Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse by K0bk2tdp

VIEWS: 73 PAGES: 27

									                                               Candace Duron
                                 Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse




Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse




Elementary school: Grades 2nd – 6th




          Candace Duron
         Small Group Unit
       EDCS 650/Spring 2006
           Dr. Bringman
                                                                                  Candace Duron
                                                                    Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse



                                 Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse

The Extent of the Problem

       Sibling rivalry and even sibling abuse is often viewed as a natural part of growing up and

is considered normal in most families. However ignoring the problem can lead to psychological

and physical problems. Sibling rivalry includes arguing, jealousy, and hostility, which leads to

sibling abuse. Sibling abuse can be as mild as pushing and shoving to as sever as an attack with a

baseball bat. Studies have consistently shown that sibling violence is the most common from of

intrafamily violence and abuse with incident rates from 60 to greater than 80 percent; with

approximately 10 percent of family homicides are sibling murders (Hoffman, K. L. & Edwards,

J.N., 2004) The journal of Child Maltreatment published in 2005 Dr. Finkelhor, a sociologist

from the University of New Hampshire, conducted a study on sibling rivalry. The study is based

on phone interviews with a representative national sample of 2,030 children or their caretaker.

The study found “14 percent of the children were repeatedly attacked by a sibling; 4.55 percent

were hit hard enough to sustain injuries like bruises, cuts, chipped teeth and an occasional broken

bone; and percent were hit by brothers or sisters wielding rocks, toys, broom handles, shovels

and even knives (Butler, 2006, p 1).” This study also found that 35 percent of the children had

been hit or attacked by a sibling in the year 2004 and the attacks were equally frequent among all

races and socioeconomic classes, however sibling attacks were more frequent in the 6 to 12 age

group and slightly more frequent on boys than girls. Of those 35 percent attacked, 13 percent

were injured, 6 percent involved a weapon and 40 percent were repeatedly attacked (Butler,

2006). Two-thirds of teenagers annually commit physical acts of aggression against their sibling

usually pushing, slapping, throwing or hitting with an object and even more common is
                                                                                   Candace Duron
                                                                     Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


psychological abuse (Hoffman, K. L. & Edwards, J.N., 2004). Psychological abuse involves

teasing, insulting, and asking siblings perform takes for them which may seem harmless but are

abusive when done repeatedly and degrade and deflate the siblings self-esteem or when the

psychological abuse is used to terrorize, exploit, or exert power and control over the other

sibling(s) (Hoffman, K. L. & Edwards, J.N., 2004).

       Negative childhood and adolescence behavior has been associated with sibling aggression

and sibling abuse, psychological and physical, is associated with negative peer relations in

preschool and elementary (Hoffman, K. L. & Edwards, J.N., 2004). Therefore, sibling rivalry

involving conflicts leading to abuse spills over into schools because it affects peer relationships.

Spillover also occurs between family subsystems of spousal relationships, parent-child

relationships, and sibling relationships and behavior seen within different family subsystems will

be modeled in sibling interactions (Pike, A., Coldwell, J., & Dunn, J.F., 2005).

Negative sibling relationships also affect the psychological well being into adulthood. “Adults

assessed as clinically disturbed often have had negative sibling relationships ((Hoffman, K. L. &

Edwards, J.N., 2004, p 187).” Adults affected by negative sibling relationships reported lower

self-esteem, lower ability to trust others, and increases in problems with depression, suicide,

substance abuse and intimate relationships (Hoffman, K. L. & Edwards, J.N., 2004).

       Still, more research needs to be conducted. Sibling rivalry and sibling abuse is the norm

in many households and the abuse is done mostly in private and not reported (as in many cases of

domestic abuse) therefore national and state data is lacking. The need for research and

counseling in this area is great as stated by K. L. Hoffman and J. N. Edwards, “Interactions

among siblings have a powerful impact, as they profoundly affect perceptions, beliefs, feelings,
                                                                                  Candace Duron
                                                                    Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


actions in adulthood, eventually influencing one’s sense of self and expectations for future

relationships (2004, p. 187).”

Behavior Characteristics

       Sibling rivalry symptoms that are observed are sibling jealousy, frequent or continuous

demands for attention, regressive behavior such as thumb sucking and bedwetting, and

aggressive behavior (Sibling Rivalry Disorder, 2003). The aggressive behavior most often seen is

domination and forcefulness when interacting with their sibling(s). Symptoms also include

resentfulness, anger, and rebelliousness (Sibling Rivalry, n.d). A cycle of unresolved disputes of

hostility or aggression may lead to psychological problems (Howe, N., Rinaldi, C. M., Jennings,

M., & Petrakos, H., 2002). The aggressiveness often leads to sibling abuse because the verbal

attacks turn physical.

       Observable symptoms for children being physically abused, especially those between the

ages of 2 and 9, show sever symptoms of trauma, anxiety and depression, sleeplessness, crying

spells, thoughts of suicide and fears of the dark (Butler, 2006). Other behavior shown by kids

who are physically abuse by their sibling are constantly avoiding their brother or sister, having

nightmares, a change in eating and sleeping patterns, and acting out violent and abusive

scenarios through play (Ferrer & McCrea, 2002).

Counseling Strategies

       Strategies that have been used in group counseling of sibling rivalry/sibling abuse relate

to the behavior characteristics. The topics generally used are cooperative behavior such as

sharing, problem solving skills, anger management, encouraging self-esteem, and understanding

and controlling jealousy. Children are counseled in ways express their anger safely and

appropriately and to value each child’s uniqueness (Ferrer & McCrea, 2002). Techniques in
                                                                                   Candace Duron
                                                                     Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


encouraging positive relationships between siblings are to teach communication skills, to focus

on the talents of that child, avoid comparisons, and a lot of positive reinforcement (Ferrer &

McCrea, 2002). Group counseling for sibling relationships (rivalry, conflict, & abuse) should

tech pro-social behaviors such as friendly play, sharing, cooperation, and empathy in all social

arenas and spillover into the sibling relationships causing “children to become nicer siblings”

(Pike, A., Coldwell, J., & Dunn, J.F., 2005, p 531). Constructive conflict or positive problem

solving approaches such as reasoned argument, justification, and negotiation has been shown to

improve sibling relationships (Howe, N., Rinaldi, C. M., Jennings, M., & Petrakos, H., 2002).

       Generally, the techniques used in counseling of sibling rivalry/sibling abuse are support

groups to allow for connections with others who have similar experiences and the most critical

things that children of sibling rivalry/sibling abuse need is to be listened to (When special needs

spark sibling rivalry, 2003). If the rivalry and abuse is very server the family should be involved

in a multimodal treatment program and should be referred to a family counselor.

       Another approach to counseling is to inform parents how to cope with sibling rivalry and

sibling abuse. This topic is often viewed as a normal family problem but few families have the

skills or are aware of techniques on handling aggressive behavior between siblings. In most

research conducted on this topic the informing parents and teaching them different parenting

styles are the primary approach to dealing with sibling rivalry and abuse.
                                                           Candace Duron
                                             Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse




                         Table of Contents


1. “Getting to Know you”

2. “Play Practice”

3. “Sharing is Caring”

4. “Jealousy Story”

5. “Name Your Feeling”

6. “Cool down and Talk it Out”

7. Evaluation

8. References
                                                                                 Candace Duron
                                                                   Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse




Session 1: “Getting to know you”

Domain(s): Personal/Social

Standard(s):
Standard A: Students will acquire the knowledge, attitudes and inter-personal skills to help them
understand and respect self and others.

Competency(ies) & Indicator(s):
PS:A1 Acquire Self-Knowledge
        PS:A1.1      Develop positive attitudes toward self as a unique and worthy person
        PS:A1.9      Demonstrate cooperative behavior in groups
PS:A2 Acquire Interpersonal Skills
        PS:A2.1      Recognize that everyone has rights and responsibilities
        PS:A2.3      Recognize, accept, respect and appreciate individual differences
        PS:A2.5      Recognize and respect differences in various family configurations
        PS:A2.7      Know that communication involves speaking, listening and nonverbal
                     behavior
Goals:
To get to know each other and each other’s family
                                                                                  Candace Duron
                                                                    Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


To find positive/unique things about people in our own family
Understand that each one is loved for their own uniqueness

Materials Needed: Group rules/contract, folders, paper, and markers/color pencils, Book: I love
you the Purplest by Barbara Joose
Specific Strategies/Activities:

Icebreaker: Give each student a piece of paper and have him or her fold it in half (long was) and
then fold the paper in thirds to create 6 boxes when paper is unfolded. In each box have them
draw a picture of the following: Favorite thing about school, Dislike most about school,
Something you’re good at, Something you wish you could do better, Something you do with
friends, Something you do with family. Have the students introduce themselves and discuss their
drawings.
Rules & folders: Discuss rules, have one student read each one, and sign the contract. Pass out
folders and allow students to draw on them after writing their name and group on the front.
Draw your family: Give each student a piece of paper to draw a picture of their family. After
they have finished have each student share their picture by saying who each person is and by
saying one positive/nice/unique thing about them.
Read a Story: I love you the purplest by Barbara Joose (a story about two brothers who compete
for their mom’s attention and love. She shows them she loves them both for their special selves)
Read book and discuss.

Reference:
Duron, C. (2006). Personal File. California State University, Bakersfield.



                                      Group Rules

   1.   We must keep everything that is said in the group private.
   2.   Only one person may talk at a time.
   3.   Show courtesy and respect to all members.
   4.   Treat others as you would like to be treated.
   5.   Understand that group members who violate the rules may be
        asked to leave the group.

Please remember that we need all group members to be on time and
to attend all of our group meetings. It is your responsibility to
complete any work you miss in class.
                                                                                 Candace Duron
                                                                   Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


I agree to these rules and I will be responsible for any class work I
miss while attending these group meetings.

Signed________________________________________________

We want everyone to enjoy our group meetings and be successful!
Therefore, participation is required. Everyone is expected to take
part in group activities, group homework, and discussions.

I will participate in the group meetings and I will do my best to meet
the goals of the group.


Signed________________________________________________

Session 2: “Play Practice”

Domain(s): Personal/Social

Standard(s):
Standard A: Students will acquire the knowledge, attitudes and inter-personal skills to help them
understand and respect self and others.
Standard B: Students will make decisions, set goals and take necessary action to achieve goals.

Competency(ies) and Indicator(s):
PS:A1 Acquire Self-knowledge
      PS:A1.5       Identify and express feelings
      PS:A1.9       Demonstrate cooperative behavior in groups
PS:A2 Acquire Interpersonal Skills
      PS:A2.2       Respect alternative points of view
      PS:A2.6       Use effective communications skills
      PS:A2.7       Know that communication involves speaking, listening and nonverbal
      behavior
      PS:A2.8       Learn how to make and keep friends
PS:B1 Self-knowledge Application
      PS:B1.1       Use a decision-making and problem-solving model
      PS:B1.3       Identify alternative solutions to a problem

Goals:
                                                                                  Candace Duron
                                                                    Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


To establish group cohesiveness
Learn to join in play nicely with others through role-play
Learn to problems solve using play related problems

Materials Needed: Slips of paper with the children’s name written on them, drawing paper,
crayons/makers/colored pencils, a collection of toys and games to be used as props, index cards
with prompts, and a bag.

Specific Stategies/Activities:
Icebreaker: “We are friends:” Place the name slips in a bag or other container. Have each child
draw the name of another child in the group. (If your group has an uneven number of children,
draw the name of a child who will draw two names from the container.) Say: “We are going to
make a mural that shows how we can play with different friends. On your paper, draw a picture
of yourself playing with the friend whose name you drew.” When children are done drawing,
have them write a description of what they are doing with their friend(s) in their picture. The
pictures may depict actual or imagined play. Each child will be featured in two pictures; their
own and their group member’s. Have each child introduce themselves and their picture to the
group. Display the pictures as a mural on the bulleting board or along the wall.

Play Practice: Have each child draw an index card with a play prompt on it from the bag. Invite
the child to choose a toys/game and approach a nearby child and say what is on the card. The two
children can briefly act out a scene of joining in to play. The child who was approached can then
draw the next card and approach a different child. Continue play until each child has a turn
drawing an index card. After, talk about using the prompts when playing with siblings.
Sample Prompts:
“May I play with you?”                                 “Do you want a turn?”
“What are you doing?”                                  “Would you like to play with this now?”
“Can I have a turn?”                                   “What do you want to play?”
“That looks like fun.”                                 “You can go first.”
“Can I use that when you’re done?”                     “Do you want to play with me?”

What would you do? Present the group with play-related problem situations. Discuss the problem
and possible solutions as a group.
Suggested problems: Your sibling called you a mean name, tried to be the boss of the game,
pushed you when you were in line for the slide, took something that you were using, wanted to
follow different games rules, left in the middle of a game.
Suggested solutions: (let group know that there are many right answers) telling your sibling how
you feel, ignoring what your sibling did, talking to an adult, thinking of a ways to be friendly
next time you see your sibling, calmly reminding your sibling of the rules, and smiling.
Remind students that it’s best to treat others, including your sibling(s), as you want to be treated
and not to respond unkindly in return.

Homework: Ask the students to bring in a special item from home to share about next session.

Reference:
                                                                                 Candace Duron
                                                                   Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


This session is modeled after “Joining In & Play” by Free Spirit Publishing Inc. (2006).
Retrieved May 13, 2006 from www.freespirit.com/educators/downloads.cfm




Session 3: “Sharing is Caring”

Domain(s): Personal/Social

Standard(s):
Standard A: Students will acquire the knowledge, attitudes and inter-personal skills to help them
understand and respect self and others.
Standard C: Students will understand safety and survival skills.

Competency(ies) and Indicator(s):
PS:A1 Acquire Self-knowledge
      PS:A1.9       Demonstrate cooperative behavior in groups
PS:A2 Acquire Interpersonal Skills
      PS:A2.1       Recognize that everyone has rights and responsibilities
      PS:A2.6       Use effective communications skills
PS:C1 Acquire Personal Safety Skills
      PS:C1.10      Learn techniques for managing stress and conflict

Goals:
To teach students the definition of sharing
To teach students why they should share
For student to learn what items to share and what items not to share
                                                                                  Candace Duron
                                                                    Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


Materials Needed: Item that is special to the group member for show and tell, Sharing is Caring
Worksheet, pen/pencils, book “Sheila Rae’s Peppermint Stick” by Kevin Henkes

Specific Strategies/Activities:
Icebreaker: (involves the homework from session 2) Have the students write a few sentences
about what the special item they brought from home means to them. Let each member introduce
him or herself and have show and tell.

Define Sharing: when you have something that someone else needs or wants and you offer to let
them use your item. Sharing makes you and the other person feel good. You can let them borrow
the item or you can take turns. When you want to someone to share with you, you should always
be considerate. It is okay if you do not want to share your very special items but you should
explain to the other person nicely why they might not borrow you very special item. Not all
things are special items and most things are okay to share.

Sharing is Caring Worksheet: Have each member complete the worksheet independently and
then discuss the answers as a group.

Read a Story: Read “Sheila Rae’s Peppermint Stick,” by Kevin Henkes. It’s a book about how
Sheila Rae taunts and torments her little sister and refuses to share her peppermint stick. Discuss
the story and the topic of sharing with siblings.

Reference:
This session is modeled after “Sharing is Caring” by Instructor Web (2005). Retrieved May 13,
2006, from http://www.instructorweb.com
              Candace Duron
Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse
              Candace Duron
Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse
                                                                                 Candace Duron
                                                                   Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


Session 4: Jealousy Story

Domain(s): Personal/Social

Standard(s):
Standard A: Students will acquire the knowledge, attitudes and inter-personal skills to help them
understand and respect self and others.

Competency(ies) and Indicator(s):
PS:A1 Acquire Self-knowledge
       PS:A1.1         Develop positive attitudes toward self as a unique and worthy person
       PS:A1.5         Identify and express feelings
PS:A2 Acquire Interpersonal Skills
       PS:A2.6         Use effective communication skills
       PS:A2.7         Know that communication involves speaking, listening and nonverbal
       behavior
Goals:
To teach the students about jealousy and how to control it
To help the students with feelings of being unwanted
To understand empathy

Materials Needed: Book “The Second Princess” by Hiawyn Oram & Tony Ross, Collins Picture
Lions (1995).

Specific Strategies/Activities:
Icebreaker: Play Duck Duck Goose and instead of saying Duck when you choose a person say
their name. After, talk about how the person in the mush pot felt.
Read Story: Read “The Second Princess,” and discuss the storyline, jealousy, feelings unwanted,
and empathy.
                                                                               Candace Duron
                                                                 Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse




Reference:
This session is modeled after “Sample lesson Plans/Facilitations Guides: The Second Princess”
by Philosophy for Children (P4C), New Zealand (n.d.). Retrieved May 13, 2006 from
www.ham.muohio.edu/kellyjs/Sample%20Lesson%20Plans.pdf
                                                                                   Candace Duron
                                                                     Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


Session 5: “Name Your Feeling”

Domain(s): Personal/Social

Standard(s):
Standard A: Students will acquire the knowledge, attitudes and inter-personal skills to help them
understand and respect self and others.
Standard B: Students will make decisions, set goals and take necessary action to achieve goals.

Competency(ies) and Indicator(s):
PS:A1 Acquire Self-knowledge
      PS:A1.5       Identify and express feelings
      PS:A1.8       Understand the need for self-control and how to practice it
      PS:A1.9       Demonstrate cooperative behavior in groups
PS:A2 Acquire Interpersonal Skills
      PS:A2.2       Respect alternative points of view
      PS:A2.3       Recognize, accept, respect and appreciate individual differences
      PS:A2.6       Use effective communications skills
PS:B1 Self-knowledge Application
      PS:B1.1       Use a decision-making and problem-solving model
      PS:B1.3       Identify alternative solutions to a problem
      PS:B1.4       Develop effective coping skills fro dealing with problems
      PS:B1.7       Demonstrate a respect and appreciation for individual and cultural
      differences

Goals:
To teach students how to identify and express their feelings
To know the definition and importance of empathy
To problem solve while controlling their feelings

Materials Needed: Board/Marker, Feelings List Worksheet, How Do You Feel Worksheet,
Problems Situations Worksheet,

Specific Strategies/Activities:
Icebreaker: Have the students think of a feeling a draw a picture of that represents the feeling
they thought of. They will say their name, the name of the feeling, and share their picture.

Discussion: Talk about what the three important elements of feelings are and what they mean.
Write them on the board. (This is the feeling problem-solving model used in the problems
situations worksheet)
                                    1. NAME YOUR FEELING
         2. KNOW YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR EXPRESSSING YOUR FEELINGS
                      3. EXPRESS YOUR FEELINGS IN A GOOD WAY
                                                                                   Candace Duron
                                                                     Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


Feelings List Worksheet: Give the students a few minutes to look over it. Explain that this list
just helps them to think of different feelings, there a many more. Ask if anyone can think of a
feeling that is not listed.

How Do You Feel Worksheet: Give the students time to complete it. They can use a feeling more
than once and they can choose if they want to use feelings from the feelings list worksheet.
Discuss the answers as a group.
Review how it is important to know how you are feeling and to be able to tell how others are
feeling (empathy)

Define empathy: putting yourself in another’s shoes. Explain how being empathic is a key to
handling conflicts. If you try to understand how people feel in different situations, you are being
empathic.

Problem Situations Worksheet: Split the group into halves. Give one group problem number 1
and the second group problem number two. Give them a few minutes to complete. Then discuss
with the whole group.
Review the key elements to feelings listed on the board.

Reference: This session is modeled after “Feelings and empathy” by Reference for School
Counselors (n.d.). Retrieved May 13, 2006 from
http://mis.spps.org/counselors/s_conflict_less4.html
 This session is also modeled after “Working with feelings by Reference for School counselors
(n.d.). Retrieved May 13, 2006 from http://mis.spps.org/counselors/t_problem_less3.html
                                          Candace Duron
                            Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse




                  FEELINGS LIST
1. Excited
2. Worried
3. Embarrassed
4. Lazy
5. Proud
6. Mad
7. Upset
8. Surprised
9. Disappointed
10. Sad
11. Frustrated
12. Lonely
13. Happy
14. Scared
15. Jealous
16. Important
17. Pleased
18. Nervous
19. Angry
                                                                    Candace Duron
                                                      Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse




                 How do you feel?
1. When someone says hello to me, I feel ________________________.
2. When people ask me to do something with them, I feel
________________________.
3. When I watch a scary movie, I feel ________________________.
4. When someone smiles at me, I feel ________________________.
5. When I share with someone, I feel ________________________.
6. When someone shares with me, I feel ________________________.
7. When I get a good grade, I feel ________________________.
8. When someone hits me, I feel ________________________.
9. When I get in trouble, I feel ________________________.
10. When I get a present, I feel ________________________.
11. When I get new clothes, I feel ________________________.
12. When I spill something on my clothes, I feel ________________________.
13. When I make a mistake, I feel ________________________.
14. When I’m a new person in the class, I feel ________________________.
15. When there is a new person in our class, I feel ________________________.
16. When I am left out, I feel ________________________.
17. When something gets stolen from me, I feel ________________________.
18. When I get lost, I feel ________________________.
19. When someone calls me a name, I feel ________________________.
20. When someone calls someone else a name, I feel ________________________.
                                                                            Candace Duron
                                                              Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse




Problem Situations
1. Joan is frustrated with her big sister. Joan was reading a book and her sister just
took it from her.
1) How is Joan feeling? _____________________________________
2) Who is responsible for expressing those feelings? ______________
3) How can Joan express those feelings in a good way? ____________
______________________________________________________.

2. Alan’s sister was bothering him while he is doing his homework. She kept turning
the light off.
1) How is Alan feeling? _____________________________________
2) Who is responsible for expressing those feelings? ______________
3) How can Alan express those feelings in a good way? ____________
______________________________________________________.
                                                                                 Candace Duron
                                                                   Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


Session 6: “Cool down and Talk it out”

Domain(s): Personal/Social

Standard(s):
Standard A: Students will acquire the knowledge, attitudes and inter-personal skills to help them
understand and respect self and others.
Standard B: Students will make decisions, set goals and take necessary action to achieve goals.

Competency(ies) and Indicator(s):
PS:A1 Acquire Self-knowledge
      PS:A1.5       Identify and express feelings
      PS:A1.6       Distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate behavior
      PS:A1.8       Understand the need for self-control and how to practice it
      PS:A1.9       Demonstrate cooperative behavior in groups
PS:A2 Acquire Interpersonal Skills
      PS:A2.1       Recognize that everyone has rights and responsibilities
      PS:A2.2       Respect alternative points of view
      PS:A2.6       Use effective communications skills
PS:B1 Self-knowledge Application
      PS:B1.1       Use a decision-making and problem-solving model
      PS:B1.2       Understand consequences of decisions and choices
      PS:B1.3       Identify alternative solutions to a problem
      PS:B1.4       Develop effective coping skills fro dealing with problems
      PS:B1.6       Know how to apply conflict resolution skills

Goals:
Understand the definition of conflict
Learn ways to resolve conflict
Learn ways to have conflict but still be respectful
Knowledge of ways to cool down when in conflict

Materials Needed: Board/Marker, worksheets: Rules for Fighting Fair and Time Out to Cool
Down

Specific Strategies/Activities:
Icebreaker: Have the students introduce themselves and share one conflict that occurred between
them and their siblings during the past six weeks of group and how they handled it and were they
happy with the result. After everyone has shared discuss the conflicts and resolutions as a group.

Define Conflict: disagreement
When in a conflict it is important to speak clearly and say how you feel and say what you want.
Three ways to handle conflict are: 1) talk it out 2) ignore it 3) get help.
                                                                                    Candace Duron
                                                                      Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


Talk it our rules: discuss the six talk it out rules (these rules should be posted/written so they can
be seen)
    1. Have a positive attitude about solving the problem
    2. Don’t yell
    3. Listen
    4. Don’t interrupt
    5. Be hones
    6. No name calling

Worksheets: Review and discuss the worksheets “Rules for fighting fair” and “Time out to cool
down.” After discussion allow the students to color the worksheets.

Reference: This session is modeled after “Review of Conflict Unit” by Reference for School
Counselors (n.d.). Retrieved May 13, 2006 from
http://mis.spps.org/counselors/t_conflict_less8.html
This session is also modeled after “Rules for Fighting Fair” by Peace Education Foundation
(n.d.). Retrieved May 13, 2006 from http://www.peacekidz.com/handouts/index.htm
This session is also modeled after “DinoPals: Time Out to cool Down” by Alan, R. for People
for Peace (1996). Retrieved May 13, 2006 from http://www.peacekidz.com/handouts/index.htm
              Candace Duron
Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse
              Candace Duron
Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse
                                                              Candace Duron
                                                Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


                                   Evaluation

Group Name: ____________________

Group Topic: _Sibling rivalry_______

We talked about things that interested me:

      _____ a lot

      _____ some

      _____ not much

I participated in the group:

      _____ a lot

      _____ some

      _____ not much

The group was:

      _____ very helpful to me

      _____ somewhat helpful to me

      _____ only a little helpful to me

      _____ not very helpful to me

The thing I liked best about this group was



The thing I did not like about this group was
                                                                                  Candace Duron
                                                                    Sibling Rivalry/Sibling Abuse


                                           References:

Butler, K. (2006). Beyond rivalry, a hidden world of sibling violence. The New York Times,
        February 28. Retrieved May 13, 2006 from
        http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/28/health/28sibl.html

Ferrer, M. & McCrea, S. (2002). Sibling rivalry. University of Florida Extension, Institute of
        Food and Agricultural Sciences. Retrieved May 13, 2006 from
        http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/HE/HE11000.pdf

Hoffman, K. L., & Edwards, J. N. (2004). An integrated theoretical model of sibling violence
      and abuse. Journal of Family Violence, 19(3), 185-200.

Howe, N., Rinaldi, C. M., Jennings, M., & Petrakos, H. (2002). No! The lambs can stay out
      because they got cozies!: Constructive and destructive sibling conflict, pretend play, and
      social understanding. Child Development, 73(5), 1460-1473.

Pike, A., Coldwell, J., & Dunn, J. F., (2005). Sibling relationships in early/middle childhood:
       Links with individual adjustment. Journal of Family Psychology, 19(4), 523-532.

Sibling rivalry. (n.d.). Retrieved May 13, 2006 from
       http://www.fullhyd.com/scripts/articles.php3?articlePath=arts_entt/kids_family/sibling_ri
       valry.htm

Sibling rivalry disorder. (2003). Retrieved May 13, 2006 from http://www.psychnet-
        uk.com/dsm_iv/sibling_rivalry_disorder.htm

When special needs spark sibling rivalry. (2003) Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.
      Retrieved May 13, 2006 from
      http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/about/patient/coping/rivalry.htm

								
To top