FHW GA Rev

Document Sample
FHW GA Rev Powered By Docstoc
					FHW/01-GA Rev.

2001 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation

Georgia

Revised March 2003

U.S. Department of the Interior Gale A. Norton, Secretary
FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Steve Williams, Director

U.S. Department of Commerce Donald L. Evans, Secretary Samuel W. Bodman, Deputy Secretary
Economics and Statistics Administration Kathleen B. Cooper, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs
U.S. CENSUS BUREAU Charles Louis Kincannon, Director

Economics and Statistics Administration Kathleen B. Cooper Under Secretary for Economic Affairs

Department of Interior Gale A. Norton, Secretary

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Steve Williams, Director

U.S. CENSUS BUREAU Charles Louis Kincannon Director Division of Federal Aid Kris E. LaMontagne, Chief

As the Nation’s principal conservation agency, the Department of the Interior has responsibility for most of our nationally owned public lands and natural resources. This includes fostering the wisest use of our land and water resources, protecting our fish and wildlife, preserving the environmental and cultural values of our national parks and historical places, and providing for the enjoyment of life through outdoor recreation. The Department assesses our energy and mineral resources and works to assure their development in the best interests of all our people. The Department also has a major responsibility for American Indian reservation communities and for people who live in island territories under U.S. administration. The mission of the Department’s Fish and Wildlife Service is to conserve, protect, and enhance fish and wildlife and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. The Service is responsible for national programs of vital importance to our natural resources, including administration of the Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration and the Federal Aid of Wildlife Restoration Programs. These two grant programs provide financial assistance to the States for projects to enhance and protect fish and wildlife resources and to assure their availability to the public for recreational purposes. Multistate grants from these programs pay for the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation.

Suggested Citation
U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau. 2001 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation.

Contents

List of Tables

....................................................................................

iv v vi

Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Survey Background and Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

Highlights
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-Associated Recreation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-Watching Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1991-2001 Survey Comparisons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 5 6 7 8 10 12 14

Tables
Guide to Statistical Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fishing and Hunting Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-Watching Tables ........................................................................... 16 17 34

Appendices
A. Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B. National and Regional 1991, 1996, and 2001 Comparisons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C. Participants 6 to 15 Years Old . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D. Sample Design and Statistical Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2 B-2 C-2 D-2

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

iii

List of Tables

Fishing and Hunting: 2001
Fishing and Hunting in Georgia by Resident and Nonresident Sportspersons: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers and Hunters, Days of Participation, and Trips in Georgia by Type of Fishing and Hunting: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers and Hunters, Trips, and Days of Participation: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia Resident Anglers and Hunters by Place Fished or Hunted: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia Resident Anglers and Hunters, Days of Participation, and Trips in the United States by Type of Fishing and Hunting: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. Freshwater Anglers, Trips, Days of Fishing, and Type of Water Fished: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. Freshwater Anglers and Days of Fishing in Georgia by Type of Fish: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. Great Lakes Anglers, Trips, and Days of Fishing in Georgia: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. Great Lakes Anglers and Days of Fishing in Georgia by Type of Fish: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. Saltwater Anglers, Trips, and Days of Fishing in Georgia: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. Saltwater Anglers and Days of Fishing in Georgia by Type of Fish: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. Hunters, Trips, and Days of Hunting in Georgia by Type of Hunting: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. Hunters and Days of Hunting in Georgia by Type of Game: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. Hunters and Days of Hunting in Georgia by Type of Land: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. Selected Characteristics of Georgia Resident Anglers and Hunters: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16. Summary of Expenditures in Georgia by U.S. Residents for Fishing and Hunting: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17. Summary of Fishing Trip and Equipment Expenditures in Georgia by U.S. Residents by Type of Fishing: 2001 . . . . . . . . 18. Summary of Hunting Trip and Equipment Expenditures in Georgia by U.S. Residents by Type of Hunting 2001 . . . . . . . 19. Expenditures in Georgia by U.S. Residents for Fishing: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20. Expenditures in Georgia by U.S. Residents for Hunting: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21. Trip and Equipment Expenditures in Georgia for Fishing and Hunting by Georgia Residents and Nonresidents: 2001 . . . 22. Summary of Expenditures by Georgia Residents in the United States for Fishing and Hunting: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23. Summary of Expenditures by Georgia Residents in State and Out of State for Fishing and Hunting: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 17 17 18 18 19 19 20 21 21 22 22 23 24 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33

Wildlife-Related Recreation: 2001
24. U.S. Residents Participating in Wildlife Watching in Georgia: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25. Participants, Trips, and Days of Participation in Nonresidential (Away From Home) Wildlife-Watching Activities in Georgia: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26. Nonresidential (Away From Home) Wildlife-Watching Participants Visiting Public Areas in Georgia and Type of Site Visited: 2001. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27. Nonresidential (Away From Home) Wildlife-Watching Participants by Wildlife Observed, Photographed, or Fed in Georgia: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28. Participation in Residential (Around the Home) Wildlife-Watching Activities in Georgia: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29. Georgia Residents Participating in Wildlife Watching in the United States: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30. Wild Bird Observers and Days of Observation in Georgia: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31. Wild Bird Observers in Georgia Who Can Identify Wild Birds by Sight or Sound, and Who Keep Birding Life Lists: 2001 . 32. Selected Characteristics of Georgia Residents Participating in Wildlife Watching: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33. Expenditures in Georgia by U.S. Residents for Wildlife Watching: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34. Trip and Equipment Expenditures in Georgia for Wildlife Watching by Residents and Nonresidents: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . 35. Expenditures in the United States by Georgia Residents for Wildlife Watching: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36. Summary of Expenditures by Georgia Residents in State and Out of State for Wildlife Watching: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37. Participation of Georgia Resident Wildlife-Watching Participants in Fishing and Hunting: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38. Participation of Georgia Resident Sportspersons in Wildlife-Watching Activities: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39. Participants in Wildlife-Associated Recreation by Participant's State of Residence: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40. Participants in Wildlife-Associated Recreation by State Where Activity Took Place: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41. Anglers and Hunters by State Where Fishing or Hunting Took Place: 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv 34 34 35 35 36 36 37 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 43 44 45 46

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Foreword

Fish and wildlife resources are part of our American culture. Whether we are fishing, hunting, watching wildlife or feeding backyard birds, Americans derive many hours of enjoyment from wildliferelated recreation. Wildlife recreation is the cornerstone of our Nation’s great conservation ethic. The 2001 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation is a partnership effort with the States and national conservation organizations, and has become one of the most important sources of information on fish and wildlife recreation in the United States. It is a useful tool that quantifies the economic impact of wildlife-based recreation. Federal, State, and private organizations use this detailed information to manage wildlife, market products, and look for trends. The 2001 Survey is the tenth in a series that began in 1955. More than 82 million U.S. residents fished, hunted, and watched wildlife in 2001. They spent over $108 billion pursuing their recreational activities, contributing to millions of jobs in industries and businesses that support wildlife-related recreation. Furthermore, funds generated by licenses and taxes on hunting and fishing equipment pay for many of the conservation efforts in this country.

Wildlife recreationists are among the Nation’s most ardent conservationists. They not only contribute financially to conservation efforts, but also spend time and effort to introduce children and other newcomers to the enjoyment of the outdoors and wildlife. I appreciate the assistance of those who took time to participate in this valuable survey. We all can be grateful that America’s great tradition of wildliferelated recreation remains strong.

Steve Williams Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Department of the Interior

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

v

Survey Background and Method

The National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation (Survey) has been conducted since 1955 and is one of the oldest and most comprehensive continuing recreation surveys. The purpose of the Survey is to gather information on the number of anglers, hunters, and wildlife-watching participants (formerly known as nonconsumptive wildlife-related participants) in the United States. Information also is collected on how often these recreationists participate and how much they spend on their activities. Preparations for the 2001 Survey began in 1999 when the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (IAFWA) asked us, the Fish and Wildlife Service, to conduct the tenth national survey of wildlife-related recreation. Funding came from the Multistate Conservation Grant Programs, authorized by Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Acts, as amended. We consulted with State and Federal agencies and nongovernmental organizations such as the Wildlife Management Institute and American Sportfishing Association to determine survey content. Other sportspersons’ organizations and conservation groups, industry representatives, and researchers also provided valuable advice. Four regional technical committees were set up under the auspices of the IAFWA to ensure that State fish and wildlife agencies had an opportunity to participate in all phases of survey planning and

design. The committees were made up of agency representatives. Data collection for the Survey was carried out in two phases by the U.S. Census Bureau. The first phase was the screen which began in April 2001. During the screening phase, the Census Bureau interviewed a sample of 80,000 households nationwide to determine who in the household had fished, hunted, or engaged in wildlife-watching activities in 2000, and who had engaged or planned to engage in those activities in 2001. In most cases, one adult household member provided information for all household members. The screen primarily covered 2000 activities while the next, more indepth phase covered 2001 activities. For more information on the 2000 data, refer to Appendix C. The second phase of the data collection consisted of three detailed interview waves. The first wave began in April 2001, the second in September 2001, and the last in January 2002. Interviews were conducted with samples of likely anglers, hunters, and wildlife watchers who were identified in the initial screening phase. These interviews were conducted primarily by telephone, with in-person interviews for those respondents who could not be reached by telephone. Respondents in the second survey phase were limited to those at least 16 years old. Each respondent provided information pertaining only to his or her activities and expenditures. Sample sizes were designed to provide statistically reliable

results at the State level. Altogether, interviews were completed for 25,070 respondents from the sportspersons sample and 15,303 from the wildlife watchers sample. More detailed information on sampling procedures and response rates is found in Appendix D.

Comparability With Previous Surveys
The 2001 Survey’s questions and methodology were similar to those used in the 1996 and 1991 Surveys. Therefore, the estimates of all three surveys are comparable. The methodology of the 2001, 1996, and 1991 Surveys did differ significantly from the 1985 and 1980 Surveys, so their estimates are not directly comparable to those earlier surveys. The changes in methodology included reducing the recall period over which respondents had to report their activities and expenditures. Previous Surveys used a 12-month recall period which resulted in greater reporting bias. Research found that the amount of activity and expenditures reported in 12month recall surveys was overestimated in comparison with that reported using shorter recall periods. See the Summary Section and Appendix B.

vi

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Highlights

Introduction

The National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation reports results from interviews with U.S. residents about their fishing, hunting, and other wildlife-related recreation. This report focuses on 2001 participation and expenditures of U.S. residents 16 years of age and older. In addition to the 2001 numbers, we also provide 11-year trend data. The 2001 numbers reported can be compared with those in the 1991 and 1996 Survey reports because these three surveys used similar methodologies. However, the 2001 estimates should not be directly compared with the results from Surveys earlier than 1991 because of changes in methodology. These changes were made to improve accuracy in the information provided. Trend information from 1991 to 2001 is presented in Appendix B. The report also provides information on participation in wildlife-related recreation in 2000, particularly of persons 6 to 15 years of age. The 2000 information is provided in Appendix C. Additional information about the scope and coverage of the Survey can be found in the Survey Background and Method section of this report. The remainder of this section defines important terms used in the Survey.

Wildlife-Associated Recreation
Wildlife-associated recreation includes fishing, hunting, and wildlife-watching activities. These categories are not mutually exclusive because many individuals enjoyed fish and wildlife in several ways in 2001. Wildlife-associated recreation is reported in two major categories: (1) fishing and hunting and (2) wildlife watching (formerly nonconsumptive wildlife-related recreation). Wildlife watching includes observing, photographing, and feeding fish and wildlife.

fished, only hunted, and both hunted and fished. It is not the sum of all anglers and all hunters, because those people who both fished and hunted are included in both the angler and hunter population and would be incorrectly counted twice.

Anglers
Anglers are sportspersons who only fished plus those who fished and hunted. Anglers include not only licensed hookand-line anglers, but also those who have no license and those who use special methods such as fishing with spears. Three types of fishing are reported: (1) freshwater, excluding the Great Lakes, (2) Great Lakes, and (3) saltwater. Since many anglers participated in more than one type of fishing, the total number of anglers is less than the sum of the three types of fishing.

Fishing and Hunting
This Survey reports information about residents of the United States who fished or hunted in 2001, regardless of whether they were licensed. The fishing and hunting sections of this report are organized to report three groups: (1) sportspersons, (2) anglers, and (3) hunters.

Hunters
Hunters are sportspersons who only hunted plus those who hunted and fished. Hunters include not only licensed hunters using common hunting practices, but also those who have no license and those who engaged in hunting with a bow and arrow, muzzleloader, other primitive firearms, or a pistol or handgun. Four types of hunting are reported: (1) big game, (2) small game, (3) migratory bird, and (4) other animals. Since many hunters participated in more than one type of hunting, the sum of hunters for big game, small game, migratory bird, and other animals exceeds the total number of hunters.

Sportspersons
Sportspersons are those who fished or hunted. Individuals who fished or hunted commercially in 2001 are reported as sportspersons only if they also fished or hunted for recreation. The sportspersons group is composed of the three subgroups in the diagram below: (1) those who fished and hunted, (2) those who only fished, and (3) those who only hunted. The total number of sportspersons is equal to the sum of people who only

Sportspersons
Anglers Hunters

Fished only

Fished and hunted

Hunted only

2

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Wildlife-Watching Activities (formerly Nonconsumptive Wildlife-Related Recreation)
Since 1980, the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation has included information on wildlife-watching activities in addition to fishing and hunting. However, the 1991, 1996, and 2001 Surveys, unlike the 1980 and 1985 Surveys, collected data only for those activities where the primary purpose was wildlife watching (observing, photographing, or feeding wildlife). The Survey uses a strict definition of wildlife watching. Participants must either take a “special interest” in wildlife around their homes or take a trip for the “primary purpose” of wildlife watching. Secondary wildlife-watching activities such as incidentally observing wildlife while

pleasure driving were included in the 1980 and 1985 Surveys but not in the succeeding ones. Two types of wildlife-watching activity are reported: (1) nonresidential and (2) residential. Because some people participate in more than one type of wildlife-watching activity, the sum of participants in each type will be greater than the total number of wildlife watchers. The two types of wildlifewatching activities are defined below.

circuses, aquariums, or museums were not considered wildlife-watching activities.

Residential (around the home)
This group included those whose activities are within 1 mile of home and involve one or more of the following: (1) closely observing or trying to identify birds or other wildlife; (2) photographing wildlife; (3) feeding birds or other wildlife on a regular basis; (4) maintaining natural areas of at least onequarter acre where benefit to wildlife is the primary concern; (5) maintaining plantings (shrubs, agricultural crops, etc.) where benefit to wildlife is the primary concern; or (6) visiting public parks within 1 mile of home for the primary purpose of observing, feeding, or photographing wildlife.

Nonresidential (away from the home)
This group included persons who took trips or outings of at least 1 mile for the primary purpose of observing, feeding, or photographing fish and wildlife. Trips to fish, hunt, or scout and trips to zoos,

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

3

2001 Georgia Summary
(Participants 16 years old and older)

Activities in the United States by Georgia Residents

Activities in Georgia by U.S. Residents

Fishing
Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,043,000 Days of fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15,559,000 Average days per angler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Total expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$612,414,000 Trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$312,750,000 Equipment and other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$299,664,000 Average per angler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$587 Average trip expenditure per day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20 Trip and equipment expenditures by Georgians out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$132,883,000

Fishing
Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,086,000 Days of fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13,757,000 Average days per angler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Total expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$543,504,000 Trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$246,467,000 Equipment and other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$297,037,000 Average per angler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$502 Average trip expenditure per day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18 Trip and equipment expenditures by nonresidents in Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$85,269,000

Hunting
Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .377,000 Days of hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,882,000 Average days per hunter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Total expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$505,894,000 Trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$197,532,000 Equipment and other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$308,362,000 Average per hunter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,343 Average trip expenditure per day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25 Trip and equipment expenditures by Georgians out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$40,064,000

Hunting
Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .417,000 Days of hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,973,000 Average days per hunter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Total expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$503,677,000 Trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$191,531,000 Equipment and other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$312,146,000 Average per hunter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,149 Average trip expenditure per day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$24 Trip and equipment expenditures by nonresidents in Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$57,636,000

Wildlife Watching
Total wildlife-watching participants . . . . . . . . . . .1,326,000 Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .302,000 Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,305,000 Total expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$334,589,000 Trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$174,269,000 Equipment and other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$160,320,000 Average per participant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$252 Trip and equipment expenditures by Georgians out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$105,437,000

Wildlife Watching
Total wildlife-watching participants . . . . . . . . . . .1,494,000 Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .411,000 Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,305,000 Total expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$535,771,000 Trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$123,264,000 Equipment and other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$412,506,000 Average per participant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$359 Trip and equipment expenditures by nonresidents in Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$278,470,000

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

5

Wildlife-Associated Recreation

Participation in Georgia
The 2001 Survey revealed that 2.2 million Georgia residents and nonresidents 16 years old and older fished, hunted, or wildlife watched in Georgia. Of the total number of participants, 1.1 million fished, 417 thousand hunted, and 1.5 million participated in wildlife-watching activities, including observing, feeding, and photographing wildlife. The sum of anglers, hunters, and wildlife watchers exceeds the total number of participants in wildlife-related recreation because many individuals engaged in more than one wildlife activity.

activity levels of 6- to 15-year-old participants and participants 16 years old and older remained the same from 2000 to 2001. Based on this assumption, in addition to the 1,043,000 resident anglers 16 years old and older in Georgia, there were 317,000 resident anglers 6 to 15 years old. Also, there were 377,000 16year-old and older Georgians and 60,000 6- to 15-year-old Georgians who hunted. Finally, there were 1,326,000 Georgians 16 years old and older and 248,000 Georgians 6 to 15 years old who wildlife watched. Further information on 6 to 15 year olds is provided in Appendix C.

Percent of Total Participation by Activity
(Total: 2.2 million participants)
68%

49%

Expenditures in Georgia
In 2001, state residents and nonresidents spent $1.7 billion on wildlife recreation in Georgia. Of that total, trip-related expenditures were $561 million and equipment purchases totaled $909 million. The remaining $194 million was spent on licenses, contributions, land ownership and leasing, and other items and services.

19%

Participation by 6- to15-year-old Georgia Residents
The focus of this report is on the activity of participants 16 years old and older since they are the primary source of wildlife-associated expenditures. However, the activity of 6 to 15 year olds can be calculated using the screening data covering the year 2000. It is assumed for estimation purposes that the relative

Fishing

Hunting

Wildlife Watching

Participants in Wildlife-Associated Recreation in Georgia—2001
(U.S. residents 16 years old and older) Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife Watchers Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Source: Tables 3, 24, 40. Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

Wildlife-Associated Recreation Expenditures in Georgia
(Total: $1.7 billion)
Other 12%

2.2 million 1.2 million 1.1 million 417 thousand 1.5 million 1.3 million 411 thousand

Trip-related 34%

Equipment 55%

6

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Sportspersons

In 2001, 1.2 million state resident and nonresident sportspersons 16 years old and older fished or hunted in Georgia. This group comprised 1.1 million anglers (88 percent of all sportspersons) and 417 thousand hunters (34 percent of all

sportspersons). Among the 1.2 million sportspersons who fished or hunted in the state, 819 thousand (66%) fished but did not hunt in Georgia. Another 150 thousand (12%) hunted but did not fish

there. The remaining 267 thousand (22%) fished and hunted in Georgia in 2001.

Sportspersons' Participation in Georgia
(State residents and nonresidents 16 years old and older) Sportspersons (fished or hunted) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fished only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fished and hunted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunted only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunted and fished . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Source: Table 1. Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

1.2 million 1.1 million 819 thousand 267 thousand 417 thousand 150 thousand 267 thousand

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

7

Anglers

Participants and Days of Fishing
In 2001, 1.1 million state residents and nonresidents 16 years old and older fished in Georgia. Of this total, 947 thousand anglers (87%) were state residents and 139 thousand anglers (13%) were nonresidents. Anglers fished a total of 13.8 million days in Georgia—an average of 13 days per angler. State residents fished 13.1 million days, 96 percent of all fishing days within Georgia compared to nonresidents who fished 613 thousand days—4 percent of all fishing days in the state.

There were more than 1 million Georgians 16 years old and older who fished in the United States in 2001. These anglers fished a total of 15.6 million days. Approximately 947 thousand resident anglers (91%) fished in Georgia. They spent 13.1 million days, 84 percent of their total fishing days, fishing in their resident state. Some state residents fished in other states as well as in Georgia. In 2001, 302 thousand anglers fished in other states— 29 percent of the resident angler total.

They fished 2.4 million days as nonresidents, representing 16 percent of all days fished by Georgia residents. For further details about fishing in Georgia, see Table 3.

Anglers in Georgia
(State residents and nonresidents 16 years old and older) Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Days of fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Source: Table 3.

1.1 million 947 thousand 139 thousand 13.8 million 13.1 million 613 thousand

In-State/Out-of-State
(State residents 16 years old and older) Georgia anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In other states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Days of fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In other states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Source: Table 3. Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

1.0 million 947 thousand 302 thousand 15.6 million 13.1 million 2.4 million

8

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Fishing Expenditures in Georgia
Anglers 16 years old and older spent nearly $544 million on fishing expenses in Georgia in 2001. Trip-related expenditures including food and lodging, transportation, and other expenses totaled $246 million—45 percent of all their fishing expenditures. They spent $106 million on food and lodging and $71 million on transportation. Other trip expenses such as equipment rental, bait, and cooking fuel totaled $70 million. Each angler spent an average of $236 on trip-related costs during 2001.

Anglers spent $262 million on equipment in Georgia in 2001, 48 percent of all fishing expenditures. Fishing equipment (rods, reels, line, etc.) totaled $105 million—40 percent of the equipment total. Auxiliary equipment expenditures (tents, special fishing clothes, etc.) and special equipment expenditures (boats, pickups, etc.) amounted to $156 million, 60 percent of the equipment total. Special and auxiliary equipment are items that were purchased for fishing, but could be used in activities other than fishing.

The purchase of other items such as magazines, membership dues, licenses, permits, stamps, and land leasing and ownership amounted to $35 million—6 percent of all fishing expenditures. For more details about fishing expenditures in Georgia, see Tables 19, 21-23.

Fishing Expenditures in Georgia
(State residents and nonresidents 16 years old and older) Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary and special . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Source: Table 19.

$544 million $246 million $262 million $105 million $156 million $35 million

Fishing Expenditures in Georgia
(Total: $544 million)
Other 6%

Trip-related 45%

Equipment 48%

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

9

Hunters

Participants and Days of Hunting
In 2001, there were 417 thousand residents and nonresidents 16 years old and older who hunted in Georgia. Resident hunters numbered 355 thousand accounting for 85 percent of the hunters in Georgia. There were 62 thousand nonresidents who hunted in Georgia—15 percent of the State's hunters. Residents and nonresidents hunted 8.0 million days in 2001, an average of 19 days per hunter. Residents hunted on 7.3 million days in

Georgia or 92 percent of all hunting days, while nonresidents spent 633 thousand days hunting in Georgia, 8 percent of all hunting days. There were 377 thousand Georgia residents 16 years old and older who hunted in the United States in 2001. Of the total 7.9 million days of hunting by state residents, 7.3 million days (93 percent of the total) were spent pursuing game within Georgia.

Some state residents hunted in other states as well as in Georgia. Altogether, 75 thousand Georgia hunters, 20 percent of the total, hunted as nonresidents in other states. Their 542 thousand days of hunting in other states represented 7 percent of all days Georgia residents spent hunting in 2001. For more information on hunting activities by Georgia residents, see Table 3.

Hunters in Georgia
(State residents and nonresidents 16 years old and older) Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Days of hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Source: Table 3.

417 thousand 355 thousand 62 thousand 8.0 million 7.3 million 633 thousand

In-State/Out-of-State
(State residents 16 years old and older) Georgia hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In other states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Days of hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In other states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Source: Table 3. Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

377 thousand 355 thousand 75 thousand 7.9 million 7.3 million 542 thousand

10

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Hunting Expenditures in Georgia
Hunters 16 years old and older spent $504 million in Georgia in 2001. Trip-related expenses such as food and lodging, transportation, and other trip costs totaled $192 million, 38 percent of their total expenditures. They spent $93 million on food and lodging and $45 million on transportation. Other expenses such as equipment rental totaled $54 million for the year. The average trip-related expenditure per hunter was $459.

Hunters spent $200 million on equipment—40 percent of all hunting expenditures. Hunting equipment (guns, ammunition, etc.) totaled $146 million and comprised 73 percent of all equipment costs. Hunters spent $54 million on auxiliary equipment (tents, special hunting clothes, etc.) and special equipment (boats, pickups, etc.), accounting for 27 percent of total equipment expenditures for hunting. Special and auxiliary equipment are items

that were purchased for hunting but could be used in activities other than hunting. The purchase of other items such as magazines, membership dues, licenses, permits, and land leasing and ownership cost hunters $112 million—22 percent of all hunting expenditures. For more details on hunting expenditures in Georgia, see Tables 20-23.

Hunting Expenditures in Georgia
(State residents and nonresidents 16 years old and older) Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary and special . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Source: Table 20.

$504 million $192 million $200 million $146 million $54 million $112 million

Hunting Expenditures in Georgia
(Total: $504 million)
Other 22%

Trip-related 38%

Equipment 40%

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

11

Wildlife-Watching Activities
Participants and Days of Activity In 2001, 1.5 million U.S. residents 16 years old and older fed, observed, or photographed wildlife in Georgia.
Approximately 87 percent—1.3 million of the wildlife watchers—enjoyed their activities close to home and are called "residential" participants. Those persons who enjoyed wildlife at least 1 mile from home are called "nonresidential" participants. People participating in nonresidential activities in Georgia in 2001 numbered 411 thousand—28 percent of all wildlife watchers in Georgia. Of the 411 thousand, 234 thousand were state residents and 178 thousand were nonresidents. Georgians 16 years old and older who enjoyed nonresidential wildlife watching within their state totaled 234 thousand. Of this group, 222 thousand participants observed wildlife, 94 thousand fed wildlife, and 72 thousand photographed wildlife. Since some individuals engaged in more than one of the three nonresidential activities during the year, the sum of wildlife observers, feeders, and photographers exceeds the total number of nonresidential participants. Georgians spent nearly 4.2 million days engaged in nonresidential wildlifewatching activities in their state. During 2001, they spent 3.4 million days observing wildlife, 543 thousand days photographing wildlife, and 541 thousand days feeding wildlife. The sum of days observing, feeding, and photographing wildlife exceeds the total days of wildlifewatching activity because individuals may have engaged in more than one activity on some days. For further details about nonresidential activities, see Table 25. Georgia residents also took an active interest in wildlife around their homes. In 2001, 1.3 million state residents enjoyed observing, feeding, and photographing wildlife within 1 mile of their homes. Among this residential group, 1.2 million fed wildlife, 908 thousand observed wildlife, and 244 thousand photographed wildlife around their homes. Another 163 thousand participants maintained natural areas of one-quarter acre or more for wildlife; and 119 thousand residential participants visited public parks within a mile of home; and 116 thousand participants maintained plantings for the benefit of wildlife. Adding the participants in these six activities results in a sum that exceeds the total number of residential participants because many people participated in more than one type of residential activity. For further details about Georgia residents participating in residential wildlife-watching activities, see Table 28. Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Wildlife-Watching Participants in Georgia
(State residents and nonresidents 16 years old and older) Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Source: Table 24. Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

1.5 million 1.3 million 411 thousand

100% 87% 28%

Nonresidential (away from home) Wildlife-Watching Participation in Georgia
(State residents and nonresidents 16 years old and older) Participants, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observe wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Photograph wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feed wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Days, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observe wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Photograph wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feed wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Source: Table 25. Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

411 thousand 400 thousand 161 thousand 108 thousand 4.9 million 3.9 million 687 thousand 573 thousand

Residential (around the home) Wildlife-Watching Participation in Georgia
(State residents 16 years old and older) Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feed wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observe wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Photograph wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintain natural areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visit public areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintain plantings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Source: Table 28. Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

1.3 million 1.2 million 908 thousand 244 thousand 163 thousand 119 thousand 116 thousand

12

Wild Bird Observers
Bird watching attracted many wildlife enthusiasts in Georgia. In 2001, 1.1 million people observed birds around the home and on trips. A large majority, 81 percent (863 thousand), observed wild birds around the home while 35 percent (367 thousand) took trips away from home to watch birds. People bird watching in Georgia varied in their ability to identify different bird species. Within Georgia, 819 thousand of these 1.1 million birders (77 percent) could identify 1 to 20 different types of birds; 123 thousand birders (12 percent) could identify 21 to 40 types of birds; and 64 thousand birders (6 percent) could identify 41 or more types of birds. For further details about birding in Georgia, see Tables 30 and 31.

Wildlife-Watching Expenditures in Georgia
Participants 16 years old and older spent $536 million on wildlife-watching activities in Georgia in 2001. Trip-related expenditures, including food and lodging ($76 million), transportation ($33 million), and other trip expenses such as equipment rental ($14 million) amounted to $123 million. This summation comprised 23 percent of all wildlifewatching expenditures by participants. The average trip-related expenditure for nonresidential participants was $300 per person in 2001. Wildlife-watching participants spent nearly $365 million on equipment— 68 percent of all their expenditures. Specifically, wildlife-watching equipment (binoculars, special clothing, etc.) totaled

$133 million, 36 percent of the equipment total. Auxiliary equipment expenditures (tents, backpacking equipment, etc.) and special equipment expenditures (campers, trucks, etc.) amounted to $232 million— 64 percent of all equipment costs. Special and auxiliary equipment are items that were purchased for wildlife-watching recreation but can be used in activities other than wildlife-watching activities. Other items purchased by wildlifewatching participants such as magazines, membership dues, and contributions, land leasing and ownership, and plantings totaled $48 million—9 percent of all wildlife-watching expenditures. For more details about wildlife-watching expenditures in Georgia, see Table 33.

Wild Bird Observers in Georgia
(State residents and nonresidents 16 years old and older) Participants, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential (around the home) . . . . . . . Nonresidential (away from home) . . . . Days, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential (around the home) . . . . . . . Nonresidential (away from home) . . . .
Source: Table 30. Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

Wildlife-Watching Expenditures in Georgia 100% 81% 35% 100% 97% 3%
(Total: $536 million)
Other 9% Trip-related 23% Equipment 68%

1.1 million 863 thousand 367 thousand 93.5 million 91.0 million 2.9 million

Wildlife-Watching Expenditures in Georgia
(State residents and nonresidents 16 years old and older) Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary and special . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Source: Table 33.

$536 million $123 million $365 million $133 million $232 million $48 million

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

13

1991-2001 Survey Comparisons

Comparing the estimates from the 1991, 1996, and 2001 National Surveys provides a picture of wildlife-related recreation in the 1990s and early 2000s in Georgia. Only the most general recreation comparisons are presented here. The best way to compare estimates from surveys is to compare the confidence intervals around the estimates—not to compare the estimates themselves. A 90percent confidence interval around an estimate gives the range of estimates that

90 percent of all possible representative samples would supply. If the 90-percent confidence intervals of two survey's estimates overlap, it is not possible to say the two estimates are statistically different at the 10 percent level of significance. The state resident estimates cover the participation and expenditure activity of Georgia residents anywhere in the United States. The in-state estimates cover the participation, day, and expenditure activity of U.S. residents in Georgia.

The expenditure estimates were made comparable by adjusting the estimates for inflation—all dollar estimates are in 2001 dollars. Also, expenditure items that were not common to each survey were not included in the comparisons. Therefore, expenditure estimates used in the comparisons may not match the estimates presented elsewhere in this report.

Georgia 1991 and 2001 Comparison
1991 Fishing (Numbers in thousands) Anglers in-state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Days in-state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In-state trip-related expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State resident anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total expenditures by state residents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunting (Numbers in thousands) Hunters in-state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Days in-state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In-state trip-related expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State resident hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total expenditures by state residents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresidential Wildlife Watching (Numbers in thousands) Participants in-state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Days in-state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State resident participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential Wildlife Watching (Numbers in thousands) Total participants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feeders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-Watching Expenditures (Numbers in thousands) Trip-related expenditures by state residents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total expenditures by state residents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . *No significant difference at the 0.10 level of significance. 2001 Percent change

1,106 15,854 $330,307 987 $694,900

1,086 13,757 $245,288 1,043 $611,235

* * * * *

412 5,905 $137,942 336 $358,874

417 7,973 $188,684 377 $503,047

* * * * *

551 4,536 400

411 4,868 302

* * *

1,730 1,235 1,594

1,305 908 1,204

–25 –26 –24

$130,503 $247,073

$157,489 $295,049

* *

14

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Georgia 1996 and 2001 Comparison
1996 Fishing (Numbers in thousands) Anglers in-state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Days in-state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In-state trip-related expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State resident anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total expenditures by state residents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunting (Numbers in thousands) Hunters in-state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Days in-state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In-state trip-related expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State resident hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total expenditures by state residents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresidential Wildlife Watching (Numbers in thousands) Participants in-state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Days in-state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . State resident participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential Wildlife Watching (Numbers in thousands) Total participants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feeders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-Watching Expenditures (Numbers in thousands) Trip-related expenditures by state residents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total expenditures by state residents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . *No significant difference at the 0.10 level of significance. 639 5,108 553 411 4,868 302 * * –45 1,088 15,171 $348,211 982 $1,367,724 1,086 13,757 $245,288 1,043 $611,235 * * * * –55 2001 Percent change

403 6,993 $117,057 365 $966,612

417 7,973 $188,684 377 $503,047

* * * * *

1,562 1,071 1,452

1,305 908 1,204

–16 * –17

$223,257 $599,233

$157,489 $295,049

* –51

Number of Georgia Resident Hunters and Anglers: 1991-2001
(Thousands)
Anglers Hunters

Number of Georgia Resident Wildlife Watchers: 1991-2001
(Thousands)
Residential Nonresidential
1,730

Total Expenditures by Georgia Residents: 1991-2001
(Millions. In constant 2001 dollars)
Anglers Hunters Total wildlife watchers

1,043 987 982 1,562 1,305

1,368

967

695 599 336 365 377 400 302 553 359 247 295 611 503

1991

1996

2001

1991

1996

2001

1991

1996

2001

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

15

Guide to Statistical Tables

Purpose and Coverage of Tables
The statistical tables of this report were designed to meet a wide range of needs for those interested in wildlife-related recreation. Special terms used in these tables are defined in Appendix A. The tables are based on responses to the 2001 Survey which was designed to collect data about participation in wildlife-related recreation. To have taken part in the Survey, a respondent must have been a U.S. resident (a resident of one of the 50 states or the District of Columbia). No one residing outside the United States (including U.S. citizens) was eligible for interviewing. Therefore, reported state and national totals do not include participation by those who were not U.S. residents or who were residing outside the United States.

Percentages Reported in the Tables
Percentages are reported in the tables for the convenience of the user. When exclusive groups are being reported, the base of a percentage is apparent from its context because the percents add to 100 percent (plus or minus a rounding error). For example, if a table reports the number of trips taken by big game hunters (57 percent), those taken by small game hunters (23 percent), those taken by migratory bird hunters (12 percent), and those taken by sportspersons hunting other animals (8 percent), then these percentages would total 100 percent because they are exclusive categories. Percents should not add to 100 when nonexclusive groups are being reported. Using Table 2 as an example, note that adding the percentages associated with total number of big game hunters, total small game hunters, total migratory bird hunters, and total hunters of other animals will not necessarily yield 100 percent because respondents could hunt for more than one type of game. When the base of the percentage is not apparent in context, it is identified in a footnote. For example, Table 12 reports 3 percentages with different bases: one for the number of hunters, one for the number of trips, and one for days of hunting. Footnotes are used to clarify the bases of the reported percentages.

Estimates based upon fewer than 10 responses are regarded as being based on a sample size that is too small for reliable reporting. An estimate based upon at least 10 but fewer than 30 responses is treated as an estimate based on a small sample size. Other footnotes appear, as necessary, to qualify or clarify the estimates reported in the tables. In addition, these two important footnotes appear frequently: • • Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses. Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse.

Comparability With Previous Surveys
The numbers reported can be compared with those in the 1991 and 1996 Survey Reports. The methodology used in 2001 was similar to that used in 1996 and 1991. These results should not be directly compared to results from surveys earlier than 1991 since there were major changes in methodology. These changes were made to improve accuracy in the information provided.

“Multiple responses” is a term used to reflect the fact that individuals or their characteristics fall into more than one category. Using Table 2 as an example, those who fished in saltwater and freshwater appear in both of these totals. Yet each angler is represented only once in the “Total, all fishing” row. Similarly, in Table 12 those who hunt for big game and small game are counted only once as a hunter in the “Total, all hunting” row. Therefore, totals may be smaller than the sum of subcategories when multiple responses exist. "Nonresponse" exists because the survey questions were answered voluntarily and some respondents did not or could not answer all the questions. The effect of nonresponses is illustrated in Table 18 where the total for hunting expenditures may be greater than the sum for the different types of hunting expenditures. This occurs because some respondents did not specify the type of hunting as the primary purpose of the purchase. As a result, it is known that the expenditures were for hunting, but it is not known whether they were primarily for a particular type of hunting. In this case, totals are greater than the sum of subcategories when nonresponses have occurred.

Coverage of an Individual Table
Since the Survey covers many activities in various places by participants of different ages, all table titles, headnotes, stubs, and footnotes are designed to identify and articulate each item being reported in the table. For example, the title of Table 2 shows that data about anglers and hunters, their days of participation, and their number of trips are being reported by type of activity. By contrast, the title of Table 7 indicates that it contains data on freshwater anglers and the days they fished for different species of fish.

Footnotes to the Tables
Footnotes are used to clarify the information or items that are being reported in a table. Symbols in the body of a table indicate important footnotes. These symbols are used in the tables to refer to the same footnote each time they appear: Estimate based on a small sample size. Sample size too small to report data reliably. W Less than .5 dollars. Z Less than .5 percent. X Not applicable. NA Not available. * ...

16

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 1. Fishing and Hunting in Georgia by Resident and Nonresident Sportspersons: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Total, state residents and nonresidents Sportspersons Number Total sportspersons (fished or hunted) . . . . . . . . . . . Total anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fished only. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fished and hunted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total hunters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunted only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunted and fished . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. 1,236 1,086 819 267 417 150 267 Percent of sportspersons 100 88 66 22 34 12 22 Number 1,040 947 685 262 355 93 262 Residents Percent of resident sportspersons 100 91 66 25 34 9 25 Nonresidents Percent of nonresident sportspersons 100 71 68 ... *32 *29 ...

Number 196 139 134 ... *62 *57 ...

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

Table 2. Anglers and Hunters, Days of Participation, and Trips in Georgia by Type of Fishing and Hunting: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Participants Type of fishing and hunting Number FISHING Total, all fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total, all freshwater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Freshwater, except Great Lakes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Great Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saltwater. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HUNTING Total, all hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Big game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small game. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Migratory bird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. 417 342 135 *86 *45 100 82 32 *21 *11 7,973 6,131 1,476 *474 *861 100 77 19 *6 *11 7,493 4,816 1,412 *451 *813 100 64 19 *6 *11 1,086 1,017 1,017 ... *98 100 94 94 ... *9 13,757 13,076 13,076 ... *467 100 95 95 ... *3 11,457 11,038 11,038 ... *419 100 96 96 ... *4 Percent Number Percent Number Percent Days of participation Trips

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

17

Table 3. Anglers and Hunters, Trips, and Days of Participation: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Activity in Georgia Anglers and hunters, trips, and days of participation Total, state residents and nonresidents Number FISHING Total anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total days of fishing. . . . . . . . . Average days of fishing . . . . . . HUNTING Total hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total days of hunting . . . . . . . . Average days of hunting . . . . . (X) Not applicable. 417 7,493 7,973 19 100 100 100 (X) 355 6,959 7,339 21 85 93 92 (X) *62 *534 *633 *10 *15 *7 *8 (X) 377 7,319 7,882 21 100 100 100 (X) 355 6,959 7,339 21 94 95 93 (X) *75 *360 *542 *7 *20 *5 *7 (X) 1,086 11,457 13,757 13 100 100 100 (X) 947 11,065 13,145 14 87 97 96 (X) 139 392 613 4 13 3 4 (X) 1,043 12,689 15,559 15 100 100 100 (X) 947 11,065 13,145 14 91 87 84 (X) 302 1,624 2,414 8 29 13 16 (X) Percent State residents Number Percent Nonresidents Number Percent Activity by Georgia residents in United States Total, in state of residence and in other states Number Percent In state of residence Number Percent In other states Number Percent

* Estimate based on a small sample size.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

Table 4. Georgia Resident Anglers and Hunters by Place Fished or Hunted: 2001
(State population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Anglers Place fished or hunted Number Total, all places. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In-state only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In-state and other states. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In other states only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. 1,043 737 210 *93 Percent 100 71 20 *9 Number 377 301 *54 ... Percent 100 80 *14 ... Hunters

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail may not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse.

18

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 5. Georgia Resident Anglers and Hunters, Days of Participation, and Trips in the United States by Type of Fishing and Hunting: 2001
(State population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Participants Type of fishing and hunting Number FISHING Total, all fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total, all freshwater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Freshwater, except Great Lakes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Great Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saltwater. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HUNTING Total, all hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Big game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small game. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Migratory bird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. 377 309 138 *80 *42 100 82 37 *21 *11 7,882 5,834 1,656 *555 *875 100 74 21 *7 *11 7,319 4,527 1,514 *475 *802 100 62 21 *6 *11 1,043 953 953 ... 245 100 91 91 ... 23 15,559 14,523 14,258 ... 1,076 100 93 92 ... 7 12,689 11,933 11,933 ... 756 100 94 94 ... 6 Percent Number Percent Number Percent Days of participation Trips

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse.

Table 6. Freshwater Anglers, Trips, Days of Fishing, and Type of Water Fished: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Activity in Georgia Anglers, trips, and days of fishing Total, state residents and nonresidents Number Total anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total days of fishing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Average days of fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ANGLERS Total, all types of water. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ponds, lakes or reservoirs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rivers or streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DAYS Total, all types of water. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ponds, lakes or reservoirs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rivers or streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. 13,076 9,761 3,526 100 100 100 12,555 9,336 3,401 96 96 96 521 425 *125 4 4 *4 1,017 884 373 100 100 100 892 787 333 88 89 89 125 98 *40 12 11 *11 1,017 11,038 13,076 13 Percent 100 100 100 (X) State residents Number 892 10,697 12,555 14 Percent 88 97 96 (X) Nonresidents Number 125 341 521 4 Percent 12 3 4 (X)

(X) Not applicable.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

19

Table 7. Freshwater Anglers and Days of Fishing in Georgia by Type of Fish: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Activity in Georgia Anglers and days of fishing Total, state residents and nonresidents Number ANGLERS Total, all types of fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crappie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Panfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . White bass, striped bass, striped bass hybrids . . . . . . . . Black bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Catfish, bullheads. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Walleye, sauger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northern pike, pickerel, muskie, muskie hybrids . . . . . . Steelhead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Salmon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anything1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other freshwater fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DAYS Total, all types of fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crappie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Panfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . White bass, striped bass, striped bass hybrids . . . . . . . . Black bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Catfish, bullheads. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Walleye, sauger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northern pike, pickerel, muskie, muskie hybrids . . . . . . Steelhead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Salmon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anything1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other freshwater fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1

State residents Number Percent

Nonresidents Number Percent

Percent

1,017 301 333 302 389 467 ... ... ... 108 ... 209 *87

100 100 100 100 100 100 ... ... ... 100 ... 100 *100

892 267 307 272 344 435 ... ... ... *87 ... 179 *87

88 89 92 90 89 93 ... ... ... *80 ... 86 *100

125 *35 ... *30 *45 *33 ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

12 *11 ... *10 *11 *7 ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

13,076 3,705 3,643 3,213 4,434 5,606 ... ... ... 962 ... 1,710 *785

100 100 100 100 100 100 ... ... ... 100 ... 100 *100

12,555 3,522 3,488 3,067 4,232 5,492 ... ... ... *903 ... 1,648 *785

96 95 96 95 95 98 ... ... ... *94 ... 96 *100

521 *182 ... *146 *202 *115 ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

4 *5 ... *5 *5 *2 ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Respondent fished for no specific species and identified ‘‘Anything’’ from a list of categories of fish.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

20

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 8. Great Lakes Anglers, Trips, and Days of Fishing in Georgia: 2001
This table does not apply to this state.

Table 9. Great Lakes Anglers and Days of Fishing in Georgia by Type of Fish: 2001
This table does not apply to this state.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

21

Table 10. Saltwater Anglers, Trips, and Days of Fishing in Georgia: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Activity in Georgia Anglers, trips, and days of fishing Total, state residents and nonresidents Number Total anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Average days of fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. *98 *419 *467 *5 Percent *100 *100 *100 (X) State residents Number *71 *368 *388 *5 (X) Not applicable. Percent *73 *88 *83 (X) Nonresidents Number ... ... ... ... Percent ... ... ... (X)

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

Table 11. Saltwater Anglers and Days of Fishing in Georgia by Type of Fish: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Activity in Georgia Anglers and days of fishing Total, state residents and nonresidents Number ANGLERS Total, all types of fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Salmon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Striped bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bluefish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flatfish (flounder, halibut) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Red drum (redfish). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seatrout (weakfish) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mackerel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shellfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anything1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other saltwater fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DAYS Total, all types of fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Salmon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Striped bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bluefish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flatfish (flounder, halibut) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Red drum (redfish). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seatrout (weakfish) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mackerel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shellfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anything1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other saltwater fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1

State residents Number Percent

Nonresidents Number Percent

Percent

*98 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... *35 ...

*100 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... *100 ...

*71 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

*73 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

*467 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... *115 ...

*100 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... *100 ...

*388 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

*83 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Respondent fished for no specific species and identified ‘‘Anything’’ from a list of categories of fish.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

22

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 12. Hunters, Trips, and Days of Hunting in Georgia by Type of Hunting: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Activity in Georgia Hunters, trips, and days of hunting Total, state residents and nonresidents Number HUNTERS Total, all hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Big game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small game. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Migratory bird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRIPS Total, all hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Big game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small game. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Migratory bird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DAYS Total, all hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Big game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small game. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Migratory bird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. 7,973 6,131 1,476 *474 *861 100 100 100 *100 *100 7,339 5,554 1,400 *455 *805 92 91 95 *96 *93 *633 *576 ... ... ... *8 *9 ... ... ... 7,493 4,816 1,412 *451 *813 100 100 100 *100 *100 6,959 4,417 1,340 *432 *770 93 92 95 *96 *95 *534 *399 ... ... ... *7 *8 ... ... ... 417 342 135 *86 *45 100 100 100 *100 *100 355 290 128 *80 *39 85 85 95 *93 *87 *62 *51 ... ... ... *15 *15 ... ... ... Percent State residents Number Percent Nonresidents Number Percent

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

23

Table 13. Hunters and Days of Hunting in Georgia by Type of Game: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Hunters, state residents and nonresidents Number Total, all types of game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Big game, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wild turkey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other big game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small game, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rabbit, hare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grouse/prairie chicken. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Squirrel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pheasant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other small game. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Migratory birds, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other migratory bird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other animals, total
1

Days of hunting Percent 100 82 80 ... ... *20 ... 32 *13 *11 ... *19 ... ... *21 ... ... *18 ... *11 Number 7,973 6,131 5,769 ... ... *774 ... 1,476 *499 *501 ... *833 ... ... *474 ... ... *383 ... *861 Percent 100 77 72 ... ... *10 ... 19 *6 *6 ... *10 ... ... *6 ... ... *5 ... *11

Type of game

417 342 332 ... ... *83 ... 135 *55 *47 ... *80 ... ... *86 ... ... *75 ... *45

....................................

* Estimate based on a small sample size.
1

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Includes groundhog, raccoon, fox, coyote, crow, prairie dog, etc.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

Table 14. Hunters and Days of Hunting in Georgia by Type of Land: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Total, state residents and nonresidents Number HUNTERS Total, all types of land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public land, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public land only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public and private land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Private land, total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Private land only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Private and public land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DAYS Total, all types of land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public land1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Private land2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1 2

State residents Number Percent

Nonresidents Number Percent

Hunters and days of hunting

Percent

417 *85 ... *76 373 298 *76

100 *20 ... *18 90 71 *18

355 *78 ... *68 317 248 *68

100 *22 ... *19 89 70 *19

*62 ... ... ... *56 *49 ...

*100 ... ... ... *91 *80 ...

7,973 *927 7,446

100 *12 93

7,339 *874 6,821

100 *12 93

*633 ... *625

*100 ... *99

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Days of hunting on public land includes both days spent solely on public land and those spent on public and private land. Days of hunting on private land includes both days spent solely on private land and those spent on private and public land.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse.

24

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 15. Selected Characteristics of Georgia Resident Anglers and Hunters: 2001
(State population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Population Characteristic Number Total persons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Population Density of Residence Urban . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Population Size of Residence Metropolitan statistical area (MSA) . 1,000,000 or more . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250,000 to 999,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 to 249,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outside MSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sex Male . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Female . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Age 16 18 25 35 45 55 65 to 17 to 24 to 34 to 44 to 54 to 64 years years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and older . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,096 3,300 2,796 4,150 3,032 1,117 ... 1,947 2,855 3,241 242 518 1,181 1,303 1,243 724 886 214 5,882 4,338 1,620 138 437 455 701 597 578 692 478 402 1,755 1,098 2,106 1,423 1,469 Percent 100 54 46 68 50 18 ... 32 47 53 4 8 19 21 20 12 15 4 96 71 27 2 7 7 12 10 9 11 8 7 29 18 35 23 24 Number 1,136 391 745 667 457 210 ... 468 854 282 *46 *77 202 305 228 135 143 ... 1,129 956 172 ... *62 *68 104 135 *91 175 138 154 210 219 403 265 249 Sportspersons (fished or hunted) Percent who participated 19 12 27 16 15 19 ... 24 30 9 *19 *15 17 23 18 19 16 ... 19 22 11 ... *14 *15 15 23 *16 25 29 38 12 20 19 19 17 Percent of sportspersons 100 34 66 59 40 19 ... 41 75 25 *4 *7 18 27 20 12 13 ... 99 84 15 ... *5 *6 9 12 *8 15 12 14 18 19 35 23 22 Anglers Percent who participated 17 11 24 15 14 17 ... 22 27 8 *16 *14 15 22 17 17 16 ... 18 20 10 ... *12 *13 15 21 *14 23 28 35 11 17 18 18 15 Hunters Percent who partici- Percent of pated hunters 6 *2 11 4 4 *6 ... 10 12 *1 ... ... *6 8 *5 *7 ... ... 6 8 *2 ... ... *7 *4 *7 *7 *11 ... *8 *5 *8 8 *4 *4 100 *21 79 49 33 *16 ... 51 89 *11 ... ... *20 28 *17 *14 ... ... 99 91 *9 ... ... *9 *8 *11 *11 *20 ... *8 *24 *24 43 *16 *17

Number 1,043 369 674 617 423 194 ... 426 774 269 *39 *70 177 283 210 123 140 ... 1,037 871 166 ... *51 *61 104 123 *81 159 132 142 189 191 373 254 224

Percent of anglers 100 35 65 59 41 19 ... 41 74 26 *4 *7 17 27 20 12 13 ... 99 83 16 ... *5 *6 10 12 *8 15 13 14 18 18 36 24 22

Number 377 *78 298 185 124 *62 ... 191 336 *41 ... ... *76 105 *65 *52 ... ... 374 344 *33 ... ... *33 *31 *40 *41 *76 ... *31 *89 *92 161 *61 *63

Ethnicity Hispanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Non-Hispanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Race White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Black. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . All others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annual Household Income Under $10,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,000 to $19,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,000 to $29,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30,000 to $39,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40,000 to $49,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50,000 to $74,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75,000 to $99,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100,000 or more. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Not reported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Education 11 years or less . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 to 3 years college . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 years college or more . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses. Percent who participated shows the percent of each row’s population who participated in the activity named by the column (the percent of those living in urban areas who fished, etc.). Remaining percent columns show the percent of each column’s participants who are described by the row heading (the percent of anglers who lived in urban areas, etc.).

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

25

Table 16. Summary of Expenditures in Georgia by U.S. Residents for Fishing and Hunting: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older) Amount (thousands of dollars) Average per spender (dollars) Average per sportsperson (dollars)

Expenditure item FISHING AND HUNTING Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment (fishing, hunting) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magazines and books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Membership dues and contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FISHING Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fishing equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magazines and books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Membership dues and contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HUNTING Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunting equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magazines and books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Membership dues and contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UNSPECIFIED5 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magazines and books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Membership dues and contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1 2 3 4 5

Spenders (thousands)

1,128,775 198,183 116,023 123,792 260,136 60,766 *223,260 4,883 14,241 127,491

1,245 853 771 814 766 268 *70 200 103 610

907 232 150 152 339 227 *3,180 24 138 209

905 164 96 102 193 48 *183 4 11 105

543,504 105,637 70,811 70,020 105,372 *16,693 *139,732 *1,879 *5,604 27,757

1,012 693 605 755 600 *82 *46 *74 *39 486

537 152 117 93 176 *203 *3,020 *25 *144 57

502 101 68 67 86 *15 *134 *2 *5 24

503,677 92,546 45,212 53,773 146,286 30,853 ... *1,241 *6,167 104,546

456 279 272 137 314 146 ... *53 *44 270

1,104 332 166 393 466 211 ... *23 *139 387

1,149 222 108 129 310 68 ... *2 *14 242

77,929 *13,220 ... *1,763 ...

162 *78 ... *76 ...

481 *170 ... *23 ...

64 *11 ... *1 ...

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Includes boating costs, equipment rental, guide fees, access fees, heating and cooking fuel, and ice and bait (for fishing only). Includes tents, special clothing, etc. Includes boats, campers, 4x4 vehicles, cabins, etc. Includes land leasing and ownership, licenses, stamps, tags, and permits. Respondent could not specify whether expenditure was primarily for either fishing or hunting.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse. See Tables 19-20 for a detailed listing of expenditure items.

26

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 17. Summary of Fishing Trip and Equipment Expenditures in Georgia by U.S. Residents, by Type of Fishing: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older) Expenditure item ALL FISHING Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALL FRESHWATER Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FRESHWATER, EXCEPT GREAT LAKES Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GREAT LAKES Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SALTWATER Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. 35,093 *13,036 *6,122 *7,652 *8,282 107 *75 *60 *61 *59 329 *174 *102 *126 *140 306 *133 *63 *78 *31 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 345,757 92,601 64,689 62,367 126,100 909 660 578 727 567 380 140 112 86 223 331 91 64 61 115 346,321 92,601 64,689 62,367 126,664 909 660 578 727 567 381 140 112 86 224 331 91 64 61 115 508,264 105,637 70,811 70,020 261,797 960 693 605 755 617 529 152 117 93 424 471 101 68 67 235 Amount (thousands of dollars) Spenders (thousands) Average per spender (dollars) Average per angler (dollars)

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse. See Table 19 for detailed listing of expenditure items.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

27

Table 18. Summary of Hunting Trip and Equipment Expenditures in Georgia by U.S. Residents, by Type of Hunting: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older) Expenditure item ALL HUNTING Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIG GAME Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SMALL GAME Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MIGRATORY BIRD Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OTHER ANIMALS Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. ... ... ... ... ... ... Sample size too small to report data reliably. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... *31,314 *2,827 *1,853 ... *25,571 *64 *40 *31 ... *31 *488 *70 *60 ... *815 *470 *189 *124 ... *86 60,241 *16,356 *8,188 ... *29,256 141 *78 *78 ... *83 428 *210 *105 ... *352 715 *334 *167 ... *82 276,888 69,074 34,101 42,850 130,862 351 240 238 121 262 789 288 143 355 500 795 202 100 125 368 391,722 92,546 45,212 53,773 200,191 438 279 272 137 346 895 332 166 393 578 890 222 108 129 430 Amount (thousands of dollars) Spenders (thousands) Average per spender (dollars) Average per hunter (dollars)

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse. See Table 20 for detailed listing of expenditure items.

28

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 19. Expenditures in Georgia by U.S. Residents for Fishing: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older) Expenditures Expenditure item Amount (thousands of dollars) 543,504 Average per angler (dollars) 502 Number (thousands) 1,012 Spenders Percent of anglers 97 Average per spender (dollars) 537

Total, all items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRIP-RELATED EXPENDITURES Total trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging, total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Privilege and other fees1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boating costs2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bait. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heating and cooking fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EQUIPMENT AND OTHER EXPENDITURES PRIMARILY FOR FISHING Fishing equipment, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reels, rods, and rod making components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lines, hooks, sinkers, etc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Artificial lures and flies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creels, stringers, fish bags, landing nets, and gaff hooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnow seines, traps, and bait containers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other fishing equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other fishing costs6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1 2 3 4 5 6

246,467 105,637 81,430 24,207 70,811 70,020 8,480 26,903 27,165 6,292 *1,179

236 101 78 23 68 67 8 26 26 6 *1

861 693 693 112 605 755 182 155 662 417 *81

82 66 66 11 58 72 17 15 63 40 *8

286 152 117 216 117 93 47 174 41 15 *15

105,372 51,480 20,935 18,306 *1,815 2,344 10,493 *16,693 *139,732 35,240

86 39 18 17 *2 2 9 *15 *134 31

600 385 462 381 *91 106 168 *82 *46 513

57 37 44 36 *9 10 16 *8 *4 49

176 134 45 48 *20 22 63 *203 *3,020 69

Includes Includes Includes Includes Includes Includes

boat or equipment rental and fees for guides, pack trip (party and charter boats, etc.), public land use, and private land use. boat launching, mooring, storage, maintenance, insurance, pumpout fees and fuel. electronic fishing devices (depth finders, fish finders, etc.), tackle boxes, ice fishing equipment, and other fishing equipment. tents, special fishing clothing, etc. boats, campers, 4x4 vehicles, cabins, etc. magazines and books, membership dues and contributions, land leasing and ownership, licenses, stamps, tags, and permits.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse. Percent of anglers may be greater than 100 because spenders who did not fish in this state are included.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

29

Table 20. Expenditures in Georgia by U.S. Residents for Hunting: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older) Expenditures Expenditure item Amount (thousands of dollars) 503,677 Average per hunter (dollars) 1,149 Number (thousands) 456 Spenders Percent of hunters 109 Average per spender (dollars) 1,104

Total, all items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRIP-RELATED EXPENDITURES Total trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging, total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Privilege and other fees1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boating costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heating and cooking fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EQUIPMENT AND OTHER EXPENDITURES PRIMARILY FOR HUNTING Hunting equipment, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guns and rifles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ammunition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other hunting equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other hunting costs5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1

191,531 92,546 62,546 *30,000 45,212 53,773 50,926 ... *2,797

459 222 150 *72 108 129 122 ... *7

313 279 279 *45 272 137 107 ... *65

75 67 67 *11 65 33 26 ... *16

612 332 224 *666 166 393 477 ... *43

146,286 64,736 17,071 64,479 30,853 ... 111,955

310 151 37 122 68 ... 259

314 100 272 154 146 ... 302

75 24 65 37 35 ... 72

466 646 63 418 211 ... 371

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

2

3 4 5

Includes guide fees, pack trip or package fees, public and private land use access fees, and rental of equipment such as boats and hunting or camping equipment. Includes bows, arrows, archery equipment, telescopic sights, decoys and game calls, handloading equipment and components, hunting dogs and associated costs, hunting knives, and other hunting equipment. Includes tents, special hunting clothing, etc. Includes boats, campers, 4x4 vehicles, cabins, etc. Includes magazines and books, membership dues and contributions, land leasing and ownership, licenses, stamps, and permits.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse. Percent of hunters may be greater than 100 percent because spenders who did not hunt in this state are included.

30

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 21. Trip and Equipment Expenditures in Georgia for Fishing and Hunting by Georgia Residents and Nonresidents: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older) Amount (thousands of dollars) Average per spender (dollars) Average per sportsperson (dollars)

Equipment item STATE RESIDENTS AND NONRESIDENTS Trip and equipment expenditures for fishing and hunting, total . . Trip and equipment expenditures for fishing, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boating costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip and equipment expenditures for hunting, total. . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boating costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unspecified equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . STATE RESIDENTS Trip and equipment expenditures for fishing and hunting, total . . Trip and equipment expenditures for fishing, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boating costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip and equipment expenditures for hunting, total. . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boating costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unspecified equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NONRESIDENTS Trip and equipment expenditures for fishing and hunting, total . . Trip and equipment expenditures for fishing, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boating costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip and equipment expenditures for hunting, total. . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boating costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unspecified equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1 2 3

Spenders (thousands)

982,160 508,264 105,637 70,811 26,903 43,116 261,797 391,722 92,546 45,212 ... 53,723 200,191 82,174

1,189 960 693 605 155 738 617 438 279 272 ... 135 346 124

826 529 152 117 174 58 424 895 332 166 ... 397 578 663

773 471 101 68 26 41 235 890 222 108 ... 129 430 61

837,228 422,995 83,208 50,476 23,290 35,690 230,332 334,086 75,260 39,195 ... 43,072 176,543 80,148

966 824 582 496 131 628 575 348 226 216 ... 113 289 113

867 513 143 102 178 57 400 960 333 181 ... 380 611 710

800 454 92 56 26 39 241 929 212 110 ... 121 485 71

144,932 85,269 22,429 20,335 *3,614 7,426 *31,465 57,636 *17,286 *6,017 ... ... *23,648 ...

223 136 111 109 *24 110 *42 90 *53 *56 ... ... *57 ...

649 626 201 186 *151 67 *749 641 *326 *107 ... ... *414 ...

633 586 161 146 *26 53 *199 663 *279 *97 ... ... *114 ...

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Includes boat launching, mooring, storage, maintenance, insurance, pumpout fees, and fuel. Includes equipment rental, guide and access fees, ice and bait for fishing, and heating and cooking oil. Respondent could not specify whether item was for fishing or for hunting.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

31

Table 22. Summary of Expenditures by Georgia Residents in the United States for Fishing and Hunting: 2001
(State population 16 years old and older) Amount (thousands of dollars) Average per spender (dollars) Average per sportsperson (dollars)

Expenditure item FISHING AND HUNTING Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment (fishing, hunting) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magazines and books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Membership dues and contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FISHING Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fishing equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magazines and books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Membership dues and contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HUNTING Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunting equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magazines and books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Membership dues and contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UNSPECIFIED5 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magazines and books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Membership dues and contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1 2 3 4 5

Spenders (thousands)

1,197,614 237,759 131,682 140,842 247,024 57,123 *196,869 4,663 13,398 168,254

1,034 783 707 773 729 235 *66 177 101 575

1,158 304 186 182 339 243 *2,985 26 133 293

1,055 209 116 124 218 50 *173 4 12 148

612,414 140,678 84,032 88,040 111,493 *17,837 *114,477 *1,907 *4,675 49,276

909 671 589 729 602 *87 *41 *73 *37 477

674 210 143 121 185 *205 *2,793 *26 *128 103

587 135 81 84 107 *17 *110 *2 *4 47

505,894 97,080 47,650 52,802 127,182 27,520 ... *1,074 *6,144 124,526

358 242 235 126 283 118 ... *43 *41 238

1,415 402 203 419 450 234 ... *25 *149 524

1,343 258 126 140 338 73 ... *3 *16 331

76,505 *11,766 ... *1,682 ...

145 *72 ... *65 ...

529 *163 ... *26 ...

67 *10 ... *1 ...

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Includes boating costs, equipment rental, guide fees, access fees, heating and cooking fuel, and ice and bait (for fishing only). Includes tents, special clothing, etc. Includes boats, campers, 4x4 vehicles, cabins, etc. Includes land leasing and ownership, licenses, stamps, tags, and permits. Respondent could not specify whether expenditure was primarily for either fishing or hunting.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse. See Tables 19-20 for a detailed listing of expenditure items.

32

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 23. Summary of Expenditures by Georgia Residents in State and Out of State for Fishing and Hunting: 2001
(State population 16 years old and older) Amount (thousands of dollars) Average per spender (dollars) Average per sportsperson (dollars)

Expenditure item IN GEORGIA Expenditures for fishing and hunting, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip-related expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment (fishing and hunting) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Expenditures for fishing, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip-related expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fishing equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Expenditures for hunting, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip-related expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunting equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unspecified expenditures for fishing and hunting, total4 . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OUT OF STATE Expenditures for fishing and hunting, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip-related expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment (fishing and hunting) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Expenditures for fishing, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip-related expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fishing equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Expenditures for hunting, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip-related expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunting equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unspecified expenditures for fishing and hunting, total4 . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1 2 3 4

Spenders (thousands)

959,331 350,206 235,087 55,373 *196,562 122,102 452,952 192,663 99,586 *16,532 *114,214 29,957 425,164 157,543 127,152 27,520 ... 91,078 69,836 *6,187 ... *3,172

993 834 702 228 *63 584 857 738 565 *80 *41 434 354 257 283 118 ... 250 114 *48 ... *62

966 420 335 243 *3,121 209 528 261 176 *206 *2,786 69 1,200 613 449 234 ... 364 613 *128 ... *51

945 345 232 55 *194 120 500 213 110 *18 *126 33 1,198 444 358 78 ... 257 69 *6 ... *3

237,605 160,077 11,652 ... ... 64,213 158,784 120,087 *11,623 ... ... 25,901 *80,730 *39,990 ... ... ... *40,666 ... ... ... ...

330 284 100 ... ... 177 287 237 *97 ... ... 135 *84 *72 ... ... ... *58 ... ... ... ...

720 565 116 ... ... 363 553 507 *120 ... ... 192 *958 *553 ... ... ... *698 ... ... ... ...

702 473 34 ... ... 190 544 411 *40 ... ... 89 *1,069 *530 ... ... ... *539 ... ... ... ...

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Includes tents, special hunting or fishing clothing, etc. Includes boats, campers, 4x4 vehicles, cabins, etc. Includes magazines, books, membership dues, contributions, land leasing and ownership, stamps, tags, and licenses. Respondent could not specify whether expenditure was primarily for either fishing or hunting.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

33

Table 24. U.S. Residents Participating in Wildlife Watching in Georgia: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Participants Total participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresidential (away from home). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observe wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Photograph wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feed wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential (around the home) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observe wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Photograph wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feed wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visit public parks1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintain plantings or natural areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1

Number 1,494 411 400 *161 *108 1,305 908 244 1,204 *119 222

Percent 100 28 27 *11 *7 87 61 16 81 *8 15

Includes visits only to parks or publicly owned areas within 1 mile of home.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

Table 25. Participants, Trips, and Days of Participation in Nonresidential (Away From Home) Wildlife-Watching Activities in Georgia: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Activity in Georgia Participants, trips, and days of participation Total, state residents and nonresidents Number PARTICIPANTS Total participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observe wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Photograph wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feed wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRIPS Total trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Average days per trip. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DAYS Total days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observing wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Photographing wildlife. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feeding wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Average days per participant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observing wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Photographing wildlife. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feeding wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. 4,868 3,947 *687 *573 12 10 *4 *5 100 81 *14 *12 (X) (X) (X) (X) 4,219 *3,448 *543 *541 18 *16 *8 *6 100 *82 *13 *13 (X) (X) (X) (X) *648 *499 *144 ... *4 *3 *2 ... *100 *77 *22 ... (X) (X) (X) (X) 3,384 1 100 (X) 2,931 1 100 (X) *453 *1 *100 (X) 411 400 *161 *108 100 97 *39 *26 234 222 *72 *94 100 95 *31 *40 *178 *178 *89 ... *100 *100 *50 ... Percent State residents Number Percent Nonresidents Number Percent

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

(X) Not applicable.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse.

34

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 26. Nonresidential (Away From Home) Wildlife-Watching Participants Visiting Public Areas in Georgia and Type of Site Visited: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Total, state residents and nonresidents Number Total participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visited public areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Did not visit public areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total, all sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oceanside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lakes and streamsides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marsh, wetland, swamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Woodland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brush-covered areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open field. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Man-made area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. 411 297 *114 411 *98 220 *161 291 *170 *179 *79 ... Percent 100 72 *28 100 *24 54 *39 71 *41 *44 *19 ... State residents Number 234 *160 *74 234 ... *129 *72 *181 *107 *109 ... ... Percent 100 *68 *32 100 ... *55 *31 *78 *46 *46 ... ... Nonresidents Number *178 *137 ... *178 ... *91 *90 *110 *63 *71 ... ... Percent *100 *77 ... *100 ... *51 *50 *62 *36 *40 ... ...

Participants and sites

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

Table 27. Nonresidential (Away From Home) Wildlife-Watching Participants by Wildlife Observed, Photographed, or Fed in Georgia: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Total, state residents and nonresidents Number Total all wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total birds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Songbirds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Birds of prey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Waterfowl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shorebirds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other birds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total land mammals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Large land mammals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small land mammals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marine mammals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. 411 373 258 236 248 *177 *131 256 *163 230 *103 ... *193 Percent 100 100 100 100 100 *100 *100 100 *100 100 *100 ... *100 State residents Number 234 204 *157 *144 *141 *89 ... *156 *101 *139 *70 ... *101 Percent 57 55 *61 *61 *57 *51 ... *61 *62 *60 *68 ... *52 Nonresidents Number *178 *169 *101 *92 *107 *87 ... *99 ... *92 ... ... *92 Percent *43 *45 *39 *39 *43 *49 ... *39 ... *40 ... ... *48

Wildlife observed, photographed, or fed

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

35

Table 28. Participation in Residential (Around the Home) Wildlife-Watching Activities in Georgia: 2001
(State population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Participants Residential activity Number Total residential participants. . . . . . . . . . Observe wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visit public parks1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Photograph wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feed wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintain natural areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintain plantings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Participants Observing Wildlife Total, all wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Birds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Land mammals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Large mammals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Small mammals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amphibians or reptiles . . . . . . . . . . . . Insects or spiders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fish and other wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . Total, 1 day or more. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 to 10 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1

Participants Residential activity Percent 100 11 to 50 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 51 to 200 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . *9 201 days or more . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1 92 Participants Visiting Public Parks Total, 1 day or more. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . *13 1 to 5 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . *9 6 to 10 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 days or more . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 95 Participants Photographing Wildlife Total, 1 day or more. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 1 to 3 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 4 to 10 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 11 or more days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 27 *15 Participants Feeding Wildlife Total, all wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wild birds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Other wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . *19 Number 219 304 193 *119 ... ... ... 244 *81 *80 *82 1,204 1,169 467 Percent 24 34 21 *100 ... ... ... 100 *33 *33 *34 100 97 39

1,305 908 *119 244 1,204 *163 *116 908 863 734 417 678 180 244 *139 908 *174

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Includes visits only to parks or publicly owned areas within 1 mile of home.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse.

Table 29. Georgia Residents Participating in Wildlife Watching in the United States: 2001
(State population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Participants Total participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresidential (away from home) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential (around home) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observe wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Photograph wildlife. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feed wild birds or other wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintain plantings or natural areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visit public parks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses. The column showing percent of participants is based on total participants. The column showing percent of population is based on the state population 16 years old and older, including those who did not participate in wildlife watching. Percent of participants 100 23 98 68 18 91 17 *9 Percent of population 22 5 21 15 4 20 4 *2

Number 1,326 302 1,305 908 244 1,204 222 *119

36

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 30. Wild Bird Observers and Days of Observation in Georgia: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Total, state residents and nonresidents Number OBSERVERS Total bird observers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential (around the home) observers . . . . . . . . . Nonresidential (away from home) observers . . . . . . DAYS Total days observing birds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential (around the home) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresidential (away from home). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. 93,460 90,523 2,937 100 97 3 92,905 90,523 *2,382 100 97 *3 *555 ... *555 *100 ... *100 1,063 863 367 100 81 35 894 863 *198 100 97 *22 *169 ... *169 *100 ... *100 Percent State residents Number Percent Nonresidents Number Percent

Observers and days of observation

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses.

Table 31. Wild Bird Observers in Georgia Who Can Identify Wild Birds by Sight or Sound, and Who Keep Birding Life Lists: 2001
(State population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Participants Total bird observers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observers who can identify: 1-20 bird species . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-40 bird species . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 or more species . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observers who keep birding life lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. ... Sample size too small to report data reliably. Number 1,063 819 *123 *64 ... Percent 100 77 *12 *6 ...

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

37

Table 32. Selected Characteristics of Georgia Residents Participating in Wildlife Watching: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Participants Population Total Characteristic Percent who participated 22 15 30 22 20 27 ... 21 20 23 ... ... 18 22 23 30 28 ... 22 29 *4 ... *19 *18 *15 *20 *14 36 *36 *45 14 18 18 22 29 Percent who participated 5 *5 *6 5 *5 ... ... *5 *6 *4 ... ... *7 *6 *5 ... ... ... 5 7 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... *13 ... ... ... ... *3 ... *9 Percent who participated 21 14 30 22 20 27 ... 21 20 23 ... ... 18 21 23 30 28 ... 22 28 *4 ... *19 *18 *15 *20 *14 34 *36 *43 14 18 18 22 28 Nonresidential (away from home) Residential (around the home)

Number Total persons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Population Density of Residence Urban . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Population Size of Residence Metropolitan statistical area (MSA) . 1,000,000 or more . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250,000 to 999,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 to 249,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outside MSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sex Male . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Female . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Age 16 18 25 35 45 55 65 to 17 to 24 to 34 to 44 to 54 to 64 years years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and older . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,096 3,300 2,796 4,150 3,032 1,117 ... 1,947 2,855 3,241 242 518 1,181 1,303 1,243 724 886 214 5,882 4,338 1,620 138 437 455 701 597 578 692 478 402 1,755 1,098 2,106 1,423 1,469

Percent 100 54 46 68 50 18 ... 32 47 53 4 8 19 21 20 12 15 4 96 71 27 2 7 7 12 10 9 11 8 7 29 18 35 23 24

Number 1,326 479 848 917 611 306 ... 409 572 754 ... ... 214 283 288 217 248 ... 1,297 1,240 *70 ... *83 *82 *105 *119 *84 246 *173 *182 253 200 384 312 431

Percent 100 36 64 69 46 23 ... 31 43 57 ... ... 16 21 22 16 19 ... 98 93 *5 ... *6 *6 *8 *9 *6 19 *13 *14 19 15 29 24 32

Number 302 *149 *154 210 *155 ... ... *92 *164 *138 ... ... *77 *81 *67 ... ... ... 297 291 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... *89 ... ... ... ... *72 ... *125

Percent 100 *49 *51 69 *51 ... ... *31 *54 *46 ... ... *26 *27 *22 ... ... ... 98 96 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... *30 ... ... ... ... *24 ... *41

Number 1,305 463 842 901 595 306 ... 404 566 739 ... ... 208 268 288 217 248 ... 1,276 1,218 *70 ... *83 *82 *105 *119 *84 235 *173 *172 253 200 384 306 415

Percent 100 36 64 69 46 23 ... 31 43 57 ... ... 16 21 22 17 19 ... 98 93 *5 ... *6 *6 *8 *9 *6 18 *13 *13 19 15 29 23 32

Ethnicity Hispanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Non-Hispanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Race White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Black. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . All others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annual Household Income Under $10,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,000 to $19,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,000 to $29,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30,000 to $39,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40,000 to $49,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50,000 to $74,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75,000 to $99,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100,000 or more. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Not reported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Education 11 years or less . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 to 3 years college . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 years college or more . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse. Percent who participated shows the percent of each row’s population who participated in the activity named by the column (the percent of those living in urban areas who participated, etc.). Percent columns show the percent of each column’s participants who are described by the row heading (the percent of those who participated who live in urban areas, etc.).

38

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 33. Expenditures in Georgia by U.S. Residents for Wildlife Watching: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older) Spenders Expenditure item Expenditures (thousands of dollars) 535,771 Average per participant (dollars) 359 Number (thousands) 1,248 Percent of wildlife-watching participants1 84 Average per spender (dollars) 429

Total, all items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRIP EXPENDITURES Total trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EQUIPMENT AND OTHER EXPENDITURES Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching equipment, total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Binoculars, spotting scopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Film and developing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameras, special lenses, videocameras, and other photographic equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Day packs, carrying cases, and special clothing . . . . . . . . . . . Bird food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food for other wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nest boxes, bird houses, bird feeders, and bird baths. . . . . . . Other equipment (including field guides) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magazines and books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Membership dues and contributions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Land leasing and ownership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plantings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1

123,264 76,011 38,300 *37,711 32,963 *14,290

300 185 93 *92 80 *35

367 341 341 *133 300 *140

89 83 83 *32 73 *34

336 223 112 *284 110 *102

412,506 132,760 *8,802 20,565 *19,889 *8,254 41,724 15,536 17,118 ... *14,086 ... *4,985 *6,684 ... *4,809

276 89 *6 14 *13 *6 28 10 11 ... *9 ... *3 *4 ... *4

1,105 1,016 *80 228 *87 *84 886 234 385 ... *76 ... *154 *118 ... *98

74 68 *5 15 *6 *6 59 16 26 ... *5 ... *10 *8 ... *8

373 131 *110 90 *228 *98 47 66 44 ... *185 ... *32 *57 ... *49

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

2 3 4

Percent of wildlife-watching participants column for trip-related expenditures is based on nonresidential participants. For equipment and other expenditures, the percent of wildlife-watching participants column is based on total wildlife-watching participants. Includes equipment rental and fees for guides, pack trips, public land use and private land use, boat fuel, other boating costs, and heating and cooking fuel. Includes tents, tarps, frame packs and other backpacking equipment, other camping equipment, and other auxiliary equipment. Includes travel or tent trailers, off-the-road vehicles, pickups, campers or vans, motor homes, boats, and other special equipment.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

39

Table 34. Trip and Equipment Expenditures in Georgia for Wildlife Watching by Residents and Nonresidents: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older) Amount (thousands of dollars) Average per spender (dollars) Average per participant (dollars)

Expenditure item STATE RESIDENTS AND NONRESIDENTS Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . STATE RESIDENTS Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NONRESIDENTS Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equipment2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1 2

Spenders (thousands)

487,966 76,011 32,963 *14,290 364,702

1,192 341 300 *140 1,042

410 223 110 *102 350

327 185 80 *35 244

209,496 *45,746 *12,556 *13,223 137,972

974 *185 *168 *77 948

215 *247 *75 *172 145

159 *196 *54 *57 105

278,470 *30,265 *20,408 *1,067 *226,729

218 *156 *132 *63 *94

1,279 *194 *155 *17 *2,410

1,568 *170 *115 *6 *1,276

Includes equipment rental and fees for guides, pack trips, public land use, private land use, boat fuel, other boating costs, and heating and cooking fuel. Includes wildlife watching, auxiliary and special equipment.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse. See Table 33 for a detailed listing of expenditure items.

40

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 35. Expenditures in the United States by Georgia Residents for Wildlife Watching: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older) Spenders Expenditure item Expenditures (thousands of dollars) 334,589 Average per participant (dollars) 252 Number (thousands) 1,019 Percent of wildlife-watching participants1 77 Average per spender (dollars) 328

Total, all items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRIP EXPENDITURES Total trip-related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food and lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other trip costs2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EQUIPMENT AND OTHER EXPENDITURES Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching equipment, total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Binoculars, spotting scopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Film and developing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cameras, special lenses, videocameras, and other photographic equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Day packs, carrying cases, and special clothing . . . . . . . . . . . Bird food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Food for other wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nest boxes, bird houses, bird feeders, and bird baths. . . . . . . Other equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Magazines and books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Membership dues and contributions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Land leasing and ownership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plantings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.
1

174,269 127,370 62,397 *64,974 30,119 *16,780

746 545 267 *278 129 *72

260 248 248 *124 227 *103

111 106 106 *53 97 *44

670 514 252 *525 133 *163

160,320 125,854 *4,714 20,083 *17,932 ... 42,190 15,594 17,177 ... *13,940 ... *4,770 *7,720 ... *4,809

121 95 *4 15 *14 ... 32 12 13 ... *11 ... *4 *6 ... *4

983 943 *69 213 *76 ... 868 234 391 ... *70 ... *150 *122 ... *98

74 71 *5 16 *6 ... 65 18 29 ... *5 ... *11 *9 ... *8

163 134 *68 94 *235 ... 49 67 44 ... *199 ... *32 *63 ... *49

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

2 3 4

Percent of wildlife-watching participants column for trip-related expenditures is based on nonresidential participants. For equipment and other expenditures, the percent of wildlife-watching participants column is based on total wildlife-watching participants. Includes equipment rental and fees for guides, pack trips, public land use and private land use, boat fuel, other boating costs, and heating and cooking fuel. Includes tents, tarps, frame packs and other backpacking equipment, other camping equipment, and other auxiliary equipment. Includes travel or tent trailers, off-the-road vehicles, pickups, campers or vans, motor homes, boats, and other special equipment.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

41

Table 36. Summary of Expenditures by Georgia Residents in State and Out of State for Wildlife Watching: 2001
(State population 16 years old and older) Amount (thousands of dollars) Average per spender (dollars) Average per participant (dollars)

Expenditure item IN GEORGIA Expenditures for wildlife watching, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip-related expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OUT OF STATE Expenditures for wildlife watching, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trip-related expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size.

Spenders (thousands)

227,580 *71,524 123,161 *13,940 ... 13,275

997 *197 937 *70 ... 185

228 *363 131 *199 ... 72

172 *306 93 *11 ... 10

*106,276 *102,745 ... ... ... ...

*125 *98 ... ... ... ...

*849 *1,046 ... ... ... ...

*80 *340 ... ... ... ...

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: See Table 33 for detailed listing of expenditure items.

42

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 37. Participation of Georgia Resident Wildlife-Watching Participants in Fishing and Hunting: 2001
(State population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Wildlife-watching activity Participants Total, nonresidential and residential Number Total participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching participants who: Did not fish or hunt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fished or hunted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fished . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse. 1,326 796 530 490 188 Percent 100 60 40 37 14 Nonresidential (away from home) Number 302 168 134 115 *70 Percent 100 56 44 38 *23 Residential (around the home) Number 1,305 789 516 480 185 Percent 100 60 40 37 14

Table 38. Participation of Georgia Resident Sportspersons in Wildlife-Watching Activities: 2001
(State population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Sportspersons Sportspersons Number Total Sportspersons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons who: Did not engage in wildlife-watching activities . . . . . . Engaged in wildlife-watching activities . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresidential (away from home) . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential (around the home) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses and nonresponse. 1,136 606 530 134 516 Percent 100 53 47 12 45 Number 1,043 553 490 115 480 Percent 100 53 47 11 46 Number 377 189 188 *70 185 Percent 100 50 50 *19 49 Anglers Hunters

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

43

Table 39. Participants in Wildlife-Associated Recreation by Participant’s State of Residence: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Total participants Participant’s state of residence Population United States, total. . . . . . . . . . . Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hampshire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212,298 3,427 454 3,700 1,999 25,982 3,215 2,536 599 12,171 6,096 916 972 9,244 4,558 2,201 2,017 3,121 3,306 1,005 4,078 4,837 7,587 3,688 2,111 4,206 699 1,266 1,454 954 6,300 1,337 14,201 5,918 483 8,645 2,587 2,630 9,303 765 3,080 559 4,317 15,445 1,554 479 5,471 4,516 1,447 4,059 377 Number 82,302 1,323 320 1,296 1,034 6,873 1,518 999 220 3,857 1,932 195 507 3,154 2,179 1,206 942 1,547 1,330 607 1,546 1,726 2,950 2,388 851 2,010 438 623 439 506 1,993 595 3,987 2,330 228 3,407 1,308 1,545 4,169 280 1,375 326 2,109 4,515 736 319 2,535 2,537 694 2,489 223 Percent of population 39 39 70 35 52 26 47 39 37 32 32 21 52 34 48 55 47 50 40 60 38 36 39 65 40 48 63 49 30 53 32 45 28 39 47 39 51 59 45 37 45 58 49 29 47 67 46 56 48 61 59 Number 37,805 726 205 437 617 2,486 679 332 94 2,158 1,136 114 306 1,507 914 580 491 703 833 256 571 521 1,325 1,437 533 1,076 279 308 194 175 669 256 1,492 982 170 1,513 730 611 1,648 96 674 176 903 2,745 468 125 970 932 353 1,141 138 Percent of population 18 21 45 12 31 10 21 13 16 18 19 12 31 16 20 26 24 23 25 26 14 11 17 39 25 26 40 24 13 18 11 19 11 17 35 17 28 23 18 13 22 31 21 18 30 26 18 21 24 28 37 Number 66,105 965 241 1,107 774 5,491 1,213 885 170 2,856 1,326 126 388 2,498 1,786 977 735 1,264 844 520 1,311 1,493 2,424 1,993 579 1,612 362 498 334 450 1,694 471 3,522 1,884 135 2,768 1,042 1,286 3,522 242 1,079 251 1,706 3,088 572 287 2,168 2,234 517 2,159 172 Percent of population 31 28 53 30 39 21 38 35 28 23 22 14 40 27 39 44 36 40 26 52 32 31 32 54 27 38 52 39 23 47 27 35 25 32 28 32 40 49 38 32 35 45 40 20 37 60 40 49 36 53 46 Sportspersons Wildlife-watching participants

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses. U.S. totals include responses from participants residing in the District of Columbia, as described in the statistical accuracy appendix.

44

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table 40. Participants in Wildlife-Associated Recreation by State Where Activity Took Place: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Total participants State where activity took place Number United States, total. . . . . . . . . . . Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hampshire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82,302 1,557 632 1,720 1,369 7,231 2,138 1,151 321 4,860 2,198 324 868 3,390 2,427 1,334 1,091 1,834 1,558 975 1,911 1,988 3,481 2,915 1,017 2,494 871 768 657 892 2,345 884 4,620 2,882 322 3,658 1,529 2,051 4,570 399 1,666 518 2,671 4,949 1,091 569 3,001 2,970 843 3,165 662 Percent 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Number 37,805 1,021 457 486 960 2,556 1,077 356 157 3,158 1,236 151 486 1,366 965 645 563 901 1,059 449 752 632 1,659 1,733 720 1,382 463 382 193 295 855 379 1,760 1,386 259 1,540 838 761 1,783 181 922 349 1,062 2,857 585 211 1,137 1,024 444 1,611 373 Percent 46 66 72 28 70 35 50 31 49 65 56 46 56 40 40 48 52 49 68 46 39 32 48 59 71 55 53 50 29 33 36 43 38 48 81 42 55 37 39 45 55 67 40 58 54 37 38 34 53 51 56 Number 66,105 1,016 420 1,465 841 5,720 1,552 967 232 3,240 1,494 220 643 2,627 1,866 1,022 807 1,362 935 778 1,524 1,686 2,666 2,155 631 1,826 687 565 543 766 1,895 671 3,885 2,168 190 2,897 1,131 1,680 3,794 298 1,186 358 2,084 3,240 806 496 2,460 2,496 605 2,442 498 Percent 80 65 67 85 61 79 73 84 72 67 68 68 74 77 77 77 74 74 60 80 80 85 77 74 62 73 79 74 83 86 81 76 84 75 59 79 74 82 83 75 71 69 78 65 74 87 82 84 72 77 75 Sportspersons Wildlife-watching participants

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses. U.S. totals include responses from participants residing in the District of Columbia, as described in the statistical accuracy appendix.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

45

Table 41. Anglers and Hunters by State Where Fishing or Hunting Took Place: 2001
(Population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) Anglers State where fishing or hunting took place Total anglers, residents and nonresidents Number United States, total. . . . . Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . Michigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hampshire . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania. . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34,071 851 421 419 782 2,444 915 346 148 3,104 1,086 150 416 1,237 874 542 404 780 970 376 701 615 1,354 1,624 586 1,215 349 296 172 267 806 314 1,550 1,287 179 1,371 774 687 1,266 179 812 214 903 2,372 517 171 1,010 938 318 1,412 293 Percent 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Residents Number 31,218 610 183 351 539 2,288 560 271 71 2,057 947 109 251 1,157 784 471 357 590 757 212 457 425 1,002 1,293 450 942 212 241 119 147 531 197 1,243 831 119 1,225 648 513 1,032 86 571 140 709 2,151 388 96 761 808 250 941 117 Percent 92 72 43 84 69 94 61 78 47 66 87 73 60 94 90 87 88 76 78 56 65 69 74 80 77 78 61 81 69 55 66 63 80 65 67 89 84 75 82 48 70 65 79 91 75 56 75 86 79 67 40 Nonresidents Number 7,880 241 239 68 243 156 357 75 *78 1,047 139 *41 165 80 90 70 *47 190 213 165 243 191 352 331 136 272 138 55 *53 119 275 *116 307 456 *59 146 126 174 234 93 241 75 194 221 129 75 248 130 *67 471 176 Percent 23 28 57 16 31 6 39 22 *53 34 13 *27 40 6 10 13 *12 24 22 44 35 31 26 20 23 22 39 19 *31 45 34 *37 20 35 *33 11 16 25 18 52 30 35 21 9 25 44 25 14 *21 33 60 Total hunters, residents and nonresidents Number 13,034 423 93 148 431 274 281 45 16 226 417 17 197 310 290 243 291 323 333 164 145 66 754 597 357 489 229 173 47 78 135 130 714 295 139 490 261 248 1,000 *9 265 209 359 1,201 198 100 355 227 284 660 133 Percent 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 *100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Hunters Residents Number 12,377 307 72 119 303 261 159 *35 13 191 355 17 150 246 269 195 189 269 295 123 115 64 705 568 245 405 170 124 42 52 108 105 635 272 87 452 241 234 858 *7 221 90 288 1,101 177 74 279 210 229 588 65 Percent 95 73 77 81 70 95 57 *77 81 84 85 100 76 79 93 80 65 83 89 75 80 97 94 95 69 83 74 72 90 67 80 80 89 92 63 92 92 94 86 *83 83 43 80 92 89 74 79 92 81 89 49 Nonresidents Number 2,027 116 *21 *28 128 *12 121 ... ... *35 *62 ... 47 *64 ... *48 103 *54 *38 41 *30 ... *48 *29 111 84 59 *49 ... *26 ... *26 79 *23 *52 *38 *20 *15 142 ... *44 119 71 100 *22 *26 *75 ... *55 *72 68 Percent 16 27 *23 *19 30 *5 43 ... ... *16 *15 ... 24 *21 ... *20 35 *17 *11 25 *20 ... *6 *5 31 17 26 *28 ... *33 ... *20 11 *8 *37 *8 *8 *6 14 ... *17 57 20 8 *11 *26 *21 ... *19 *11 51

* Estimate based on a small sample size.

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses. U.S. totals include responses from participants residing in the District of Columbia, as described in the statistical accuracy appendix.

46

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Appendix A

Appendix A. Definitions

Annual household income—Total 2001 income of household members before taxes and other deductions. Auxiliary equipment—Equipment owned primarily for wildlife-associated recreation. These include for the sportspersons section—camping bags, packs, duffel bags and tents, binoculars, field glasses, telescopes, special fishing and hunting clothing, foul weather gear, boots, waders, and processing and taxidermy costs; and for the wildlifewatching section—tents, tarps, frame packs, backpacking equipment and other camping equipment. Big game—Antelope, bear, deer, elk, moose, wild turkey, and similar large animals which are hunted. Birding life list—A tally of bird species seen during a birder’s lifetime.

Utah Wyoming New England Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Pacific Alaska California Hawaii Oregon Washington South Atlantic Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Maryland North Carolina South Carolina Virginia West Virginia West North Central Kansas Iowa Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota South Dakota West South Central Arkansas Louisiana Oklahoma Texas Day—Any part of a day spent in a given activity. For example, if someone hunted 2 hours 1 day and 3 hours another day, it would be recorded as 2 days of hunting. If someone hunted 2 hours in the morning and 3 hours in the evening of the same

day, it would be considered 1 day of hunting. Education—The highest completed grade of school or year of college. Expenditures—Money spent in 2001 for wildlife-related recreation trips in the United States and wildlife-related recreational equipment purchased in the United States. Expenditures include both money spent by participants for themselves and the value of gifts they received. Federal land—Public land owned by the federal government such as National Forests and National Wildlife Refuges. Fishing—The sport of catching or attempting to catch fish with a hook, line, bow and arrow, or spear; it also includes catching or gathering shellfish (clams, crabs, etc.); and the noncommercial seining or netting of fish, unless the fish are for use as bait. For example, seining for smelt is fishing, but seining for bait minnows is not included as fishing. Fishing equipment—Items owned primarily for fishing. These items are listed in Table 19. Freshwater—Reservoirs, lakes, ponds, and the nontidal portions of rivers and streams. Great Lakes fishing—Fishing in Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario, their connecting waters such as the St. Marys River system, Detroit River, St. Clair River, and the Niagara River, and the St. Lawrence River south of the bridge at Cornwall, New York. Great Lakes fishing includes fishing in tributaries of the Great Lakes for smelt, steelhead, and salmon.

Census Divisions
East North Central Illinois Indiana Michigan Ohio Wisconsin East South Central Alabama Kentucky Mississippi Tennessee Middle Atlantic New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Mountain Arizona Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico

Appendix A A-2

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Home—The starting point of a wildliferelated recreational trip. It may be a permanent residence or a temporary or seasonal residence such as a cabin. Hunting—The sport of shooting or attempting to shoot wildlife with firearms or archery equipment. Hunting equipment—Items owned primarily for hunting. These items are listed in Table 20. Local land—Public land owned by local government such as county parks or municipal watersheds. Maintain natural areas—To set aside one-quarter acre or more of natural environment such as wood lots or open fields for the primary purpose of benefiting wildlife. Maintain plantings—To introduce or encourage the growth of food and cover plants for the primary purpose of benefiting wildlife. Metropolitan statistical area (MSA)— Except in the New England States, an MSA is a county or group of contiguous counties containing at least one city of 50,000 or more inhabitants or twin cities (i.e., cities with contiguous boundaries and constituting, for general social and economic purposes, a single community) with a combined population of at least 50,000. Also included in an MSA are contiguous counties that are socially and economically integrated with the central city. In the New England States, an MSA consists of towns and cities instead of counties. Each MSA must include at least one central city. Migratory birds—Birds that regularly migrate from one region or climate to another. The survey focuses on migratory birds which may be hunted, including bandtailed pigeons, coots, ducks, doves, gallinules, geese, rails, and woodcocks. Multiple responses—The term used to reflect the fact that individuals or their characteristics fall into more than one reporting category. An example of a big game hunter who hunted for deer and elk demonstrates the effect of multiple responses. In this case, adding the number of deer hunters (1) and elk hunters (1) would over state the number of big game hunters (1) because deer and elk hunters are not mutually exclusive U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

categories. In contrast, total participants is the sum of male and female participants, because male and female are mutually exclusive categories. Nonresidential activity (away from home)—Trips or outings at least 1 mile from home for the primary purpose of observing, photographing, or feeding wildlife. Trips to zoos, circuses, aquariums, and museums are not included. Nonresidents—Individuals who do not live in the state being reported. For example, a person living in Texas who watches whales in California is a nonresident participant in California. Nonresponse—Nonresponse is a term used to reflect the fact that some survey respondents provide incomplete sets of information. For example, a survey respondent may have been unable to identify the primary type of hunting for which a gun was bought. Hunting expenditures will reflect the gun purchase, but it will not appear as spending for big game or any other type of hunting. Nonresponses result in reported totals that are greater than the sum of their parts. Observe—To take special interest in or try to identify birds, fish, or other wildlife. Other animals—Coyotes, crows, foxes, groundhogs, prairie dogs, raccoons, and similar animals that are often regarded as varmints or pests. Other animals may be classified as unprotected or nongame animals by the state in which they are hunted. Participants—Individuals who engaged in fishing, hunting, or a wildlifewatching activity. Primary purpose—The principal motivation for an activity, trip, or expenditure. Public areas—Public lands owned by local, state, or federal governments. Public land—Land that is owned by the local, state, or federal government. Private land—Land that is owned by a private individual, group of individuals, or nongovernmental organization.

Residential activity (around the home)—Activity within 1 mile of home with a primary purpose: (1) closely observing or trying to identify birds or other wildlife, (2) photographing wildlife, (3) feeding birds or other wildlife, (4) maintaining natural areas of at least one-quarter acre primarily for the benefit to wildlife, (5) maintaining plantings (shrubs, agricultural crops, etc.) primarily for the benefit of wildlife, or (6) visiting public parks within 1 mile of home to observe, photograph, or feed wildlife. Residents—Individuals who lived in the state being reported. For example, persons who live in California and watch whales in California are resident participants in California. Rural—Respondent lived in a rural nonfarm, or rural farm area, as determined by Census. Saltwater—Oceans, tidal bays and sounds, and the tidal portions of rivers and streams. Screening interviews—The first survey contact with a household. Screening interviews with a household representative in each household to identify respondents who are eligible for indepth interviews. Screening interviews gather data about the individuals in the households, such as their age and sex. Screening interviews are discussed in the Survey Background and Method section of this report. Small game—Grouse, partridge, pheasants, quail, rabbits, squirrels, and similar small animals and birds for which many states have small game seasons and bag limits. Special equipment—Items of equipment that are owned primarily for wildliferelated recreation. These include for the sportsmen section bass boat and other types of motor boat; canoe and other types of nonmotor boat; boat motor, boat trailer/hitch, and other boat accessories; pickup, camper, van, travel or tent trailer, motor home, house trailer, RV, cabin; and trail bike, dune buggy, 4x4 vehicle, four-wheeler, and snowmobile. For the wildlife-watching section these include off-the-road vehicles such as snowmobiles, four-wheeler, 4x4 vehicle, trail bike, dune buggy, travel or tent trailer, motor home, pickup, camper, van, Appendix A A-3

house trailer, RV, boat and boat accessories, and cabin. Spenders—Individuals who reported an expenditure value for fishing, hunting, or wildlife-watching activities or equipment. Sportspersons—Individuals who engaged in fishing, hunting, or both. State land—Public land owned by a state such as state parks or state wildlife management areas. Trip—An outing involving fishing, hunting, or wildlife-watching activities. In the context of this survey, a trip may begin from an individual’s principal residence or from another place, such as a vacation home or the home of a

relative. A trip may last an hour, a day, or many days. Type of fishing—Three types of fishing are reported: fishing in (1) freshwater except Great Lakes, (2) Great Lakes, and (3) saltwater. Type of hunting—Four types of hunting are reported: hunting for (1) big game, (2) small game, (3) migratory bird, and (4) other animals. Urban—Respondent lived in an urban area, as determined by the U.S. Census Bureau. Wildlife—Animals such as birds, fish, insects, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles that are living in natural or wild environments. Wildlife does not include

animals living in aquariums, zoos, and other artificial surroundings or domestic animals such as farm animals or pets. Wildlife-associated recreation— Recreational fishing, hunting, or wildlife watching. Wildlife-watching activity—An activity engaged in primarily for the purpose of feeding, photographing, or observing fish or other wildlife. In previous years, this was termed nonconsumptive activity. (See also residential and nonresidential activities.) Wildlife-watching equipment—Items owned primarily for observing, photographing, or feeding wildlife. These items are listed in Table 33.

Appendix A A-4

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Appendix B

Appendix B. National and Regional 1991-2001 Comparisons
Appendix B provides national and regional trend information based on the 1991, 1996, and 2001 Surveys. Since all three surveys used similar methodologies, their published information is directly comparable. types of wildlife watching. The number of wildlife watchers decreased 17 percent from 1991 to 1996 and increased 5 percent from 1996 to 2001—with 76.1 million participants in 1991, 62.9 million in 1996, and 66.1 million in 2001. Residential wildlife watching, the preeminent type of wildlife watching, lead this trend with an 18 percent drop from 1991 to 1996 and a 4 percent increase from 1996 to 2001. Unlike residential wildlife watching, nonresidential wildlife watching dropped throughout the ‘90s and early ‘00s with a 21 percent drop from 1991 to 1996 and an 8 percent drop from 1996 to 2001. Days afield by participants tended upward, counter to the trend in participation, although the increase is not statistically significant. Total expenditures for wildlife watching increased 21 percent from 1991 to 1996 and 16 percent from 1996 to 2001, making an overall increase of 41 percent from 1991 to 2001. interviewed on behalf of the entire household. The 1991 screening interview consisted primarily of sociodemographic questions and wildlife-related recreation questions concerning activity in the year 1990 and intentions for the year 1991. The screening interviews for the 1996 and 2001 Surveys were conducted April through June of their survey years in conjunction with the first wave of the detailed interviews. The screening interviews consisted primarily of sociodemographic questions and wildlife-related recreation questions concerning activity in the previous year (1995 or 2000) and intentions for the survey year (1996 or 2001). 3. In the 1991 Survey, an attempt was made to contact every sample person in all three detailed interview waves. In 1996 and 2001, respondents who were interviewed in the first detailed interview wave were not contacted again until the third wave. Also, all interviews in the second wave were conducted by telephone. In-person interviews were only conducted in the first and third waves.

Fishing and Hunting
Comparing national hunting and fishing estimates for the 1991, 1996, and 2001 Surveys found participation declined over that 10-year time period. In 1991 and 1996, the number of people who hunted and fished remained essentially unchanged. In 2001, the overall number of people who hunted and fished declined from their 1991/1996 levels. In 1991, there were 35.6 million anglers and 14.1 million hunters. In 1996, there were 35.2 million anglers and 14.0 million hunters. In 2001, there were 34.1 million anglers—a 4 percent drop from its 1991 level, and 13.0 million hunters—a 7 percent drop from 1991. The amount of time people spent fishing and hunting fluctuated between 1991 and 2001. The number of days spent fishing rose 22 percent between 1991 and 1996 and then fell 11 percent between 1996 and 2001. Days of hunting followed a similar pattern. Between 1991 and 1996, hunting days increased 9 percent but then fell 11 percent between 1996 and 2001. The amount of money spent for fishing and hunting trips and equipment rose from 1991 to 1996 and fell from 1996 to 2001. Total fishing expenditures rose 37 percent from $31.2 billion in 1991 to $42.7 billion in 1996; and, then fell 17 percent to $35.6 billion in 2001. Likewise, hunting expenditures increased from $16.0 billion in 1991 to $23.3 billion in 1996—45 percent increase—and then fell 12 percent to $20.6 billion in 2001.

Differences in the 1991, 1996, and 2001 Surveys
The 1996 and 2001 Surveys underwent a number of changes in order to improve data collection, lower costs, and meet the data needs of its users. The most significant design differences in the three surveys are as follows: 1. The 1991 Survey data was collected by interviewers filling out paper questionnaires. The data entries were keyed in a separate operation after the interview. The 1996 and 2001 survey data were collected by the use of computer-assisted interviews. The questionnaires were programmed into computers, and interviewers keyed in the responses at the time of the interview. The 1991 Survey screening phase was conducted in January and February of 1991, when the sample households were contacted and a household respondent was

Important instrument differences in the 1991, 1996, and 2001 Surveys
1. The 1991 Survey collected information on all wildlife-related recreation purchases made by participants without reference to where the purchase was made. The 1996 and 2001 Surveys asked in which state the purchase was made. In 1991, respondents were asked what kind of fishing they did, i.e., Great Lakes, other freshwater, or saltwater, and then were asked in what states they fished. In 1996 and 2001, respondents were asked in which states they fished and then were asked the pertinent kind of fishing questions. This method had the advantage of not asking about, Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

2.

2.

Wildlife Watching
Comparing the results from the last three surveys finds different trends for various Appendix B B-2

for example, saltwater fishing when they only fished in a noncoastal state. In 1991, respondents were asked how many days they "actually" hunted or fished for a particular type of game or fish and then how many days they "chiefly" hunted or fished for the same type of game or fish rather than another type of game or fish. To get total days of hunting or fishing for a particular type of game or fish, the "actually" day response was used, while to get the sum of all days of hunting or fishing, the "chiefly" days were summed. In 1996 and 2001, respondents were asked their total days of hunting or fishing in the United States and each state, then how many days they hunted or fished for a particular type of game or fish. Trip-related and equipment expenditure categories were not the same for all Surveys. "Guide fee" and "Pack trip or package fee" were two separate trip-related expenditure items in 1991, while they were combined into one category in the 1996 and 2001 Surveys. "Boating costs" was added to the 1996 and 2001 hunting and wildlife-watching trip-related expenditure sections. "Heating and cooking fuel" was added to all of the trip-related expenditure sections. "Spearfishing equipment" was moved from a separate category to the "Other" list. "Rods" and "Reels" were two separate categories in 1991 but were combined in 1996 and 2001. "Lines, hooks, sinkers, etc." was one category in 1991 but split into "Lines" and "Hooks, sinkers, etc." in 1996 and 2001. "Food used to feed other wildlife" was added to the wildlife-watching equipment section, "Boats" and "Cabins" were added to the wildlife-watching special equipment section, and "Land leasing and ownership" was added to the wildlife-watching expenditures section. 5. Questions asking sportspersons if they participated as much as they wanted were added in 1996 and 2001. If the sportspersons said no, they were asked why not.

6.

The 1991 Survey included questions about participation in organized fishing competitions; anglers using bows and arrows, nets or seines, or spearfishing; hunters using pistols or handguns and target shooting in preparation for hunting. These questions were not asked in 1996 and 2001. The 1996 Survey included questions about catch and release fishing and persons with disabilities participating in wildlife-related recreation. These questions were not part of the 1991 Survey. The 2001 Survey included questions about persons with disabilities participating in wildlife-related recreation but not about catch and release fishing. The 1991 Survey included questions about average distance traveled to recreation sites. These questions were not included in the 1996 and 2001 Surveys. The 1996 Survey included questions about the last trip the respondent took. Included were questions about the type of trip, where the activity took place, and the distance and direction to the site visited. These questions were not asked in 2001.

2.

The 1991 and 1996 land leasing and ownership sections asked the respondent to combine the two types of land use into one and give total acreage and expenditures. In 2001, the two types of land use were explored separately. The 1991 and 1996 wildlife watching sections included questions on birdwatching for residential users only. The 2001 Survey added a question on birdwatching for nonresidential users. Also, questions on the use of birding life lists and how many species the respondent can identify were added in 2001. "Recreational vehicles" was added to the sportspersons and wildlife watchers special equipment section in 2001. "House trailer" was added to the sportspersons special equipment section. Total personal income was asked in the detailed phase of the 1996 Survey. This was changed to total household income in the 2001 Survey. A question was added to the triprelated expenditures section in the 2001 Survey to ascertain how much of the total was spent in the respondent’s state of residence when the respondent participated in hunting, fishing, or wildlife watching out-of-state. Boating questions were added to the 2001 Surveys fishing section. The respondent was asked about the extent of boat usage for the three types of fishing. The 1996 Survey included questions about the months residential wildlife watchers fed birds. These questions were not repeated in the 2001 Survey. The contingent valuation sections of the three types of wildlife-related recreation were altered, using an open-ended question format instead of 1996's dichotomous choice format.

3.

7.

4.

8.

5.

9.

6.

10. The 1991 Survey collected data on hunting, fishing, and wildlife watching by U.S. residents in Canada. The 1996 and 2001 Surveys collected data on fishing and wildlife-watching by U.S. residents in Canada.

7.

Important instrument changes in the 2001 Survey
1. The 1991 and 1996 single race category "Asian or Pacific Islander" was changed to two categories "Asian" and "Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander." In 1991 and 1996, the respondent was required to pick only one category, while in 2001 the respondent could pick any combination of categories. The next question stipulated that the respondent could only be identified with one category and then asked what that category was. 8.

9.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

Appendix B B-3

Table B-1. Comparison of Wildlife-Related Recreation in the United States: 1991 to 2001
(U.S. population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) 1991-2001 (Percent change) –7 –3* 29 –4 9 14 –13 –15 –27 9* 41 1996-2001 (Percent change) –7 –11 –12* –3 –11 –17 5 4 –8 19 16

Participants, days, and expenditures Hunting Hunters, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunting days, total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunting expenditures, total (2001 dollars) 1 . . . . . . . . . Fishing Anglers, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fishing days, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fishing expenditures, total (2001 dollars) 1 . . . . . . . . . Wildlife Watching Total wildlife watching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Days, nonresidential. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching expenditures, total (2001 dollars) 1.

1991 (Number) 14,063 235,806 $16,031,197 35,578 511,329 $31,175,168 76,111 73,904 29,999 342,406 $24,002,990

2001 (Number) 13,034 228,368 $20,611,025 34,067 557,394 $35,632,132 66,105 62,928 21,823 372,006 $33,730,868

1996 (Number) 13,975 256,676 $23,293,156 35,246 625,893 $42,710,679 62,868 60,751 23,652 313,790 $29,062,524

2001 (Number) 13,034 228,368 $20,611,025 34,067 557,394 $35,632,132 66,105 62,928 21,823 372,006 $33,730,868

* Not different from zero at the 5 percent confidence level.
1

All 2001 and 1996 expenditure categories are adjusted to make them comparable to 1991.

Appendix B B-4

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table B-2. Anglers and Hunters by Census Division: 1991, 1996, and 2001
(U.S. population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) 1991 Sportspersons Number UNITED STATES Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Middle Atlantic Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . East North Central Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West North Central Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Atlantic Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . East South Central Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West South Central Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mountain Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pacific Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sportspersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32,188 7,202 6,264 2,789 100 22 19 9 33,121 6,912 6,006 2,712 100 21 18 8 34,082 6,400 5,655 2,421 100 19 17 7 29,216 4,508 3,871 1,746 100 15 13 6 29,371 4,192 3,627 1,453 100 14 12 5 29,806 3,810 3,250 1,633 100 13 11 5 10,180 1,658 1,545 444 100 16 15 4 10,306 1,673 1,520 465 100 16 15 5 10,575 1,504 1,402 386 100 14 13 4 189,964 39,979 35,578 14,063 100 21 19 7 201,472 39,694 35,246 13,975 100 20 17 7 212,298 37,805 34,067 13,034 100 18 16 6 Percent Number Percent Number Percent 1996 2001

13,504 4,143 3,647 1,709

100 31 27 13

13,875 3,977 3,416 1,917

100 29 25 14

14,430 4,239 3,836 1,710

100 29 27 12

33,682 6,996 6,441 2,083

100 21 19 6

36,776 7,282 6,636 2,050

100 20 18 6

39,286 6,957 6,451 1,875

100 18 16 5

11,667 2,984 2,635 1,279

100 26 23 11

12,459 2,907 2,514 1,301

100 23 20 10

12,976 2,865 2,543 1,164

100 22 20 9

19,926 5,125 4,592 1,843

100 26 23 9

21,811 5,093 4,616 1,812

100 23 21 8

23,337 4,924 4,375 1,988

100 21 19 9

10,092 2,488 2,079 1,069

100 25 21 11

11,966 2,761 2,411 1,061

100 23 20 9

13,308 2,757 2,443 1,020

100 21 18 8

29,508 4,875 4,505 1,101

100 17 15 4

31,787 4,897 4,501 1,203

100 15 14 4

34,498 4,349 4,111 837

100 13 12 2

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

Appendix B B-5

Table B-3. Wildlife-Watching (Nonconsumptive) Participants by Census Division: 1991, 1996, and 2001
(U.S. population 16 years old and older. Numbers in thousands) 1991 Wildlife watching Number UNITED STATES Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching participants. . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New England Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching participants. . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Middle Atlantic Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching participants. . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . East North Central Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching participants. . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West North Central Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching participants. . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Atlantic Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching participants. . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . East South Central Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching participants. . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West South Central Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching participants. . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mountain Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching participants. . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pacific Total population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wildlife-watching participants. . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19,926 7,035 2,459 6,817 100 35 12 34 21,811 5,933 2,096 5,773 100 27 10 26 23,337 5,747 1,822 5,490 100 25 8 24 11,667 4,864 1,592 4,765 100 42 14 41 12,459 3,904 1,118 3,795 100 31 9 30 12,976 4,514 1,086 4,390 100 35 8 34 13,504 6,924 2,654 6,722 100 51 20 50 13,875 5,089 1,927 4,900 100 37 14 35 14,430 6,206 2,059 5,938 100 43 14 41 29,216 10,556 4,166 10,282 100 36 14 35 29,371 8,185 2,960 8,023 100 28 10 27 29,806 8,740 2,849 8,452 100 29 10 28 10,180 4,598 1,856 4,544 100 45 18 45 10,306 3,710 1,443 3,586 100 36 14 35 10,575 3,875 1,155 3,765 100 37 11 36 189,964 76,111 29,999 73,904 100 40 16 39 201,472 62,868 23,652 60,751 100 31 12 30 212,298 66,105 21,823 62,928 100 31 10 30 Percent Number Percent Number Percent 1996 2001

32,188 14,511 5,572 14,175

100 45 17 44

33,121 11,731 4,501 11,297

100 35 14 34

34,082 11,631 3,571 11,196

100 34 10 33

33,682 13,047 4,450 12,813

100 39 13 38

36,776 11,252 3,992 10,964

100 31 11 30

39,286 11,395 3,469 10,911

100 29 9 28

10,092 4,437 2,215 4,145

100 44 22 41

11,966 4,099 1,967 3,855

100 34 16 32

13,308 4,619 2,019 4,282

100 35 15 32

29,508 10,139 5,035 9,641

100 34 17 33

31,787 8,966 3,648 8,558

100 28 11 27

34,498 9,377 3,793 8,504

100 27 11 25

Appendix B B-6

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Appendix C

Appendix C. Participants 6 to 15 Years Old

The 2001 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation was carried out in two phases. The first (or screening) phase began in April 2001. The main purpose of this phase was to collect information about persons 16 years old and older in order to develop a sample of potential sportsmen and wildlife-watching participants for the second (or detailed) phase. Information was also collected on the number of persons 6 to 15 years old who participated in wildlife-related recreation activities in 2000. These data are reported here in order to include the recreation activity of 6- to 15-year-olds in this report. It is important to emphasize that the information reported here from the 2001 screening questionnaires relates to activity only up to and including 2000.

Also, these data were based on long-term recall (at least 12-month recall was required for most of these tables) and were reported, in most cases, by one household respondent speaking for all household members rather than the shorter term recall of the actual participant, as in the case of the 2001 detailed phase. Tables C-1 to C-3 report data on participants 6 to 15 years old in 2000. Detailed expenditures and recreational activity data were not gathered for the 6to 15-year-old participants. Because of the difference in methodologies of the screening phase and the detailed phase of the 2001 Survey, the data are not comparable. Only participants 16 years old and older were eligible for the detailed phase. The

detailed phase was a series of three interviews conducted at 4-month intervals. The screening interviews were 1-year recall. The shorter recall period of the detailed phase had better data accuracy. It has been found in survey studies that in many cases longer recall periods result in over-estimating participation in and expenditures on wildlife-related recreation activities.

Appendix C C-2

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table C-1. Georgia Residents 6 to 15 Years Old Participating in Fishing and Hunting: 2000
(State population 6 to 15 years old. Numbers in thousands) Sportspersons 6 to 15 years old Sportspersons Number Total sportspersons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total anglers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fished only. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fished and hunted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total hunters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunted only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hunted and fished . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. ... Sample size too small to report data reliably. 406 398 348 *49 *57 ... *49 Percent of sportspersons 100 98 86 *12 *14 ... *12 Percent of population 33 32 28 *4 *5 ... *4

Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses. Column showing percent of sportspersons is based on the ‘‘Total sportspersons’’ row. Column showing percent of population is based on the state population 6 to 15 years old, including those who did not fish or hunt. Data reported on this table are from screening interviews in which one adult household member responded for household members 6 to 15 years old. The screening interview required the respondent to recall 12 months worth of activity. Includes state residents who fished or hunted only in other countries.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

Appendix C C-3

Table C-2. Selected Characteristics of Georgia Resident Anglers and Hunters 6 to 15 Years Old: 2000
(State population 6 to 15 years old. Numbers in thousands) Population Characteristic Number Total persons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Population Density of Residence Urban . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Population Size of Residence Metropolitan statistical areas (MSA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000,000 or more . . . . . . . . 250,000 to 999,999 . . . . . . . 50,000 to 249,999 . . . . . . . . Outside MSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sex Male . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Female . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Age 6 to 8 years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 to 11 years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 to 15 years . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ethnicity Hispanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Non-Hispanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Race White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . All others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annual Household Income Less than $10,000 . . . . . . . . . . $10,000 to $19,999 . . . . . . . . . $20,000 to $29,999 . . . . . . . . . $30,000 to $39,999 . . . . . . . . . $40,000 to $49,999 . . . . . . . . . $50,000 to $74,999 . . . . . . . . . $75,000 or more . . . . . . . . . . . Not reported. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,224 Percent 100 Number 406 Sportspersons (fished or hunted) Percent who participated 33 Percent of sportspersons 100 Anglers Percent who participated 32 Hunters Percent who participated *5

Number 398

Percent of anglers 100

Number *57

Percent of hunters *100

633 591

52 48

189 217

30 37

47 53

189 209

30 35

47 53

... *46

... *8

... *80

788 559 229 ... 436 649 575 359 349 516 *67 1,156 806 392 ... *89 *67 152 126 128 172 169 320

64 46 19 ... 36 53 47 29 28 42 *6 94 66 32 ... *7 *5 12 10 10 14 14 26

275 234 *42 ... 130 259 146 118 *111 176 ... 398 344 *51 ... ... ... ... *65 *42 *85 *101 *68

35 42 *18 ... 30 40 25 33 *32 34 ... 34 43 *13 ... ... ... ... *51 *33 *49 *60 *21

68 58 *10 ... 32 64 36 29 *27 44 ... 98 85 *13 ... ... ... ... *16 *10 *21 *25 *17

275 234 *42 ... 122 251 146 114 *111 173 ... 390 336 *51 ... ... ... ... *65 *42 *85 *101 *60

35 42 *18 ... 28 39 25 32 *32 33 ... 34 42 *13 ... ... ... ... *51 *33 *49 *60 *19

69 59 *10 ... 31 63 37 29 *28 43 ... 98 84 *13 ... ... ... ... *16 *11 *21 *25 *15

... ... ... ... ... *53 ... ... ... ... ... *57 *53 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

... ... ... ... ... *8 ... ... ... ... ... *5 *7 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

... ... ... ... ... *93 ... ... ... ... ... *100 *93 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

* Estimate based on a small sample size.

... Sample size too small to report data reliably.

Note: Percent who participated shows the percent of each row’s population who participated in the activity named by the column (the percent of those living in urban areas who fished, etc.). Remaining percent columns show the percent of each column’s participants who are described by the row heading (the percent of anglers who lived in urban areas, etc.). Data reported on this table are from screening interviews in which one adult household member responded for 6 to 15 years old. The screening interview required the respondent to recall 12 months worth of activity. Includes state residents who fished or hunted only in other countries.

Appendix C C-4

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table C-3. Georgia Residents 6 to 15 Years Old Participating in Wildlife Watching: 2000
(State population 6 to 15 years old. Numbers in thousands) Participants Total participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nonresidential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Residential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Observe wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Photograph wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feed wild birds or other wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintain plantings or natural areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * Estimate based on a small sample size. Note: Detail does not add to total because of multiple responses. The column showing percent of participants is based on total participants. The column showing percent of population is based on the state population 6 to 15 years old, including those who did not participate in wildlife watching. Data reported on this table are from screening interviews in which one adult household member responded for household members 6 to 15 years old. The screening interview required the respondent to recall 12 months worth of activity. Percent of participants 100 42 88 70 *13 58 *13 Percent of population 27 11 23 19 *3 15 *3

Number 325 136 286 228 *42 189 *41

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

Appendix C C-5

Appendix D

Appendix D. Sample Design and Statistical Accuracy

This Appendix is presented in two parts. The first part is the U.S. Census Bureau Source and Accuracy Statement. This statement describes the sampling design for the 2001 Survey and highlights the steps taken to produce estimates from the completed questionnaires. The statement explains the use of standard errors and confidence intervals. It also provides comprehensive information about errors characteristic of surveys, and formulas and parameters to calculate an approximate standard error or confidence interval for each number published in this report. The second part reports approximate standard errors (S.E.s) for selected measures of participation and expenditures for wildlife-related recreation. Tables D-1 to D-3 show common estimates by state with their estimated standard errors. Tables D-4 to D-9 provide parameters for computing standard errors. Source and Accuracy Statement for the Georgia State Report of the 2001 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation

identify likely sportspersons and wildlifewatching participants, and a series of follow-up interviews of selected persons to collect detailed data about their wildlife-related recreation during 2001. The 2001 FHWAR state samples were selected from expired samples of the Current Population Survey (CPS).

Sample Design
A. CPS - Current Population Survey The expired CPS samples used for the 2001 FHWAR had been selected initially from 1990 decennial census files with coverage in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The samples, while active, had been continually updated to reflect new construction. The sample addresses were located in 754 geographic areas consisting of a county or several contiguous counties. B. The FHWAR Screening Sample The screening sample consisted of households identified from the above sources. In Georgia, 1,538 household interviews were assigned to be interviewed. Of these, 10.1 percent were found to be vacant or otherwise not enumerated. Of the remaining households, about 9.6 percent could not be enumerated because the occupants were not found at home after repeated calls or were unavailable for some other reason. Overall, 1,237 completed household interviews were obtained for a state response rate of 90.4 percent. The field representatives asked screening questions for all household members 6 years old and older. Interviewing for the screen was conducted during April, May, and June of 2001.

Data for the FHWAR sportspersons sample and wildlife-watchers sample were collected in three waves. The first wave started in April 2001, the second in September 2001, and the third in January 2002. In the sportspersons sample, all persons who hunted or fished in 2001 by the time of the screening interview were interviewed in the first wave. The remaining sportspersons sample were interviewed in the second wave. All sample persons (from both the first and second waves) were interviewed in the third wave. The reference period was the preceding 4 months for waves 1 and 2. In wave 3, the reference period was either 4 or 8 months depending on when the sample person was first interviewed. C. The Detailed Samples Two independent detailed samples were chosen from the FHWAR screening sample. One consisted of sportspersons (people who hunt or fish) and the other of wildlife watchers (people who observe, photograph, or feed wildlife). 1. Sportspersons The Census Bureau selected the state detailed samples based on information reported during the screening phase. Every person 16 years old and older in the FHWAR screening sample was assigned to a sportspersons stratum based on time devoted to hunting/fishing in the past and time expected to be devoted to hunting/fishing in the future.

Source of Data
The estimates in this report are based on data collected in the 2001 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and WildlifeAssociated Recreation (FHWAR). The 2001 FHWAR Survey was designed to provide state-level estimates of the number of participants in recreational hunting and fishing, and in wildlifewatching activities (e.g., wildlife observation). Information was collected on the number of participants, where and how often they participated, the type of wildlife encountered, and the amounts of money spent on wildlife-related recreation. The survey was conducted in two stages: an initial screening of households to

Appendix D D-2

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

The four sportspersons categories were: Active - a person who had already participated in hunting/fishing in 2001 at the time of the screener interview. Likely - a person who had not participated in 2001 at the time of the screener but had participated in 2000 OR said they were likely to participate in 2001. Inactive - a person who had not participated in 2000 or 2001 AND said they were somewhat unlikely to participate in 2001. Nonparticipant - a person who had not participated in 2000 or 2001 AND said they were very unlikely to participate in 2001. Persons were selected for the detailed phase based on these groupings. Active sportspersons were given the detailed interview twice—at the same time of the screening interview (April-June 2001) and again in January/February 2002. Likely sportspersons and a subsample of the inactive sportspersons were also interviewed twice—first in September/October 2001, then in January/February 2002. If Census field representatives were not able to obtain the first interview, they attempted to interview the person in the final interviewing period with the reference period being the entire year. Persons in the nonparticipant group were not eligible for a detailed interview. About 604 persons were designated for interviews in Georgia. Overall, 556 detailed sportspersons interviews were completed for a response rate of 92.1 percent. 2. Wildlife Watchers The wildlife-watching state detailed sample also was selected based on information reported during the screening phase. Every person 16 years of age and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

older was assigned to a category based on time devoted to wildlife-watching activities in previous years, participation in 2001 by the time of the screening interview, and intentions to participate in activities during the remainder of 2001. Each person was placed into one of the following five groups based on their past participation: Active - a person who had already participated in 2001 at the time of the screening interview. Avid - a person who had not yet participated in 2001 but in 2000 had taken trips to participate in wildlife-watching activities for 21 or more days or had spent $300 or more. Average - a person who had not yet participated in 2001 but in 2000 had taken trips to wildlifewatch for less than 21 days and had spent less than $300 OR had not participated in wildlifewatching activities but said they were very likely to in the remainder of 2001. Infrequent - a person who had not participated in 2000 or 2001 but said they were somewhat likely or somewhat unlikely to participate in the remainder of 2001. Nonparticipant - a person who had not participated in 2000 or 2001 and said they were very unlikely to participate during the remainder of 2001. Persons were selected for the detailed phase based on these groupings. Persons in the nonparticipant group were not eligible for a detailed interview. A subsample of each of the other groups was selected to receive a detailed interview with the chance of being selected diminishing as the likelihood of participation diminished. Wildlife-watching participants were given the detailed interview twice. Some received their first detailed interview at the same

time as the screening interview (April-June 2001). The rest received their first detailed interview in September/October 2001. All wildlife-watching participants received their second interview in January/February 2002. If Census field representatives were not able to obtain the first interview, they attempted to interview the person in the final interviewing period with the reference period being the entire year. About 286 persons were designated for interviews in Georgia. Overall, 263 detailed wildlife-watching participant interviews were completed for a response rate of 92.0 percent.

Estimation Procedure
Several stages of adjustments were used to derive the final 2001 FHWAR person weights. A brief description of the major components of the weights is given below. All statistics for the population 6 to 15 years of age were derived from the screening interview. Statistics for the population 16 and over came from both the screening and detailed interviews. Estimates which came from the screening sample are presented in Appendix C. A. Screening Sample Every interviewed person in the screening sample received a weight that was the product of the following factors: 1. Base Weight. The base weight is the inverse of the household’s probability of selection. 2. Household Noninterview Adjustment. The noninterview adjustment inflated the weight assigned to interviewed households to account for households eligible for interview but for which no interview was obtained. 3. First-Stage Adjustment. The 754 areas designated for our samples were selected from over 2,000 such areas of the United States. Appendix D D-3

Some sample areas represent only themselves and are referred to as self-representing. The remaining areas represent other areas similar in selected characteristics and are thus designated nonselfrepresenting. The first-stage factor reduces the component of variation arising from sampling the nonself-representing areas. 4. Second-Stage Adjustment. This adjustment brings the estimates of the total population in each state into agreement with censusbased estimates of the civilian noninstitutional and nonbarrack military populations for each state. B. Sportspersons Sample Every interviewed person in the sportspersons detailed sample received a weight that was the product of the following factors: 1. Screening Weight. This is the individual’s final weight from the screening sample. 2. Sportspersons Stratum Adjustment. This factor inflated the weights of persons selected for the detailed sample to account for the subsampling done within each sportsperson’s stratum. 3. Sportspersons Noninterview Adjustment. This factor adjusts the weights of the interviewed sportspersons to account for sportspersons selected for the detailed sample for whom no interview was obtained. A person was considered a noninterview if he/she were not interviewed in the third wave of interviewing. 4. Sportspersons Ratio Adjustment Factor. This is a ratio adjustment of the detailed sample to the screening sample within sportspersons sampling stratum. This adjustment brings the population estimates of persons age 16 years old or older from the detailed sample into agreement with the same estimates from the screening sample, which was a much larger sample.

C. Wildlife-Watchers Sample Every interviewed person in the wildlife-watchers detailed sample received a weight that was the product of the following factors: 1. Screening Weight. This is the individual’s final weight from the screening sample. 2. Wildlife-Watchers Stratum Adjustment. This factor inflated the weights of persons selected for the detailed sample to account for the subsampling done within each wildlife-watcher stratum. 3. Wildlife-Watchers Noninterview Adjustment. This factor adjusts the weights of the interviewed wildlife-watching participants to account for wildlife watchers selected for the detailed sample for which no interview was obtained. A person was considered a noninterview if he/she were not interviewed in the third wave of interviewing. 4. Wildlife-Watchers Ratio Adjustment Factor. This is a ratio adjustment of the detailed sample to the screening sample within wildlife-watchers sampling strata. This adjustment brings the population estimates of persons age 16 years old or older from the detailed sample into agreement with the same estimates from the screening sample, which was a much larger sample.

nonsampling errors in responses and enumeration, but do not measure systematic biases in the data. (Bias is the average over all possible samples of the differences between the sample estimate and the actual value.)

Nonsampling Variability
Let us suppose that a comparable complete enumeration was conducted. That is, an interview is attempted for every person 16 years old and older in the United States. Chances are we will not correctly estimate every parameter under consideration (for example, the proportion of people who fished). In this instance, the difference is due solely to nonsampling errors. Nonsampling errors also occur in sample surveys and can be attributed to several sources including the following: • • • • The inability to obtain information about all cases in the sample. Definitional difficulties. Differences in the interpretation of questions. Respondents’ inability or unwillingness to provide correct information. Respondents’ inability to recall information. Errors made in data collection such as in recording or coding the data. Errors made in the processing of data. Errors made in estimating values for missing data. Failure to represent all units with the sample (undercoverage).

• • • • •

Accuracy of the Estimates
Since the 2001 estimates came from a sample, they may differ from figures from a complete census using the same questionnaires, instructions, and enumerators. A sample survey estimate has two possible types of error— sampling and nonsampling. The accuracy of an estimate depends on both types of error, but the full extent of the nonsampling error is unknown. Consequently, one should be particularly careful when interpreting results based on a relatively small number of cases or on small differences between estimates. The standard errors for the 2001 FHWAR estimates primarily indicate the magnitude of sampling error. They also partially measure the effect of some

Overall CPS undercoverage is estimated to be about 8 percent. Generally, undercoverage is larger for males than for females and larger for Blacks and other races combined than for Whites. Ratio estimation to independent population controls, as described previously, partially corrects for the bias due to survey undercoverage. However, biases exist in the estimates to the extent that missed persons in missed households or missed persons in interviewed households have different Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Appendix D D-4

characteristics from those of interviewed persons in the same age group. Comparability of Data. Data obtained from the 2001 FHWAR and other sources are not entirely comparable. This results from differences in field interviewer training and experience and in differing survey processes. This is an

example of nonsampling variability not reflected in the standard errors. Use caution when comparing results from different sources (See Appendix B). Note When Using Small Estimates. Because of the large standard errors involved, summary measures (such as medians and percentage distributions)

would probably not reveal useful information when computed on a base smaller than 100,000. Take care in the interpretation of small differences. For instance, even a small amount of nonsampling error can cause a borderline difference to appear significant or not, thus distorting a seemingly valid hypothesis test.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

Appendix D D-5

Sampling Variability
The particular sample used for the 2001 FHWAR Survey is one of a large number of all possible samples of the same size that could have been selected using the same sample design. Estimates derived from the different samples would differ from each other. This sample-to-sample variability is referred to as sampling variability and is generally measured by the standard error. The exact sampling error is unknown. However, guides to the potential size of the sampling error are provided by the standard error of the estimate. Since the standard error of a survey estimate attempts to provide a measure of the variation among the estimates from the possible samples, it is a measure of the precision with which an estimate from a particular sample approximates the average result of all possible samples. Standard errors, as calculated by methods described next in “Standard Errors and Their Use,” are primarily measures of sampling variability, although they may include some nonsampling error. The sample estimate and its standard error enable one to construct a confidence interval, a range that would include the average result of all possible samples with a known probability. For example, if all possible samples were surveyed under essentially the same general conditions and using the same sample design, and if an estimate and its standard error were calculated from each sample, then approximately 90 percent of the intervals from 1.645 standard errors below the estimate to 1.645 standard errors above the estimate would include the average result of all possible samples. A particular confidence interval may or may not contain the average estimate derived from all possible samples. However, one can say with specified confidence that the interval includes the average estimate calculated from all possible samples. Standard errors may also be used to perform hypothesis testing—a procedure for distinguishing between population parameters using sample estimates. One common type of hypothesis is that the population parameters are different. An example would be comparing the proportion of anglers to the proportion of hunters. Tests may be performed at various levels of significance where a significance level is the probability of concluding that the characteristics are different when, in fact, they are the same. To conclude that two characteristics are different at the 0.10 level of significance, the absolute value of the estimated difference between characteristics must be greater than or equal to 1.645 times the standard error of the difference. This report uses 90-percent confidence intervals and 0.10 levels of significance to determine statistical validity. Consult standard statistical textbooks for alternative criteria. Standard Errors and Their Use. A number of approximations are required to derive, at a moderate cost, standard errors applicable to all the estimates in this report. Instead of providing an individual standard error for each estimate, parameters are provided to calculate standard errors for each type of characteristic. These parameters are listed in tables D-4 to D-9. Methods for using the parameters to calculate standard errors of various estimates are given in the next sections. Standard Errors of Estimated Numbers. The approximate standard error, sx, of an estimated number shown in this report can be obtained using the following formulas. Formula (1) is used to calculate the standard errors of levels of sportspersons, anglers, and wildlife watchers. (1)

Here, x is the size of the estimate and a and b are the parameters in the tables associated with the particular characteristic. Formula (2) is used for standard errors of aggregates, i.e., trips, days, and expenditures. (2)

Here, x is again the size of the estimate; y is the base of the estimate; and a, b, and c are the parameters in the tables associated with the particular characteristic.

Appendix D D-6

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Illustration of the Computation of the Standard Error of an Estimated Number Suppose that a table shows that 37,805,000 persons 16+ either fished or hunted in the United States in 2001. Using formula (1) with the parameters a= -0.000020 and b= 4,289 from table D-5, the approximate standard error of the estimates number of 37,805,000 sportspersons 16+ is

The 90-percent confidence interval for the estimated number of sportspersons 16+ is from 37,203,800 to 38,406,200, i.e., 37,805,000 ± 1.645 x 365,500. Therefore, a conclusion that the average estimate derived from all possible samples lies within a range computed in this way would be correct for roughly 90 percent of all possible samples. Suppose that another table shows that 13,034,300 hunters 16+ engaged in 228,367,800 days of participation in 2001 in the United States. Using formula (2) with the parameters a = 0.000168, b = -11,904, and c = 12,496 from table D-7, the approximate standard error on 228,367,800 estimated days on an estimated base of 13,034,300 hunters is

The 90-percent confidence interval on the estimate of 228,367,800 days is from 216,053,200 to 240,682,400, i.e., 228,367,800 ± 1.645 x 7,486,100. Again, a conclusion that the average estimate derived from all possible samples lies within a range computed in this way would be correct for roughly 90 percent of all possible samples. Standard Errors of Estimated Percentages. The reliability of an estimated percentage, computed using sample data for both numerator and denominator, depends on the size of the percentage and its base. Estimated percentages are relatively more reliable than the corresponding estimates of the numerators of the percentages, particularly if the percentages are 50 percent or more. When the numerator and the denominator of the percentage are in different categories, use the parameter in the tables indicated by the numerator. The approximate standard error, sx,p, can be obtained by use of the formula

(3) Here, x is the total number of sportspersons, hunters, etc., which is the base of the percentage; p is the percentage (0 < p < 100); and b is the parameter in the tables associated with the characteristic in the numerator of the percentage. Illustration of the Computation of the Standard Error of an Estimated Percentage Suppose that a table shows that of the 13,034,300 hunters 16+ in the United States, 22.7 percent hunted migratory birds. From table D-5, the appropriate b parameter is 3,793. Using formula (3), the approximate standard error on the estimate of 22.7 percent is

Consequently, the 90-percent confidence interval for the estimate percentage of migratory bird hunters 16+ is from 21.5 percent to 23.9 percent, i.e. 22.7 ± 1.645 x 0.71.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

Appendix D D-7

Standard Error of a Difference. The standard error of the difference between two sample estimates is approximately equal to

(4) where sx and sy are the standard errors of the estimates x and y. The estimates can be numbers, percentages, ratios, etc. This will represent the actual standard error quite accurately for the difference between estimates of the same characteristic in two different areas, or for the difference between separate and uncorrelated characteristics in the same area. However, if there is a high positive (negative) correlation between the two characteristics, the formula will overestimate (underestimate) the true standard error. Illustration of the Computation of the Standard Error of a Difference Suppose that a table shows that of the 13,034,300 hunters in the United States, 9,985,100 were licensed hunters, and 1,689,300 were exempt from a hunting license. The corresponding percentages are 76.6 percent and 13.0 percent, respectively. The apparent difference between the percent of licensed hunters and hunters who are exempt from a license is 63.6 percent. Using formula (3) and the appropriate b parameter from Table D-5, the approximate standard errors of 76.6 percent and 13.0 percent are 0.83 and 1.59, respectively. Using formula (4), the approximate standard error of the estimated difference of 63.6 percent is

The 90-percent confidence interval on the difference between licensed hunters and those who were exempt from a hunting license is from 62.1 to 65.1 percent, i.e., 63.6 ± 1.645 x 0.92. Since the interval does not contain zero, we can conclude with 90 percent confidence that the percentage of licensed hunters is greater than the percentage of hunters who are exempt from a hunting license. Standard Errors of Estimated Averages. Certain mean values for sportspersons, anglers, etc., shown in the report were calculated as the ratio of two numbers. For example, average days per angler is calculated as:

Standard errors for these averages may be approximated by the use of formula (5) below.

(5) In formula (5), r represents the correlation coefficient between the numerator and the denominator of the estimate. In the above formula, use 0.7 as an estimate of r. Illustration of the Computation of the Standard Error of an Estimated Average Suppose that a table shows that the average days per angler 16 years old or older for all fishing was 16.4 days. Using formulas (1) and (2) above, we compute the standard error on total days, 557,393,900, and total anglers, 34,071,100, to be 8,726,000 and 350,600, respectively. The approximate standard error on the estimated average of 16.4 days is

therefore, the 90-percent confidence interval on the estimated average of 16.4 days is from 16.1 to 16.7, i.e., 16.4 ± 1.645 x 0.18.

Appendix D D-8

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table D-1. Approximate Standard Errors of Resident Anglers, Days of Fishing by State Residents, and Expenditures for Fishing by State Residents
(Numbers in thousands) Participation State Estimate Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hampshire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 634 185 394 546 2,389 626 324 89 2,109 1,043 113 261 1,415 833 524 431 630 763 216 531 500 1,039 1,345 475 982 221 265 180 164 639 215 1,340 894 142 1,390 685 551 1,270 95 604 146 803 2,381 424 104 888 873 273 981 121 Standard error 28 8 23 31 124 31 17 5 91 52 7 15 73 41 28 21 36 44 13 31 23 66 59 28 46 11 13 12 8 30 13 79 45 6 65 35 27 80 5 28 8 40 137 17 7 47 37 16 56 6 Estimate 10,841 2,445 4,327 11,776 27,878 7,639 5,496 1,341 43,439 15,559 2,662 3,097 21,603 15,537 8,534 6,426 12,135 12,130 3,449 7,112 8,387 18,869 29,344 9,325 12,396 3,656 3,378 2,230 2,974 10,973 2,407 23,167 14,615 2,584 22,014 13,228 8,720 21,417 1,638 10,321 2,414 15,451 34,148 5,346 1,969 14,774 13,520 4,346 19,360 1,901 Standard error 452 262 510 1,296 3,138 638 631 213 4,318 1,799 554 330 1,814 1,865 672 907 1,041 1,412 397 1,027 789 3,090 3,270 1,652 859 468 281 387 305 1,632 358 2,932 1,280 217 1,944 1,554 1,081 2,271 179 946 289 1,519 5,143 344 212 1,198 1,142 349 2,175 220 Estimate $600,364 $213,781 $326,068 $386,164 $2,162,620 $772,537 $327,787 $92,474 $3,426,795 $612,414 $97,707 $230,006 $1,147,325 $469,379 $319,087 $331,195 $551,378 $648,285 $158,533 $495,458 $460,207 $960,469 $1,251,828 $317,408 $757,928 $202,751 $179,878 $235,599 $186,436 $712,797 $196,661 $921,777 $924,937 $182,746 $905,650 $493,616 $590,738 $762,242 $117,842 $496,974 $101,893 $468,841 $2,129,921 $400,214 $72,326 $688,844 $966,874 $146,288 $844,539 $135,280 Standard error $83,099 $18,009 $59,815 $50,245 $362,896 $105,782 $33,697 $20,799 $420,930 $87,929 $18,656 $25,225 $186,223 $80,663 $37,612 $46,971 $64,270 $61,451 $25,580 $63,380 $71,626 $172,980 $159,542 $47,936 $93,775 $25,563 $27,770 $39,457 $29,039 $90,138 $30,674 $169,508 $105,704 $19,235 $97,445 $62,689 $64,749 $69,554 $15,812 $58,949 $15,767 $92,443 $258,534 $36,948 $10,954 $103,105 $89,559 $19,717 $115,997 $20,747 Days Expenditures in dollars

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

Appendix D D-9

Table D-2. Approximate Standard Errors of Resident Hunters, Days of Hunting by State Residents, and Expenditures for Hunting by State Residents
(Numbers in thousands) Participation State Estimate Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hampshire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316 74 124 306 278 168 45 16 270 377 18 151 340 284 203 202 271 316 123 124 79 725 582 257 413 171 128 49 53 125 114 642 313 92 481 241 236 867 11 232 90 320 1,126 178 75 308 231 235 591 65 Standard error 22 5 13 28 43 18 7 2 39 32 4 12 44 28 16 17 23 28 10 14 10 54 40 23 37 11 10 6 5 15 13 51 33 7 39 24 18 68 2 21 7 31 108 13 6 32 17 16 41 6 Estimate 7,262 982 1,649 7,075 3,695 1,982 824 279 5,865 7,882 322 1,784 5,842 5,016 4,086 3,424 4,538 7,325 2,169 1,992 1,727 8,784 8,673 6,977 6,715 2,112 1,963 558 1,300 3,000 1,594 13,124 8,372 1,417 11,077 5,965 2,917 14,091 193 4,657 1,347 6,962 15,186 2,512 1,460 5,819 3,311 4,791 9,305 870 Standard error 1,047 174 345 1,140 1,076 338 199 85 1,370 1,023 92 252 2,234 939 725 443 482 1,565 366 352 406 1,080 930 1,283 1,184 240 203 104 169 641 371 1,611 1,717 232 2,011 1,012 481 1,656 61 810 215 1,248 3,248 386 195 866 352 637 1,151 100 Estimate $652,845 $111,678 $225,651 $387,489 $368,701 $185,277 $69,359 $18,424 $545,627 $505,894 $17,266 $168,088 $527,776 $279,670 $185,082 $223,192 $384,751 $528,155 $119,144 $143,143 $113,461 $556,880 $601,497 $306,157 $490,761 $161,239 $135,092 $149,292 $55,775 $156,786 $171,811 $975,691 $566,504 $78,745 $645,875 $323,215 $432,628 $901,173 $15,214 $280,030 $112,448 $659,063 $1,467,034 $308,510 $53,805 $340,273 $339,470 $201,282 $634,413 $62,958 Standard error $132,117 $18,869 $74,606 $69,954 $136,459 $39,453 $24,196 $6,513 $130,063 $88,503 $6,678 $32,796 $181,913 $70,406 $38,141 $41,908 $59,977 $98,836 $23,982 $33,553 $24,955 $131,109 $97,084 $74,399 $115,416 $25,032 $28,074 $38,530 $11,739 $48,877 $39,225 $202,696 $124,764 $11,192 $157,380 $66,265 $104,547 $144,957 $6,679 $52,190 $25,400 $122,182 $244,695 $53,000 $8,476 $64,904 $81,858 $39,066 $119,195 $13,319 Days Expenditures in dollars

Appendix D D-10

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table D-3. Approximate Standard Errors of Resident Nonresidential Participants, Days of Nonresidential Participation by State Residents, and Trip-Related Expenditures for Nonresidential Activities by State Residents
(Numbers in thousands) Participation State Estimate Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hampshire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 118 329 190 2,191 531 248 43 1,279 302 50 214 683 484 354 286 329 250 174 413 427 747 562 103 581 195 150 128 139 564 205 1,112 367 48 887 340 561 1,173 58 282 77 375 1,043 323 109 581 874 166 769 95 Standard error 40 12 45 43 254 61 34 8 171 67 9 43 81 67 41 34 40 39 21 53 59 122 82 22 129 22 21 20 21 66 26 138 62 8 94 55 68 148 8 56 14 57 240 35 17 84 90 22 85 10 Estimate 3,782 1,766 3,537 1,545 25,134 6,555 6,770 595 20,371 5,175 1,099 2,540 9,208 12,319 6,960 2,470 6,365 2,364 3,384 5,959 10,992 13,192 13,406 3,466 12,028 2,975 1,853 1,108 1,641 10,772 5,375 21,423 5,458 450 20,687 3,834 7,288 19,672 974 4,458 1,762 3,601 11,956 3,651 2,081 9,599 12,238 2,494 14,215 1,778 Standard error 746 316 571 407 4,024 1,258 1,596 135 4,477 1,581 282 558 2,307 3,071 1,751 347 2,093 562 614 1,226 2,658 2,762 4,473 1,449 3,251 631 405 199 371 2,207 1,059 4,045 1,857 97 5,732 1,079 981 4,214 230 1,374 518 663 2,858 1,162 526 2,345 1,311 599 3,348 411 Estimate $109,926 $49,035 $174,237 $70,811 $894,746 $183,470 $82,766 $15,727 $508,519 $174,269 $32,319 $58,842 $254,698 $140,460 $77,012 $81,231 $93,187 $53,259 $64,202 $188,565 $145,764 $332,609 $124,187 $32,803 $130,720 $75,050 $34,077 $50,162 $47,666 $230,096 $69,803 $471,293 $121,730 $6,946 $266,849 $42,413 $175,678 $445,924 $9,876 $79,258 $14,195 $114,678 $689,729 $93,928 $30,384 $225,247 $433,951 $62,283 $268,911 $27,150 Standard error $24,800 $11,646 $34,239 $24,515 $175,803 $45,064 $16,616 $4,444 $118,715 $55,270 $10,688 $15,651 $57,633 $34,864 $19,264 $15,404 $24,333 $18,104 $16,036 $47,258 $30,650 $90,218 $25,145 $13,539 $32,074 $20,978 $7,859 $13,058 $11,395 $41,929 $29,473 $128,063 $30,272 $2,453 $54,800 $9,434 $25,285 $108,522 $2,638 $21,827 $3,862 $29,348 $188,701 $24,813 $6,397 $59,484 $77,714 $16,816 $43,219 $9,198 Days Expenditures in dollars

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

Appendix D D-11

Table D-4. Parameters a and b for Calculating Approximate Standard Errors of Sportspersons, Anglers, Hunters, and Wildlife-Watching Participants
(These parameters are to be used only to calculate estimates of standard errors for characteristics developed from the screening sample) 6 years old and over State a United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hampshire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . –0.000017 –0.000380 –0.000948 –0.000399 –0.001069 –0.000221 –0.000521 –0.000336 –0.000428 –0.000427 –0.000506 –0.000659 –0.001285 –0.000427 –0.000578 –0.000803 –0.000659 –0.000493 –0.000874 –0.000903 –0.000463 –0.000193 –0.000606 –0.001004 –0.000955 –0.000681 –0.001327 –0.000479 –0.000588 –0.000455 –0.000220 –0.000887 –0.000298 –0.000506 –0.000994 –0.000402 –0.000774 –0.000429 –0.000563 –0.000327 –0.000542 –0.000788 –0.000798 –0.000674 –0.000532 –0.001116 –0.000636 –0.000190 –0.000784 –0.000986 –0.001599 b 4,191 1,493 512 1,559 2,456 6,329 1,819 996 283 5,619 3,361 705 1,393 4,572 3,064 2,084 1,528 1,760 3,461 1,035 2,151 1,065 5,281 4,226 2,368 3,305 1,085 714 845 482 1,591 1,389 4,907 3,353 581 4,091 2,323 1,261 6,176 291 1,838 522 3,887 11,571 948 605 3,870 956 1,344 4,628 718 a –0.000103 –0.002270 –0.004485 –0.001931 –0.006381 –0.001083 –0.002707 –0.002227 –0.002753 –0.002768 –0.002856 –0.003146 –0.006911 –0.002310 –0.003388 –0.004015 –0.004453 –0.002857 –0.004231 –0.005933 –0.002684 –0.001155 –0.003588 –0.006232 –0.005090 –0.004295 –0.008909 –0.002742 –0.003740 –0.002565 –0.001309 –0.004190 –0.001768 –0.004040 –0.007996 –0.002543 –0.003822 –0.002347 –0.004018 –0.002062 –0.002857 –0.005465 –0.005230 –0.003386 –0.001723 –0.008013 –0.003336 –0.001070 –0.005315 –0.005562 –0.007708 b 4,052 1,417 489 1,303 2,444 5,240 1,551 1,007 284 5,390 3,156 538 1,424 4,043 2,867 1,702 1,804 1,623 3,101 1,086 1,973 928 5,206 4,574 2,275 3,440 1,292 713 838 446 1,434 1,228 4,458 4,161 816 4,199 2,007 1,105 6,755 276 1,566 667 3,954 10,479 667 697 3,090 889 1,323 4,461 647 6-15 year olds only

Appendix D D-12

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table D-5. Parameters a and b for Calculating Approximate Standard Errors of Levels for the Detailed Sportspersons Sample
Sportspersons and anglers 16+ State a United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hampshire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . –0.000020 –0.000459 –0.001213 –0.000405 –0.001229 –0.000275 –0.000602 –0.000385 –0.000483 –0.000395 –0.000512 –0.000509 –0.001216 –0.000487 –0.000549 –0.000888 –0.000642 –0.000835 –0.000991 –0.000954 –0.000516 –0.000252 –0.000643 –0.001114 –0.001033 –0.000678 –0.001195 –0.000676 –0.000617 –0.000501 –0.000252 –0.000711 –0.000364 –0.000451 –0.000814 –0.000421 –0.000954 –0.000652 –0.000635 –0.000423 –0.000527 –0.001088 –0.000577 –0.000603 –0.000616 –0.001086 –0.000546 –0.000427 –0.000781 –0.001026 –0.001209 b 4,289 1,570 535 1,492 2,452 7,111 1,924 976 288 4,789 3,106 454 1,176 4,492 2,501 1,953 1,292 2,592 3,270 959 2,087 1,221 4,874 4,105 2,169 2,843 832 851 893 478 1,588 944 5,159 2,646 389 3,638 2,454 1,715 5,902 322 1,616 605 2,490 9,273 955 520 2,930 1,913 1,133 4,165 452 a –0.000018 –0.000489 –0.000986 –0.000389 –0.001529 –0.000265 –0.000649 –0.000429 –0.000658 –0.000478 –0.000472 –0.001043 –0.001263 –0.000648 –0.000654 –0.000659 –0.000832 –0.000679 –0.000831 –0.000937 –0.000397 –0.000278 –0.000592 –0.000889 –0.001124 –0.000857 –0.001299 –0.000707 –0.000576 –0.000547 –0.000305 –0.001259 –0.000301 –0.000616 –0.001295 –0.000381 –0.001042 –0.000558 –0.000628 –0.000510 –0.000696 –0.001013 –0.000749 –0.000733 –0.000714 –0.001184 –0.000658 –0.000305 –0.000891 –0.000832 –0.001693 b 3,793 1,672 435 1,431 3,050 6,859 2,075 1,086 392 5,788 2,858 930 1,221 5,979 2,982 1,450 1,673 2,110 2,743 942 1,605 1,344 4,491 3,278 2,360 3,597 904 890 833 522 1,918 1,672 4,277 3,618 619 3,292 2,679 1,468 5,840 389 2,133 563 3,232 11,259 1,106 567 3,529 1,368 1,288 3,378 633 Hunters 16+

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

Appendix D D-13

Table D-6. Parameters a, b, and c for Calculating Approximate Standard Errors for Expenditures for the Detailed Sportspersons Sample
Sportspersons and anglers 16+ State a United States. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hampshire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.000209 0.009175 –0.006112 0.026819 0.004633 0.021384 0.009864 0.001877 0.040550 0.007654 0.014008 0.025846 –0.002875 0.019572 0.022696 0.005064 0.015860 0.004591 –0.00040 0.017717 0.008904 0.016262 0.019792 0.008800 0.016340 0.010252 0.006249 0.017333 0.018933 0.018219 0.008872 0.009851 0.026625 0.002898 0.005072 0.006294 0.004660 0.003145 –0.001615 0.008233 0.006577 0.016156 0.033971 0.002571 0.001106 0.011747 0.016382 0.003760 0.006720 0.012407 0.012293 b –81,938 –61,525 –16,312 –7,817 –23,748 –70,276 –19,578 –16,928 –7,042 20,508 –36,268 –5,658 –29,463 10,051 –22,961 –20,998 18,185 –41,799 –65,739 –5,998 –8,843 –12,678 –127,849 –47,947 –3,615 –14,938 2,944 –3,651 –14,263 –2,158 –21,461 –15,340 –55,537 –52,854 –1,310 –16,259 –37,618 –20,997 –16,424 –3,065 –24,715 –6,396 –12,176 –181,509 –2,243 –4,625 –12,594 –21,018 –9,550 –19,300 –9,179 c 16,935 5,860 2,378 2,578 6,426 15,458 5,293 2,684 809 14,478 6,059 1,067 3,878 8,854 5,102 4,528 1,730 5,443 6,880 1,713 3,522 3,571 11,921 9,688 2,838 4,700 2,023 1,663 1,569 896 4,161 3,013 8,963 8,564 842 6,658 7,562 4,657 12,085 823 4,435 1,099 3,739 27,582 3,125 1,103 5,152 4,033 2,878 6,202 1,344 a 0.000849 0.024164 0.021402 0.092593 0.014405 0.113785 0.022718 0.079125 0.105687 0.023874 0.008831 0.097125 0.016379 0.085878 0.033251 0.016656 0.021785 0.008079 0.019445 0.025284 0.032998 0.024064 0.040148 0.014048 0.048203 0.044792 0.012939 0.027267 0.031588 0.019369 0.074090 0.038148 0.021960 0.027058 0.013476 0.032819 0.020499 0.039506 0.015010 0.163731 0.014150 0.041242 0.025020 0.012511 0.011415 0.008540 0.014967 0.047027 0.031204 0.024061 0.024311 b –338,404 –1,049 39,475 –90,851 –62,820 –136,283 –94,581 –34,580 –2,637 –155,743 –95,649 –938 –64,453 –549,762 –103,911 –138,890 –50,528 –58,497 –21,541 –13,157 –11,255 –1,953 –65,705 –30,492 –12,376 –43,432 –22,671 –39,668 –38,184 –16,561 –47,814 4,904 –65,942 –70,174 10,740 –343,279 –34,984 –209,288 –45,176 1,552 –45,230 13,567 25,879 228,353 –63,829 –5,531 –57,318 –137,577 –15,338 –96,808 –20,666 c 16,347 5,155 489 2,072 5,523 6,339 3,887 1,895 311 8,973 7,863 788 3,289 11,311 8,051 5,392 2,671 4,208 4,669 1,841 2,731 1,922 9,671 6,738 2,679 4,274 1,865 2,043 1,658 1,337 2,925 1,576 13,270 6,255 593 12,406 4,891 4,495 9,408 318 4,751 850 2,858 16,609 3,240 1,212 6,583 2,616 1,413 6,607 1,350 Hunters 16+

Appendix D D-14

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table D-7. Parameters a, b, and c for Calculating Approximate Standard Errors for Days or Trips for the Detailed Sportspersons Sample
Sportspersons and anglers 16+ State a United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hampshire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . –0.000359 –0.014899 0.004232 0.009813 –0.000591 0.005829 –0.002514 0.004894 0.019930 0.004327 0.006853 0.024692 –0.003745 –0.001740 0.005471 –0.002638 0.016223 –0.001146 0.005167 –0.001145 0.015009 0.001279 0.014345 0.003565 0.019493 –0.002128 0.000449 –0.001914 0.021810 0.002071 0.011720 0.001275 0.006773 –0.003764 –0.000254 –0.002277 0.002908 –0.004964 –0.000351 0.003515 0.001822 0.006727 –0.003393 0.008771 –0.000945 –0.003874 –0.003305 0.001423 –0.003294 –0.000821 0.001824 b –10,379 –1,645 –2,284 –504 –4,532 –32,577 –4,440 –1,905 –260 –8,388 –15,975 –3,126 –3,875 –10,299 –5,800 –1,789 –605 –3,831 –9,551 –2,421 –1,757 –5,091 –13,184 –17,781 –15,942 –5,253 –2,600 –1,750 –2,046 –1,578 –5,526 –6,683 –19,672 –7,850 –1,046 –12,642 –8,589 –10,252 –9,506 –532 –4,530 –857 –8,542 –62,115 –159 –1,213 –6,179 –4,085 –831 –11,365 –978 c 21,216 10,642 1,514 1,658 7,151 19,133 6,304 2,797 493 12,123 7,865 2,236 4,263 13,115 7,756 4,745 1,633 5,559 6,990 3,262 3,235 4,088 13,688 12,718 6,461 7,226 3,680 2,477 1,649 1,470 6,959 5,081 13,519 10,700 1,099 14,807 7,908 11,849 15,294 829 4,244 1,163 10,929 37,457 2,170 1,671 9,142 5,250 2,712 13,762 1,466 a 0.000168 0.010257 0.017337 0.025859 0.005331 0.046419 0.005304 0.032365 0.042659 0.023712 0.000498 –0.011390 0.007761 0.116103 0.015379 0.013073 –0.005996 –0.008903 0.031739 0.012469 –0.000817 0.028210 0.005369 –0.002763 0.014162 0.018480 0.000401 –0.000535 –0.001816 0.000312 0.022081 0.035962 –0.006261 0.005307 0.013638 0.014951 –0.012896 0.014008 0.001946 0.036010 0.016996 0.014473 0.014450 0.026724 0.009900 0.001720 0.003533 –0.000778 0.003483 0.002687 0.000207 b –11,904 –3,745 –1,630 –2,427 –5,600 –14,455 –3,344 –208 –901 –8,026 –4,557 –629 –1,392 –25,870 –6,119 –5,442 –2,318 –1,883 –9,447 –2,544 –3,341 –2,953 –5,906 –5,610 –6,098 –8,909 –1,984 –295 –1,230 –511 –3,488 –4,491 –6,261 –10,202 –2,072 –10,264 –7,384 –4,387 –7,227 –680 –2,924 –561 –5,875 –40,596 –3,490 –943 –4,262 –1,826 –2,510 –8,025 3,198 c 12,496 3,494 1,174 2,408 6,560 11,763 4,269 1,179 837 8,704 6,375 1,711 1,956 11,750 5,928 4,003 4,722 5,581 4,809 2,121 4,179 2,268 7,564 8,671 5,274 5,746 2,302 1,450 1,883 902 3,096 2,409 14,001 11,887 1,354 9,111 10,343 3,466 10,734 752 3,226 1,029 5,933 24,438 2,684 1,254 5,955 2,912 3,463 7,969 606 Hunters 16+

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

Appendix D D-15

Table D-8. Parameters a and b for Calculating Approximate Standard Errors of Levels of Wildlife-Watching Participants for the Detailed Wildlife-Watching Sample
Nonresidential users State a United States. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hampshire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1

Wildlife-watching participants1 b a 15,974 6,172 1,757 6,858 10,740 32,229 8,521 5,136 1,797 25,612 15,802 1,558 11,088 10,311 10,485 5,750 4,676 5,341 6,621 3,066 7,604 8,924 22,083 14,226 5,085 33,309 3,568 3,292 3,438 3,767 8,490 4,023 18,488 11,203 1,503 11,210 10,317 10,356 21,485 1,205 12,288 3,043 9,330 59,315 4,685 3,413 13,684 11,601 3,226 11,690 1,552 –0.000040 –0.000996 –0.003102 –0.001138 –0.003708 –0.000675 –0.001570 –0.001170 –0.001488 –0.001029 –0.001239 –0.001508 –0.002755 –0.001182 –0.001294 –0.002397 –0.001200 –0.001519 –0.001352 –0.002046 –0.001100 –0.000791 –0.001385 –0.002710 –0.002331 –0.002372 –0.003963 –0.001558 –0.001641 –0.001860 –0.000839 –0.001796 –0.000811 –0.001382 –0.002659 –0.000884 –0.002253 –0.001506 –0.001198 –0.001226 –0.001840 –0.002845 –0.001206 –0.001142 –0.002427 –0.003296 –0.001540 –0.000842 –0.001979 –0.002288 –0.004075 b 8,555 3,406 1,368 4,191 7,397 17,485 5,017 2,963 887 12,478 7,512 1,345 2,664 10,900 5,899 5,274 2,414 4,717 4,459 2,056 4,449 3,824 10,506 9,989 4,896 9,949 2,758 1,961 2,375 1,774 5,282 2,385 11,505 8,114 1,271 7,638 5,796 3,958 11,142 934 5,460 1,582 5,202 17,541 3,762 1,579 8,266 3,773 2,859 9,283 1,524

–0.000076 –0.001806 –0.003984 –0.001862 –0.005383 –0.001245 –0.002666 –0.002028 –0.003015 –0.002113 –0.002607 –0.001747 –0.011466 –0.001118 –0.002301 –0.002614 –0.002324 –0.001720 –0.002007 –0.003051 –0.001879 –0.001845 –0.002911 –0.003859 –0.002421 –0.007940 –0.005126 –0.002615 –0.002376 –0.003949 –0.001349 –0.003029 –0.001303 –0.001908 –0.003144 –0.001298 –0.004011 –0.003939 –0.002310 –0.001581 –0.004009 –0.005473 –0.002163 –0.003860 –0.003023 –0.007125 –0.002550 –0.002590 –0.002233 –0.002881 –0.004150

Use these parameters for total wildlife-watching participants and residential participants.

Appendix D D-16

Georgia—U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Table D-9. Parameters a, b, and c for Calculating Approximate Standard Errors for Expenditures and Days or Trips for Detailed Wildlife-Watching Sample
Expenditures State a United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alaska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Delaware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michigan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mississippi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Hampshire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . North Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pennsylvania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhode Island . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vermont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . –0.000286 0.030708 0.041800 0.015564 0.010470 0.018066 0.038817 0.009671 0.048255 0.037237 0.049562 0.073902 0.049578 0.023791 0.031176 0.027387 0.014086 0.034724 0.077714 0.023033 0.043571 0.006810 0.040492 0.014246 0.124078 0.034639 0.057903 0.024994 0.034440 0.035666 0.013039 0.160478 0.055761 0.016613 0.083798 0.013567 0.016264 0.006779 0.029900 0.030265 0.053921 0.057120 0.037696 0.038651 0.056421 0.013746 0.036266 0.018752 0.051192 –0.001127 0.097425 b –65,186 –4,434 –4,269 –88,920 –232,312 –66,438 –215,098 –39,324 793 246,936 –47,365 –7,392 3,816 –91,738 –6,949 –151,677 –26,411 –14,328 –11,409 –44,469 –70,123 –178,680 –319,042 –14,209 18,562 –25,636 –22,171 –4,237 22,068 –13,208 –52,984 –37,219 –88,911 –38,392 –1,532 –190,802 –32,772 –12,633 –197,526 –1,717 14,141 7,343 –9,299 –443,322 9,481 –43,820 –105,349 –46,218 –2,708 –25,290 –2,122 c 37,635 4,714 1,514 7,092 19,942 36,961 11,070 6,004 1,135 15,955 13,337 1,428 4,179 15,163 11,644 10,811 5,617 9,748 5,935 5,406 6,923 12,400 19,607 13,809 3,885 11,799 3,776 3,539 4,012 2,568 9,831 3,245 14,702 14,073 1,564 23,398 9,957 7,354 29,144 1,486 5,196 999 8,559 33,784 4,059 3,010 16,055 10,365 2,632 18,720 1,550 a 0.000052 –0.022833 –0.029715 –0.006753 –0.016982 0.012283 –0.052385 –0.041089 –0.017715 –0.011904 –0.012828 –0.107474 –0.012767 0.017880 –0.031304 –0.043626 –0.020112 –0.100682 –0.079705 –0.017174 –0.033325 –0.031568 –0.018833 –0.095678 –0.030843 –0.010269 –0.012332 –0.038650 –0.005101 0.022014 –0.011200 –0.041133 –0.018354 –0.014391 0.000482 0.054816 0.012938 –0.034862 0.024902 –0.069322 –0.019706 –0.031149 0.000581 0.005378 0.045711 0.010618 –0.016136 –0.015432 –0.035244 –0.064163 –0.093805 b 543,738 –34,485 –14,349 8,600 –55,327 199,721 –41,128 –115,012 –10,761 368,712 –66,122 –50,423 26,870 –26,735 –137,397 –36,375 –42,505 –143,695 –145,421 –7,365 –216,192 –234,200 –31,270 –560,553 –100,539 219,841 5,559 –12,323 –34,384 –23,662 215,547 –40,922 –352,468 –150,974 –16,359 –205,827 93,047 –36,621 969,419 –95,835 –230,401 –123,874 38,507 354,179 –66,098 –34,930 –231,865 –108,529 –80,788 –592,681 –13,385 c 10,948 19,838 8,241 9,994 23,242 11,847 50,721 28,194 3,753 53,853 35,936 10,960 10,809 32,660 50,618 39,705 16,304 76,120 49,422 9,098 46,228 47,548 48,594 139,828 24,176 37,795 10,812 13,951 8,741 6,038 18,712 17,946 78,358 57,926 3,936 28,294 14,288 32,540 –33,184 12,964 46,919 14,456 8,480 23,102 23,779 7,630 58,093 31,269 20,819 124,050 14,702 Days or trips

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—Georgia

Appendix D D-17