, Assistant Chief for Post Data Collection Processing, was responsible for editing and the analysts’ interactive database review and correction system. Design and specifications were prepared under the supervision of Dennis L. Wagner, Chief, Post Collection Census Branch, assisted by S. Mark Schmidt and Robert A. Rosati. The staff of the Data Preparation Division, Judith N. Petty, Chief, performed mailout preparation and receipt operations, clerical and analytical review activities, data keying, and geocoding review. The Geography Division staff developed geographic coding procedures and associated computer programs. The Economic Statistical Methods and Programming Division, Charles P. Pautler, Jr., Chief, developed and coordinated the computer processing systems. Martin S. Harahush, Assistant Chief for Quinquennial Programs, was responsible for design and implementation of the computer systems. Gary T. Sheridan, Chief, Manufactures and Construction Branch, assisted by Barbara L. Lambert, supervised the preparation of the computer programs. Computer Services Division, Marvin D. Raines, Chief, performed the computer processing. The staff of the Administrative and Customer Services Division, Walter C. Odom, Chief, performed publication planning, design, composition, editorial review, and printing planning and procurement for publications and report forms. Cynthia G. Brooks provided publication coordination and editing. Special acknowledgment is also due the many businesses whose cooperation has contributed to the publication of these data. If you have any questions concerning the statistics in this report, call 301-457-4680.

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Economics and Statistics Administration Everett M. Ehrlich, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS Martha Farnsworth Riche, Director Bryant Benton, Deputy Director
Paula J. Schneider, Principal Associate Director for Programs Frederick T. Knickerbocker, Associate Director for Economic Programs Thomas L. Mesenbourg, Assistant Director for Economic Programs ECONOMIC PLANNING AND COORDINATION DIVISION John P. Govoni, Chief MANUFACTURING AND CONSTRUCTION DIVISION David W. Cartwright, Chief

For sale by Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402.

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Contents Middle Atlantic Division
Page Introduction to the Economic Census ---------------------------------------------------------Census of Mineral Industries -------------------------------------------------------------------Users’ Guide for Locating Statistics in This Report by Table Number ----------------------STATES New Jersey --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- NJ–1 New York ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- NY–1 Pennsylvania ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- PA–1 APPENDIXES A. B. Explanation of Terms --------------------------------------------------------------------Geographic Divisions and States -------------------------------------------------------A–1 B–1 V VII X

Publication Program --------------------------------------------------------------- Inside back cover

MINERAL INDUSTRIES—GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

CONTENTS III

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Introduction to the Economic Census

PURPOSES AND USES OF THE ECONOMIC CENSUS
The economic census is the major source of facts about the structure and functioning of the Nation’s economy. It provides essential information for government, business, industry, and the general public. The economic census furnishes an important part of the framework for such composite measures as the gross domestic product, input/ output measures, production and price indexes, and other statistical series that measure short-term changes in economic conditions. Policymaking agencies of the Federal Government use the data, especially in monitoring economic activity and providing assistance to business. State and local governments use the data to assess business activities and tax bases within their jurisdictions and to develop programs to attract business. Trade associations study trends in their own and competing industries and keep their members informed of market changes. Individual businesses use the data to locate potential markets and to analyze their own production and sales performance relative to industry or area averages.

Special programs also cover enterprise statistics and minority-owned and women-owned businesses. (The 1992 Census of Agriculture and 1992 Census of Governments are conducted separately.) The next economic census is scheduled to be taken in 1998 covering the year 1997.

AVAILABILITY OF THE DATA
The results of the economic census are available in printed reports for sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office and on compact discs for sale by the Census Bureau. Order forms for all types of products are available on request from Customer Services, Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC 20233-8300. A more complete description of publications being issued from this census is on the inside back cover of this document. Census facts are also widely disseminated by trade associations, business journals, and newspapers. Volumes containing census statistics are available in most major public and college libraries. Finally, State data centers in every State as well as business and industry data centers in many States also supply economic census statistics.

AUTHORITY AND SCOPE
Title 13 of the United States Code (sections 131, 191, and 224) directs the Census Bureau to take the economic census every 5 years, covering years ending in 2 and 7. The 1992 Economic Census consists of the following eight censuses: • Census of Retail Trade • Census of Wholesale Trade • Census of Service Industries • Census of Financial, Insurance, and Real Estate Industries • Census of Transportation, Communications, and Utilities • Census of Manufactures • Census of Mineral Industries • Census of Construction Industries MINERAL INDUSTRIES—GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

WHAT’S NEW IN 1992
The 1992 Economic Census covers more of the economy than any previous census. New for 1992 are data on communications, utilities, financial, insurance, and real estate, as well as coverage of more transportation industries. The economic, agriculture, and governments censuses now collectively cover nearly 98 percent of all economic activity. Among other changes, new 1992 definitions affect the boundaries of about a third of all metropolitan areas. Also, the Survey of Women-Owned Businesses has now been expanded to include all corporations.

HISTORICAL INFORMATION
The economic census has been taken as an integrated program at 5-year intervals since 1967 and before that for 1963, 1958, and 1954. Prior to that time, the individual subcomponents of the economic census were taken separately at varying intervals. INTRODUCTION V

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The economic census traces its beginnings to the 1810 Decennial Census, when questions on manufacturing were included with those for population. Coverage of economic activities was expanded for 1840 and subsequent censuses to include mining and some commercial activities. In 1902, Congress established a permanent Census Bureau and directed that a census of manufactures be taken every 5 years. The 1905 Manufactures Census was the first time a census was taken apart from the regular every-10-year population census. The first census of business was taken in 1930, covering 1929. Initially it covered retail and wholesale trade and construction industries, but it was broadened in 1933 to include some of the service trades. The 1954 Economic Census was the first census to be fully integrated—providing comparable census data across economic sectors, using consistent time periods, concepts, definitions, classifications, and reporting units. It was the first census to be taken by mail, using lists of firms provided by the administrative records of other Federal agencies. Since 1963, administrative records also have been used to provide basic statistics for very small firms, reducing or eliminating the need to send them census questionnaires. The Enterprise Statistics Program, which publishes combined data from the economic census, was made possible with the implementation of the integrated census program in 1954. The range of industries covered in the economic censuses has continued to expand. The census of construction industries began on a regular basis in 1967, and the scope of service industries was broadened in 1967, 1977, and 1987. The census of transportation began in 1963 as a set of surveys covering travel, transportation of commodities, and trucks, but expanded in 1987 to cover business establishments in several transportation industries. For 1992, these statistics are incorporated into a broadened census of transportation, communications, and utilities. Also new for 1992 is the census of financial, insurance, and real estate industries. This is part of a gradual expansion in coverage of industries previously subjected to government regulation.

The Survey of Minority-Owned Business Enterprises was first conducted as a special project in 1969 and was incorporated into the economic census in 1972 along with the Survey of Women-Owned Businesses. An economic census has also been taken in Puerto Rico since 1909, in the Virgin Islands of the United States and Guam since 1958, and in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands since 1982. Statistical reports from the 1987 and earlier censuses provide historical figures for the study of long-term time series and are available in some large libraries. All of the census data published since 1967 are still available for sale on microfiche from the Census Bureau.

AVAILABILITY OF MORE FREQUENT ECONOMIC DATA
While the census provides complete enumerations every 5 years, there are many needs for more frequent data as well. The Census Bureau conducts a number of monthly, quarterly, and annual surveys, with the results appearing in publication series such as Current Business Reports (retail and wholesale trade and service industries), the Annual Survey of Manufactures, Current Industrial Reports, and the Quarterly Financial Report. Most of these surveys, while providing more frequent observations, yield less kind-of-business and geographic detail than the census. The County Business Patterns program offers annual statistics on the number of establishments, employment, and payroll classified by industry within each county.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION
More information about the scope, coverage, classification system, data items, and publications for each of the economic censuses and related surveys is published in the Guide to the 1992 Economic Census and Related Statistics. More information on the methodology, procedures, and history of the census will be published in the History of the 1992 Economic Census. Contact Customer Services for information on availability.

VI

INTRODUCTION

MINERAL INDUSTRIES—GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

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Census of Mineral Industries

This report, from the 1992 Census of Mineral Industries, is one of a series of nine geographic division reports; each provides statistics for individual States within a defined geographic area. Additional separate reports are issued for individual industries or groups of related industries and for special subjects, such as fuels and electric energy consumed. The introduction to the General Summary discusses, at greater length, many of the subjects described in this introduction. For example, the General Summary text will discuss the economic significance of the mining sector, the relation of value added by mining to value added by manufacture, some of the changes in statistical concepts over the history of the census, and the valuation problems arising from intracompany transfers between mining establishments, manufacturing plants, and sales offices and sales branches of a company.

Scope of Census and Definition of Mineral Industries
The 1992 Census of Mineral Industries covers all establishments with one paid employee or more primarily engaged in mining as defined in the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Manual1. This is the system of industrial classification developed by experts on classification in Government and private industry under the guidance of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget. This classification system is used by Government agencies as well as many organizations outside the Government. The SIC Manual defines mining in the broad sense to include the extraction of minerals occurring naturally: solids such as coal and ores, liquids such as crude petroleum, and gases such as natural gas. The term ‘‘mining’’ is used in the broad sense to include quarrying, well operation, milling (crushing, screening, washing, flotation, etc.), and other preparations needed to make minerals marketable. Exploration is included as is the development of mineral properties. Services performed on a

contract, fee, or other basis in the exploration and development of mineral properties are classified separately but within this division. Mining operations are classified by industry on the basis of the principal mineral produced or, if there is no production, on the basis of the principal mineral for which exploration or development work is in progress. The recovery of material from culm banks, ore dumps, and other waste mineral piles is classified in the appropriate mining industry according to the mineral product recovered. The crushing, grinding, or other treatment of certain earths, rocks, and other nonmetallic minerals not in conjunction with mining activities is not included in this division but is classified as manufacturing. Hauling and other transportation beyond the mine property and contract hauling (except out of open pits in conjunction with mining) also are excluded. Mining operations carried on as secondary activities at manufacturing establishments (such as clay pits at clay products plants or sand and gravel operations at readymixed concrete plants) are not within the scope of this census. However, selected data (production workers’ wages and hours; total cost of supplies, fuels, electric energy, and contract work; and quantity of production for mined products) on such mining activities have been obtained in the 1992 Census of Manufactures and are included in the mining reports. They are clearly specified wherever included.

Establishment Basis of Reporting
The census of mineral industries covers each mining establishment of firms with one paid employee or more operating in the United States. A company operating more than one establishment is required to file a separate report for each location. A mineral establishment is defined as a single physical location where mineral operations are conducted. For oil and gas field operations and for contract services, the basis for reporting is different from the ‘‘establishment’’ basis used for other types of mining. Firms operating oil and gas wells, drilling wells, or exploring for oil and gas for their own account were required to submit a separate report for each State or offshore area adjacent to a State in which it conducted such activities. Firms that performed contract services for oil and gas field operations or for mining establishments were required to submit one report covering all such activities in the United States and

1 Standard Industrial Classification Manual: 1987. For sale by Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. Stock No. 041-001-00314-2.

MINERAL INDUSTRIES–GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

CENSUS OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES VII

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to include information on receipts for services and productionworker wages and hours by State. These consolidated reports were then allocated to State establishments based on the data reported at the State level. The 1992 figures for establishments include the summation of operations for each State allocated from these nationwide reports.

Use of Administrative Records
From a mailout universe of about 28,500 mining establishments, approximately 11,000 small, single-establishment companies were not mailed a questionnaire. For these establishments, some employment, payroll, and receipts data were obtained from the administrative records of other agencies. Selection of the small establishment nonmail cases was done on an industry-by-industry basis, and a variable cutoff was used to determine those establishments for which administrative records were to be used in place of a census report. This information was then used in conjunction with industry averages and other information to estimate the statistics for administrative-record and nonresponse establishments. The first column in tables 2a and 5 provides an indication of the extent that these establishments account for the figures shown. The value of shipments and receipts and cost of supplies were generally not distributed among specific products and supplies for these establishments, but were included in the product and supply ‘‘not specified by kind’’ categories. Overall, establishments for which administrative-record data were used accounted for less than 2 percent of total value of shipments and receipts. The industry classification codes included in the administrativerecord files were used for those establishments excused from filing census forms. Generally, these codes were assigned on the basis of brief descriptions of the general activity of the establishment. Where the description was incomplete or where there were relatively fine lines of demarcation among industries or between mining and nonmining activities, the code assigned to an establishment could differ from that which would have been assigned on the basis of more complete product or activity information. Therefore, the total establishment count should be viewed as an approximate measure. The counts for establishments with 20 employees or more are far more reliable. In the 1992 census, as in the 1987, 1982, 1977, and 1972 censuses, data for single-unit firms without paid employees were excluded. This exclusion had only a slight effect on industry aggregates for most industries. Data for firms without employees were included in the 1963, 1958, and 1954 censuses if they reported more than $500 in (1) value of shipments and receipts, (2) cost of supplies and purchased machinery, or (3) capital expenditures.

storage facilities, and other auxiliary establishments servicing mining establishments. As in previous censuses, respondents were asked to file separate reports (form ES-9200) for any separately operated auxiliary establishments. Classification of employment and payroll data at such auxiliary establishments was based on the mining establishments served.

Industry Classification of Establishments
Each of the establishments covered in the census was classified in 1 of 31 mineral industries in accordance with the industry definitions in the 1987 SIC Manual. An industry is generally defined as a group of establishments producing the same product or closely related group of products. The resulting group of establishments must be significant in terms of its number, value added by mining, value of shipments and receipts, number of employees, and payroll. Application of these criteria led to the formulation of 31 mining industries, each assigned a four-digit code. The classification system also provides broader groups of industries, with 20 three-digit groups and 4 two-digit groups. Within industries, the system provides for seven-digit products and five-digit product classes. Products are considered primary to an industry if the first four digits of the product codes are the same as the industry code. Products whose first four code numbers differ from the industry code are called secondary products. To determine the industry classification of an establishment, the seven-digit products are grouped together according to the first four digits of the product code. The first four digits of the group of products with the largest value of production become the industry code for the establishment. (For mineral service industries, the classification is on the basis of receipts for services performed.) In most industries, establishments making products falling into the same industry category use a variety of processes. Separate statistics are provided on the various types of operation. Whenever possible, separate figures are shown for establishments with mines only, mines with preparation plants, and preparation plants only. Separate figures are provided by type of mine (underground, open pit, and combination). Separate statistics also are provided on producing and nonproducing operations; an establishment being defined as nonproducing if no mineral products were shipped during the year. Statistics usually are provided on the production of minerals mined and used in the same establishment for producing prepared minerals or used at the producing establishment for fuel. Differences in the integration of production processes and types of operation should be considered when relating the general items (employment, payrolls, value added, etc.) to the product and material data.

Auxiliaries
Statistics for employment and payroll for individual industries and industry groups also include employment and payroll figures for administrative offices, warehouses,

VIII

CENSUS OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES

MINERAL INDUSTRIES–GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

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CENSUS DISCLOSURE RULES

ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS
The following abbreviations and symbols are used in this publication:

In accordance with Federal law governing census reports, no data are published that would disclose the data for an individual establishment or company. However, the number of establishments classified in a specific industry is not considered a disclosure, so this information may be released even though other information is withheld. The disclosure analysis for the State statistics in the tables of this report is based on the total value of shipments and receipts and capital expenditures. When the total value of shipments and receipts cannot be shown without disclosing information for individual companies, the complete line is suppressed except for capital expenditures. If capital expenditures alone is a disclosure, only total capital expenditures and cost of supplies statistics are suppressed. However, the suppressed data are included in higher-level totals.

– (D)

(NA) (NC) (S) (X) (Z) n.e.c. n.s.k. r SIC

Represents zero. Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies; data are included in higher level totals. Not available. Not comparable. Withheld because estimate did not meet publication standards. Not applicable. Less than half the unit shown. Not elsewhere classified. Not specified by kind. Revised. Standard Industrial Classification.

Other abbreviations, such as lb, gal, yd, and bbl, are used in the customary sense.

CONTACTS FOR DATA USERS
Contact Mineral industries 5-year industry and product statistics Subject area Construction and Mineral Census Branch Manufacturing and Construction Division Bureau of the Census Phone 301-457-4680

SPECIAL TABULATIONS

Special tabulations of data collected in the 1992 Census of Mineral Industries may be requested. The data will be in summary form and subject to the same rules prohibiting disclosure of confidential information (including name, address, kind of business, or other data for individual business establishments or companies) as are the regular publications. Special tabulations are prepared on a cost basis. A request for a cost estimate, as well as exact specifications on the type and format of the data to be provided, should be directed to the Chief, Manufacturing and Construction Division, Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC 20233-6901.

Mineral industries National Energy Coal and oil and Information Center gas production (NEIC) Department of Energy To order any Census Bureau publication Import/ Export statistics Customer Services Bureau of the Census Foreign Trade Division Bureau of the Census

202-586-8800

301-457-4100

301-457-3041

MINERAL INDUSTRIES–GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

CENSUS OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES IX

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Users’ Guide for Locating Statistics in This Report by Table Number

[For explanation of terms, see appendixes] State by major group and type of operation State by county and industry State summary group State by county and establishment size

Item State historical Establishments: Total number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Employment size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Employment and payroll: Number of employees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Payroll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Production, development, and exploration— Workers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Supplemental labor costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . Value added, cost of supplies, shipments, and inventories: Value added by mining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cost of supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resales, cost and value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Purchased fuels consumed . . . . . . . . . . . . Purchased electricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cost of contract work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Value of shipments and receipts . . . . . . . Inventories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New and used capital expenditures, excluding land and rights: Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Buildings and structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Machinery and equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . Mineral exploration and development . . Rental payments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Expensed mineral exploration, development, land, and rights . . . . . . . . . . .

State by Industry

1

2a,2b

3

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

5

6 6

1 1 1 1 1

2a 2a 2a 2a,2b 2a,2b

3

5 5 5 5 5

1 1

2a 2a,2b

3

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

5 5

1

2a

5

1

2a

4 4 4 4 4 4

5

X

USERS’ GUIDE

MINERAL INDUSTRIES—GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

Contents New Jersey
[Page numbers listed here omit the prefix that appears as part of the number of each page]

Page Summary of Findings Map 2 3

TABLES
Historical Statistics 1. Historical Statistics for the State: 1992 and Earlier Census Years 5

State Statistics 2a. 2b. 3. 4. Mineral Establishment Statistics by Industry for the State: 1992 and 1987 Mining Activities of Manufacturing Establishments With Associated Mines by Industry for the State: 1992 Selected Statistics by Type of Operation and Major Group for the State: 1992 Summary Statistics for the State: 1992 5 -6 6

County Statistics 5. Industry Group Statistics for Counties: 1992 7

Employment-Size Class Statistics 6. Number of Mineral Establishments in Major Groups by Employment-Size Class for Counties: 1992
-- Not applicable for this report.

7

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

NEW JERSEY NJ–1

TIPS UPF [MCD_SRB,V_HARLEY] 2/ 27/ 96 14:27:21 EPCV24 TLP:ST31_TOCDATA.TLP;8 2/ 27/ 96 14:26:32 DATA:NONE UPF:DIR:ST31_TOC.UPF PAGE: 1 TSF:TIPS92-14263352.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:26:43 UTF:TIPS93-14263352.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:26:44 META:TIPS96-14263352.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:27:16

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Summary of Findings

The total value of shipments and receipts for the 114 establishments classified in mineral industries in New Jersey was $279.4 million in 1992 compared to $326.2 million in 1987. Value added by mining amounted to 199.1 million in 1992, and payroll in mining amounted to $99.3 million. All dollar figures included in this report are shown in current dollars for the years specified and have not been adjusted for inflation.

Mineral industries employment in New Jersey was 2.5 thousand in 1992. This is a decrease of 40 percent from 1987. The nonmetallic minerals, except fuels, industry led all other mineral industries in the State, accounting for most of the State’s mineral industries employment.

NJ–2

NEW JERSEY

MINERAL INDUSTRIES—GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

Table 1.

Historical Statistics for the State: 1992 and Earlier Census Years
Establishments during year Year Total (number) With 20 employees or more (number) 36 44 40 36 42 Number (1,000) 2.5 4.2 3.4 3.0 3.3 Payroll (million dollars) 99.3 153.3 101.8 48.6 36.8 Number (1,000) 1.4 1.9 1.6 1.7 2.1 Hours (millions) 3.1 4.0 3.3 3.5 4.4 Wages (million dollars) 48.6 46.7 32.0 22.1 19.4 All employees Production, development, and exploration workers Value added by mining (million dollars) 199.1 241.2 120.1 93.3 78.0 Cost of supplies used, purchased machinery installed, etc. (million dollars) 101.4 116.2 77.6 49.9 43.2

[For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

Value of shipments and receipts (million dollars) 279.4 326.2 181.3 130.4 102.8

Capital expenditures (million dollars) 21.2 31.2 16.5 12.7 18.3

1992 1987 1982 1977 1972

Census Census Census Census Census

114 154 165 157 145

Table 2a.

Mineral Establishment Statistics by Industry for the State: 1992 and 1987
1992 Establishments during year All employees Production, development, and exploration workers Value added by mining (million dollars) 199.1 (D) (D) 109.5 24.2 30.7 54.5 82.0 61.9 20.1 (D) – Cost of supplies used, purchased Value of machinery shipments installed, and etc. receipts (million (million dollars) dollars) 101.4 (D) (D) 51.6 (D) (D) 24.8 45.0 32.6 12.4 (D) – 279.4 (D) (D) 149.3 38.1 39.3 71.9 118.2 87.5 30.7 (D) – 1987

[For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

SIC code

Industry group and industry With 20 employees Total or more Number2 (number) (number) (1,000) 114 7 106 26 9 5 12 64 55 9 4 1 36 1 34 12 3 3 6 20 15 5 1 1 2.5 C G 1.0 .2 .3 .5 1.0 .8 .2 E C Payroll (million dollars) 99.3 (D) (D) 44.4 6.8 13.0 24.5 34.0 27.5 6.6 (D) (D) Wages (million dollars) 48.6 (D) (D) 27.6 4.0 10.9 12.7 18.8 15.0 3.8 (D) –

E1 All industries 13 14 142 1422 1423 1429 144 1442 1446 145 1455 Oil and gas extraction Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Crushed and broken limestone Crushed and broken granite Crushed and broken stone, n.e.c. Sand and gravel Construction sand and gravel Industrial sand Clay, ceramic, and refractory minerals Kaolin and ball clay E1 – E1 – – – E1 E1 E1 – E6 –

Number Hours (1,000) (millions) 1.4 (D) (D) .7 .1 .2 .3 .6 .5 .2 (D) – 3.1 (D) (D) 1.6 .3 .5 .7 1.3 1.0 .3 (D) –

Capital Value expendiadded by tures All emmining (million ployees2 (million dollars) (1,000) dollars) 21.2 (D) (D) 11.8 (D) (D) 7.4 8.8 7.0 1.8 (D) – 4.2 F 3.2 1.2 C C .7 1.0 .8 .2 F F 241.2 (D) 220.8 122.6 (D) (D) 57.0 88.6 67.5 21.2 (D) –

1Payroll and sales data for some small single-unit companies with up to 20 employees (cutoff varied by industry) were obtained from administrative records of other government agencies rather than from census report forms. These data were then used in conjunction with industry averages to estimate the items shown for these small establishments. This technique was also used for other establishments whose reports were not received at time data were tabulated. The following symbols are shown where estimated data account for 10 percent or more of figures shown: E1 10 to 19 percent; E2 20 to 29 percent; E3 30 to 39 percent; E4 40 to 49 percent; E5 50 to 59 percent; E6 60 to 69 percent; E7 70 to 79 percent; E8 80 to 89 percent; E9 90 percent or more. 2General statistics for some industries are withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. However, for such disclosures with 100 employees or more, number of establishments is shown and employment-size range is indicated by one of the following symbols: C 100 to 249 employees; E 250 to 499 employees; F 500 to 999 employees; G 1,000 to 2,499 employees; H 2,500 to 4,999 employees; I 5,000 to 9,999 employees. Statistics for industry groups shown include data for all component industries, regardless of whether data are shown for individual industries in group.

Table 2b.
[Not applicable]

Mining Activities of Manufacturing Establishments With Associated Mines by Industry for the State: 1992

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

NEW JERSEY NJ–5

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Table 3.

Selected Statistics by Type of Operation and Major Group for the State: 1992
Producing establishments Mines only Mines with preparation plants

[For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

SIC code

Major group and item

All types of establishments

Total

Total

Underground mines

Combination methods, well Open operations, pit and other mines methods

Total

Under ground mines

Open pit mines

Combination and other methods

Separately operated preparation plants

Undistributed1

Nonproducing establishments

ALL INDUSTRIES
Establishments Employees Value added in mining number 1,000 mil dol 114 2.5 199.1 114 2.5 199.1 5 (D) (D) – – – 5 (D) (D) – – – 62 (D) (D) – – – 59 1.5 159.7 3 (D) (D) – – – 47 .8 29.7 – – –

10

METAL MINING
Establishments Employees Value added in mining number 1,000 mil dol 1 (D) (D) 1 (D) (D) – – – – – – – – – – – – 1 (D) (D) – – – 1 (D) (D) – – – – – – – – – – – –

13

OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION
Establishments Employees Value added in mining number 1,000 mil dol 7 (D) (D) 7 (D) (D) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 7 (D) (D) – – –

14

NONMETALLIC MINERALS, EXCEPT FUELS
Establishments Employees Value added in mining
1Includes

number 1,000 mil dol

106 (D) (D)

106 (D) (D)

5 (D) (D)

– – –

5 (D) (D)

– – –

61 (D) (D)

– – –

58 (D) (D)

3 (D) (D)

– – –

40 (D) (D)

– – –

data for separately operated auxiliary establishments in addition to establishments that were not possible to classify based on the information available.

Table 4.

Summary Statistics for the State: 1992
Item 1992 number number number number 1,000 mil dol 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 millions mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol 114 78 33 3 Item mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil kWh mil dol mil kWh mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil mil mil mil mil mil mil mil dol dol dol dol dol dol dol dol 1992 101.4 61.5 6.1 10.5 159.0 13.6 (D) 9.8 .6 279.4 6.5 21.2 14.5 .5 13.9 5.6 (Z) 5.5 1.2 3.4 .8 2.6 2.1

[For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

Establishments during year With 0 to 19 employees With 20 to 99 employees With 100 employees or more All employees: Average for year Payroll for year Production, development, and exploration workers: Average for year March May August November Hours Wages Supplemental labor costs not included in payroll Legally required expenditures, including Social Security contributions Payments for voluntary programs Value added by mining Inventories, beginning of 1992 Inventories, end of 1992
1Excludes 2Excludes

Cost of supplies Supplies used, minerals received, and purchased machinery installed Resales Purchased fuels consumed Purchased electric energy: 2.5 Quantity 99.3 Cost Electric energy generated less sold Contract work 1.4 Cost of purchased communication services 1.3 1.4 Value of shipments and receipts 1.5 Value of resales 1.4 Capital expenditures during year (except land and mineral rights) New capital expenditures during year 3.1 Buildings and other structures, except land Machinery and equipment 48.6 Used capital expenditures during year Buildings and other structures, except land 15.6 Machinery and equipment 7.1 8.5 199.1 Mineral exploration and development1 Rental payments during year Buildings and other structures, except land Machinery and equipment

mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol

47.3 Expensed mineral exploration, development, land, and 45.2 rights1 2

data for mining services industries and natural gas liquids industries where data were not collected. data for mineral land and rights for the crude petroleum and natural gas industries were data were not collected.

NJ–6 NEW JERSEY

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

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Table 5.

Industry Group Statistics for Counties: 1992
For meaning of Establishments during year All employees Production, development, and exploration workers Value added by mining (million dollars) 199.1 (D) (D) (D) 16.8 16.8 14.7 (D) (D) (D) (D) 16.0 9.2 9.2 46.5 46.5 (D) 18.6 18.6 (D) (D) 9.2 9.2 Cost of supplies used, purchased machinery installed, etc. (million dollars) 101.4 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 5.2 3.8 3.8 20.7 20.7 (D) 13.2 13.2 (D) (D) 3.3 3.3

[Data for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries were not collected by county in 1992 and are not included with the data shown by county. abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

SIC code

Geographic area and industry group Total (number) 114 11 11 11 12 12 8 2 3 3 2 11 7 7 5 5 4 14 14 7 7 6 6 With 20 employees or more (number) 36 6 6 6 5 5 4 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 6 6 3 3 3 3 Number2 (1,000) 2.5 E E E .5 .5 .2 E E E E .1 .1 .1 .4 .4 E .3 .3 C C .1 .1 Payroll (million dollars) 99.3 (D) (D) (D) 25.4 25.4 9.7 (D) (D) (D) (D) 3.5 4.0 4.0 19.2 19.2 (D) 8.2 8.2 (D) (D) 3.3 3.3 Number (1,000) 1.4 (D) (D) (D) .1 .1 .1 (D) (D) (D) (D) .1 .1 .1 .2 .2 (D) .2 .2 (D) (D) .1 .1 Hours (millions) 3.1 (D) (D) (D) .2 .2 .2 (D) (D) (D) (D) .2 .2 .2 .6 .6 (D) .4 .4 (D) (D) .2 .2 Wages (million dollars) 48.6 (D) (D) (D) 4.3 4.3 3.4 (D) (D) (D) (D) 2.6 3.0 3.0 9.9 9.9 (D) 5.2 5.2 (D) (D) 2.4 2.4

E1 New Jersey Cumberland County 14 144 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Sand and gravel Middlesex County 14 144 145 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Sand and gravel Clay, ceramic, and refractory minerals Morris County 14 142 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Ocean County Passaic County 14 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Somerset County 14 142 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Sussex County 14 142 144 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Sand and gravel Warren County 14 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels
1Payroll

Value of shipments and receipts (million dollars) 279.4 (D) (D) (D) 29.9 29.9 23.4 (D) (D) (D) (D) 20.2 12.3 12.3 60.2 60.2 (D) 31.1 31.1 (D) (D) 12.0 12.0

Capital expenditures (million dollars) 21.2 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 1.0 .6 .6 7.0 7.0 (D) .7 .7 (D) (D) .5 .5

E1 – – – E3 E3 E3 E9 – – – – – – E1 E1 E1 – – – – E1 E1

and sales data for some small single-unit companies with up to 20 employees (cutoff varied by industry) were obtained from administrative records of other government agencies rather than from census report forms. These data were then used in conjunction with industry averages to estimate the items shown for these small establishments. This technique was also used for other establishments whose reports were not received at time data were tabulated. The following symbols are shown where estimated data account for 10 percent or more of figures shown: E1 10 to 19 percent; E2 20 to 29 percent; E3 30 to 39 percent; E4 40 to 49 percent; E5 50 to 59 percent; E6 60 to 69 percent; E7 70 to 79 percent; E8 80 to 89 percent; E9 90 percent or more. 2General statistics for some industries are withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. However, for such disclosures with 100 employees or more, number of establishments is shown and employment-size range is indicated by one of the following symbols: C 100 to 249 employees; E 250 to 499 employees; F 500 to 999 employees; G 1,000 to 2,499 employees; H 2,500 to 4,999 employees; I 5,000 to 9,999 employees. Statistics for industry groups shown include data for all component industries, regardless of whether data are shown for individual industries in group.

Table 6.

Number of Mineral Establishments in Major Groups by Employment-Size Class for Counties: 1992
Nonmetallic minerals mining (SIC14) 106 Nonmetallic minerals mining (SIC14) 4 3 1 11 5 6 1 1 5 5 1 1 2 2

[Data for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries were not collected by county in 1992 and are not included with the data shown by county. For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes] All mineral industries 114 39 17 22 26 7 3 3 2 1 4 4 1 1 4 3 1 Oil and gas extraction (SIC13) 7 5 1 – – 1 – – – – – – – – – – – All mineral industries 4 3 1 11 5 6 1 1 5 5 1 1 2 2 Oil and gas extraction (SIC13) – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Geographic area and employmentsize class1

Metal mining (SIC 10) 1 – – – 1 – – – – – – – – – – – –

Coal mining (SIC 12) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Geographic area and employmentsize class1

Metal mining (SIC 10) – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Coal mining (SIC 12) – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

New Jersey 0 to 4 employees 5 to 9 employees 10 to 19 employees 20 to 49 employees 50 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Atlantic 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Bergen 0 to 19 employees Burlington 0 to 19 employees Camden 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees See footnotes at end of table.

New Jersey Cape May 34 16 0 to 19 employees 22 20 to 99 employees 25 Cumberland 6 3 0 to 19 employees 3 20 to 99 employees 2 1 4 4 1 Hudson 1 20 to 99 employees 4 Hunterdon 3 1 0 to 19 employees Essex 0 to 19 employees Gloucester 0 to 19 employees

Con.

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

NEW JERSEY NJ–7

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Table 6.

Number of Mineral Establishments in Major Groups by Employment-Size Class for Counties: 1992 Con.
Nonmetallic minerals mining (SIC14) 3 3 12 7 4 1 4 4 3 1 1 1 10 9 1 Nonmetallic minerals mining (SIC14) 7 4 3 5 1 3 1 14 8 6 6 3 3 6 6 –

[Data for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries were not collected by county in 1992 and are not included with the data shown by county. For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes] All mineral industries 3 3 12 7 4 1 4 4 3 1 1 1 11 9 2 Oil and gas extraction (SIC13) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – All mineral industries 7 4 3 5 1 3 1 14 8 6 6 3 3 13 12 1 Oil and gas extraction (SIC13) – – – – – – – – – – – – – 7 6 1

Geographic area and employmentsize class1

Metal mining (SIC 10) – – – – – – – – – – – – 1 – 1

Coal mining (SIC 12) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Geographic area and employmentsize class1

Metal mining (SIC 10) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Coal mining (SIC 12) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

New Jersey Mercer 0 to 19 employees Middlesex 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Monmouth 0 to 19 employees Morris 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Ocean 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees
1Data

Con.

New Jersey Passaic 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Somerset 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Sussex 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Warren 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Undistributed 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees

Con.

for crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries are excluded from the individual counties and shown at the end of the table as " undistributed."

NJ–8 NEW JERSEY

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

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Contents New York
[Page numbers listed here omit the prefix that appears as part of the number of each page]

Page Summary of Findings Map 2 3

TABLES
Historical Statistics 1. Historical Statistics for the State: 1992 and Earlier Census Years 5

State Statistics 2a. 2b. 3. 4. Mineral Establishment Statistics by Industry for the State: 1992 and 1987 Mining Activities of Manufacturing Establishments With Associated Mines by Industry for the State: 1992 Selected Statistics by Type of Operation and Major Group for the State: 1992 Summary Statistics for the State: 1992 5 5 6 6

County Statistics 5. Industry Group Statistics for Counties: 1992 7

Employment-Size Class Statistics 6. Number of Mineral Establishments in Major Groups by Employment-Size Class for Counties: 1992 8

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

NEW YORK NY–1

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JOBNAME: No Job Name PAGE: 1 SESS: 4 OUTPUT: Tue Feb 27 11:29:21 1996 / pssw02/ disk2/ economic/ mic92a/ 33/ 07txtsum

Summary of Findings

The total value of shipments and receipts for the 445 establishments classified in mineral industries in New York was $616.9 million in 1992 compared to $641.7 million in 1987. Value added by mining amounted to $476.6 million in 1992, and payroll in mining amounted to $301.4 million. All dollar figures included in this report are shown in current dollars for the years specified and have not been adjusted for inflation.

Mineral industries employment in New York was 7.5 thousand in 1992 or 1 percent of the Nation’s total. This is a decrease of 15 percent from 1987. The nonmetallic minerals, except fuels, industry led all other mineral industries in the State, accounting for approximately 52 percent of the State’s mineral industries employment.

NY–2

NEW YORK

MINERAL INDUSTRIES—GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

Table 1.

Historical Statistics for the State: 1992 and Earlier Census Years
Establishments during year Year Total (number) With 20 employees or more (number) 62 77 (NA) 63 74 Number (1,000) 7.5 8.8 7.8 7.1 7.7 Payroll (million dollars) 301.4 342.1 204.5 133.5 94.1 Number (1,000) 3.8 3.9 4.3 4.2 4.7 Hours (millions) 7.5 8.7 9.0 8.6 10.1 Wages (million dollars) 102.2 98.8 88.3 61.3 47.0 All employees Production, development, and exploration workers Value added by mining (million dollars) 476.6 484.3 414.7 217.8 154.3 Cost of supplies used, purchased machinery installed, etc. (million dollars) 199.3 219.9 261.3 113.4 64.0

[For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

Value of shipments and receipts (million dollars) 616.9 641.7 576.8 298.1 193.1

Capital expenditures (million dollars) 59.1 62.5 99.2 33.1 25.2

1992 1987 1982 1977 1972

Census Census Census Census Census

445 466 537 467 461

Table 2a.

Mineral Establishment Statistics by Industry for the State: 1992 and 1987
1992 Establishments during year All employees Production, development, and exploration workers Value added by mining (million dollars) 476.6 (D) – – (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 359.9 141.3 116.3 19.9 95.6 (D) 69.2 69.2 46.3 46.3 Cost of supplies used, purchased Value of machinery shipments installed, and etc. receipts (million (million dollars) dollars) 199.3 (D) – – (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 159.7 68.5 53.0 (D) 46.4 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 616.9 (D) – – (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 472.3 193.4 156.7 30.6 132.2 (D) 80.3 80.3 56.0 56.0 1987

[For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

SIC code

Industry group and industry With 20 employees Total or more Number2 (number) (number) (1,000) 445 11 1 1 3 3 164 93 93 71 41 269 86 65 17 151 148 7 7 7 7 62 4 1 1 2 2 12 7 7 5 5 45 24 20 3 14 14 3 3 3 3 7.5 F E E E E H G G F E 3.9 1.7 1.4 .3 1.2 G .4 .4 .4 .4 Payroll (million dollars) 301.4 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 114.8 49.6 39.2 8.9 34.3 (D) 14.7 14.7 13.2 13.2 Wages (million dollars) 102.2 (D) – – (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 85.1 38.8 30.9 6.7 26.4 (D) 10.2 10.2 7.6 7.6

E1 All industries 10 Metal mining 102 Copper ores 1021 Copper ores 103 Lead and zinc ores 1031 Lead and zinc ores 13 Oil and gas extraction 131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 1311 Crude petroleum and natural gas 138 Oil and gas field services 1389 Oil and gas field services, n.e.c. 14 142 1422 1429 144 1442 147 1479 149 1499 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Crushed and broken limestone Crushed and broken stone, n.e.c. Sand and gravel Construction sand and gravel Chemical and fertilizer mineral mining Chemical and fertilizer mineral mining, n.e.c. Miscellaneous nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Miscellaneous nonmetallic minerals, except fuels
1Payroll

Number Hours (1,000) (millions) 3.8 (D) – – (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 3.0 1.5 1.2 .2 .9 (D) .3 .3 .3 .3 7.5 (D) – – (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 6.0 2.8 2.3 .4 1.9 (D) .6 .6 .5 .5

Capital Value expendiadded by tures All emmining (million ployees2 (million dollars) (1,000) dollars) 59.1 (D) – – (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 47.3 16.4 12.6 (D) 9.8 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 8.8 F E E C C 4.2 3.6 3.6 .6 .4 3.9 1.6 1.0 .5 G 1.3 E E .5 .5 484.3 (D) – – (D) (D) 153.5 128.0 128.0 25.4 13.5 315.5 136.2 97.3 36.2 (D) 89.3 (D) (D) 36.9 36.9

E1 – – – – – E3 E3 E3 E3 E2 E1 E1 E1 E1 E2 E2 – – – –

and sales data for some small single-unit companies with up to 20 employees (cutoff varied by industry) were obtained from administrative records of other government agencies rather than from census report forms. These data were then used in conjunction with industry averages to estimate the items shown for these small establishments. This technique was also used for other establishments whose reports were not received at time data were tabulated. The following symbols are shown where estimated data account for 10 percent or more of figures shown: E1 10 to 19 percent; E2 20 to 29 percent; E3 30 to 39 percent; E4 40 to 49 percent; E5 50 to 59 percent; E6 60 to 69 percent; E7 70 to 79 percent; E8 80 to 89 percent; E9 90 percent or more. 2General statistics for some industries are withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. However, for such disclosures with 100 employees or more, number of establishments is shown and employment-size range is indicated by one of the following symbols: C 100 to 249 employees; E 250 to 499 employees; F 500 to 999 employees; G 1,000 to 2,499 employees; H 2,500 to 4,999 employees; I 5,000 to 9,999 employees. Statistics for industry groups shown include data for all component industries, regardless of whether data are shown for individual industries in group.

Table 2b.

Mining Activities of Manufacturing Establishments With Associated Mines by Industry for the State: 1992
Production, development, and exploration workers Industry group and industry Establishments during year (number) 15 4 3 9 1 Hours (millions) (D) (D) .2 .1 (D) Wages (million dollars) (D) (D) 2.7 1.5 (D) Cost of supplies used, etc. (million dollars) (D) (D) 1.5 1.4 (D) Quantity of production (1,000 s tons) (X) (D) 3 864.6 1 298.7 (D)

[Represents data reported for mining activities by establishments classified in manufacturing industries. Figures may be understated due to use of administrative records and short forms. For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

Nonmetallic mineral mines included in manufactures Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Crushed and broken limestone Sand and gravel Gypsum

Note: Industries and industry groups with less than 50 thousand hours for employees engaged in production, development, and exploration work are not shown.

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

NEW YORK NY–5

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Table 3.

Selected Statistics by Type of Operation and Major Group for the State: 1992
Producing establishments Mines only Mines with preparation plants

[For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

SIC code

Major group and item

All types of establishments

Total

Total

Underground mines

Combination methods, well Open operations, pit and other mines methods

Total

Under ground mines

Open pit mines

Combination and other methods

Separately operated preparation plants

Undistributed1

Nonproducing establishments

ALL INDUSTRIES
Establishments Employees Value added in mining number 1,000 mil dol 445 7.5 476.6 442 7.5 476.6 98 .5 79.5 – – – 18 .2 11.1 80 .3 68.4 148 3.2 320.3 4 .6 89.9 144 2.7 230.4 – – – – – – 196 3.7 76.9 3 (Z) –

10

METAL MINING
Establishments Employees Value added in mining number 1,000 mil dol 11 (D) (D) 11 (D) (D) 1 (D) (D) – – – 1 (D) (D) – – – 2 (D) (D) 2 (D) (D) – – – – – – – – – 8 (D) (D) – – –

12

COAL MINING
Establishments Employees Value added in mining number 1,000 mil dol 1 (D) – 1 (D) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 1 (D) – – – –

13

OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION
Establishments Employees Value added in mining number 1,000 mil dol 164 (D) (D) 162 (D) (D) 78 (D) (D) – – – – – – 78 (D) (D) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 84 (D) (D) 2 (Z) –

14

NONMETALLIC MINERALS, EXCEPT FUELS
Establishments Employees Value added in mining
1Includes

number 1,000 mil dol

269 3.9 359.9

268 3.9 359.9

19 (D) (D)

– – –

17 (D) (D)

2 (D) (D)

146 (D) (D)

2 (D) (D)

144 2.7 230.4

– – –

– – –

103 .7 51.3

1 – –

data for separately operated auxiliary establishments in addition to establishments that were not possible to classify based on the information available.

Table 4.

Summary Statistics for the State: 1992
Item 1992 number number number number 1,000 mil dol 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 millions mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol 445 383 48 14 7.5 301.4 3.8 3.5 3.7 4.1 3.8 7.5 Item Cost of supplies Supplies used, minerals received, and purchased machinery installed Resales Purchased fuels consumed Purchased electric energy: Quantity Cost Electric energy generated less sold Contract work Cost of purchased communication services Value of shipments and receipts Value of resales mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil kWh mil dol mil kWh mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil mil mil mil mil mil mil mil dol dol dol dol dol dol dol dol 1992 199.3 115.0 9.2 23.0 350.6 30.7 (D) 21.4 .8 616.9 9.9 59.1 45.3 4.0 41.3 7.5 .2 7.3 6.3 9.4 1.7 7.7 4.3

[For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

Establishments during year With 0 to 19 employees With 20 to 99 employees With 100 employees or more All employees: Average for year Payroll for year Production, development, and exploration workers: Average for year March May August November Hours Wages Supplemental labor costs not included in payroll Legally required expenditures, including Social Security contributions Payments for voluntary programs Value added by mining Inventories, beginning of 1992 Inventories, end of 1992
1Excludes 2Excludes

Capital expenditures during year (except land and mineral rights) New capital expenditures during year Buildings and other structures, except land Machinery and equipment 102.2 Used capital expenditures during year Buildings and other structures, except land 36.7 Machinery and equipment 19.1 Mineral exploration and development1 17.6 Rental payments during year Buildings and other structures, except land 476.6 Machinery and equipment 86.9 Expensed mineral exploration, development, land, and 87.1 rights1 2

mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol

data for mining services industries and natural gas liquids industries where data were not collected. data for mineral land and rights for the crude petroleum and natural gas industries were data were not collected.

NY–6

NEW YORK

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

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Table 5.

Industry Group Statistics for Counties: 1992
For meaning of Establishments during year All employees Production, development, and exploration workers Value added by mining (million dollars) 476.6 19.1 19.1 (D) 12.6 12.6 (D) (D) (D) 7.2 7.2 6.9 (D) (D) (D) 17.6 17.6 12.4 (D) (D) – (D) (D) (D) 8.6 8.6 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 55.2 (D) (D) (D) (D) 11.3 11.3 21.4 21.4 20.5 (D) (D) (D) 9.6 9.6 Cost of supplies used, purchased machinery installed, etc. (million dollars) 199.3 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 2.5 2.5 (D) (D) (D) (D) 6.5 6.5 (D) (D) (D) – (D) (D) (D) 2.7 2.7 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 11.9 11.9 10.4 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D)

[Data for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries were not collected by county in 1992 and are not included with the data shown by county. abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

SIC code

Geographic area and industry group Total (number) 445 14 14 3 8 8 4 3 1 11 11 7 3 3 1 17 17 6 7 4 1 6 6 2 14 14 6 6 3 4 4 4 11 3 3 8 1 3 3 19 19 16 4 4 1 3 3 With 20 employees or more (number) 62 2 2 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 5 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 5 2 2 3 1 2 2 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 Number2 (1,000) 7.5 .3 .3 C .1 .1 C C C .1 .1 .1 E E C .2 .2 .2 E E E C C C .1 .1 C C C C C C .5 E E E C .1 .1 .3 .3 .3 C C C .1 .1 Payroll (million dollars) 301.4 8.1 8.1 (D) 4.7 4.7 (D) (D) (D) 2.1 2.1 1.9 (D) (D) (D) 6.5 6.5 4.4 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 2.8 2.8 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 17.7 (D) (D) (D) (D) 3.4 3.4 8.9 8.9 8.1 (D) (D) (D) 3.3 3.3 Number (1,000) 3.8 .2 .2 (D) .1 .1 (D) (D) (D) .1 .1 .1 (D) (D) (D) .2 .2 .1 (D) (D) – (D) (D) (D) .1 .1 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) .4 (D) (D) (D) (D) .1 .1 .2 .2 .2 (D) (D) (D) .1 .1 Hours (millions) 7.5 .5 .5 (D) .2 .2 (D) (D) (D) .1 .1 .1 (D) (D) (D) .3 .3 .2 (D) (D) – (D) (D) (D) .1 .1 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) .7 (D) (D) (D) (D) .2 .2 .5 .5 .4 (D) (D) (D) .2 .2 Wages (million dollars) 102.2 7.0 7.0 (D) 3.3 3.3 (D) (D) (D) 1.5 1.5 1.3 (D) (D) (D) 4.9 4.9 3.1 (D) (D) – (D) (D) (D) 1.9 1.9 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 9.7 (D) (D) (D) (D) 2.6 2.6 6.7 6.7 6.2 (D) (D) (D) 2.1 2.1

E1 New York Dutchess County 14 142 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Erie County 14 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Essex County 14 149 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Miscellaneous nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Jefferson County 14 142 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Livingston County 14 147 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Chemical and fertilizer mineral mining Monroe County 14 142 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap New York County 10 102 Metal mining Copper ores Niagara County 14 142 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Oneida County 14 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Onondaga County 14 142 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Rockland County 14 142 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap St. Lawrence County 10 103 14 149 Metal mining Lead and zinc ores Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Miscellaneous nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Schenectady County 14 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Suffolk County 14 144 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Sand and gravel Tompkins County 14 147 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Chemical and fertilizer mineral mining Warren County 14 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels
1Payroll

Value of shipments and receipts (million dollars) 616.9 28.8 28.8 (D) 20.6 20.6 (D) (D) (D) 8.4 8.4 7.7 (D) (D) (D) 21.6 21.6 15.0 (D) (D) – (D) (D) (D) 10.7 10.7 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 70.8 (D) (D) (D) (D) 15.1 15.1 30.7 30.7 28.4 (D) (D) (D) 13.7 13.7

Capital expenditures (million dollars) 59.1 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 1.4 1.4 (D) (D) (D) (D) 2.4 2.4 (D) .2 (D) – (D) (D) (D) .7 .7 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) .8 (D) (D) (D) 2.5 2.5 2.4 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D)

E1 – – – – – – – – E1 E1 E1 – – – – – – E8 E9 – E9 E9 E9 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – E4 E4 E4 – – – – –

and sales data for some small single-unit companies with up to 20 employees (cutoff varied by industry) were obtained from administrative records of other government agencies rather than from census report forms. These data were then used in conjunction with industry averages to estimate the items shown for these small establishments. This technique was also used for other establishments whose reports were not received at time data were tabulated. The following symbols are shown where estimated data account for 10 percent or more of figures shown: E1 10 to 19 percent; E2 20 to 29 percent; E3 30 to 39 percent; E4 40 to 49 percent; E5 50 to 59 percent; E6 60 to 69 percent; E7 70 to 79 percent; E8 80 to 89 percent; E9 90 percent or more. 2General statistics for some industries are withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. However, for such disclosures with 100 employees or more, number of establishments is shown and employment-size range is indicated by one of the following symbols: C 100 to 249 employees; E 250 to 499 employees; F 500 to 999 employees; G 1,000 to 2,499 employees; H 2,500 to 4,999 employees; I 5,000 to 9,999 employees. Statistics for industry groups shown include data for all component industries, regardless of whether data are shown for individual industries in group.

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

NEW YORK NY–7

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Table 6.

Number of Mineral Establishments in Major Groups by Employment-Size Class for Counties: 1992
Nonmetallic minerals mining (SIC14) Nonmetallic minerals mining (SIC14) 2 2 17 12 5 3 2 1 2 2 – – 6 5 1 14 13 1 6 4 1 1 6 5 1 7 7 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 1 3 2 1 1 1 4 1 3 8 5 2 1 5 5 3 1 2 3 2 1 1 1 4 2 2 19 16 2 1

[Data for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries were not collected by county in 1992 and are not included with the data shown by county. For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes] All mineral industries 445 220 91 72 37 11 11 1 1 1 3 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 8 8 2 2 1 1 3 2 1 2 2 2 2 5 4 1 14 12 1 1 8 5 3 4 3 1 3 3 3 3 7 7 4 4 1 1 5 5 11 10 1 1 1 3 2 1 Oil and gas extraction (SIC13) 164 109 27 16 7 1 2 – 1 1 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – All mineral industries 2 2 17 12 5 3 2 1 7 5 1 1 6 5 1 14 13 1 6 4 1 1 6 5 1 7 7 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 1 3 2 1 1 1 4 1 3 11 6 3 2 5 5 3 1 2 3 2 1 1 1 4 2 2 19 16 2 1 Oil and gas extraction (SIC13) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Geographic area and employmentsize class1

Metal mining (SIC 10) 11 3 2 2 – 2 1 1 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 1 1 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Coal mining (SIC 12) 1 – – – – 1 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Geographic area and employmentsize class1

Metal mining (SIC 10) – – – – – – – – 4 3 – 1 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 3 1 1 1 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Coal mining (SIC 12) – – – – – – – – 1 – 1 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

New York 0 to 4 employees 5 to 9 employees 10 to 19 employees 20 to 49 employees 50 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees 250 to 499 employees 500 to 999 employees 1,000 to 2,499 employees Albany 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Allegany 0 to 19 employees Bronx 0 to 19 employees Broome 0 to 19 employees Cattaraugus 0 to 19 employees Cayuga 0 to 19 employees Chautauqua 0 to 19 employees Chemung 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Columbia 0 to 19 employees Cortland 0 to 19 employees Delaware 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Dutchess 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Erie 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Essex 0 to 19 employees 100 to 249 employees Franklin 0 to 19 employees Fulton 0 to 19 employees Genesee 0 to 19 employees Greene 0 to 19 employees Hamilton 0 to 19 employees Herkimer 0 to 19 employees Jefferson 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Kings 0 to 19 employees Livingston 0 to 19 employees 100 to 249 employees See footnotes at end of table.

New York Con. 269 Madison 108 62 0 to 19 employees 54 Monroe 30 7 0 to 19 employees 8 20 to 99 employees – Montgomery – – 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 3 New York 2 1 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 2 250 employees or more 2 Niagara 2 2 2 2 8 8 2 2 1 1 3 2 1 2 2 2 2 5 4 1 0 to 19 employees 100 to 249 employees Oneida 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Onondaga 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Ontario 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Orange 0 to 19 employees Orleans 0 to 19 employees Oswego 0 to 19 employees Otsego 0 to 19 employees Putnam

14 0 to 19 employees 12 Queens 1 1 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 8 Rensselaer 5 3 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 3 Richmond 2 1 0 to 19 employees Rockland 3 3 3 3 7 7 4 4 1 1 5 5 11 10 1 1 1 3 2 1 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees St. Lawrence 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Saratoga 0 to 19 employees Schenectady 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Schoharie 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Seneca 20 to 99 employees Steuben 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Suffolk 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees

NY–8

NEW YORK

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

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Table 6.

Number of Mineral Establishments in Major Groups by Employment-Size Class for Counties: 1992 Con.
Nonmetallic minerals mining (SIC14) 8 8 2 1 1 4 3 1 7 6 1 3 2 1 Nonmetallic minerals mining (SIC14) 6 5 1 5 4 1 2 2 3 3 7 7 – – –

[Data for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries were not collected by county in 1992 and are not included with the data shown by county. For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes] All mineral industries 8 8 2 1 1 4 3 1 7 6 1 3 2 1 Oil and gas extraction (SIC13) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – All mineral industries 6 5 1 5 4 1 2 2 3 3 174 161 9 2 2 Oil and gas extraction (SIC13) – – – – – – – – – – 164 152 8 2 2

Geographic area and employmentsize class1

Metal mining (SIC 10) – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Coal mining (SIC 12) – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Geographic area and employmentsize class1

Metal mining (SIC 10) – – – – – – – – – – 3 2 1 – –

Coal mining (SIC 12) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

New York Con. Sullivan 0 to 19 employees Tioga 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Tompkins 0 to 19 employees 100 to 249 employees Ulster 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Warren 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees
1Data

New York Con. Washington 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Wayne 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Westchester 0 to 19 employees Wyoming 0 to 19 employees Undistributed 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees 250 employees or more

for crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries are excluded from the individual counties and shown at the end of the table as " undistributed."

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

NEW YORK NY–9

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Contents Pennsylvania
[Page numbers listed here omit the prefix that appears as part of the number of each page]

Page Summary of Findings Map 2 3

TABLES
Historical Statistics 1. Historical Statistics for the State: 1992 and Earlier Census Years 5

State Statistics 2a. 2b. 3. 4. Mineral Establishment Statistics by Industry for the State: 1992 and 1987 Mining Activities of Manufacturing Establishments With Associated Mines by Industry for the State: 1992 Selected Statistics by Type of Operation and Major Group for the State: 1992 Summary Statistics for the State: 1992 5 6 6 7

County Statistics 5. Industry Group Statistics for Counties: 1992 7

Employment-Size Class Statistics 6. Number of Mineral Establishments in Major Groups by Employment-Size Class for Counties: 1992 9

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

PENNSYLVANIA PA–1

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JOBNAME: No Job Name PAGE: 1 SESS: 4 OUTPUT: Tue Feb 27 10:11:02 1996 / pssw02/ disk2/ economic/ mic92a/ 39/ 07txtsum

Summary of Findings

The total value of shipments and receipts for the 1,219 establishments classified in mineral industries in Pennsylvania was $3.7 billion in 1992 or 2 percent of the Nation’s total. This compares to $4.1 billion in 1987, when it was 3 percent of the Nation’s total. Value added by mining amounted to $2.3 billion in 1992, and payroll in mining amounted to $878.8 million. All dollar figures included in this report are shown in current dollars for the years specified and have not been adjusted for inflation.

Mineral industries employment in Pennsylvania was 24.9 thousand in 1992 or 4 percent of the Nation’s total. This is a decrease of 25 percent from 1987. The coal mining industry led all other mineral industries in the State, accounting for approximately 64 percent of the State’s mineral industries employment.

PA–2

PENNSYLVANIA

MINERAL INDUSTRIES—GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

Table 1.

Historical Statistics for the State: 1992 and Earlier Census Years
Establishments during year Year Total (number) With 20 employees or more (number) 266 314 (NA) 417 338 Number (1,000) 24.9 33.4 48.0 51.7 41.9 Payroll (million dollars) 878.8 977.6 1 180.2 851.9 441.6 Number (1,000) 18.6 24.7 37.1 42.1 33.6 Hours (millions) 38.9 50.7 70.8 80.7 68.4 Wages (million dollars) 612.5 705.2 868.2 658.1 337.2 All employees Production, development, and exploration workers Value added by mining (million dollars) 2 2 2 2 344.7 561.6 936.8 166.1 847.2 Cost of supplies used, purchased machinery installed, etc. (million dollars) 1 1 2 1 628.0 821.6 179.0 895.8 610.0

[For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

Value of shipments and receipts (million dollars) 3 4 4 3 1 714.9 102.0 575.6 625.4 311.2

Capital expenditures (million dollars) 257.9 281.2 540.2 436.5 146.0

1992 1987 1982 1977 1972

Census Census Census Census Census

1 1 1 1 1

219 382 610 696 543

Table 2a.

Mineral Establishment Statistics by Industry for the State: 1992 and 1987
1992 Establishments during year All employees Production, development, and exploration workers Value added by mining (million dollars) 2 344.7 1 575.7 1 414.5 425.8 988.6 97.2 97.2 64.0 64.0 (D) 287.8 287.8 (D) 33.3 50.1 389.5 262.6 217.9 36.3 98.3 (D) (D) – – 7.4 7.4 Cost of supplies used, purchased Value of machinery shipments installed, and etc. receipts (million (million dollars) dollars) 1 628.0 1 351.0 1 247.7 659.3 588.4 67.3 67.3 35.9 35.9 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 169.2 116.3 94.5 19.7 40.9 (D) (D) – – (D) (D) 3 714.9 2 753.0 2 496.0 1 045.4 1 450.6 160.4 160.4 96.5 96.5 (D) 314.0 314.0 (D) 45.2 67.2 517.0 352.5 290.9 51.3 126.7 (D) (D) – – 10.6 10.6 1987

[For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

SIC code

Industry group and industry With 20 employees Total or more Number2 (number) (number) (1,000) 1 219 525 367 273 94 76 76 82 82 365 171 171 193 66 111 325 165 128 34 108 103 5 5 4 10 10 266 145 115 60 55 18 18 12 12 36 19 19 17 6 10 85 60 50 7 19 17 2 2 2 2 2 24.9 15.9 13.7 5.2 8.5 1.4 1.4 .9 .9 H 1.9 1.9 G .5 .8 5.7 3.8 3.1 .5 1.2 G C E E .1 .1 Payroll (million dollars) 878.8 609.7 549.2 163.9 385.3 38.6 38.6 21.9 21.9 (D) 68.1 68.1 (D) 13.2 22.4 160.8 98.5 80.1 15.3 32.2 (D) (D) (D) (D) 2.5 2.5 Wages (million dollars) 612.5 471.2 425.2 118.4 306.7 29.8 29.8 16.2 16.2 (D) 23.6 23.6 (D) 10.6 13.3 91.6 61.3 49.0 10.5 24.1 (D) (D) – – 1.9 1.9

E1 All industries 12 122 1221 1222 123 1231 124 1241 13 131 1311 138 1381 1389 14 142 1422 1429 144 1442 1446 147 1479 149 1499 Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Bituminous coal and lignite surface mining Bituminous coal underground mining Anthracite mining Anthracite mining Coal mining services Coal mining services Oil and gas extraction Crude petroleum and natural gas Crude petroleum and natural gas Oil and gas field services Drilling oil and gas wells Oil and gas field services, n.e.c. Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Crushed and broken limestone Crushed and broken stone, n.e.c. Sand and gravel Construction sand and gravel Industrial sand Chemical and fertilizer mineral mining Chemical and fertilizer mineral mining, n.e.c. Miscellaneous nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Miscellaneous nonmetallic minerals, except fuels
1Payroll

Number Hours (1,000) (millions) 18.6 12.8 11.0 4.0 7.0 1.1 1.1 .7 .7 (D) .9 .9 (D) .4 .5 3.8 2.7 2.2 .4 .9 (D) (D) – – .1 .1 38.9 27.3 23.6 8.9 14.8 2.2 2.2 1.5 1.5 (D) 1.9 1.9 (D) 1.0 1.0 7.6 5.1 4.2 .8 1.9 (D) (D) – – .2 .2

Capital Value expendiadded by tures All emmining (million ployees2 (million dollars) (1,000) dollars) 257.9 173.8 166.2 39.7 126.5 4.1 4.1 3.4 3.4 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 41.7 26.5 21.5 4.6 12.5 (D) (D) – – (D) (D) 33.4 22.5 19.7 7.9 11.8 1.9 1.9 .8 .8 4.6 2.3 2.3 G .8 1.2 6.2 3.4 2.7 F 2.0 1.8 .2 C C (NA) (NA) 2 561.6 1 776.5 1 628.4 635.3 993.1 109.4 109.4 38.6 38.6 422.8 313.3 313.3 (D) 37.6 64.1 354.4 257.3 195.4 (D) 69.4 59.1 10.2 – – (NA) (NA)

– – – E1 – – – E1 E1 E2 E2 E2 E2 E2 E2 E1 – – E2 E2 E3 – – – E1 E1

and sales data for some small single-unit companies with up to 20 employees (cutoff varied by industry) were obtained from administrative records of other government agencies rather than from census report forms. These data were then used in conjunction with industry averages to estimate the items shown for these small establishments. This technique was also used for other establishments whose reports were not received at time data were tabulated. The following symbols are shown where estimated data account for 10 percent or more of figures shown: E1 10 to 19 percent; E2 20 to 29 percent; E3 30 to 39 percent; E4 40 to 49 percent; E5 50 to 59 percent; E6 60 to 69 percent; E7 70 to 79 percent; E8 80 to 89 percent; E9 90 percent or more. 2General statistics for some industries are withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. However, for such disclosures with 100 employees or more, number of establishments is shown and employment-size range is indicated by one of the following symbols: C 100 to 249 employees; E 250 to 499 employees; F 500 to 999 employees; G 1,000 to 2,499 employees; H 2,500 to 4,999 employees; I 5,000 to 9,999 employees. Statistics for industry groups shown include data for all component industries, regardless of whether data are shown for individual industries in group.

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

PENNSYLVANIA PA–5

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Table 2b.

Mining Activities of Manufacturing Establishments With Associated Mines by Industry for the State: 1992
Production, development, and exploration workers Industry group and industry Establishments during year (number) 29 4 13 13 10 Hours (millions) (D) .1 .5 .5 .1 Wages (million dollars) (D) .8 6.5 6.5 .5 Cost of supplies used, etc. (million dollars) (D) .6 15.1 15.1 1.6 Quantity of production (1,000 s tons) (X) 16.2 10 897.6 10 897.6 699.4

[Represents data reported for mining activities by establishments classified in manufacturing industries. Figures may be understated due to use of administrative records and short forms. For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

Nonmetallic mineral mines included in manufactures Dimension stone Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Crushed and broken limestone Clay and related minerals

Note: Industries and industry groups with less than 50 thousand hours for employees engaged in production, development, and exploration work are not shown.

Table 3.

Selected Statistics by Type of Operation and Major Group for the State: 1992
Producing establishments Mines only Mines with preparation plants

[For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

SIC code

Major group and item

All types of establishments

Total

Total

Underground mines

Combination methods, well Open operations, pit and other mines methods

Total

Under ground mines

Open pit mines

Combination and other methods

Separately operated preparation plants

Undistributed1

Nonproducing establishments

ALL INDUSTRIES
Establishments Employees Value added in mining number 1,000 mil dol 1 219 24.9 2 344.7 1 204 24.5 2 347.7 485 6.2 832.1 54 2.5 317.4 266 2.3 224.7 165 1.4 289.9 292 12.3 1 275.9 34 5.2 709.9 237 6.1 470.2 21 1.1 95.8 22 .4 39.1 405 5.5 200.8 15 .4 –3.0

10

METAL MINING
Establishments Employees Value added in mining number 1,000 mil dol 4 (D) (D) 4 (D) (D) 2 (D) (D) – – – 2 (D) (D) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 1 (D) (D) 1 (D) – – – –

12

COAL MINING
Establishments Employees Value added in mining number 1,000 mil dol 525 15.9 1 575.7 514 15.5 1 578.7 289 4.7 524.3 54 2.5 317.4 233 (D) (D) 2 (D) (D) 92 8.2 958.7 27 4.9 686.3 50 (D) (D) 15 (D) (D) 14 .3 31.7 119 2.3 64.0 11 .4 –3.0

13

OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION
Establishments Employees Value added in mining number 1,000 mil dol 365 (D) (D) 363 (D) (D) 163 (D) (D) – – – – – – 163 (D) (D) – – – – – – – – – – – – 1 (D) (D) 199 (D) (D) 2 (Z) –

14

NONMETALLIC MINERALS, EXCEPT FUELS
Establishments Employees Value added in mining
1Includes

number 1,000 mil dol

325 5.7 389.5

323 5.7 389.5

31 (D) (D)

– – –

31 (D) (D)

– – –

200 4.2 317.2

7 .3 23.6

187 (D) (D)

6 (D) (D)

6 (D) (D)

86 (D) (D)

2 (Z) (Z)

data for separately operated auxiliary establishments in addition to establishments that were not possible to classify based on the information available.

PA–6 PENNSYLVANIA

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

TIPS UPF [MCD_SRB,V_HARLEY] 2/ 27/ 96 14:33:00 EPCV24 TLP:ST39.BTI;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:07 DATA:NONE UPF:DIR:ST39_09.UPF PAGE: 2 TSF:ST42_92.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:20 UTF:ST42_93.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:21 META:TIPS96-14311241.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:32:38

Table 4.

Summary Statistics for the State: 1992
Item 1992 number number number number 1,000 mil dol 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 millions mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol Item mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil kWh mil dol mil kWh mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol mil mil mil mil mil mil mil mil dol dol dol dol dol dol dol dol 1992 1 628.0 1 275.1 28.9 98.1 1 746.0 96.3 (D) 129.6 3.1 3 714.9 29.1 257.9 183.0 10.2 172.9 33.7 1.2 32.4 41.1 52.2 3.0 49.2 76.7

[For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

Establishments during year With 0 to 19 employees With 20 to 99 employees With 100 employees or more All employees: Average for year Payroll for year Production, development, and exploration workers: Average for year March May August November Hours Wages Supplemental labor costs not included in payroll Legally required expenditures, including Social Security contributions Payments for voluntary programs Value added by mining Inventories, beginning of 1992 Inventories, end of 1992
1Excludes 2Excludes

1 219 Cost of supplies 953 Supplies used, minerals received, and purchased machinery 216 installed 50 Resales Purchased fuels consumed Purchased electric energy: 24.9 Quantity 878.8 Cost Electric energy generated less sold Contract work 18.6 Cost of purchased communication services 18.8 18.5 Value of shipments and receipts 18.7 Value of resales 18.3 Capital expenditures during year (except land and mineral rights) New capital expenditures during year 38.9 Buildings and other structures, except land Machinery and equipment 612.5 Used capital expenditures during year Buildings and other structures, except land 320.5 Machinery and equipment 171.6 148.9 2 344.7 255.4 258.0 Mineral exploration and development1 Rental payments during year Buildings and other structures, except land Machinery and equipment Expensed mineral exploration, development, land, and rights1 2

mil dol mil dol mil dol mil dol

data for mining services industries and natural gas liquids industries where data were not collected. data for mineral land and rights for the crude petroleum and natural gas industries were data were not collected.

Table 5.

Industry Group Statistics for Counties: 1992
For meaning of Establishments during year All employees Production, development, and exploration workers Value added by mining (million dollars) 2 344.7 (D) (D) (D) 33.6 20.5 20.5 (D) 9.9 112.1 96.4 96.4 (D) 5.5 19.1 19.1 (D) (D) (D) (D) 28.4 (D) 22.5 35.6 22.7 22.7 13.0 104.4 104.4 104.4 10.5 13.8 13.8 (D) Cost of supplies used, purchased machinery installed, etc. (million dollars) 1 628.0 (D) (D) (D) 19.1 (D) (D) (D) (D) 167.7 161.7 161.7 (D) (D) 10.5 10.5 (D) (D) (D) (D) 10.3 (D) (D) 18.4 (D) (D) (D) 77.8 77.8 77.8 (D) 4.0 4.0 (D)

[Data for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries were not collected by county in 1992 and are not included with the data shown by county. abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

SIC code

Geographic area and industry group Total (number) 1 219 3 3 3 33 19 19 13 9 43 28 28 14 8 13 13 11 7 7 5 17 16 11 18 9 9 9 20 20 20 11 8 8 5 With 20 employees or more (number) 266 1 1 1 9 6 6 3 3 13 10 10 3 2 4 4 4 2 2 2 5 5 4 8 4 4 4 7 7 7 3 5 5 3 Number2 (1,000) 24.9 C C C 1.0 .8 .8 C .2 1.1 .9 .9 C .1 .2 .2 C C C C .3 E .2 .4 .2 .2 .2 1.2 1.2 1.2 .1 .3 .3 C Payroll (million dollars) 878.8 (D) (D) (D) 45.6 38.8 38.8 (D) 4.2 38.1 33.6 33.6 (D) 2.7 7.0 7.0 (D) (D) (D) (D) 10.0 (D) 7.7 9.5 5.3 5.3 4.2 42.7 42.7 42.7 3.3 7.7 7.7 (D) Number (1,000) 18.6 (D) (D) (D) .3 .2 .2 (D) .1 .8 .8 .8 (D) .1 .2 .2 (D) (D) (D) (D) .2 (D) .1 .3 .2 .2 .2 1.0 1.0 1.0 .1 .2 .2 (D) Hours (millions) 38.9 (D) (D) (D) .7 .4 .4 (D) .2 1.7 1.5 1.5 (D) .1 .3 .3 (D) (D) (D) (D) .4 (D) .3 .7 .4 .4 .3 2.2 2.2 2.2 .2 .3 .3 (D) Wages (million dollars) 612.5 (D) (D) (D) 11.8 7.8 7.8 (D) 2.6 28.5 26.0 26.0 (D) 1.2 5.1 5.1 (D) (D) (D) (D) 5.2 (D) 3.4 7.6 3.9 3.9 3.7 37.4 37.4 37.4 2.6 3.2 3.2 (D)

E1 Pennsylvania Adams County 14 142 12 122 14 144 12 122 14 142 14 142 14 142 14 142 12 122 14 12 122 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Allegheny County Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Sand and gravel Armstrong County Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Berks County Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Blair County Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Bucks County Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Butler County Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Cambria County Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Centre County Chester County 14 142 Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap See footnotes at end of table. – – – – E4 E3 E3 E5 E7 – – – – – – – – – – – E1 – – E1 – – E3 – – – – – – –

Value of shipments and receipts (million dollars) 3 714.9 (D) (D) (D) 49.6 31.6 31.6 (D) 12.7 274.2 253.2 253.2 (D) 7.2 26.4 26.4 (D) (D) (D) (D) 36.0 (D) 28.3 48.6 31.0 31.0 17.6 173.4 173.4 173.4 18.5 17.0 17.0 (D)

Capital expenditures (million dollars) 257.9 (D) (D) (D) 3.1 (D) (D) (D) (D) 5.6 4.8 4.8 (D) (D) 3.2 3.2 (D) (D) (D) (D) 2.8 (D) (D) 5.4 (D) (D) (D) 8.7 8.7 8.7 (D) .8 .8 (D)

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

PENNSYLVANIA PA–7

TIPS UPF [MCD_SRB,V_HARLEY] 2/ 27/ 96 14:33:00 EPCV24 TLP:ST39.BTI;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:07 DATA:NONE UPF:DIR:ST39_09.UPF PAGE: 3 TSF:ST42_92.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:20 UTF:ST42_93.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:21 META:TIPS96-14311241.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:32:38

Table 5.

Industry Group Statistics for Counties: 1992 Con.
For meaning of Establishments during year All employees Production, development, and exploration workers Value added by mining (million dollars) 33.1 (D) (D) 74.1 (D) (D) 6.2 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 55.0 41.8 41.8 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 468.2 (D) (D) 188.4 (D) (D) 45.9 (D) (D) 5.8 (D) – 24.7 24.7 (D) 10.2 (D) 30.2 25.7 25.7 11.8 30.9 (D) (D) 20.9 20.9 (D) 5.3 13.5 8.7 (D) 68.0 (D) (D) 96.3 91.8 91.8 151.2 (D) (D) 52.9 (D) (D) (D) (D) Cost of supplies used, purchased machinery installed, etc. (million dollars) 29.1 (D) (D) 49.8 (D) (D) 2.4 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 29.6 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 399.3 (D) (D) 177.9 (D) (D) 62.8 (D) (D) 2.5 (D) – 10.2 10.2 (D) 6.5 (D) 18.6 15.6 15.6 11.9 (D) (D) (D) 10.8 10.8 (D) 1.7 6.0 (D) (D) 48.4 (D) (D) 77.8 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 33.2 (D) (D) (D) (D)

[Data for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries were not collected by county in 1992 and are not included with the data shown by county. abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

SIC code

Geographic area and industry group Total (number) 9 8 8 51 49 49 7 6 5 3 3 1 38 32 32 5 4 4 3 3 18 17 17 41 39 39 28 26 26 14 11 2 11 11 9 11 10 21 13 13 7 9 5 5 12 12 7 6 14 6 5 54 50 50 44 41 41 29 28 28 28 21 21 7 5 With 20 employees or more (number) 3 3 3 13 13 13 2 2 2 1 1 1 8 5 5 3 3 1 1 1 11 11 11 16 16 16 5 4 4 2 2 1 8 8 7 3 2 9 7 7 4 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 1 1 1 12 10 10 15 12 12 12 12 12 6 2 2 4 3 Number2 (1,000) .4 E E 1.0 F F .1 C C C C C .6 .4 .4 C C C C C 3.1 H H 1.9 G G .3 E E .4 E E .4 .4 E .1 C .5 .4 .4 .1 .4 E E .3 .3 E .1 .1 .1 C 1.0 F F 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.4 G G .5 E E C C Payroll (million dollars) 12.3 (D) (D) 25.3 (D) (D) 3.9 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 18.1 14.6 14.6 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 154.0 (D) (D) 79.9 (D) (D) 8.2 (D) (D) 17.9 (D) (D) 12.1 12.1 (D) 3.6 (D) 14.1 12.2 12.2 4.5 11.1 (D) (D) 8.7 8.7 (D) 5.1 3.5 2.5 (D) 25.8 (D) (D) 36.9 35.2 35.2 59.3 (D) (D) 19.6 (D) (D) (D) (D) Number (1,000) .3 (D) (D) .8 (D) (D) (Z) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) .5 .4 .4 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 2.9 (D) (D) 1.6 (D) (D) .3 (D) (D) .1 (D) – .3 .3 (D) .1 (D) .4 .3 .3 .1 .4 (D) (D) .2 .2 (D) (Z) .1 .1 (D) .8 (D) (D) 1.0 .9 .9 .9 (D) (D) .4 (D) (D) (D) (D) Hours (millions) .8 (D) (D) 1.9 (D) (D) .1 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 1.0 .8 .8 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 6.4 (D) (D) 3.1 (D) (D) .6 (D) (D) .2 (D) – .6 .6 (D) .3 (D) .8 .6 .6 .3 .8 (D) (D) .3 .3 (D) .1 .2 .1 (D) 1.6 (D) (D) 2.3 2.1 2.1 1.9 (D) (D) .8 (D) (D) (D) (D) Wages (million dollars) 9.3 (D) (D) 20.3 (D) (D) 1.3 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 15.6 12.7 12.7 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 144.0 (D) (D) 61.8 (D) (D) 6.8 (D) (D) 1.6 (D) – 6.9 6.9 (D) 3.1 (D) 10.5 9.1 9.1 3.3 9.3 (D) (D) 5.6 5.6 (D) .9 2.0 1.2 (D) 20.6 (D) (D) 33.4 31.9 31.9 37.9 (D) (D) 16.4 (D) (D) (D) (D)

E1 Pennsylvania Clarion County 12 122 12 122 14 142 14 142 12 122 14 142 14 142 12 122 12 122 12 122 14 147 14 142 14 12 123 Con. – – – E1 E1 E1 E6 E6 E6 – – – E2 E2 E2 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – E5 E5 – E2 E2 E2 – – E1 E1 E1 – E9 E9 E9 – – – E2 – – E1 – – – E1 E1 E1 – – – – – – – –

Value of shipments and receipts (million dollars) 60.6 (D) (D) 117.1 (D) (D) 8.1 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 79.2 62.1 62.1 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 796.8 (D) (D) 359.7 (D) (D) 106.5 (D) (D) 7.1 (D) – 32.8 32.8 (D) 15.0 (D) 47.3 40.8 40.8 21.1 43.7 (D) (D) 30.0 30.0 (D) 6.6 18.0 10.9 (D) 113.4 (D) (D) 163.4 156.0 156.0 226.2 (D) (D) 83.4 (D) (D) (D) (D)

Capital expenditures (million dollars) 1.7 (D) (D) 6.7 (D) (D) .5 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 5.3 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 70.7 (D) (D) 6.6 (D) (D) 2.2 (D) (D) 1.2 (D) – 2.1 2.1 (D) 1.8 (D) 1.4 .5 .5 2.7 (D) (D) (D) 1.8 1.8 (D) .4 1.5 (D) (D) 2.9 (D) (D) 10.7 (D) (D) (D) (D) (D) 2.7 (D) (D) (D) (D)

Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Clearfield County Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Dauphin County Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Delaware County Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Fayette County Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Fulton County Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Greene County Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Indiana County Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Jefferson County Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Lackawanna County Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Chemical and fertilizer mineral mining Lancaster County Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Lawrence County Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Luzerne County Coal mining Anthracite mining Lycoming County Mercer County

12 122

Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Montgomery County

14 142

Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap Northampton County Northumberland County

14

Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Philadelphia County Schuylkill County

12 123

Coal mining Anthracite mining Somerset County

12 122

Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Washington County

12 122

Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Westmoreland County

12 122 14 142

Coal mining Bituminous coal and lignite mining Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap See footnotes at end of table.

PA–8 PENNSYLVANIA

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

TIPS UPF [MCD_SRB,V_HARLEY] 2/ 27/ 96 14:33:00 EPCV24 TLP:ST39.BTI;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:07 DATA:NONE UPF:DIR:ST39_09.UPF PAGE: 4 TSF:ST42_92.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:20 UTF:ST42_93.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:21 META:TIPS96-14311241.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:32:38

Table 5.

Industry Group Statistics for Counties: 1992 Con.
For meaning of Establishments during year All employees Production, development, and exploration workers Value added by mining (million dollars) 18.5 18.5 (D) Cost of supplies used, purchased machinery installed, etc. (million dollars) 11.1 11.1 (D)

[Data for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries were not collected by county in 1992 and are not included with the data shown by county. abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes]

SIC code

Geographic area and industry group Total (number) 8 8 7 With 20 employees or more (number) 6 6 5 Number2 (1,000) .3 .3 E Payroll (million dollars) 9.0 9.0 (D) Number (1,000) .2 .2 (D) Hours (millions) .4 .4 (D) Wages (million dollars) 5.8 5.8 (D)

E1 Pennsylvania York County 14 142 Con. E1 E1 –

Value of shipments and receipts (million dollars) 27.7 27.7 (D)

Capital expenditures (million dollars) 2.0 2.0 (D)

Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels Crushed and broken stone, including riprap

1Payroll and sales data for some small single-unit companies with up to 20 employees (cutoff varied by industry) were obtained from administrative records of other government agencies rather than from census report forms. These data were then used in conjunction with industry averages to estimate the items shown for these small establishments. This technique was also used for other establishments whose reports were not received at time data were tabulated. The following symbols are shown where estimated data account for 10 percent or more of figures shown: E1 10 to 19 percent; E2 20 to 29 percent; E3 30 to 39 percent; E4 40 to 49 percent; E5 50 to 59 percent; E6 60 to 69 percent; E7 70 to 79 percent; E8 80 to 89 percent; E9 90 percent or more. 2General statistics for some industries are withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. However, for such disclosures with 100 employees or more, number of establishments is shown and employment-size range is indicated by one of the following symbols: C 100 to 249 employees; E 250 to 499 employees; F 500 to 999 employees; G 1,000 to 2,499 employees; H 2,500 to 4,999 employees; I 5,000 to 9,999 employees. Statistics for industry groups shown include data for all component industries, regardless of whether data are shown for individual industries in group.

Table 6.

Number of Mineral Establishments in Major Groups by Employment-Size Class for Counties: 1992
Nonmetallic minerals mining (SIC14) 325 103 64 73 64 15 5 1 – 3 2 1 13 Nonmetallic minerals mining (SIC14) – – – – – 2 2 3 2 1 8 3 4 1 1 1 – – 2 2 – – 1 1 2 2 3 2 1 3 3 6 4 2 3 2 1 2 2

[Data for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries were not collected by county in 1992 and are not included with the data shown by county. For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes] All mineral industries 1 219 539 221 193 170 46 36 13 1 3 2 1 33 24 7 1 1 43 30 10 3 7 5 2 1 1 13 9 4 7 5 2 8 8 17 12 5 18 10 8 Oil and gas extraction (SIC13) 365 240 54 35 25 7 3 1 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – All mineral industries 20 13 4 2 1 2 2 11 8 3 8 3 4 1 9 6 2 1 51 38 10 3 1 1 2 2 3 2 1 3 3 7 5 2 3 2 1 5 5 Oil and gas extraction (SIC13) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Geographic area and employmentsize class1

Metal mining (SIC 10) 4 – 3 1 – – – – – – – – 1 1 – – – 1 1 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Coal mining (SIC 12) 525 196 100 84 81 24 28 11 1 – – – 19 13 4 1 1 28 18 7 3 3 2 1 – – – – – – – – – – 1 1 – 9 5 4

Geographic area and employmentsize class1

Metal mining (SIC 10) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Coal mining (SIC 12) 20 13 4 2 1 – – 8 6 2 – – – – 8 5 2 1 49 36 10 3 – – – – – – – – – 1 1 – – – – 3 3

Pennsylvania 0 to 4 employees 5 to 9 employees 10 to 19 employees 20 to 49 employees 50 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees 250 to 499 employees 500 to 999 employees Adams 0 to 19 employees 100 to 249 employees Allegheny 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees 250 employees or more Armstrong 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Beaver 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Bedford 20 to 99 employees Berks 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Blair 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Bradford 0 to 19 employees Bucks 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Butler 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees See footnotes at end of table.

Pennsylvania Con. Cambria 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees 250 employees or more Carbon 0 to 19 employees Centre 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Chester

10 0 to 19 employees 3 20 to 99 employees – 100 to 249 employees – Clarion 14 11 3 – 4 3 1 1 1 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 250 employees or more Clearfield 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Clinton 0 to 19 employees Columbia Crawford 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Cumberland 0 to 19 employees Dauphin 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Delaware 0 to 19 employees 100 to 249 employees Elk 0 to 19 employees

13 0 to 19 employees 9 4 7 5 2 8 8 16 11 5 9 5 4

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

PENNSYLVANIA PA–9

TIPS UPF [MCD_SRB,V_HARLEY] 2/ 27/ 96 14:33:00 EPCV24 TLP:ST39.BTI;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:07 DATA:NONE UPF:DIR:ST39_09.UPF PAGE: 5 TSF:ST42_92.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:20 UTF:ST42_93.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:21 META:TIPS96-14311241.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:32:38

Table 6.

Number of Mineral Establishments in Major Groups by Employment-Size Class for Counties: 1992 Con.
Nonmetallic minerals mining (SIC14) 13 Nonmetallic minerals mining (SIC14) 12 8 3 1 2 2 5 3 2 6 5 1 1 1 2 2 – 3 3 4 2 2 – 1 1 3 – 3 – 11 9 2 3 3 3 2 1 3 3 4 4 1 1 – – – 7 7 7 3 4 – 6 6 8 2 6 6 6 – – –

[Data for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries were not collected by county in 1992 and are not included with the data shown by county. For meaning of abbreviations and symbols, see introductory text. For explanation of terms, see appendixes] All mineral industries 13 13 38 30 7 1 1 1 5 4 1 4 3 1 18 7 3 2 6 3 2 1 41 25 7 9 28 23 5 1 1 14 12 1 1 11 3 8 11 8 3 3 3 5 3 2 21 12 8 1 7 3 4 9 6 1 2 3 3 8 8 Oil and gas extraction (SIC13) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 1 1 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – All mineral industries 12 8 3 1 3 3 6 3 3 14 13 1 1 1 5 4 1 3 3 54 42 11 1 1 1 44 29 13 2 11 9 2 3 3 3 2 1 5 5 4 4 29 17 9 1 2 7 7 28 22 5 1 7 7 8 2 6 452 404 44 3 1 Oil and gas extraction (SIC13) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 364 328 32 3 1

Geographic area and employmentsize class1

Metal mining (SIC 10) – – 1 1 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Coal mining (SIC 12) – – 32 27 4 1 – – – – – 1 1 – 17 6 3 2 6 – – – 39 23 7 9 26 22 4 – – 3 3 – – – – – 1 – 1 – – – – – 13 6 6 1 2 – 2 5 2 1 2 – – – –

Geographic area and employmentsize class1

Metal mining (SIC 10) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 1 1 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Coal mining (SIC 12) – – – – 1 1 1 – 1 8 8 – – – 2 1 1 – – 50 40 9 1 – – 41 29 10 2 – – – – – – – – 2 2 – – 28 16 9 1 2 – – 21 19 1 1 1 1 – – – 82 70 12 – –

Pennsylvania Con. Erie 0 to 19 employees Fayette 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Forest 0 to 19 employees Franklin 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Fulton 0 to 19 employees 100 to 249 employees Greene 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees 250 employees or more Huntingdon 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Indiana 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Jefferson 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Juniata 0 to 19 employees Lackawanna 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 250 employees or more Lancaster 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Lawrence 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Lebanon 0 to 19 employees Lehigh 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Luzerne 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Lycoming 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Mercer 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Mifflin 0 to 19 employees Monroe 0 to 19 employees
1Data

Pennsylvania Con. Montgomery

13 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 5 100 to 249 employees 2 Montour 3 – 0 to 19 employees 1 1 5 4 1 3 2 1 – Northampton 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Northumberland 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Perry 0 to 19 employees Philadelphia

– 0 to 19 employees – 20 to 99 employees – Pike – 3 0 to 19 employees 2 1 2 Schuylkill 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 250 employees or more

2 Snyder – – 20 to 99 employees 2 Somerset 1 0 to 19 employees 1 20 to 99 employees 1 100 to 249 employees Susquehanna 1 11 9 1 1 11 3 8 10 8 2 3 3 5 3 2 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Tioga 0 to 19 employees Union 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees Venango 0 to 19 employees Warren 0 to 19 employees Washington 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees 250 employees or more

8 Wayne 6 0 to 19 employees 2 – Westmoreland 5 3 2 4 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees Wyoming 0 to 19 employees

4 York – – 0 to 19 employees 20 to 99 employees 3 Undistributed 3 0 to 19 employees 8 20 to 99 employees 100 to 249 employees 8 250 employees or more

for crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries are excluded from the individual counties and shown at the end of the table as " undistributed."

PA–10 PENNSYLVANIA

MINERAL INDUSTRIES GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

TIPS UPF [MCD_SRB,V_HARLEY] 2/ 27/ 96 14:33:00 EPCV24 TLP:ST39.BTI;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:07 DATA:NONE UPF:DIR:ST39_09.UPF PAGE: 6 TSF:ST42_92.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:20 UTF:ST42_93.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:31:21 META:TIPS96-14311241.DAT;1 2/ 27/ 96 14:32:38

JOBNAME: No Job Name PAGE: 1 SESS: 5 OUTPUT: Wed Jan 31 07:13:26 1996 / pssw02/ disk2/ economic/ mic92a/ 0/ 14apdxa

Appendix A. Explanation of Terms

Employment and related items. The report forms requested separate information on production, development, and exploration workers for a specific payroll period within each quarter of the year and on other employees as of the payroll period which included the 12th of March.

All employees. This item includes all full-time and parttime employees on the payrolls of mining establishments during any part of the pay period which included the 12th of the months specified on the report form. Included are all persons on paid sick leave, paid holidays, and paid vacations during these pay periods. Also included are employees working for miners paid on a per ton, car, or yard basis. Excluded are employees at the mine but on the payroll of another employer (such as employees of contractors) and employees at company stores, boardinghouses, bunkhouses, and recreational centers. Also excluded are members of the Armed Forces and pensioners carried on the active rolls but not working during the period. Officers of corporations are included as employees; proprietors and partners of unincorporated firms are excluded. Production, development, and exploration workers. This item includes employees (up through the workingsupervisor level) engaged in manual work (using tools, operating machines, hauling materials, loading and hauling products out of the mine in mine cars or trucks, and caring for mines, plants, mills, shops, or yards). Included are exploration work, mine development, storage, shipping, maintenance, repair, janitorial, and guard services, auxiliary production for use at establishments (such as power plant), recordkeeping, and other services closely associated with these production and development operations at the establishment covered by the report. Gang and straw bosses and supervisors who performed manual labor are included, as are employees paid on either a time- or piece-rate basis. Also included are miners paid on a per ton, car, or yard basis and persons engaged by them and paid out of the total amount received by these miners. In addition, other employees at the establishment but not on its payroll are included if paid directly through its own employees, such as superintendents and supervisors. The payments received by these types of employees are included as part of the establishments payroll. Employees above the working-supervisor level are excluded from this category.
MINERAL INDUSTRIES—GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

All other employees. This item covers nonproduction employees of the establishment including those engaged in the following activities: supervision above the workingsupervisor level, sales, highway trucking (by employees not entering mines or pits), advertising, credit, collection, clerical and routine office functions, executive, purchasing, financing, legal, personnel (including cafeteria and medical), professional (such as engineers and geologists), and technical activities. Also included are employees on the payroll of the establishment engaged in the construction of major additions or alterations to the plant and utilized as a separate work force. (Workers engaged in regular maintenance and repair operations are not included here but are classified as production, development, and exploration workers.) Separately operated auxiliary establishments employees. This item includes employment at separate central administrative offices or auxiliary units of multiestablishment companies and at those offices or units servicing more than one establishment during the payroll period which included March 12. Establishments are classified on the basis of the industry or principal industry served. Employees at an office located at or near the mining establishment are usually included in the mine report. All employees, average for year. The 1992 census report form requested employment figures for production, development, and exploration workers for four selected pay periods (mid-March, May, August, and November). For all other employees, only a mid-March figure was requested. The annual average is an average of the four monthly figures for production, development, and exploration workers plus the March figure for all other employees. This approach was used to simplify the schedule format and lighten the reporting burden of respondents, since it was found that the average of these selected pay periods closely approximates, for most industries, the average employment for the year that would be obtained from 12 monthly pay periods.
Payroll. This item includes the gross earnings of all employees on the payroll of mining establishments paid in the calendar year 1992. It includes all forms of compensation such as salaries; wages; commissions; payments received on a ton, car, or yard basis; dismissal pay; APPENDIX A A–1

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bonuses; vacation and sick leave pay; employee contributions to pension plans (such as 401(k) plan); and compensation in kind, prior to such deductions as employees’ Social Security contributions, withholding taxes, group insurance, union dues, and savings bonds. The total includes salaries of officers of corporations; it excludes payments to proprietors or partners of unincorporated concerns, and payments to members of Armed Forces and pensioners carried on the active payroll of mining establishments. Also excluded are royalty payments to unions and costs of smithing, explosives, fuses, electric cap lamps, and mine supplies used in production, development, and exploration work but charged to employees and deducted from their wages. As in the case of employment and establishment figures, the annual payrolls of separate auxiliary establishments of multiestablishment companies are included in the totals for individual industries and for States. Production-, development-, and exploration-worker hours. This item represents all hours that production, development, and exploration workers worked, both on active days during which there was production or development work and on inactive days when only security guards, inspectors, repair persons, and other maintenance persons were on duty. It includes all hours worked or paid for at the mining operations, except hours paid for vacations, holidays, or sick leave, when the employee was not at the establishment. Included are actual overtime hours, not straight time equivalent hours. Hours of working proprietors or partners and employees of contractors are excluded. Supplemental labor costs. This item represents employers’ costs for fringe benefits not included in payrolls.

purchased fuel, purchased electricity, and contract work from the sum of the value of shipments (mining products plus receipts for services rendered) and total capital expenditures. This statistic avoids the duplication in value of shipments and receipts which results from the use of products of some establishments as supplies, energy sources, or materials by others. Moreover, it provides a measure of value added not only in mineral production but also in the development of mineral properties. For these reasons, it is considered to be the best value measure for comparing the relative economic importance of mining among industries and geographic areas. Cost of supplies used, purchased machinery installed, etc. Besides supplies used and purchased machinery installed, this cost includes fuels and electric energy used and contract work done by others for each establishment. It includes charges to both the current and capital accounts. It also includes the cost of items used during 1992 whether they were purchased, withdrawn from inventories, or received from other establishments of the company. For selected supplies and fuels and for electric energy, both quantity and cost data were requested. The cost data refer to direct charges actually paid or payable (after discounts) for items used during the year. Freight charges and other direct charges incurred by the establishment in acquiring the item are included. Companies whose records did not show actual amounts used were asked to approximate use by adding purchases (or receipts) during the year to beginning inventory and subtracting ending inventory. Separate figures were requested for (1) selected supplies used, minerals received for preparation, and purchased machinery installed; (2) electric energy purchased; (3) purchased fuels used for heat, power, or the generation of electricity; (4) contract work done by others; and (5) products bought and resold in the same condition. Supplies and equipment used in mine development, plant expansion, and capitalized repairs, which are chargeable to fixed assets accounts, are included in this item, as are supplies furnished without charge to contractors for use at the mining operation and supplies sold to employees for use at the establishment. Excluded are such costs as advertising, insurance, telephone, and research and consulting services of other establishments or such overhead costs as depreciation charges, rent, interest, and royalties. Value of shipments and receipts. The amounts shown as value of shipments and receipts for each industry and State are the net selling values, f.o.b. mine or plant after discounts and allowances, excluding freight charges and excise taxes. Shipments includes all products physically shipped from the establishment during 1992, including material withdrawn from stockpiles and products shipped on consignment, whether or not sold in 1992. Prepared material or concentrates includes preparation from ores mined at the same establishment, purchased, received from other operations of the same company, or received for milling on a custom or toll basis. For products transferred to other establishments of the same company or MINERAL INDUSTRIES—GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

Legally required expenditures, including Social Security contributions. This cost includes employer contributions for all programs required under Federal and State legislation, such as Federal Old Age and Survivors’ Insurance, unemployment compensation, and workers’ compensation. Also included are legally required State temporary disability payments. Payments for voluntary programs. Included in this cost are payments resulting from union negotiated contracts and all employer payments of insurance premiums on hospital and medical plans, life insurance premiums, and premiums on supplementary accident and sickness insurance. For programs supported by joint employer-employee contributions, only the employer payments are included. Also included are payments or allocations on all pension plans regardless of methods of administration, supplemental unemployment compensation plans, welfare plans, stock purchase plans in which the employer payment is not subject to withholding tax, and deferred profit sharing plans.
Value added by mining. This measure of mining activity is derived by subtracting the cost of supplies, minerals received for preparation, purchased machinery installed, A–2 APPENDIX A

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prepared on a custom basis, companies were requested to report the estimated value, not merely the cost of producing the items. Multiestablishment companies were asked to report value information for each establishment as if it were a separate economic unit. They were instructed to report the value of all products transferred to other plants of the company at their full economic value; to include, in addition to direct cost of production, a reasonable proportion of company overhead and profits. For all establishments classified in an industry, value of shipments and receipts includes (1) the value of all primary products of the industry; (2) the value of secondary products which are primary to other industries; (3) the receipts for contract work done for others, except custom milling; and (4) the value of products purchased and resold without further processing. Receipts for custom milling are not included to avoid duplication with the value of custom milled ores included in an industry’s primary and secondary products. Some duplication exists in industry and industry group totals because of the inclusion of materials transferred from one establishment to another for mineral preparation or resale. Capital expenditures. This item covers expenditures made during the year for development and exploration of mineral properties, for new construction, and for purchased machinery chargeable to fixed assets accounts of the mineral establishment. They are the type for which depreciation, depletion, or Office of Minerals Exploration accounts are ordinarily maintained. Capital expenditures during 1992 were determined as ‘‘additions completed during the year plus construction in progress at the end of the year minus construction in progress at the beginning of the year.’’ Reported capital expenditures include work done on contract, as well as by the mine forces. Expenditures for machinery and equipment include those made for replacement purposes, as well as those for additions to capacity. Excluded from these expenditures were costs of maintenance and repairs charged as current operating expense and expenditures for land and mineral rights. Whenever applicable, separate figures were provided for expenditures for development and exploration of mineral property, construction of preparation plants and

other construction, new machinery and equipment, used plant, and used equipment acquired from others. Rental payments. This item consists of rental payments made to other companies for use of such depreciable assets as buildings, other structures, machinery, and equipment. It does not include payments made to the parent company or another subsidiary of the parent company for the use of buildings and equipment owned by the parent company or its subsidiary. The value of such company-owned assets is included in the gross value of depreciable assets. Rented equipment is reported according to the type of lease negotiated with the lessor. If the lease qualified as an ‘‘operating lease’’ the periodic payments made to the producer or the lessor are reported in the rental section. However, if the leasing arrangement met the criteria set down by the Financial Accounting Standards Board for a ‘‘capital lease,’’ the original cost or market value of the equipment or building is reported as a value of fixed assets and not as rental payments. Current account expenditures. This item includes all expenses for mineral properties, exploration, and development charged to current accounts. This includes all supplies, machinery, equipment, parts, fuels, power, etc., used for development or exploration and charged to current operating expenses. Also included are royalty payments, acquisition costs for mineral land and rights which were not capitalized, and the cost of maintenance and repairs associated with exploration or development activity and charged to current accounts. Inventories. This item includes inventories of mined or quarried products and supplies, parts, fuels, etc., at the beginning and end of the year. Included as mined or quarried products are stockpiles of products ready for shipment and stocks of raw products awaiting treatment or beneficiation. Beginning with the 1982 Census of Mineral Industries, all respondents were requested to report their inventories at (the lower of) cost or market prior to adjustment to LIFO cost. This is a change from the 1977 census in which respondents were permitted to value their inventories using any generally accepted accounting method.

MINERAL INDUSTRIES—GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

APPENDIX A A–3

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Appendix B. Geographic Divisions and States

NEW ENGLAND STATES
Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont

SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES—Con.
North Carolina South Carolina Virginia West Virginia

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES
Alabama Kentucky Mississippi Tennessee

MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES
New Jersey New York Pennsylvania

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES EAST NORTH CENTRAL STATES
Illinois Indiana Michigan Ohio Wisconsin Arkansas Louisiana Oklahoma Texas Offshore Areas

MOUNTAIN STATES WEST NORTH CENTRAL STATES
Iowa Kansas Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota South Dakota Arizona Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Utah Wyoming

SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES
Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Maryland

PACIFIC STATES
Alaska California Hawaii Oregon Washington

MINERAL INDUSTRIES—GEOGRAPHIC AREA SERIES

APPENDIX B B–1

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Publication Program
1992 CENSUS OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES
Publications of the 1992 Census of Mineral Industries, containing data on establishments primarily engaged in the extraction of minerals, are described below. Publications order forms for the specific reports may be obtained from any Department of Commerce district office or from Customer Services, Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC 20233-8300. type of operation and by county. Also, data are shown for value of shipments; value added by mining; employment; payroll; hours worked; capital expenditures; cost of supplies, etc.; purchased machinery installed; and number of mining establishments, with comparative 1987 data on employment and value added by mining. Subject series—2 reports (MIC92-S-1 and -2) One of these reports is a general national-level summary; the other report contains detailed statistics on fuels and electric energy consumed by mineral industries. Reference series—1 report (MC92-R-1) The Numerical List of Manufactured and Mineral Products includes a description of the principal products and services published in the 1992 Censuses of Manufactures and Mineral Industries.

Preliminary Reports
Industry series—12 reports (MIC92-I-10A(P) to -14E(P)) Preliminary data from the 1992 census are issued in 12 separate reports covering 31 mineral industries. Preliminary summary data for the United States and States are released in one report.

Final Reports
Industry series—12 reports (MIC92-I-10A to -14E) Each of the 12 reports provides information for an industry or a group of related industries (e.g., clay, ceramic, and refractory minerals). Final figures for the United States are shown for each of 31 mineral industries on quantity and value of products shipped and supplies used; inventories; quantity and cost of fuels and electric energy purchased and the quantities of fuels produced and consumed; capital expenditures; assets; rents; employment; depreciation, amortization, and depletion; payroll; hours worked; cost of purchased machinery; value added by mining; mineral development, and exploration costs; number of establishments; and number of companies. Comparative statistics for earlier years are included. Industry statistics are shown by State, type of operation, and size of establishment. Geographic area series—9 reports (MIC92-A-1 to -9) A separate report for each of the nine geographic divisions presents statistics for individual States and offshore areas for two- and three-digit industry groups by

Electronic Media
All data included in the printed reports are available on compact disc–read only memory (CD-ROM). The CD-ROM’s provide the same information found in the reports. Electronic media products are available for users who wish to summarize, rearrange, or process large amounts of data. These products, with corresponding technical documentation, are sold by Customer Services, Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC 20233-8300.

OTHER ECONOMIC CENSUSES REPORTS
Data on retail trade, wholesale trade, service industries, financial, insurance, real estate, construction industries, manufactures, transportation, communications, utilities, enterprise statistics, minority-owned businesses, and womenowned businesses also are available from the 1992 Economic Census. A separate series of reports covers the census of outlying areas—Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands of the United States, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Separate announcements describing these reports are available free of charge from Customer Services, Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC 20233-8300.