Newcastle Schools BSF- Supplementary Planning Guidance Walbottle by RMhfl66

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									              NEWCASTLE SCHOOLS BSF -
         SUPPLEMENTARY PLANNING DOCUMENT
        WALBOTTLE HIGH SCHOOL, NEWBURN WARD
                     APRIL 2005


1.    PREFACE

1.1   The purpose of this Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) is to enable the
      Local Planning Authority to inform the Newcastle Schools ‘Building Schools for
      the Future’ bidders, and therefore potential developers, of the land use planning
      and transportation opportunities and constraints for the school site. The
      guidance will highlight the relevant policy considerations and statutory
      requirements which must be addressed in the submission of a planning
      application for proposed development.

1.2   The guidance set out in this SPD is based on „parent‟ policies that are to be
      saved from the adopted Newcastle Upon Tyne Unitary Development Plan (refer
      to section 13 and Appendix V). In addition to this SPD, and in accordance with
      the Town and Country Planning (Local Development) (England) Regulations
      2004, a Sustainability Appraisal and Statement of Community Involvement have
      also been produced concurrently with this guidance.

1.3   The production of a Supplementary Planning Document requires a Sustainability
      Appraisal. At present the City Council is working on a draft Sustainability
      Appraisal matrix which is based on best practice associated with the
      Sustainability Appraisal of the Regional Spatial Strategy. The 17 sustainability
      objectives (which have been agreed at a regional level) the City Council are
      looking to employ are derived from the Integrated Regional Framework for
      Sustainability. The redevelopment of the Walbottle Campus and the success of
      the scheme will be measured against various sustainability criteria from this list,
      highlighted in Appendix I.

1.4   Throughout the production stages of this SPD there has been a thorough
      consultation process undertaken by the Local Planning Authority to ensure that
      public participation requirements as set out in the Town and Country Planning
      (Local Development) (England) Regulations 2004 (specifically Part 5-
      Supplementary Planning Documents, Regulations 17 and 18 Public Participation)
      have been met. Details of this consultation are set-out in Appendix II.

1.5   Walbottle Campus Technology College is an 11-18 Secondary School that
      currently accommodates 1400 students in the outer west of Newcastle. The large
      site comprises 3 separate buildings which were built in the 1950‟s as a grammar
      school and 2 secondary schools. Two pre-fabricated buildings have been added
      since. There is a large successful Sixth Form that has very limited specialist
      facilities. The school achieved specialist Technology College status in 1995. All
      building stock is in poor condition and is inadequate for today‟s curriculum. The 3
      separate blocks require students and staff to travel between lessons, a journey of
      over 300m, in all weathers. Information Technology (IT) facilities are widespread
      and situated in converted, as opposed to specialist, rooms. Technology rooms
      are similarly spread across the site, as are the Science laboratories. This makes
      management and support of these key areas very difficult. Music is situated in a
      converted art room. There is no provision for drama, some art has to be taught in
      a technology room and PE facilities are sited across all 3 buildings as opposed to
      being concentrated in one area. Most of the problems can be attributed to the
      schools original design as 3 separate institutions. The site is also very open and
      exposed, which adds to their difficulties in bad weather.

1.6   Movement inside the buildings is a problem. Narrow corridors, cramped
      stairways and lack of circulation space leads to congestion at lesson changeover.
      Heating and ventilation is inadequate. Several rooms suffer from being too hot in
      summer and too cold in winter.

1.7   It is intended that the existing school buildings will be demolished and a new
      school rebuilt within the site. The only buildings that would not be demolished
      are the recently built, Sport Lottery funded cricket pavilion and associated
      changing rooms and two of the three Caretaker houses.

2.    THE SITE AND SURROUNDING AREA

2.1   Walbottle School is located in the Newburn Ward, north of the B6528 (Hexham
      Road) in the outer west of the city. The site is approximately 16hecatares (site
      plan attached). The school itself is split into three main buildings that dissect the
      site from west to east. As the school was originally built as two secondary
      schools and a main grammar school (in the 1950‟s and 60‟s) the use of land on
      the site is very inefficient. Although the actual total building area is just over 1.2
      hectares, the sprawling nature of development means that around 6 hectares of
      land is formed between the three school buildings, consisting of small areas of
      open space, car parking, hard surfacing and other informal areas. The buildings
      are predominantly 2-3storeys in height with some 1 storey development and
      recently there has been a number of additional mobile classrooms added to the
      site. The main school playing fields (cricket pitch, 2 football pitches and 3 hard
      standing pitches) are located in the northern part of the site.

2.2   The site is both within and surrounded by designated Green Belt land and on
      three sides the school abuts an area locally designated as of exceptional
      landscape value in the Unitary Development Plan. To the south of the site on the
      school boundary is a small pocket of residential cottages. The Hadrian's Wall
      corridor broadly follows the line of the main road, the B6528, to the south of the
      site. This stretch of Wall, ditch and milecastle 10 is designated as a Scheduled
      Ancient Monument (SAM 28(20)) and is part of the UNESCO Hadrian's Wall
      World Heritage Site. To the south east of the site lie allotments and to the
      immediate east there is Talbot House School (providing specialist educational
      opportunities for 50, 11-16 year olds). A Public Right of Way (PROW) denotes
      the eastern boundary of the site, which runs between the two schools. This
      PROW offers the only entrance to Talbot House School. To the west of the site a
      woodland Dene separates the school from the neighbouring settlement of
      Throckley with another PROW running parallel with the western boundary of the
      site through the Dene. Just north of the site runs the A69, dissecting what would
      otherwise be continuous farmland.

2.3   Vehicular and pedestrian access is gained from the B6528 to the south of the
      school site. There are three houses on the site; two of these houses (located at
      the main building and the eastern building) are the current caretaker‟s houses.
      The third house is currently used as small offices where school counsellors are
      located- for one on one sessions with the pupils. Again these houses are spread
      across the site and are located in proximity to each of the main school buildings.

2.4   There have been substantial improvements to the schools outdoor sports
      facilities in recent years and this is set to continue in the forthcoming months.
      The school received Sport Lottery finance to improve the cricket and changing
      facilities at the school. The funding was used to build new changing rooms on
      the western part of the site on the southern edge of the cricket pitch. It is
      anticipated that these facilities will remain during the reconstruction of the school.
      In addition to the Sport Lottery money the school has also received around one
      million pounds New Opportunities Funding (now the Big Lottery Fund) to improve
      the sports provision to the rear of the main school building. In the coming
      months „astro-turf‟, floodlit playing areas are to be developed as are increased
      numbers of improved quality tennis courts. Any proposed redevelopment of the
      school will have to be mindful of these improvements and incorporate them into
      the new design of the school (see section 6 for further detail).

3.    DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

3.1   The redevelopment of the Walbottle Campus provides an excellent opportunity to
      provide a quality educational facility, fit for the needs of children and the
      community in the 21st Century. In addition, the new development has the
      potential to achieve an imaginatively designed building, sensitive to the needs of
      its users and the surrounding environment.

3.2   There have been many recent publications and guidance particularly relating to
      civic developments and in particular schools from the Government and related
      bodies. Specifically, these include “Being involved in school design: A guide for
      school communities, local authorities, funders and design and construction
      teams” CABE (Sept 2004) “The Value of Good Design” by CABE (2002)
      “Improving Standards of Design in the Procurement of Public Buildings” by CABE
      (2002) and “Creative Spaces: improving school design” CITB Construction Skills
      and CABE Education (see www.cabe-education.org.uk/creativespaces). These
      highlight the importance of good design practice in educational environments,
      identifying the relationship between the design quality of schools and improved
      student performance.

3.3   “Better Civic Buildings and Spaces” by CABE (2003) describes how all building
      initiatives involving local authorities should be seen as civic projects and states
      that schools have a major impact on the public‟s view of their neighbourhoods.
      These guides are extremely useful in highlighting what can be achieved and what
      is expected from modern developments. It is important that the new
      development at Walbottle adheres to the principles and criteria laid out in these
      guides. The developer should also refer to Schools for the Future DfES Building
      Bulletin 98 (BB98), and the DfES Exemplar Designs.

4.    DESIGN AND LAYOUT

4.1   The school is fairly isolated in terms of its position with regard to the main
      residential areas in the Newburn Ward. Throckley is situated to the west of the
      site and the village of Walbottle is located to the south east. Neither of these
      settlements adjoins the site. There is, however, a small cluster of cottages
      (previously Dene Farm) on the southern border of the school boundary. The new
      development should fit into the character of the surrounding area and any impact
      on the cottages needs to be minimised before, during and after construction. At
      present the school buildings form a sprawling mix of predominantly 2 and 3
      storey buildings with some 1 storey development. New development should
      ensure a more structured layout, not only in terms of function but also in relation
      to design and appearance. The current use of the site is extremely inefficient
      and new development should contribute to the openness of the area by
      improving on this (i.e. reduce the developed proportion of the site) without
      increasing the current maximum height of the buildings.

4.2   It is important that all new designs pay due regard of the need to integrate the
      development with the setting and character of the surrounding area. The school
      site and its surrounding area fall within the designated Greenbelt that
      encompasses the City. Central Government attaches great importance to Green
      Belt land, which has been an essential element of planning policy for some four
      decades, and any redevelopment of the site will have to satisfy the requirements
      outlined in Planning Policy Guidance note 2 Annex C Future of Major Developed
      Sites in the Green Belt. Inappropriate development is, by definition, harmful to
      the Green Belt and it is for the applicant to show why permission should be
      granted. In view of the presumption against inappropriate development, the
      Secretary of State will attach substantial weight to the harm to the Green Belt
      when considering any planning application or appeal concerning such
      development. The City Council is also committed to the concept of the Green
      Belt and has a number of Unitary Development Plan Policies to define, control
      and protect it from development. Particular reference needs to be made to UDP
      policies GB2 and GB2.5 and EN3.1. The location of the site within the Greenbelt
      should inform the character and form of buildings, reflecting the rural, landscaped
      setting as opposed to a more formal urban setting. The school should be
      designed to create a development with a sense of identity whilst drawing on local
      character and distinctiveness. Designing for local distinctiveness involves the
      creative reconciliation of local practices on the one hand, with the latest
      technologies, building types and needs on the other.

4.3   It is the Planning Authority‟s view that new development should not impinge on
      the school playing fields to the north of the site. Nor should development
      impinge on the open space that currently exists between the school and Hexham
      Road on the southeast of the site, as it is considered that this area is of particular
      archaeological and landscape importance. Restriction of development of this
      part of the site would also reduce the potential difficulties that would arise in
      avoiding damage to the setting of the Hadrian‟s Wall World Heritage site.
      Consideration about the location of new development needs to be given in
      relation to the improvements that are occurring to the tennis courts and the
      „astro-turf‟ pitches behind the current main school building. In planning terms, it
      is considered that there may be potential for development on the eastern
      boundary of the site, where there is an existing hard standing pitch. Any
      development in this area could assist in the phased decanting of pupils through
      the construction process. Temporary playing field loss during construction will be
      acceptable provided there remain sufficient pitches to meet curriculum and
      community needs on site. However, should development proposals lead to a
      permanent net loss of playing fields, this will need to be compensated by
      appropriate mitigation measures to be agreed with the relevant bodies (e.g. Sport
      England, Newcastle City Council Planning Policy Officers etc). Any development
      on the eastern boundary should not adversely affect the privacy of the
      neighbouring Talbot House School.

4.4   Any design should be planned so as to make maximum advantage of passive
      solar gain and southerly elevations in the interests of developing sustainable
      buildings. The school should have a higher proportion of glazing in its southerly
      aspect, which should face within 15 ° of south. Schemes should include other
      aspects of sustainable building methods, using appropriate materials, and
      adequate consideration of energy and water conservation, and sustainable
      energy production. In addition the site is relatively exposed to the prevailing
      westerly winds, so attempts should be made to incorporate shelter from the wind
      in the design of both the building and the associated external spaces in order to
      maximise both sustainability and usability.

4.5   The design should maximise the safety of the building and its users. Accordingly
      the development should conform to the guidelines in “Secured by Design”, an
      initiative supported and managed by the Association of Chief Police Officers.
      Secured by Design is aimed at encouraging the building industry to adopt crime
      prevention measures to assist in reducing the opportunity for crime and fear of
      crime. Security measures should be introduced as apart of the design process
      with natural surveillance and appropriate lighting encouraged throughout the
      development.

4.6   A design statement should accompany any application for the development of
      this site, outlining design principles involved in the layout, visual appearance of
      the development and its wider context.

4.7   Sport England produce a series of Design Guidance Notes on the design of both
      indoor and outdoor sports facilities, and Sport England expect facilities to be
      designed in accordance with these notes. However, where such facilities are
      offered as mitigation for the net loss of playing field it should be noted that Sport
      England require that their Design Guidance Notes are adhered to.

4.8   Developers must be aware of the implications of the Disability Discrimination
      Act 1995 (as amended by the Special Educational Needs and Disability Act
      2001) and to British Standard BS 8300 : 2001 which is the best practice standard
      with regards to access for all. Good access for all goes beyond wheelchair
      access, and includes wayfinding, signage, tactile and sensory information, the
      use of colour and tonal contrast. Newcastle City Council adopts a policy which
      requires all public buildings to pass British Standard BS 8300 and therefore to
      achieve this best practice standard. Proposals will be expected to be
      accompanied with an accessibility statement detailing how the schools have
      been designed to be fully inclusive with regard to disabled users.

4.9   The developer will be expected to liaise with and comply with the requirements of
      the utility companies that would be affected by the redevelopment of the site.

5.    TRANSPORTATION

5.1   The redevelopment of the School provides the opportunity to address current
      problems associated with pedestrian and cycle routes, school bus access, traffic
      congestion and car parking. The transportation policies in the UDP deal with all
      modes of travel in detail and the relative transportation priorities of the Council,
      including specific development control policies.

5.2   A school travel plan to underpin sustainable transport to this site will be required
      as part of any planning application that may be granted. It is expected that both
      the infrastructure provided and also the layout of the development will maximise
      the use and accessibility of walking, cycling and public transport.

5.3   A Transport Assessment Report (TAR) must be submitted with any planning
      application in order for the development to be assessed. The scope of the TAR
      must be agreed with Officers from Transportation Developments at an early
      stage in consultation with the Council. Promoting alternative forms of travel to
      the car is a primary concern for any school development and must be adequately
      addressed in the TAR . A movement framework should be included as part of a
      site evaluation and should accompany the TAR. This is an illustrative plan
      indicating where pedestrian and vehicular movement exists or is to be created.
      The movement framework should influence the location of buildings, entrances,
      accesses, and other spaces for different types and volumes of movement.

5.4   The pupil catchment area should be analysed to determine pedestrian routes
      leading to and from the school site. Several pedestrian and cycle entrances may
      be required, so that the site is permeable for users and to encourage sustainable
      transport. Priority should therefore be given to the movement of pedestrians, by
      prioritising pedestrian desire lines to and through the site. Walk and cycle routes
      must also be segregated from vehicular traffic at access points and within the
      site. The design of the pedestrian and vehicular routes should provide natural
      surveillance, ensuring safe, secure and convenient routes. An accessible cycle
      parking area should be provided within the site.

5.5   Parking provision should take account of Policy T4.5 of the UDP, Development
      Control Policy Statement 23, PPG13 and the most recent interim parking
      standards policy (Development Control Committee, 15 March 2002.)
5.6   A drop off/pick up area for parents should also be provided within the curtilage of
      the site, and should be located away for the main entrance. The school currently
      has a number of scholars bus services, the movement of these must be
      prioritised over that of parents vehicles. In addition, the access and road layout
      should facilitate service vehicles and school bus services. Any alterations to
      existing accesses or proposed new accesses should be discussed with the
      Council at an early stage. Redundant accesses should be removed and the
      highway reinstated at the applicant‟s expense. Any new access would need to
      adhere to current junction spacing and visibility standards to ensure highway
      safety.

5.7   Provision, amendment or removal of highway infrastructure (guard-rail, zigzags
      etc) and legal orders to facilitate the school on the site must be identified and
      agreed with the Highway Authority. These works would be undertaken by the
      City Council at the applicants expense.

5.8   A Traffic Management plan must be submitted for approval outlining how site
      traffic is to be managed during construction to minimise impact on the locality.

5.9   The above clauses deal with potential specific design issues, however, for the
      avoidance of doubt, works on the immediate adjacent highway network to
      facilitate any new design, should form part of the site works for development.

6.    SPORT ENGLAND AND PLAYING FIELD POLICY

6.1   The developer should ensure that there will be no net loss of playing field at the
      school and shall have regard to the Council‟s Draft Playing Pitch Strategy. Any
      proposed development on existing playing field, will only be permitted if it
      satisfies the requirements of Planning Policy Guidance Note 17. Planning for
      Open space, Sport and Recreation, in addition to UDP open space policies.

6.2   The Town & Country Planning (Playing Fields) (England) Direction 1998 states
      that planning authorities must notify Government Office North East (GO-NE)
      when there is an outstanding objection from Sport England, to proposals to
      develop local authority owned playing fields and those which are currently used,
      or have been used during the past 5 years, by educational institutions.

6.3   Sport England‟s Planning Policy Statement clearly defines their policies on
      planning applications for development on playing fields. The developer should
      liaise with Sport England prior to the submission of a planning application to
      ensure that all sports issues have been appropriately incorporated in the scheme
      and that they are provided with all the necessary information required to properly
      assess the proposals.

6.4   There is also an issue of previously funded sports development schemes on the
      site. There are two – the cricket/tennis pavilion was part funded with Sports
      Lottery finance and the recently improved grass playing pitches received funding
      through the New Opportunities Fund (now the Big Lottery Fund). Sport England
      will expect to see these facilities retained or replaced to at least the same size
      and specification (see Appendix IV for the legal standings on this matter). In
      addition, the community use of these facilities is managed by a local community
      sports organisation. The Building Schools for the future programme provides an
      ideal opportunity to provide sport and recreational use for both the school and the
      community and it is expected that this, or a similar community use agreement
      with the City Council and other parties as appropriate, to continue.

7.    OPEN SPACE

7.1   Open space is essential to the City‟s health and wellbeing and provides
      opportunities for exercise, development of sporting skills, relaxation and fresh air.
      The developer should note that the site is subject to open space policies within
      the Council‟s Unitary Development Plan and the most relevant policies are OS1,
      OS1.4 and OS1.5 (see Appendix V). In addition, the developer should refer to
      “Green spaces….your spaces” Newcastle‟s Green Space strategy (April 2004)
      and its sister document the Draft Playing Pitch Strategy. The Dene running along
      the western boundary is a popular and well used Natural/Semi-natural Urban
      Green Space and there may be opportunities to enhance the linkage, amenity
      and educational value of the Dene to the benefit of the school, its staff and its
      students, as part of this redevelopment.

7.2   Any development of a replacement school in the grounds of an existing school
      will result in a temporary loss of open space. The Council expects that the
      footprint of any new buildings will be no greater than that of the existing buildings
      and any loss of existing open space, tree cover and habitat should be replaced
      with at least equivalent quantity and quality of open space elsewhere on the site.
      Therefore, there will be no long term loss of open space at this site.

7.3   In terms of wider green space needs in Newburn, the Green Space Strategy
      assessment indicates that the area is relatively well served and benefits from its
      urban fringe, riverside location. However the school, Walbottle/North Walbottle
      and northern Throckley are poorly served by parks with no medium or large park
      within the desire distance.

8.    LANDSCAPING AND ECOLOGY

8.1   The site itself is characterised by a terraced landscape of level playing field areas
      divided by landscaped banks, many including areas of tree and shrub planting,
      some now well established. These trees perform a number of functions to
      enhance the site, including shelter, screening, amenity value and wildlife value.
      Trees Newcastle – The Newcastle Tree Strategy (April 2002) sets out policy
      guidance with regard to trees within the City. This includes presumptions against
      the removal of trees, requires replacement where trees are removed, and
      encourages additional planting of trees.

8.2   The existing tree cover consists of three main types. Firstly there are large
      mature trees which predate the original School development. There are
      relatively few of these, and they are primarily located at the western boundary to
      the Dene, and around the eastern Caretakers house. By virtue of their size they
      are significant landscape features, and the presumption is that these would be
      retained and protected. Also by virtue of their age they will be the most
      vulnerable to disturbance.

8.3   Secondly there are specimen trees planted in many areas of the site, both singly
      and in groups or avenues. These mainly date from the original campus
      construction in the mid-20th Century. Some of these are good trees and should
      be retained where possible, while others are relatively small or poor and their
      loss could be acceptable provided there is significant replacement planting.

8.4   Finally there are the blocks of woodland planting which act as shelter belts as
      well as providing amenity and wildlife value. These are also contemporary with
      the buildings, and are mainly located around the margins of the pitch areas.
      These groups are typically 12m – 15m in height, and were planted at around 1m
      centres. In many areas no subsequent thinning has occurred. If these are to
      form viable tree groups on the longer term it is vital that a coherent management
      policy for these woodlands is developed and implemented. The presumption is
      that all these woodland blocks would be retained intact but their long-term
      viability and wildlife value enhanced by suitable management and additional
      planting.

8.5   The first stage in the assessment of the tree cover will be for the developer to
      produce a detailed tree survey in accordance with the recommendations of BS
      5837 (new edition anticipated early 2005). This should include all trees and
      provide location, species, size (height and crown spread) and condition (including
      SULE). It should include advice for protection during the development work,
      again fully in accordance with BS 5837, and also suggestions for ameliorating the
      effect of the development where necessary. This survey should be used as the
      basis for all design decisions concerning the layout of the site.

8.6   This will also provide a basis for the future management of the tree resource, and
      a long-term management plan should be produced which will take this forward.

8.7   In addition to protecting the existing tree cover where appropriate every
      opportunity should be taken to maximise new tree, hedge and shrub planting to
      enhance the shelter, amenity and wildlife value of this important but exposed site,
      which is within the Green Belt, and adjacent to a major wildlife corridor. The tree
      management plan referred to above should also incorporate recommendations
      for the management of the new planting.

8.8   There are also areas of ornamental shrub planting on the site, mainly associated
      with the school buildings. Although some of these could be retained, they are not
      considered to be of sufficient value to provide major constraints to the
      redevelopment of the site, again provided the finished scheme replaces and
      enhances the shrub resource.

8.9   It is anticipated that the new buildings will be located in the eastern corner of the
      site, and with a significantly smaller land take up than the present multi-school
      situation. Other than requiring care with the mature trees by the eastern
      caretaker‟s house, this should allow substantial additional plantings. This should
      consist of both trees for shelter, wildlife and amenity throughout the wider site
       area, and also trees and shrubs of primarily amenity value around the new
       buildings themselves.

8.10   Reference is made elsewhere to other recent and upcoming improvements to the
       sports facilities on the site, which are to be retained. These are likely to involve
       some work to the existing tree planting, and also new planting. It is important
       that the developers liaise closely with those responsible for the sports facilities to
       ensure no elements are either duplicated or omitted in this respect.

8.11   Your Wildlife - The Newcastle Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) (October
       2001), describes how important open spaces are for wildlife and people. There
       are a number of habitat and species action plans that are relevant: in particular -
       Dene Woodland, Gardens and Allotments, Scrub, Shrub and Hedgerows, Man-
       made Structures, Parks, Open Space and Roadside verges, Red Squirrel,
       Skylark, and Song Thrush. Importantly, all City schools are targeted to have
       nature conservation areas or elements within their grounds by 2011 and the
       developer will be expected to include for this in the proposals for the school.
       There are also targets for Dene woodland which should be considered in this
       context. A school wildlife garden linking with Walbottle Dene is a significant
       opportunity to deliver BAP targets and enhanced educational resources. These
       targets could be aided by the provision of landscaping for wildlife in the design,
       and the maintenance and enhancement of the existing wildlife areas and
       habitats.

8.12   Proposals for landscaping schemes within the site have the potential to impact
       on the setting and archaeology of the Hadrian‟s Wall World Heritage Site. Any
       proposal for landscaping schemes within this area will need to avoid damage to
       the setting and remains of Hadrian‟s Wall (see section 12- Archaeology- for
       further information).

8.13   The school has indicated that it would like the current greenhouse and wildlife
       area, on site at the moment, replicated within the redevelopment of the school.

9.     ENERGY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

9.1    The Council has adopted “A Charter for the Environment” which seeks to reduce
       the amount of the earth‟s resources we use through the promotion of sustainable
       forms of development. The charter draws particular attention to the efficient use
       of water, energy and materials. A regional good practice guide „Building in
       Sustainability‟ is available, prepared with support from Newcastle City Council,
       with the intention of helping prospective developers adopt a sustainable
       approach to new construction.

9.2    In accordance with Policy SD1.4, the Council will expect developers to
       demonstrate that they have designed the buildings to maximise Passive Solar
       Gain. The buildings should include appropriate energy efficiency measures such
       as increased levels of insulation and improving the specification of boiler
       equipment. The development should take advantage of passive solar gain,
       through both the consideration of building orientation and detailed design. In
       addition, active sustainable technologies, such as solar water heating or the
       incorporation of photovoltaic cells, should be considered. The development will
       also be expected to use the principles of Sustainable Urban Drainage wherever
       possible and appropriate.

9.3    Renewable energy technologies should be incorporated and celebrated in the
       external design of elevations and roof structures where appropriate. Where
       possible, the development should also allow for the future incorporation of such
       facilities in the detailed design of the south facing elevations.

10.    ART IN THE ENVIRONMENT

10.1   Distinctive works of art help to create a sense of identity. Policy EN1.3
       encourages the provision of new works of art in development and improvement
       schemes. In determining any planning applications the authority will have regard
       to the contributions made by any such works to the appearance of the scheme
       and the amenity of the area.

11.    CONTAMINATION AND LAND STABILITY

11.1   POL6 of the UDP requires developers to undertake a thorough site investigation
       where a site is, or may be contaminated. The investigation must identify the
       nature of contamination together with the remedial measures required to treat or
       remove it, in accordance with the best practicable environmental option
       appropriate to the proposed development and the nature of the site. This should
       normally be done prior to any planning application.

12.    ARCHAEOLOGY

12.1   The Hadrian's Wall corridor broadly follows the line of the main road, the B6528,
       to the south of the site. This stretch of Wall, ditch and milecastle 10 is designated
       as a Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM 28(20)) and is part of the UNESCO
       Hadrian's Wall World Heritage Site. Hadrian's Wall is also designated as a Site of
       Archaeological Interest in the Unitary Development Plan (policy C4.1). English
       Heritage will have to be consulted on the proposals at an early stage. In
       accordance with PPG16 and policy C4.2 of the Unitary Development Plan, the
       developer will be required to submit an archaeological desk based assessment to
       determine the potential impact of the proposed development upon archaeological
       remains. This will almost certainly recommend the need for archaeological field
       evaluation. Any development would have to preserve in-situ the remains of the
       Roman Wall, ditch and any other associated archaeological features discovered
       on site. This could result in the developable area being constrained in size and
       means of access also being constrained. The development must not have an
       adverse visual impact on the setting of the Scheduled Ancient Monument.
       Scheduled Monument Consent would be required for any works within the
       Scheduled area, including the installation of service works associated with the
       development that run into Hexham Road outside of the site boundary.
13.    DEVELOPMENT POLICY

13.1   Within the Approved Local Development Scheme it is proposed that generic
       policies used for the determination of planning applications within the existing
       Unitary Development Plan be saved until adoption of the Development Control
       Policies- Development Planning Document (DPD), anticipated June 2009. The
       Walbottle site is allocated in Newcastle‟s Unitary Development Plan, as an
       Education Establishment with Attached Open Space and accordingly the open
       space is protected by UDP policies OS1.4 and OS1.5. There are a number of
       other policies relevant to the development of this site and these are listed in
       Appendix V.
Appendix I
Sustainability Appraisal
                 IRF Objective                                  Suggested Targets                         Suggested Indicator / Baseline                              Data source
1. To ensure high and stable levels of                                                             Unemployment rate as a % of economically           NCC – Policy and research (Sarah Ledger)
employment so everyone can share and                                                               active
contribute to greater prosperity
2. To achieve high and sustainable levels of                                                       Number of sustained business start ups             NCC - Research and Information section (Peter
economic growth                                                                                                                                       Sturman)
                                                                                                   Others

3. To raise educational achievement across the                          KS2: (% level 4+)                                KS2: (% level 4+)            NCC – Education (Bob Gaffney)
City                                                             English               N/A                      English                 N/A
                                                                 Maths                 N/A                      Maths                   N/A
                                                                 Science               N/A                      Science                 N/A
                                                   Key Stage            KS3: (% level 5+)          Key Stage             KS3: (% level 5+)
                                                    Results:     English                            Results:    English                  58
                                                                 Maths                                          Maths                    66
                                                                 Science                                        Science                  56
                                                                    KS4: (% 5+ A – C grades)                        KS4: (% 5+ A – C grades)
                                                                                                                                32
                                                   % 16 – 17 year olds who moved into learning*     % 16 – 17 year olds who moved into learning1      Connexions (Nigel Scroat) 0191 443 4200
                                                            post compulsory education                 post compulsory education who were at
                                                                                                               Walbottle Campus 2004
                                                                                                            78.65 (328 from possible 417)
4. To ensure everyone has the opportunity of                                                       Number affordable units built each year            NCC – Housing land monitoring
living in a decent and affordable home
                                                                                                   Percentage of Council housing stock meeting        NCC / Your Homes Newcastle
                                                                                                   Decent Homes Standard
                                                                                                   Housing needs identified in Housing                NCC – Housing land monitoring
                                                                                                   Requirement Study
5. To ensure good local air quality for all                                 1 hour mean            How will the lifetime of the proposal contribute   NCC – Air Quality Action Plan
                                                                                                   towards the objectives for the purposes of Local
                                                                 200 μg/m3 not to be exceeded      Air Quality Management (included in the Air
                                                    Nitrogen     more than 18 times per year       Quality Regulations as amended)? Groups to
                                                    Dioxide               Annual mean              be measured:
                                                                                                            Benzene;
                                                                 40 μg/m3                                   1,3 Butadiene;


1
    „learning‟ is classed as either full time education at same school or other institution or entering into employment with training
                                                                              1 hour mean                       Carbon monoxide;
                                                                                                                Lead;
                                                                  50 μg/m not to be exceeded
                                                                          3
                                                                                                                Nitrogen dioxide;
                                                      Fine
                                                    Particles     more than 35 times per year                   Particles (PM10); and
                                                     PM10                  Annual mean                          Sulphur dioxide.
                                                                  40 μg/m3

6. To protect and enhance the quality of the                                                                                                              NCC – Pollution Team (Phil Hartley)
City’s ground, river and sea waters                                                                                                                       NCC – Planning Policy Section (Colin Percy)
7. To reduce the causes and the impacts of         To include installed capacity for energy           Currently no renewable energy incorporated          NCC – Energy Team (Matt Dunlop)
climate change                                     produced from renewable sources
                                                   To incorporate CO2 reduction measures beyond       CO2 emission levels
                                                   minimum levels set via Building Regulations
                                                   Steps taken to reduce fuel poverty across          Fuel poverty levels                                 NCC – Energy Team (Colin White)
                                                   residential development
8. To protect and enhance the City’s               Promotion of education of and community            -                                                   NCC – Conservation Team (Liz Bray)
biodiversity                                       involvement in Biodiversity
                                                   Increase extent of habitats and species in line    Extent of habitats and species in locality
                                                   with local and national Biodiversity Action Plan
                                                   targets
                                                   Increased provision of Local Nature Reserve        Number and extent of Local Nature Reserves
                                                   where applicable.
9. To reduce the amount of waste produced and      Raise amount of office/white paper recycled in     Current City wide average of office/white paper     NCC – Neighbourhood Services (Mark Manley)
increase the amount recycled                       schools to:                                        recycled in schools
                                                                     kg per month                                     200kg per month

10. To make better use of our resources                                                               % planning consents that have provided              NCC – EMAS Team (Adrian McLoughlin)
                                                                                                      evidence of the sustainable use of resources
                                                                                                      Consideration given to, but not limited to, use
                                                                                                      of:
                                                                                                               Renewable materials eg non PVC,
                                                                                                                recycled aggregates etc;
                                                                                                               Sustainably generated materials e.g.
                                                                                                                FSC timber;
                                                                                                               Product impact mapping; and
                                                                                                               Design for recycling.
11. To protect and enhance the quality and         Contribute with citywide target of 75%             % of new houses built on previously developed       NCC - Urban capacity study (Peter Cockbain)
diversity of the City’s rural and urban land and                                                      land
landscapes
                                                                                                      Enhancement of wildlife value of existing           NCC – Green Space Team
                                                                                                      habitats and green spaces, industrial land and
                                                                                                      gardens throughout the City
                                                                                                      Provision of linkages between habitats to create    NCC – Green Space Team
                                                                                                      ‘green corridors’ for species movement
12. To protect and enhance the City’s cultural     Reduction of buildings on English Heritage’s       Number of Grade I, II* and II listed buildings at   NCC - Historic Environment Team / English
heritage and diversity                             ‘Register of Buildings at Risk’                    risk through the proposal                           Heritage
                                                  Develop inclusive schemes to support current                                                           Author of SPD
                                                  use and occupier Or bring redundant building
                                                  into appropriate use via integrated design
                                                  approach
                                                                                                    Protection and enhancement of Conservation
                                                                                                    Area
                                                                                                    Compliancy with Conservation Character
                                                                                                    Statement and, where appropriate, Conservation
                                                                                                    Area Management Plan
                                                                                                    Protection and enhancement of Listed Buildings
                                                                                                    Promotion of education of and community
                                                                                                    involvement in Historic Environment
                                                                                                    Investment in Historic Environment
13. To reduce crime and the fear of crime                                                           Levels of car theft                                  NCC – Community safety team
                                                                                                    Levels of burglary                                   NCC – Community safety team
                                                                                                    Levels of violent crime against the person           NCC – Community safety team
                                                                                                    Selected incident reports                            NCC – Community safety team
14. To improve health and well-being while                                                          Mortality rates                                      Newcastle Primary Care Trust
reducing inequalities in health                                                                     Life expectancy at birth                             Newcastle Primary Care Trust
                                                                                                    Conception rates amongst females aged 15 - 17        Newcastle Primary Care Trust
                                                                                                    Smoking cessation rates                              NCC – Policy and research (Sarah Ledger)

15. To ensure good accessibility for all jobs,                                                      Creation of jobs for local people
facilities, goods and services in the City                                                          Training opportunities for local people
                                                                                                    Current distance to schools                          NCC - School Travel Plans (Cheryl
                                                                                                                                                         Ford/Trevor Arkless)
                                                                                                    Current distance to open space
                                                                                                    Current distance to shops
                                                                                                    Current distance to post office
                                                                                                    Current distance to public library
                                                  Raise the average number of non pupils            Average number of non pupils (monthly) who
                                                  (monthly) who use the school leisure facilities   use the school leisure facilities ie pitches halls
                                                  ie pitches halls etc.                             etc as at academic year end 2005:
                                                  New average post 2005 academic year end:

16. To increase public involvement in decision-                                                     Election turnouts                                    NCC – Electoral services (Debbie Frost)
making and civic activity
                                                  Raise the average number of attendees at          Average number of attendees at consultation          NCC – DPG: Richard Carmichael
                                                  consultation events associated with Walbottle     events associated with Walbottle Campus
                                                  Campus proposals post 30/03/05.                   proposals as at 30/03/05:
                                                  NEW average:
                                                                                                              6.2 (31 people over 5 events)
                                          To raise levels of positive feedback to the       Do you agree or disagree that you can influence   NCC – Policy and research: Residents Survey
                                          percentages indicated below for the Residents     decisions affecting your local area? (City Wide   (Ann Atkinson)
                                          Survey question:                                  average taken from 2003 Residents Survey
                                          Do you agree or disagree that you can influence   results – Outer West information not yet
                                          decisions affecting your local area?              available).
                                          Agree                                             Agree                              21%
                                          Neither agree nor                                 Neither agree nor                  28%
                                          disagree                                          disagree
                                          Disagree                                          Disagree                           52%
                                          Don’t know                                        Don’t know                            -
                                          Net score                                         Net score                          -31%
17. To reduce adverse impacts on global                                                     Localised level of Fairtrade business activity    NCC – LA21 (Allen Creedy)
communities



Key
The Matrix is designed to provide a basis for a sustainability appraisal of applicable developments.

The 17 objectives contained within the Matrix are taken from the Integrated Regional Framework (IRF) for sustainability and their aim is to
integrate the sustainability aims of plans and strategies across the Region by providing a common framework.

Whilst it can be argued that every development will have an impact on every aspect of sustainability in a global sense, it is felt that different
types of development will have a greater bearing on certain objectives than they will on others. It should be noted that this list is not definitive
and your views are sought on all of the objectives and on whether the list of those objectives indicated as being most relevant is correct.
The way in which the Matrix is anticipated to work is as follows: The objectives of sustainability have been set at the regional level. If a
development meets these objectives it will be considered to be a sustainable scheme. The targets relate to the ways in which we are
aiming to meet the objectives. The indicators of sustainability will allow for the measurement of whether the targets are being met. Where
possible, a data source has been set in order to assist measurement.

All three categories (objectives, indicators, and targets) are only „suggested‟ at this stage. Prior to use, the Matrix will be subject to internal
and external consultation to ensure that it covers all aspects of sustainability and to encourage ownership. By definition then the Matrix can
only be considered a draft prior to further consultation.
Appendix II
Statement of Community Involvement

A „scoping note‟ for the redevelopment of the Walbottle Campus through the „Building
Schools for the Future (BSF) programme‟ was finalised in November 2004, highlighting
what the Local Planning Authority considered the key opportunities and constraints of
redeveloping the site to be. The „scoping note‟ was intended to act as a first point of
discussion between the Local Planning Authority and the general public.

On the back of the production of the „scoping note‟ a public „drop-in‟ session was held
on the 9 December 2004 at Walbottle Campus to discuss and highlight any emerging
Planning and Transportation issues and to give the public the chance to highlight any
support or concerns they have for the scheme. This session was attended by Richard
Carmichael (Planning Officer) and Graham Johnson (Project Director). To advertise the
event 1400 letters were sent to residents in the Newburn Ward, every child of the school
took home a letter, an advertisement was placed in local papers for the week running up
to the event and flyers were placed in public buildings in the Newburn Ward. The letter
that was sent out also included a link to the City Councils website where a copy of the
scoping note is located as well as including officer contact details so „hard‟ copies of the
scoping note could be requested. Prior to the public session starting, the Planning
Authority used the opportunity to discuss the redevelopment of the school with the
schools Student Council to see what the pupils would like to see in the redevelopment
of the school.

To meet the new requirements of the reformed planning system a copy of the „scoping
note‟ was sent out to all required statutory consultees for comment (25 November
2004), so that they could have an earlier input into the production of the Draft
Supplementary Planning Document (SPD). Copies of the „scoping note‟ were also
made available at the school, the Civic Centre and at public buildings in the Newburn
Ward. Comments on the „scoping note‟ were requested by 16 December 2004. A copy
of the „scoping note‟ was also sent to All Newburn Ward members, Councillor Cott
(executive portfolio: education), Doug Henderson MP and neighbouring County and
District authorities. A complete list of these consultees is located at the end of this
statement.

The Draft SPD was approved as a basis for further consultation by Executive
Committee February 2005. Once the paper was approved, copies of the Draft SPD
were made available on the Internet (through links on Newcastle City Councils
homepage), at the school, at public buildings in the Newburn and Westerhope Wards
and at the Civic Centre from the 17 February 2005. To meet the new requirements of
the reformed planning system a copy of the Draft SPD was also sent out to all required
statutory consultees for comment. Comments on the Draft SPD were requested by the
24 March 2005 (a five week consultation period). During this five week period the Local
Planning Authority held four public „drop-in‟ sessions at locations within the Newburn,
Lemington and Westerhope wards, as agreed with the Ward Community Coordinators.
These sessions were intended to give members of the general public the opportunity to
comment on the Draft SPD before finalisation. To advertise the event over 1400 letters
were sent to residents in the Newburn Ward, every child of the school took home a
letter, an advertisement was placed in local papers for the week running up to the event
and flyers were placed in public buildings in the Newburn, Lemington and Westerhope
Wards. The letter and flyers that were sent out included a link to the City Councils
website where a copy of the Draft SPD is located as well as including officer contact
details so „hard‟ copies of the Draft SPD could be requested.

Statement of Consultation responses to Scoping Note (used to develop the Draft
SPD)

Statutory Consultees

Of the Statutory Consultees that were requested to comment on the scoping note for
the production of the Draft Supplementary Planning Document, responses were
received from English Nature, The Environment Agency, NEDL, Network Rail, The
Countryside Agency, Sport England and English Heritage.

Both English Nature and Network Rail had no comments to make on the scoping note.
NEDL sent a copy of the enclosed Mains Records for the site given approximate
locations of known Northern Electric apparatus in the area. The Draft SPD will be
written with reference to the fact that any development of the site should be done in
consultation with NEDL and all other utility providers and statutory consultees. The
Countryside Agency issued a copy of their Planning Policy Statement „Planning
Tomorrows Countryside’ which sets out their vision for rural areas. The Agency, given
their strategic priorities, did not wish to comment on the scoping note directly. The
Environment Agency indicated that it wanted any Scoping Report on the redevelopment
of the Walbottle Site to consider a number of general issues. The Draft SPD and Draft
Sustainability Appraisal will consider and reflect the comments submitted by the
Environment Agency.

Sport England provided, as requested, the legal wording in respect of the Sports Lottery
& NOF funded facilities on the site. This wording has been included within the Draft
SPD as an appendix to make clear Sports England‟s stance on this issue. They had no
other comments to make at this stage.

English Heritage were very supportive, not only of the content of the „scoping note‟, but
also in the approach taken in developing the guidance for the site. Only a few minor
amendments were suggested and these will be incorporated into the Draft SPD.

GO-NE were also contacted by phone (11/01/05), in addition to having the scoping
report sent to them, to see if they wanted to make any representations but they reported
that they had no comments to make at this time.

Other Stakeholders

Through the public consultation exercise, 5 responses were received from various
stakeholders. One response received was from the Student Council of Walbottle
School, one was from the Principal of Talbot House School (to the immediate east of
the site) and three were from members of the general public.
The Student Council of Walbottle School came up with a number of ideas that they
would want to see incorporated into any new school design. The list of these ideas are
as follows; secure cycling facilities; floodlit Astroturf pitches that can be used when the
school isn‟t using them; CCTV cameras for extra security; Bigger Halls; a Swimming
Pool; Rugby pitches not just Football pitches; modern looking school that they can be
proud of; one main building with wider corridors; improved toilets; a drama hall, music
studio etc; a bigger canteen (less formal); more informal study areas and places for
lockers; possible metal detectors on the gates/main pedestrian routes on the site. Many
of these issues will be covered in the schools vision which will form part of the Invitation
To Negotiate (ITN). The Draft Supplementary Planning Document will also cover a
number of the themes suggested by the Council including the idea of cycling facilities,
floodlit pitches, safety in schools, increased and varied sports uses and improved
efficiency of land on the site.

The Principal of Talbot House School, responding on behalf of the Trustees, made a
number of observations to the scoping report. The response makes explicit that there
should be mention of Talbot House School within the SPD as it shares an adjoining
boundary with the Walbottle site. In addition to this it is recommended mention should
be made to the Bridleway that denotes the boundary to the east and north of the site,
which runs between the two schools. This Bridleway is a Public Right of Way (PROW)
and due mention of it is now included within the Draft SPD, as is mention of the school.

One local resident had concerns that increased pupil numbers would result in more
buses, more parents parking in front of there properties and more children vandalising
there property. This resident is concerned with having the school access located next
to their properties and have requested that the access point be moved as they believe it
affects the value of their property.
Another resident questioned to what extent the open space at the school would be
available for community use at large. They also commented that they would expect the
Dene (to the immediate west of the site) to be protected from any damage and would
like to see the area enhanced with native tree planting. The possibilities for „green
energy‟ also need to be explored. The respondent also wants the opportunities
between linking the school and the archaeology to be fully developed where possible.
All these aspects have now been considered and addressed, where appropriate, in the
Draft SPD.

Statement of Consultation responses to Draft SPD (Used to develop this
document)

Statutory Consultees

Of the Statutory Consultees that were requested to comment on the Draft
Supplementary Planning Document, responses were received from Network Rail,
Transco, Sport England, GO-NE and English Heritage.

Neither Network Rail or Transco had any specific comments to make on the Draft SPD
and so no amendments are proposed for the finalised SPD.

English Heritage made a number of comments on the Draft SPD and these are
summarised as follows
   Given the fundamental importance of the potential archaeological issues associated
    with the site, they would prefer to see this section earlier in the document and not
    „relegated to section twelve’ of the document
   Section 8.12 should refer to ‘Hadrians Wall World Heritage Site’
   Design and Layout (section 4) should reflect the archaeological and landscape
    importance of the open space between the current school buildings and Hexham
    Road. English Heritage would prefer the brief to state that there should be no
    development in this area.’
   They would like section 12 to specifically refer to the implications of any service
    works associated with the development that run into the road outside the site.

Given the importance of the recommendations highlighted by English Heritage the final
SPD has been amended as follows. The wording in section 8.12 has been changed to
reflect the suggestion by English Heritage. Section 4 of the brief has been firmed up to
reflect that the Local Planning Authority would not want to see any development on the
open area that currently exists between the existing school buildings (western school
block) and Hexham Road. Greater emphasis has also been placed in Section 12 on the
implications of any potential service works that may run onto the road outside the site.
It is considered that the archaeological section of the SPD doesn‟t need to be moved
from Section 12. The SPD doesn‟t list each of the sections in order of importance,
indeed it considers no one section to be more or less important than another to achieve
the optimum development and as such the archaeological section will remain where it
is.

On a final note English Heritage reaffirmed their support for the production and content
of this document as representing the best way to ensure a high quality development that
addresses all potential concerns.

Sport England made a series of comments to the Draft SPD which are summarised as
follows
 In overall terms Sport England were satisfied that Sport England‟s importance as a
    stakeholder in the BSF process is accurately reflected in the document
 Para 4.3 - Sentence beginning „However‟ should be amended to read;
    “Temporary playing field loss during construction will be acceptable provided there
    remain sufficient pitches to meet curriculum and community needs on site.
    However, should development proposals lead to a permanent net loss of playing
    fields, this will need to be compensated by appropriate mitigation measures to be
    agreed with the relevant bodies (e.g. Sport England, Newcastle City Council Leisure
    Policy Officers).”
 Para 4.7 - Suggest fleshing this paragraph out to read; “Sport England produce a
    series of Design Guidance Notes on the design of both indoor and outdoor sports
    facilities, and Sport England expect facilities to be designed in accordance with
    these notes. However, where such facilities are offered as mitigation for the net loss
    of playing field it should be noted that Sport England require that their Design
    Guidance Notes are adhered to”.
 On a more general note the only specific mention of the community use of the site
    and facilities in the draft SPD is in the paragraph that concerns the Lottery funded
    facilities. The Building Schools for the Future programme provides a once in a
    generation opportunity to provide sport and recreational facilities for both school and
    community use. Sport England see community use as an important part of BSF
    proposals and I would wish to see this reflected in the SPD
   Finally I would appreciate it if Appendix II to the SPD – Statement of Community
    Involvement, gave further indication of the information I sent you on Playing Field
    policy and Playing Field definition, and consultation arrangements with Sport
    England

Given the importance of Sport England‟s comments paragraphs 4.3 and 4.7 of the brief
have been amended accordingly. The reference to the importance of community use
has been strengthened and the Planning Authority feels that this reflects the great
importance that community use has in the redevelopment of Walbottle. With regards to
the information Sport England has already provided in the production of this document,
reference has been made to this in the ‘Statutory Consultation on the Scoping Note’
and in Appendix IV. The Planning Authority recognises and welcomes the roles,
dialogue and availability of Sport England throughout the production of this document.

GO-NE suggested that reference need to be made early on in the document to the
development plan policies upon which the SPD is based. This comment was noted by
the Local Planning Authority and paragraphs 1.2, and subsequently 13.1, have been
amended accordingly.

Other Stakeholders

The Local Planning Authority received five responses to the Draft SPD from other
stakeholders. A local resident from Dene Head Cottages on the southern boundary of
the site noted that the dropping-off and picking-up of pupils by private car caused
severe traffic problems when parents parked on foot paths, grass verges etc and they
would want to see this problem tackled in the redevelopment of the school. The Local
Planning Authority believes the requirements set out in Section 5-Transportation of the
SPD will tackle this problem. The TAR and drop-off/pick-up points within the curtilage of
the site will help to alleviate the problems of private traffic parking on the public highway
by exploring alternative forms of travel to the car and providing a dedicated drop-
off/pick-up space within the site boundary itself.

Another response was received from the Principal of Talbot House School. The issue
of parent parking was raised as a concern, especially as the only entrance to Talbot
House School is often blocked. Again it is believed the requirements set out in section
5 of the SPD will alleviate these problems. The respondent has stressed that it would
not want the building developed too close to the existing school boundary so that Talbot
House School was constantly overlooked. Whilst the SPD points towards development
of the site towards the eastern boundary, we would not want the privacy of Talbot
House School to be compromised. Section 4 (Design and Layout) of the SPD has been
amended to reflect this point. The Principal also raised a number of points that although
cannot be addressed in this document, need to be borne in mind as the project
develops, in particular the relationship between the Walbottle and Talbot House School
and its pupils.

The final three responses were received from Walbottle School (three pupils). All the
responses highlighted the need for improved sports provision and Community Use. The
responses commented that the design of the building needs to be modern, atmospheric
and colourful with appropriately proportioned areas for classrooms, social spaces,
seating etc. The issue of improved sports provision and community use is covered in
section 6 of the document, and the Local Planning Authority will expect enhanced sports
facilities with the redevelopment of the site. The importance of good design is
highlighted throughout the document, not only in terms of the building itself but also its
relationship with the surrounding area. A number of other issues are raised in the
responses of the three pupils but these are not land use planning and transportation
issues and so cannot be addressed in this document. Issues like furniture and fittings
standards can be addressed in the Schools Vision Statement.

Consultees who received copies of the Scoping Note and Draft SPD for comment

1.    GO-NE- FAO Caroline Burden
2.    English Heritage
3.    Newcastle Disability Forum
4.    Sport England- FAO Dave Mcguire
5.    Nexus
6.    Transco PLC
7.    Northern Electric
8.    Environment Agency
9.    Northumbria Water
10.   Countryside Agency
11.   Environment Agency
12.   North East Civic Trust
13.   English Nature
14.   Strategic Rail Authority
15.   Historic buildings and monuments commission
16.   One North East
17.   C.L. Barnes- Northumberland Estates, Estates Office, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick,
      Northumberland, NE6 1NQ
18.   Head of the Environment Directorate, Northumberland County Council
19.   Head of Planning, Castle Morpeth District Council
20.   Head of Planning, Tynedale District Council
21.   Cllr John O'Shea (Newburn Ward Councillor)
22.   Cllr Anne Whittaker (Newburn Ward Councillor)
23.   Cllr Linda Wright (Newburn Ward Councillor)
24.   Cllr Cott (Executive Portfolio: Education)
25.   Doug Henderson MP
26.   Mike Booth- Headteacher, Walbottle Campus, Hexham Road, Walbottle, NE15 9TP
27.   Chair of School Governors, Walbottle Campus, Hexham Road, Walbottle, NE15
      9TP
Appendix III
Appendix IV
Legal wording provided by Sport England in respect of Sports Lottery and NOF
funded facilities

The cricket/tennis pavilion & improved grass pitches (referred to hereafter
as the facilities) may only be sold, transferred, leased, or otherwise disposed of, or
ceased to be used for the sports purposes approved by the ESC, with prior written
approval of the ESC. Such approval shall, in part, be reliant upon the provisions of the
following paragraph being satisfied.

In such circumstances of sale, transfer, lease, or other disposal or change of use within
a period of 21 years from the date of provision of the facility:

If the facilities are sold, or transferred, the Organisation shall ensure that the sale or
transfer will be at full market value – such valuation to be assessed by an independent
surveyor experienced in the valuation of sporting facilities & approved in writing by the
ESC. An appropriate proportion of the proceeds (determined by the ESC by reference
to the proportion of the original facilities purchase & development costs met by the grant
& taking account of the period of use) will be surrendered to the ESC unless otherwise
agreed in writing in advance by the ESC.

If the facilities are leased, or otherwise disposed of, or ceases to be used for the sports
purposes approved by the ESC, the market value of the facilities will be assessed by an
independent surveyor approved in writing by the ESC, & an appropriate proportion of
such value, (determined by the ESC by reference to the proportion of the original
facilities purchase & development cost met by the grant, & taking account of the period
of use) will be surrendered to the ESC unless otherwise agreed in writing in advance by
the ESC.
Appendix V
Development Plan Policy

The site is identified in Newcastle‟s Unitary Development Plan (UDP) as an education
establishment with attached open space, at policy OS1.6. The site is therefore subject
to policies OS1, OS1.2 and OS1.4.

OS1   THE BEST POSSIBLE STANDARDS IN THE RANGE, AMOUNT, DISTRIBUTION,
      ACCESSIBILITY AND QUALITY OF OPEN SPACE WILL BE SOUGHT THROUGHOUT THE
      CITY BY:

      A.    PREVENTING THE LOSS OF OPEN SPACE TO DEVELOPMENT;

      B.    MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING EXISTING OPEN SPACE;

      C.    CREATING NEW OPEN SPACE WHERE OPPORTUNITIES OCCUR AND IN
            ASSOCIATION WITH NEW DEVELOPMENT;

      D.    PROMOTING RECREATION IN THE COUNTRYSIDE THROUGH SCHEMES FOR
            ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT, PUBLIC ACCESS, AND APPROPRIATE
            FACILITIES; AND

      E.    PURSUING PROVISION FOR ALL NEEDS IN THE COMMUNITY, INCLUDING THOSE
            OF CHILDREN, THE ELDERLY, AND PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES.

OS1.2 IN THE DETERMINATION OF PLANNING APPLICATIONS FOR RESIDENTIAL
      DEVELOPMENT, THE COUNCIL WILL HAVE REGARD TO THE FOLLOWING STANDARDS
      IN ASSESSING THE APPROPRIATE AMOUNT AND DISTRIBUTION OF OPEN SPACE
      REQUIRED AS PART OF, AND AS A RESULT OF, THE PROPOSALS;

      A.    NEIGHBOURHOOD AND CITY CENTRE PARKS – SUBSTANTIAL PUBLIC SPACES
            PROVIDING FOR A RANGE OF ACTIVE AND PASSIVE PURSUITS FOR PEOPLE OF
            ALL AGES AND ABILITIES. MOST HOUSEHOLDS SHOULD BE WITHIN 0.5 KM OF A
            PUBLIC PARK OF 6 HECTARES MINIMUM;

      B.    LOCAL OPEN SPACES – 1.2 HECTARES FOR 1,000 PERSONS;

      C.    SPACES FOR OUTDOOR SPORT – PROVIDING FACILITIES FOR INDIVIDUAL
            PARTICIPATION IN SPORT AS WELL AS FOR ORGANISED TEAM GAMES – 1.1
            HECTARES PER 1,000 POPULATION, INCLUDING EDUCATION FACILITIES USED
            BY THE PUBLIC;

      D.    OTHER SPECIALIST RECREATION FACILITIES – SPACES PROVIDING
            OPPORTUNITIES FOR HORTICULTURE AND KEEPING ANIMALS, E.G.
            ALLOTMENTS AND STABLES -–ALLOTMENT PLOTS SHOULD BE AVAILABLE FOR
            APPROXIMATELY 5% OF THE POPULATION OF 30-75 YEARS; AND

      E.    THE AVAILABILITY OF AREAS OF NATURE CONSERVATION VALUE,
            COUNTRYSIDE CHARACTER, COMMUNITY WOODLAND OR COUNTRY PARKS
            WHICH CAN PROVIDE FOR A WIDE RANGE OF PASSIVE RECREATIONAL
            ACTIVITY.

OS1.4 DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD CAUSE DEMONSTRABLE HARM TO ANY PUBLIC OPEN
      SPACE, OR PRIVATE OPEN SPACE FOR OUTDOOR SPORT, WILL NOT BE ALLOWED.
      HARM INCLUDES LOSS OF THE SPACE IN WHOLE OR PART. DEVELOPMENT,
      THEREFORE WILL ONLY BE ALLOWED IN EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES IN
      ACCORDANCE WITH POLICY OS1.5. HARM WILL BE ASSESSED ACCORDING TO THE
      IMPACT ON THE VALUE, ACTUAL OR POTENTIAL, OF THE OPEN SPACE FOR ANY ONE
      OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING PURPOSES:

      A.     INCLUSION WITHIN A GREEN WEDGE LINKED TO THE COUNTRYSIDE OR LAND OF
             COUNTRYSIDE CHARACTER IN THE URBAN AREA ;

      B.     PROVISION FOR PARTICULAR SPORT OF OTHER ORGANISED RECREATIONAL
             ACTIVITY:

      C.     PROVISION FOR INFORMAL OR CASUAL RECREATION, INCLUDING CHILDREN’S
             PLAY AND RECREATIONAL ROUTES;

      D.     PROVISION FOR HORTICULTURAL OR OTHER SIMILAR SPECIALISED
             RECREATION SUCH AS ALLOTMENTS AND PIGEON CREES;

      E.     OPENNESS AND/OR GREENERY PROVIDING VISUAL RELIEF IN A BUILT-UP AREA;

      F.     CONTRIBUTION TO THE AMENITY OF A LOCALITY; OR

      G.     PRESERVATION OF A WILDLIFE HABITAT OR CONTINUITY OF A WILDLIFE
             CORRIDOR.

Policy OS1.5 explains the rare circumstances where development of open space can be
justified, and reads as follows:
OS1.5 DEVELOPMENT AFFECTING AN OPEN SPACE SUBJECT TO POLICY OS1.4 MAY ONLY BE
      ALLOWED IF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES APPLY:

      A.     IT IS FOR RECREATIONAL PURPOSES RELEVANT TO THE USE OF THE SPACE; OR

      B.     IT IS FOR NEW OR IMPROVED ESSENTIAL LOCAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES FOR
             WHICH THERE IS NO SUITABLE ALTERNATIVE SITE; OR

      C.     THE ONLY MEANS OF RETAINING OR ENHANCING THE OPEN SPACE IS THROUGH
             DEVELOPMENT OF A SMALL PART;

      D.     ALTERNATIVE PROVISION OF EQUIVALENT COMMUNITY BENEFIT IS MADE
             AVAILABLE.

There are a number of other policies relevant to the development of this site, as follows:

Green Belt

The City Council is committed to the concept of the Green Belt and has a number of
Unitary Development Plan Policies to define, control and protect it from development.
Particular reference needs to be made to UDP policies GB2 and GB2.5.
GB2   WITHIN THE GREEN BELT PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GIVEN, EXCEPT IN VERY SPECIAL
      CIRCUMSTANCES, FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEW BUILDINGS FOR PURPOSES
      OTHER THAN AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY, ESSENTIAL FACILITIES FOR OUTDOOR
      SPORT AND RECREATION, CEMETERIES, OR FOR OTHER USES OF LAND WHICH DO
      NOT CONFLICT WITH THE PURPOSES OF INCLUDING THE LAND IN THE GREEN BELT.
GB2.5 DEVELOPMENT WITHIN, OR CONSPICUOUS FROM, THE GREEN BELT WHICH, ALTHOUGH
       IT WOULD NOT PREJUDICE ITS MAIN PURPOSE, MIGHT BE INAPPROPRIATE BY
       REASON OF SITING, MATERIALS OR DESIGN AND THUS HARM THE VISUAL AMENITY
       OF THE GREEN BELT, WILL NOT BE ALLOWED.
Design

Policy EN1.1 states that all development will be required to meet high standards of
design, in accordance with various principles. These principles include taking
advantage of landform, landscape and other site features; integrating development into
its setting; facilitating pedestrian movement; incorporating hard and soft landscaping;
and minimising impact on adjacent land uses.

EN1    ALL DEVELOPMENT WILL BE REQUIRED TO MEET HIGH STANDARDS OF DESIGN.

EN1.1 ALL DEVELOPMENT WILL BE REQUIRED TO MEET HIGH STANDARDS OF DESIGN IN
      ACCORDANCE WITH THE FOLLOWING PRINCIPLES:

       A.    RETAINING THE BEST BUILDINGS;

       B.    TAKING FULL ADVANTAGE OF LANDFORM, LANDSCAPE AND OTHER SITE
             FEATURES;

       C.    INTEGRATING DEVELOPMENT INTO ITS SETTING WITH REGARD TO THE SCALE
             AND PATTERN OF SURROUNDING BUILDINGS AND SPACES, AND LINKS IN THE
             PEDESTRIAN ROUTE NETWORK;

       D.    RELATING TO THE MATERIALS AND DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF
             SURROUNDING BUILT DEVELOPMENT;

       E.    FACILITATING SAFE PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT;

       F.    DESIGNING FOR EQUAL ACCESSIBILITY FOR ALL USERS REGARDLESS OF AGE
             OR DISABILITIES, AND MINIMISING OPPORTUNITIES FOR CRIME;

       G.    ENSURING NEW BUILDINGS ARE ADAPTABLE TO USE FOR OTHER PURPOSES;

       H.    A COMPREHENSIVE AND CO-ORDINATED APPROACH TO NEW DEVELOPMENTS
             OF MORE THAN ONE BUILDING ;

       I.    INCORPORATING HARD AND SOFT LANDSCAPING AS AN INTEGRAL PART OF
             DESIGN, MAXIMISING TREE PLANTING WHERE APPROPRIATE, AND PROVIDING
             FOR ITS LONG TERM MAINTENANCE;

       J.    MINIMISING ADVERSE IMPACTS ON NEARBY LAND USES;

       K.    MINIMISING IMPACTS ON ACTIVITIES ON NEIGHBOURING OPEN LAND AND
             COUNTRYSIDE; AND

       L. MAXIMISING THE USE OF BUILDINGS, STRUCTURES AND LAND FORMS TO SCREEN
          NOISE SENSITIVE DEVELOPMENT AND SPACES.

Housing

Policy H2 concerns the protection of residential amenity and reads as follows:

H2     DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD HARM THE AMENITY OF ANY DWELLING, OR GROUP OF
       DWELLINGS WILL NOT BE ALLOWED. IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL AMENITY WILL BE
       ASSESSED WITH PARTICULAR REGARD TO:
       A.    PROTECTING THE CHARACTER OF THE LOCALITY AND OF THE EXISTING
             BUILDING IN THE CASE OF ALTERATIONS, EXTENSIONS OR CONVERSIONS;

       B.    PROTECTING TREES AND OTHER SOFT LANDSCAPING OF AMENITY VALUE;

       C.    ENSURING SATISFACTORY DAYLIGHT, SUNLIGHT, OUTLOOK AND PRIVACY FOR
             ALL DWELLINGS, EXISTING AND PROPOSED, PARTICULARLY IN RELATION TO
             GOOD EXISTING STANDARDS IN THE LOCALITY

       D.    AVOIDING THE INTRODUCTION OF SUCH ADDITIONAL ACCESSES, TRAFFIC OR
             PARKING AS WOULD INCREASE VISUAL INTRUSION, NOISE OR DISTURBANCE,
             OR PREJUDICE ROAD SAFETY; AND

       E.    ENSURING THAT NON-RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT AND/OR ASSOCIATED
             OPERATIONS WILL NOT HARM RESIDENTIAL AMENITY THROUGH AN INCREASE IN
             NOISE, DISTURBANCE, SMELLS, FUMES OR OTHER HARMFUL EFFECTS.

Transport

The City Council aims to provide access to a safe and efficient transport system. The
transportation policies within the UDP deal with all modes of travel in detail and the relative
transportation priorities of the Council, including specific development control policies. Kenton
Lane is defined as a main distributor road in the north of the City, and as such distributes
medium distance traffic.

T2.1   THE FOLLOWING HIERARCHY OF ROADS IS DEFINED IN ORDER TO MANAGE
       MOVEMENT ON THE HIGHWAY NETWORK FOR THE PURPOSES OF POLICY T2:

       1.    Strategic Highway
       2.    Main Distributor Road
       3.    Secondary Distributor Road
       4.    Local Road
       5.    Local access road or pedestrian priority street

Parking

T4.5   DEVELOPMENT SHALL PROVIDE PARKING WHICH SATISFIES OPERATIONAL
       REQUIREMENTS. PROVISION IN EXCESS OF THIS REQUIREMENT WILL BE
       DETERMINED IN RELATION TO THE IMPACT OF DEVELOPMENT ON THE ENVIRONMENT.
       PARKING PROVISION WILL BE MET BY:

       A.    THE IMPLEMENTATION OF PARKING STANDARDS ON SITE; OR

       B.    THE PAYMENT, BY DEVELOPERS TO THE CITY COUNCIL, OF A COMMUTED SUM
             SO THAT ALTERNATIVE PROVISION CAN BE MADE ELSEWHERE; OR

       C.    THE PROVISION OF CAR PARKING SPACES BY THE DEVELOPER ON AN
             ACCEPTABLE SITE ELSEWHERE IN THE LOCALITY.

T5.3   CYCLING IN NEWCASTLE WILL BE ENCOURAGED BY:

       A.    PROVIDING A SIGNED CITYWIDE NETWORK OF CYCLE ROUTES SEPARATE,
             WHERE POSSIBLE, FROM MAJOR TRAFFIC FLOWS;

       B.    ENSURING CYCLISTS’ NEEDS ARE TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT IN THE DESIGN OF
             HIGHWAY AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT SCHEMES;
       C.    ENSURING CYCLISTS’ NEEDS ARE CONSIDERED AS PART OF NEW
             DEVELOPMENT AND WHERE APPROPRIATE, REQUIRING THAT FACILITIES,
             INCLUDING PARKING, ARE PROVIDED, TO SATISFY OPERATIONAL
             REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS;

       D.    PROVIDING CYCLE PARKING FACILITIES AT APPROPRIATE LOCATION IN THE
             CITY CENTRE, LOCAL SHOPPING CENTRES AND ELSEWHERE;

       E.    PROVIDING ACCESS TO ROAD SPACE OTHERWISE SHARED BY BUSES AND
             SERVICE VEHICLES WHERE APPROPRIATE; AND

       F.    PROVIDING EDUCATION, TRAINING AND PUBLICITY WHICH ENCOURAGE SAFE
             AND GOOD CYCLING PRACTICE.

T7.1   WHERE A PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT WOULD GENERATE TRAFFIC CAUSING
       DEMONSTRABLE DANGER OR INCONVENIENCE ON THE PUBLIC HIGHWAY, OR OTHER
       SERIOUS HARM TO THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENT, AND WHICH COULD NOT BE
       SATISFACTORILY MITIGATED BY PLANNING CONDITIONS AND/OR PLANNING
       OBLIGATIONS, PERMISSION WILL BE REFUSED.

T7.2   DEVELOPMENT REQUIRING IMPROVEMENTS TO THE PUBLIC HIGHWAY WILL NOT BE
       ALLOWED UNLESS:

       A.    APPROPRIATE CONTRIBUTIONS ARE OBTAINED FROM DEVELOPERS.

       B.    THE OPERATIONAL, ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL INTERESTS OF THOSE
             AFFECTED BY DEVELOPMENT ARE PROPERLY SAFEGUARDED;

       C.    IT IS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE STANDARDS OF THE HIGHWAY AUTHORITY; AND

       D.    APPROPRIATE PROVISION IS MADE FOR PUBLIC TRANSPORT, PEDESTRIANS,
             CYCLISTS AND HORSE RIDERS.

Sustainable Development

Policy SD1.2 encourages the development of combined heat and power in buildings. In
addition, Policy SD1.4 encourages the development and use of renewable energy, by
incorporating solar gain in building design and introducing photovoltaic cells onto appropriate
buildings.

SD1.4 THE DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF RENEWABLE ENERGY WILL BE ENCOURAGED BY:

       A.    MAXIMISING PASSIVE SOLAR GAIN THROUGH BUILDING DESIGN AND
             ORIENTATION

       B.    INTRODUCING PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS ONTO APPROPRIATE BUILDINGS

       C.    UTILISING BIO GAS FROM ENERGY CROPS OR WASTE; AND

       D.    THE DEVELOPMENT OF WIND TURBINES IN SUITABLE LOCATIONS

Nature Conservation

Policy NC1.5 concerns the protection of wildlife corridors and states that development which
would harm the nature conservation value of a wildlife corridor will be allowed only in
exceptional circumstances (as defined by Policy NC1.1).
NC1.1 DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD CAUSE DEMONSTRABLE HARM TO AN EXISTING OF
      PROPOSED SITE OF SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC INTEREST (SSSI) WILL NOT BE ALLOWED.
      DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD CAUSE SUCH HARM TO A SITE OF NATURE
      CONSERVATION IMPORTANCE (SNCI) OR SITE OF LOCAL CONSERVATION
      IMPORTANCE (SLCI) WILL BE ALLOWED ONLY:

      A.    WHERE THERE IS A PROVEN PUBLIC INTEREST WHICH OUTWEIGHS THE HARM
            TO THE SITE; OR

      B.    WHERE IT CAN BE SHOWN THAT THE NEED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT CANNOT BE
            MET IN OTHER LOCATIONS WHERE LESS HARM TO WILDLIFE INTERESTS WOULD
            BE CAUSED, OR BY REASONABLE ALTERNATIVE MEANS; OR

      C.    WHERE IT IS POSSIBLE TO IMPOSE CONDITIONS, OR WHERE PLANNING
            OBLIGATIONS HAVE BEEN ENTERED INTO, WHICH PREVENT DAMAGING IMPACTS
            ON WILDLIFE HABITATS OR IMPORTANT NATURAL FEATURES.

NC1.2 THE FOLLOWING ARE RECOGNISED AS SITES OF NATURE CONSERVATION
      IMPORTANCE (SNCI) FOR THE PURPOSES OF NC01.1;

      ..... (20) Walbottle Dene

NC1.4 DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD CAUSE HARM TO AN EXISTING OR PROPOSED LOCAL
      NATURE RESERVE (LNR) WILL BE ALLOWED ONLY;

      A.   WHERE THERE IS A PROVEN PUBLIC INTEREST WHICH OUTWEIGHS THE HARM TO
           THE SITE; OR

      B.   WHERE IT CAN BE SHOWN THAT THE NEED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT CANNOT BE
           MET IN OTHER LOCATIONS WHERE LESS HARM TO WILDLIFE INTERESTS WOULD
           BE CAUSED OR BY REASONABLE ALTERNATIVE MEANS; OR

      C.   WHERE IT IS POSSIBLE TO IMPOSE CONDITIONS, OR WHERE PLANNING
           OBLIGATIONS HAVE BEEN ENTERED INTO, WHICH PREVENT DAMAGING IMPACTS
           ON WILDLIFE HABITATS OR IMPORTANT NATURAL FEATURES.

NC1.5 DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD HARM THE NATURE CONSERVATION VALUE OF A
      WILDLIFE CORRIDOR WILL BE ALLOWED ONLY IN EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES (AS
      DEFINED BY POLICY NC1.1).

Landscaping and trees

EN03.1 DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD DEMONSTRABLY HARM THE FOLLOWING AREAS OF
       EXCEPTIONAL LANDSCAPE VALUE WILL NOT BE ALLOWED:

      1.      Big Waters

      2.      Gosforth Park

      3.      Jesmond Dene

      4.      Newburn/Throckley/Walbottle, environs of

      5.      Town Moor

      6.      Woolsington Park

EN3.2 WHERE APPROPRIATE, DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS SHALL RETAIN WOODLAND,
      TREES, HEDGEROWS AND SHRUBS, AND THE COUNCIL WILL ATTACH CONDITIONS
          FOR THEIR PROTECTION DURING AND AFTER CONSTRUCTION; WHERE SUCH
          FEATURES ARE WORTHY OF PROTECTION BUT THEIR LOSS IS UNAVOIDABLE
          REPLACEMENT PLANTING WILL BE REQUIRED.

Noise and vibration

POL8      NOISE SENSITIVE DEVELOPMENT EXPOSED TO UNACCEPTABLE LEVELS OF NOISE
          FROM ROADS, EXISTING INDUSTRIAL AREAS OR OTHER NOISE GENERATING USES
          WILL ONLY BE ALLOWED IF IT COMPLIES WITH THE DEVELOPMENT CONTROL POLICY
          STATEMENT 22 - NOISE AND VIBRATION AND INCORPORATES SATISFACTORY
          ATTENUATION MEASURES.

Archaeology

The site includes an area of archaeological interest in the playing fields to the south west of the
site.

C4        DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD HARM SITES OR AREAS OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL
          INTEREST AND THEIR SETTINGS WILL NOT BE ALLOWED

C4.2      WHERE A PROPOSAL MAY AFFECT A SITE OR AREA OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL INTEREST,
          THE DEVELOPER WILL BE REQUIRED TO SUBMIT AN APPROPRIATE ASSESSMENT OF
          ITS POTENTIAL IMPACT UPON THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS AND WHERE
          NECESSARY UNDERTAKE AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD EVALUATION

Development Control Policy Statements

a)        The UDP contains a number of Development Control Policy Statements which are also
          relevant, including:

          DCPS1           -   Access for All
          DCPS14          -   Security shutters and grilles
          DCPS16          -   Crime Prevention
          DCPS19          -   Landscaping
          DCPS 22         -   Noise and Vibration
          DCPS23          -   Parking Standards for Cars and Cycles

b)        Your Wildlife – The Newcastle Biodiversity Action Plan (October 2001)

c)        “Trees Newcastle” – The City‟s Tree Strategy (2002)

d)        “Green Spaces…Your Spaces” – The City‟s Parks and Green Space Strategy (2004)

e)        Outer West Regeneration Plan July 2003

f)        A Charter for our Environment 2001


brief – walbottle high school – rc
LW

								
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