PERENNIAL PEANUT FIELD DAY by HptuFA

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									             PERENNIAL PEANUT
                 FIELD DAY
     • SPONSORED BY:
        – LOWNDES COUNTY YOUNG
          FARMERS
        – RON SMOAK, ADVISOR



Provided by Dr. James Corbett, Agriculture Teacher, Lowndes
Co. High School
GA Ag Ed Curriculum Office
To accompany Georgia Agriculture Education Curriculum
July 2002
  WHAT IS A PERENNIAL
       PEANUT?
• A PRIMITIVE PEANUT THAT
  PRODUCES VERY FEW SEEDS.

• A WARM SEASON/TROPICAL
  PERENNIAL LEGUME FROM SOUTH
  AFRICA.
PERENNIAL PEANUT FIELD
     ALSO KNOWN AS
  “FLORIDA’S ALFALFA”
• IT IS SIMILAR IN QUALITY TO
  ALFALFA.

  – CRUDE PROTEIN RANGES FROM 13%-
    18%

  – DIGESTIBILITY IS QUITE SIMILAR TO
    ALFALFA
FIELD IN FULL BLOOM
      ADVANTAGES OF
    PERENNIAL PEANUTS
• LONG-LIVING/ DOES NOT REQUIRE
  REPLANTING

• NO ADDITIONAL NITROGEN NEEDED

• NO MAJOR INSECT, DISEASE, OR
  NEMATODE PESTS

• HIGH TOLERANCE TO DROUGHT
   HOW DO I GET STARTED
    PLANTING PERENNIAL
         PEANUTS?
• Locate a source of well-managed rhizomes

• Complete land preparation during the winter
  months

• Plant during January, February, and March
          PLANTING SITE
          REQUIREMENTS
• Geographic- grow best from South Georgia to
  North Florida (neither above 31º to 32º latitude
  nor farther than 80 miles from a coast)

• Climatic- grow best in full sun; long, hot, &
  humid days

• Soil- grow best in well-drained soil and deep
  sands

• Fertilization- must soil test for phosphorus and
  potassium
     PLANTING SITE
  REQUIREMENTS (CONT.)
• Site History- try to avoid post-plant weed
  problems in field

• Land Preparation- must bottom plow followed
  by disk-harrow in order to smooth land
FIRST SUMMER AFTER
     PLANTING
    PLANTING MATERIAL
• Cultivars- Florigraze & Arbrook

  – Florigraze- adapted to well drained-soils

  – Arbrook- drought hardy; does well on
    excessively drained sandy soils

• Source- propagated vegetatively using
  rhizomes (modified underground stems)
   RHIZOME HARVESTING
• Remove from soil mechanically with a sprig
  harvester

• Plant as individual rhizome pieces

• Rhizomes should be 1/8 inch plus in diameter and
  a minimum of 9 inches in length

• Rhizomes should be planted as soon as possible
  after digging
RHIZOME FIELD
               PLANTING
• Time of Planting- during winter months of
  January, February, and March (peanut is in a
  quiescent or inactive growing state)

• Planting Rate- 80 bushels of rhizomes/acre

• Planting Methods- Bermuda sprig planters
  commonly used; broadcast by hand; disk harrow
  to depth of 1 1/2 - 2 inches
  COST CONSIDERATIONS
• Establishment (varies from as little as $200
  up to $500/acre)
• Number of acres to be planted
• Rhizome source
• Labor
• Equipment
POST-PLANT MANAGEMENT
• Sand Blast Prevention- includes planting rye in
  strips every 10 feet over field

• Irrigation- should be considered if it is available.

• Weed Control- must be done during first and
  second growing season; includes chemical
  applications and mowing
CENTER PIVOT IRRIGATION
WEED CONTROL
MORE WEED CONTROL
LATE CONTROL OF WEEDS
WEED CONTROL AFTER
     PLANTING
           HARVESTING
• Best way to harvest is with a square baler;
  store bales in a dry, dark barn

• Keep horse-quality hay from rain and other
  elements after harvest

• Wet hay can be rolled into larger bales for
  cattle hay
ENCLOSED HAY BARN
FIELD READY TO HARVEST
HARVESTING THE CROP
ACCUMULATOR BEHIND
 THE SQUARE BALER
BALE LOADER
           MARKETING

• Majority of the hay is used in the horse
  industry

• 50-60 bales sell for approximately $5/bale
WHY NOT TRY PERENNIAL
PEANUTS ON YOUR FARM?

								
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