SPEECH AND LANGUAGE DIFFICULTIES IN SPECIAL POPULATIONS by HC11120914489

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									   Chapter 13: music through songs and
              nursery rhymes
                Rhymes, poems and songs for classroom use

Objectives:
   To discuss the development of children’s creative and emotional lives
      through music and movement
   To learn more about movements’ necessary role in the development of
      the brain.
   To understand how to incorporate music and movement into everyday
      classroom activities


   “Mobility is Central to being human. Our brain needs interaction and
   involvement to learn.”
                               Dr. Robert Sylvester of the University of Oregon

13.1   Why include music and movement in your classroom

As teachers you probably already realize that music can be an effective
method of learning for both children with special needs and those who are
normally developing.

When teachers and caregivers talk about why they sing with their children
they often say it’s “to stop the children becoming bored” or “to make the
children happy.” But there is even more to it than that. This chapter provides
you with some additional justification for using music in your lessons as well
as some songs, rhymes and tongue twisters that you can incorporate.

 Music and Movement Activity:

 Think about the following questions:

        * Why should we incorporate music and movement in the
        classroom?


        * What are some opportunities you use every day to incorporate
        music and movement in your classroom?

 Jot down your answers on this page or in a note book. These questions
 should be answered as we progress through the text. Be sure to go back
 and compare your answers with those given here.




                Please note: portions of this text are adapted with permission
                             from work produced by Leap Learning Systems
According to National Association for the Education of Young Children music
and movement can help students:

          Move with expression and rhythm
          Value movement and sound
          Develop listening skills
          Find their own singing voice
          Express emotion

There are many goals and skill areas being addressed through music and
movement. These include (but are not limited to):

               o Creativity, self-expression
               o Concepts including color, shape, rhythm, properties,
                 textures, sizes, design, patterns
               o Muscle development
               o Eye hand coordination
               o Outlet for feelings and emotions

Music happens to the whole brain. Scientists have found that it is not
compartmentalized in certain sections of the brain like other functions.
When young children move they are fundamentally developing their
cerebellums (small brain). This part of the brain stores memory. The better
developed the cerebellum, the larger capacity for memory. We teach our
children a lot of information that requires rote memory i.e. the alphabet,
counting. Why not strengthen their chances for success by allowing then
ample movement throughout the day? If we don’t get them moving at an early
age, once they get to grade school, they have to rely on higher parts of the
brain to do what the lower brain should do routinely.

Looking at brain research we see that children should not sit for extended
periods of time. Think about how you can get your children up and moving
throughout the day. Think about ways to incorporate movement to your
lessons.

For example: You can try telling a story and then having them act it out.
Alternatively have them say the alphabet and write it in the air with their
fingers at the same time.




 VSO Jitolee 2008                                                             154.
                          Deaf children from a school in Mumias perform a dance routine

13.2 Incorporating music and movement into your routine
Even if you have physically disabled children in your classrooms, think about
ways to modify the activity so they can participate. Children in wheel chairs
are still able to chase and dance and do other activities their more abled body
peers can do.

   1. Begin each day with song to welcome your students to class. Some
      morning songs we have heard went like this:

       Good Morning Song
       Good morning, good morning, good morning how are you?
       I’m fine, I’m fine, and I hope that you are too
       Shake hands, shake hands, shake hands with the person next to you
       Shake hands, shake hands and say “how do you do? how do you do?”

       Hello to you
       Hello to you and what is your name?
       Hello to you and what is your name?
       Hello to you and what is your name?
       Tell me what your name is

       My name is __________, how do you do?
       My name is __________, how do you do?
       My name is __________, how do you do?
       Very pleased to meet you

       Look who came to school today
       Look who came to school today _(name of child)_, __(name of child)__
       Look who came to school today, __(name of child)_ came to school



 VSO Jitolee 2008                                                                    155.
       There was a funny clown
       There was a funny clown in a circus ring
       Let’s see _____________ do his/her funny thing, let’s go
       Da da da da da da, da da da da da da,
       Da da da da da, da da da da da
       da da da da da da, hey!

       We’ve Been Waiting for You (by Bev Bos www.turnthepage.com)
       We’ve been waiting for you to come to this place,
       Waiting for you to come to this place
       Where ever you’re from, we’re glad that you’ve come,
       we’ve been waiting for you to come to this place

       If you want to _______________, we’ve been waiting for you
       And if you want to ________________ we’ll be waiting here too
       Where ever you’re from, we’re glad that you’ve come,
       we’ve been waiting for you to come to this place

       Allow the children to fill in the blank with their suggestions (e.g. sing,
       dance, draw, play, write, eat etc.)

   2. Teach concepts like size, colour and number by using song, chants
      and rhymes. Try songs like:

       The Rainbow Song
       Red and yellow and pink and green, purple and orange and blue
       I can sing a rainbow, sing a rainbow, sing a rainbow too.

       One potato…
       One potato, two potatoes, three potatoes, four
       Five potatoes, six potatoes, seven potatoes more

       1, 2, 3, 4, 5
       One, two, three, four, five
       once I caught a fish alive
       six, seven, eight, nine, ten
       then I let him go again

   3. Use songs to make transitions in your classroom. For example:

       When it’s time to clean up sing “clean up, clean up, everybody clean
       up.”

       At home time sing “it’s time to say goodbye, it’s time to say goodbye, I’ll
       see you tomorrow (or Monday!), it’s time to say goodbye.”

In addition to the reasons given above, songs like those suggested help build
your learning community. When children feel safe and secure in their learning
environment we know they are better able to perform.


 VSO Jitolee 2008                                                                  156.
13.3   Activities that Encourage Movement:

       -   Animal Dance
           Have children participate in an animal dance when teaching about
           animals. Don’t forget to emphasize those verbs (the action words)
              o Fly like a bird
              o Waddle like a duck
              o Stretch like a giraffe
              o Walk like an elephant
              o Run like a bear
              o Prowl like Lion
              o Leap like a dolphin
              o Swim like a fish
              o Hop like a rabbit
              o Gallop like a horse

Note: When engaging your children in movement activities, be sure to
reinforce to the children that there is no one way to move. Let them know that
all types of movement are welcome and appreciated.

       -   Draw the Music.
           Put on the radio or your favorite instrumental track. Give each of
           your students a blank piece of paper and a choice of crayon colors.
           Ask them to listen to the sounds. What color is the music? Once
           they decide, have them draw a picture of the music. Once the song
           is over, have them dictate what they drew and why they chose the
           color they did.

       -   Musical Chairs.
           Gather together one chair per child in an open space. Put them in a
           circle with their backs together. Play some music. While the music
           is playing the children get up and move around the chairs. While
           they are moving take away one or more chairs. When the music
           stops all the children have to find a chair. Whoever is left standing is
           out. Continue playing music and removing chairs until there are only
           2 children and 1 chair left in the game. Whoever gets the chair is
           the winner!!

       -   Act out the Weather.
           For example if you were acting out a storm:
           1. Separate the children into three groups. One group will be wind,
              another rain and the other thunder.
           2. Have the group that will be wind rub their hands together briskly.
              They can even make wind with their mouths by blowing through
              tight lips.
           3. The students making the thunder will stomp their feet on the
              floor.
           4. For rain, have a section on students lightly pat their thighs.
           5. You can orchestrate the storm by pointing to sections on
              children starting and stopping them at will. Here’s a nice pattern;

 VSO Jitolee 2008                                                                  157.
13.4   What about when the students in your class won’t STOP moving?

      You can call out “1-2-3 Freeze” and wait for the children to quiet
       themselves. Then give your instructions

13.5 Incorporating rhyme
Research shows that a young child’s ability to rhyme correlates with their later
abilities to read. In order to promote student’s rhyming skills don’t forget to
incorporate nursery rhymes on a daily basis. Below are some simple songs
and nursery rhymes that you may be familiar with.

Five Little Ducks
Five little ducks went out one day, over the hills and far away.
Mother duck said “quack, quack, quack, quack” but only four little ducks came
back

Four little ducks went out one day, over the hills and far away.
Mother duck said “quack, quack, quack, quack” but only three little ducks
came back

Three little ducks went out one day, over the hills and far away.
Mother duck said “quack, quack, quack, quack” but only two little ducks came
back

Two little ducks went out one day, over the hills and far away.
Mother duck said “quack, quack, quack, quack” but only one little duck came
back

One little duck went out one day, over the hills and far away.
Mother duck said “quack, quack, quack, quack” but none of her little ducks
came back

Sad mother duck went out one day, over the hills and far away.
Mother duck said “quack, quack, quack, quack” and all of her five little ducks
came back

Five Little Monkeys
Five little monkeys jumping on the bed,
One fell off and bumped his head
The mother called the doctor and the doctor said
“No more silly monkeys jumping on the bed”

Four little monkeys jumping on the bed,
One fell off and bumped his head
The mother called the doctor and the doctor said
“No more silly monkeys jumping on the bed”



 VSO Jitolee 2008                                                                 158.
Three little monkeys jumping on the bed,
One fell off and bumped his head
The mother called the doctor and the doctor said
“No more silly monkeys jumping on the bed”

Two little monkeys jumping on the bed,
One fell off and bumped his head
The mother called the doctor and the doctor said
“No more silly monkeys jumping on the bed”

One little monkeys jumping on the bed,
One fell off and bumped his head
The mother called the doctor and the doctor said
“No more silly monkeys jumping on the bed”

If You’re Happy
If you’re happy and you know it
Clap your hands (Clap –clap)
If you’re happy and you know it
Clap your hands (Clap –clap)

If you’re happy and you know it, and you really want to show it
If you’re happy and you know it
Clap your hands (clap-clap)

Variations: stomp your feet, shout hooray, do a dance, say hello, sit down

I’m a Little Teapot
I’m a little teapot short and stout,
here is my handle, here is my spout
When I get all steamed up hear me shout
“tip me over, pour me out”

Jack and Jill
Jack and Jill went up the hill
To fetch a pail of water;
Jack fell down and broke his crown
And Jill came tumbling after

Miss Polly Had a Dolly
Miss Polly had a dolly who was sick, sick, sick
So she called for the doctor to come quick, quick, quick
The doctor came with his bag and his hat
and knocked on the door with a rat-a-tap-tap

He looked at the dolly and he shook his head
He said “Miss Polly put her straight to bed”
He wrote on a paper for a pill, pill, pill
I’ll be back in the morning with your bill, bill, bill


 VSO Jitolee 2008                                                           159.
The Itsy-Bitsy Spider
The itsy-bitsy spider went up the garden spout
Down came the rain and washed the spider out
Out came the sun and dried up all the rain
So the itsy bitsy spider, climbed up the spout again

Zoom, zoom zoom
Zoom, zoom zoom we’re going to the moon
Zoom, zoom zoom we’ll be there very soon
5,4,3,2,1, blast off



A word about tongue twisters:
Many teachers cite the use of tongue twisters for working on speech with their
students. If you are going to user these difficult sentences be sure they are
appropriate for the child. Remember we want to meet the child at their level
and push them a little. Choosing a long tongue twister filled with sounds they
can’t produce is going to be frustrating rather than fun.




                                           Girls perform a poem about disability


Other Notable Resources:
Music & Movement; A Practical Guide for Teaching Young Children by Ellen
Booth Church

This book lists developmental expectations for music and movement
according to age. It also details your role as the teacher in successfully
fostering a child’s music and movement.



 VSO Jitolee 2008                                                               160.

								
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