from Self-Reliance by Ralph Waldo Emerson by HC111210074921

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									               from Self-Reliance
               by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Feature Menu
               Introducing the Essay
               Literary Focus: Figures of Speech
               Reading Skills: Understanding
                 Figures of Speech
                 from Self-Reliance
                  by Ralph Waldo Emerson




Dover Plains, Dutchess County, New York by Asher Brown Durand
               from Self-Reliance
                by Ralph Waldo Emerson

This above all: to thine own self
be true.
                 William Shakespeare
               from Self-Reliance
               by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Emerson believed that a person—not society, the
church, or government—is his or her own best
authority.
In this essay he expresses his ideas about
• the unique character and destiny of each
  individual
• the importance of following one’s inner voice



                                        [End of Section]
              from Self-Reliance
           Literary Focus: Figures of Speech

Figures of speech are imaginative comparisons
of things that are basically unalike.
• A figure of speech is not meant to be taken
  literally.
• Instead, an effective figure of speech helps us
  see something in a new, imaginative way.
                 from Self-Reliance
             Literary Focus: Figures of Speech

Emerson often uses poetic figures of speech to
drive home his philosophical points.

Trust thyself: Every heart vibrates to that iron string.
                     from “Self-Reliance” by Ralph Waldo Emerson



idea of       compared to      vibration from an iron
self-trust                     string, such as a string on
                               a musical instrument that
                               has been plucked

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                from Self-Reliance
     Reading Skills: Understanding Figures of Speech

In a good figure of speech, a characteristic of one
thing helps us see the other, unlike thing in a new
way.
Some of Emerson’s figures of speech are complex.
To understand them, you may need to
• read the figure of speech several times
• analyze the points of comparison
                from Self-Reliance
     Reading Skills: Understanding Figures of Speech

When you come across a difficult figure of speech
in the essay, ask yourself:
• What do the two things being compared have in
  common?
• Why has the writer chosen this particular
  comparison?




                                           [End of Section]

								
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