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					                         Syllabus – Foundations English
Thematic Units


Unit One – Innocence and Experience
      Readings:
             Short Stories:          “The Bass, the River and Sheila Mant” by W.D.
             Wetherell
                                     “The First Appendectomy” by William Nolen
             Poetry:                 “since feeling is first” e.e. cummings
                                     “The Road Not Taken” Robert Frost
             Required Novel:         Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
             Choice Novels:          The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros
                                     The Afterlife by Gary Soto


      Discussion Questions:
                 How are experience and maturity linked?
                 According to Eugenia Collier, one cannot have both innocence and
                  compassion. How does experience, or a loss of innocence, help to
                  inform our perceptions of the needs and feelings of others?
                 How does the loss of innocence help to create or develop a person’s
                  identity?
                 How does the degree of a person’s innocence or experience determine
                  his or her ability to understand a reality beyond appearance?
      Objectives:
                 To introduce the topic of innocence versus experience
                 To demonstrate the significance of this topic and its relevance to our
                  lives
                 To practice close reading of a text
                 To see how a character develops from life’s experiences
                 To recognize and appreciate the universal experience of loss of
                  innocence


      Possible Assessments: Journal Entries, comprehension and analysis quizzes
      Sample Writing Assignments: Book of Memory – 8-10 personal reflections
      Vocabulary
Unit Two: Choices
      Readings:
             Short Stories:          “The Utterly Perfect Murder” by Ray Bradbury
                                     “The Cask of Amontillado” by Edgar Allen Poe
             Poetry:                 “Siren Song” by Margaret Atwood
                                     “Penelope” by Dorothy Parker
             Required Novel:         The Odyssey by Homer
                                     The Pearl by John Steinbeck
             Choice Novels:          Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
                                     Freak the Mighty by Rodman Philbrick
      Discussion Questions:
                      How do choices affect characters?
                      How does chance affect characters?
                      Which is more important, choice or chance, in determining destiny?
                      To what extent is our life’s path determined by our own decisions?
                      To what extent do external forces influence our decisions?
      Objectives:
                 To introduce the topic of choice versus chance
                 To demonstrate the significance of this topic and its relevance to our
                  lives
                 To practice close reading of a text
                 To see how a character develops from life’s choices
                 To recognize and appreciate the universal experience of the impact of
                  human choices and/or the belief in fate or destiny


      Possible Assessments: Journal Entries, reading comprehension and analysis
      quizzes, character comparison essay, multimedia presentations
      Sample Writing Assignments: Creative Writing – Develop a sequel to either
      Stargirl or Freak the Mighty.
      HSPA Prep: Persuasive Essay
      Vocabulary


Unit Three: Stereotypes and Gender Bias
      Readings:
             Short Stories:          “American History” Judith Ortiz Cofer
                                     “The Mountain” by Martin J. Hamer
                Poetry:                “Theme for English B” by Langston Hughes
                Required Novel:        Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
                Choice Novels:         Breadgivers by Anzia Yesierska
                                       Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins


      Discussion Questions:
                   What are stereotypes and where do they come from?
                   When have you been affected by stereotypes and gender biases?
                   Can stereotypes and gender biases be changed through the actions of a
                    single individual?
                   How do stereotypes affect a character’s development?
                   How can we change stereotypes and gender biases that exist in our
                    world?
                   How do stereotypes and gender-bias limit our understanding of the
                    world?
                   How does overcoming stereotypes and gender-bias create a greater
                    awareness of self and the world?
      Objectives:
                   To introduce the topic of stereotypes and gender bias
                   To demonstrate the significance of this topic and its relevance to our
                    lives
                   To practice close reading of a text
                   To see how a character is affected by stereotypes and gender bias
                   To recognize the instances of stereotypes and gender bias in our lives
                    and in literature


      Possible Assessments: Journal Entries, reading comprehension and analysis
      quizzes, multimedia presentation, and personal reflections
      Sample Writing Assignments: Research on stereotypes and gender biases;
      develop a position and a thesis
      HSPA Prep
      Vocabulary


Research Unit
   Objectives:
      To help students learn the current research methods
      To practice integrating information coherently
         To help students analyze quality of sources
         To help students use the database for information


   Teacher may determine what project to use with the English 9 class. Skill that should be
   emphasized are paraphrasing and summarizing, blending quotes, citing properly, integrating
   sources, and utilizing direct quotes.

Unit Four: Coming of Age
      Readings:
             Short Stories:          “Brothers are the Same” by Beryl Markham
             Required Novel:         Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
             Poetry:                 “Oranges” by Gary Soto
             Choice Novels:          Life as We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeiffer
                                     The Chosen by Chaim Potok


      Discussion Questions:
                 How is the theme Coming of Age prevalent in literature and their lives?
                 How do painful or difficult situations effect a clearer understanding of
                  oneself?
                 How do painful or difficult situations effect a clearer understanding of
                  the world?
                 How do conflict and struggle impact world view?
                 How do conflict and struggle help to define one’s identity?
      Objectives:
                 To introduce blank verse through a Shakespearean drama
                 To help students appreciate the language of Shakespeare
                 To read and appreciate drama, namely tragedy
                 To introduce the topic of coming of age
                 To demonstrate the significance of this topic and its relevance to our
                  lives
                 To practice close reading of a text
                 To see how a character develops from difficult situations or conflict
                 To recognize and appreciate the universal experience of coming of age
                  through difficult situations or conflict
      Possible Assessments: Journal Entries, reading comprehension and analysis
      quizzes, creative character responses, persuasive writing
       Sample Writing Assignments: Literary Essay – Determine which character in
       Romeo and Juliet is most responsible for the tragedy. Use textual evidence to
       support your choice.
       Vocabulary

VI. Strategies:

Instructional strategies may include:
    Lecture
    Class Discussion
    Group Discussions
    Individual/Group Presentations
    Peer Editing
    Independent Reading
    Analytical Writing
    Informal Writing Assignments
    Formal Writing Assignments
    Research Project
    Reading Groups


VIII. Required Resources – will be supplied by MHS

   Short Stories and Poetry:
       The Language of Literature
   Vocabulary
   Drama:
       Shakespeare, William, Romeo and Juliet
   Novels:
       Anderson, Susan Halse, Speak
       Cisneros, Sandra, The House on Mango Street
       Collins, Suzanne, Catching Fire
       Collins, Suzanne, Hunger Games
       Homer, The Odyssey
       Pfeiffer, Susan Beth, Life As We Knew It
       Philbrick, Rodman, Freak the Mighty
       Potok, Chaim, The Chosen
       Spinelli, Jerry, Stargirl
       Soto, Gary, The Afterlife
       Steinbeck, John, The Pearl
       Yesierska, Anzia, Breadgivers

   Video Materials:
       Romeo and Juliet (Zeffirelli)
       The Odyssey (Konchalovsky)
         David Copperfield (BBC)
         The Cask of Amontillado (Ca)


VIX. Scope and Sequence
   Fall Semester:
       Unit 1 – Innocence and Experience (9 weeks)
       Unit 2 – Choices (9 weeks)

   Spring Semester:
       Unit 3 – Stereotypes and Gender Bias (9 weeks)
       Unit 4 – Coming of Age (9 weeks)

				
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