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					             SIXTH DRAFT




              Tonbridge
      Local Children’s Services
             Partnership



 Children and Young People‟s Plan
            2008-2011




March 2009
Our vision
Our vision is to deliver these Every Child Matters outcomes, improve the lives
and well-being of all children and young people in the Tonbridge area; and
ensure they all receive the best start in life possible.

These aims reflect the broader vision of the Kent Children and Young People‟s
Plan where children and young people are positive about their future and are:

         Nurtured and encouraged at home
         Inspired and motivated by school and education
         Safe and secure in the community
         Living healthy and fulfilled lives.



    Chair: Angela Ford.
    Contact Number: 01622 605159
     Email angela.ford@kent.gov.uk


    Local Children‟s Services Partnership Manager: George Parkin
    Contact Number: 01732 525156
    Email: george.parkin@kent.gov.uk




    GPCP32 CYPP                                                                  2
Introduction
Welcome to the Tonbridge Local Children and Young People‟s Plan for 2008 -
2011.

Tonbridge is a partnership of all agencies including 22 schools who work
together to make a difference to the lives of children young people and
families in Tonbridge. The plan has the support of all major agencies involved
in services to children young people and families including:

      Kent County Council – Children, Families and Education
      Tonbridge and Malling Borough Council
      Kent Police
      West Kent Primary Care Trust
      The voluntary and community sector


Tonbridge is one of 23 Local Children‟s Service Partnerships in Kent which
commission integrated services and which put the child at the heart of the
decision-making process

Tonbridge is the 2nd least deprived cluster in the county as measured by the
index for multiple deprivation of all pupils in its schools scoring 8.94 (Kent 16.85)

Mosaic analysis shows that at secondary level the „Symbols of Success‟ group is
the most dominant grouping, accounting for 33.7% of the area which is over
double the national average.

At primary level this grouping accounts for 16.9% of the area (Kent average
11.2%).
This grouping contains people who have rewarding and successful careers, who
are well educated with twice the national average of degree qualifications.
However IDAC – Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index data shows 2
Trench ward areas and 1 Hadlow ward area ranking amongst the most deprived
in Kent and Medway with equivalised income below 60% of median before
housing costs.

This plan sets out our vision for the work that all agencies, in both the
statutory and voluntary sector, in the Tonbridge area are engaged in to
address the needs and aspirations of, and support for all the children, young
people and their families in the Tonbridge area.

This plan should be used as a reference point for multi-agency work across
the Tonbridge area. It will be updated regularly and can be used by all
partner agencies to inform their own strategic plans and enhance partnership
working.




 GPCP32 CYPP                                                                       3
The plan will be monitored by the Local Children‟s Services Partnership Board,
supported by working groups and targeted work as appropriate. The Board is
made up of representatives from both the statutory and voluntary sectors of
children‟s and family support services working in the Tonbridge area.

The plan is designed to highlight specific priorities to be focused upon in
partnership with all the agencies in Tonbridge. It should be viewed alongside
broader individual agency planning and service delivery and the Kent CYPP
(Children and Young People‟s Plan).

The aim of this plan is to provide a clearer focus and define priority areas of
work to be undertaken in order to improve the lives of all the children, young
people and families of Tonbridge.


Every Child Matters
In 2003 the Government launched „Every Child Matters: Change for Children‟
which signalled a new way of integrating public services for children, young
people and their families. The resulting Children Act 2004 provided the
legislative framework for developing more accessible services focused around
the child and family. A range of other guidance supports this framework,
including the 10 year Childcare Strategy, the Youth Matters green paper, the
Kent 2010 Vision and the Kent Children and Young People‟s Plan 2006-9.

The Local Tonbridge CYPP – Children and Young People‟s Plan – takes these
ECM areas as the basic structure and outline for the plan and the chosen
priorities have been drawn together through the use of a wide range of data
analysis and consultation exercises based upon these ECM areas of focus.

Integrated Youth Support Services (IYSS)

IYSS will provide universal services to all young people according to their
needs. It will ensure closer integration of planning, commissioning and
delivery of services and the active involvement of young people.

Targeted Youth Support (TYS)

The aim of TYS is for agencies to work together to help vulnerable young
people, providing individual support with a lead professional and making
services accessible and relevant

Responsibility for delivering this will fall to local authorities working through
the Children‟s Trust and local partnerships.

Many elements will be offered through extended secondary schools
programmes




 GPCP32 CYPP                                                                        4
The Development of our Plan
The priorities for our plan have been identified by analysis of data relating to
children, young people and their families collected locally, across Kent, and
nationally, combined with identified local needs.

The Kent Children and Young People‟s Plan (CYPP), Kent NFER Pupil Survey,
„Serving You Better‟ (the Tonbridge and Malling Community Strategy 2006-
2009) and the Tonbridge and Malling Borough Council Corporate Performance
Plan have also helped to shape our priorities. The development of these plans
involved robust consultation with key stakeholders including the more
vulnerable, disadvantaged and hard-to-reach groups.

Measuring our Progress
A series of 22 priority focus areas were agreed upon, utilising both local
knowledge and data information across a wide range of information and
agency specialisation.

These priorities became the focus of work for the „Planning for Real‟ initiative
which involved all 21 schools in Tonbridge in a two phase consultation model
involving all the children, young people, families, wider community and
agencies in Tonbridge.

For each of the priority areas identified, SMART targets have been set with
key outcome indicators identified. Success criteria relate whenever possible to
measurable targets based upon current data available. All actions proposed
have a named lead person responsible.

Monitoring and Evaluation

The LCSP Manager will take a leading role in ensuring the Action Plan is
monitored, the work will be managed by the LCSP Board.

Monitoring Impact

Monitoring and evaluation will be based on Results (or Outcomes) Based
Accountability (RBA) model and will ask 3 key questions:

How much did we do?

How well did we do it?

and most importantly -

Is anyone better off?

Outcomes will be tested against High level and Intermediate outcome Indicators
in the CYPP Measures Framework 2007.

 GPCP32 CYPP                                                                       5
The Local Trust Board will monitor the progress of the CYPP 4 times a year using:

      Data and trend indicators
      Management information
      Updates from partners
      Consultation with children young people and families

A full evaluation will be compiled annually.


Summary of priorities identified
1 Improve and expand provision of early intervention services for
  emotional and mental health issues

2 Improve and promote healthy lifestyles, including Sex and
  Relationships Education

3 Promote the safety and well-being of children

4 Raise the level of achievement and enjoyment of children in schools
  and early years settings

5 Improve stability in placements and educational outcomes for
  Looked After Children

6 Encourage young people to make a positive contribution to their
  community and have things to do and safe places to go in their
  leisure time

7 Increase opportunities for employment through work and core skills
  training

8 Increase provision of supported housing for young people

9 Provide information, advice, guidance and support for parents,
  children and young people

10 Reduce the effects of poverty on the lives of children, young people
   and families in Tonbridge




    GPCP32 CYPP                                                                 6
What do we already know?
1 Improve and expand provision of early intervention services for emotional and
    mental health issues



●    The Kent Pupil Survey showed that 75.3% of primary pupils said that they usually
     feel happy (Kent 72.5%)
●    The number of referrals to the Partnership Based Review for incidences involving
     emotional/mental health and counselling requests has increased.
●    Mental health difficulty is a common problem affecting one in ten children in Kent,
     with 7% having moderately severe problems requiring attention from professionals
     trained in mental health and 1.85% with severe and complex mental health
     problems requiring a multi-disciplinary approach. (CAMHS Commissioning Strategy
     data 2007)
●    The Kent Pupil survey (2007) of 11-19 yr olds found that around three-quarters
     said they needed more information on healthy living, safe sex, how to cope with
     feeling depressed and sex education.

What is working well?

Partnership based review system – Schools accessing a wide range of agencies and
services

Areas for Improvement

More teacher training in emotional health and wellbeing
Mental health support – CAMHS Access.
More long-term mental health input for children.
Reduction in self-harming.
Increase health and mental health programmes for the most vulnerable.

Planning for Real consultation top 6 suggestions with % selected by grouping:

„Someone to talk to if you have a problem‟ - 54% of primary 3% of secondary and 43%
of parents
„Bereavement counselling‟ 45% of parents
„Child psychologist‟ 36% of parents
„Someone to talk to if you have a problem‟
„Support / counselling – families‟




       GPCP32 CYPP                                                                   7
                           What do we already have in place?

1 Primary Mental Health worker
Solihull training
SEAL programme
School nurse intervention
SSKY Family Support Project
Tier 3 CAMHS
Commissioned family support services
Some parenting programmes offered by health visitors
Children‟s centre

                   Other plans / priorities which will impact upon this

Kent CYPP
Kent Agreement
CAMHS County Strategy for Kent
County Parenting Strategy
Children‟s Centres
Healthy Schools




     GPCP32 CYPP                                                          8
2 Promote healthy lifestyles, including Sex and Relationships Education



●   In April 2008 100% of the Cluster schools were engaged in &/or accredited with
    Healthy Schools Status.
●   By April 2008 59% of the Cluster had been accredited with the new Healthy
    Schools Award; with a further 8 schools due for accreditation by July 08; giving
    the Cluster a 95% accreditation rate by July 08.
●   In the summer of 2007 all schools confirmed that they had SRE (Sex and
    Relationship Education) policies and Schemes of Work in place.
●   Good support in local schools for drug awareness – 88% of 16-19 olds undertake
    training course.
●   The SEAL programme has been introduced across primary schools in the Cluster
    with approximately 40% of primary schools using it regularly and one Primary
    School leading as a hub school. (No data available on exact numbers)
●   Teenage (Under 16) conception rates in Tonbridge and Malling (per1000 females)
    had decreased to 5.1 per 1,000 in 2005 however indications are that the trend is
    increasing not decreasing as in other areas of Kent.
●   A Kent wide SRE survey in 2006 revealed that only 39% of boys and 55% of girls
    agreed with the statement that “people should refuse to have sex with someone
    who refuses to wear a condom” (Kent Centre for Health Services Studies „SRE
    Schools Survey ‟, 2006)
●   The Kent Pupil survey (2007) of 11-19 yr olds found that around three-quarters
    said they needed more information on healthy living, safe sex, how to cope with
    feeling depressed and sex education.
●   The Tonbridge and Malling Joint Local Board survey showed that sex education in
    schools taught as part of PSHE was often „too little, too late and too biological‟.
    Anecdotal research showed that 30% of young people under the age of 16 were
    sexually active.
●   Almost 70% of the teenage (under 16) conceptions end in a termination.
●   GUM services for Tonbridge and Malling are not currently meeting their targets for
    ensuring those referred are seen within 48 hours.

What is working well?

Breast feeding drop-in at Tonbridge Baptist Church (partnership working promoting
healthy lifestyle).
Increased access points in area for condom distribution and testing.

Areas for Improvement

GUM Clinics – poor performance at Preston Hall and Kent and Sussex against Kent
agreement indicators compared to all other clinics in Kent.
Teenage pregnancy rates increasing.
Irresponsible attitudes to sexual relationships by some young people.
Local NHS funding for venues and health initiatives in the area.
Lack of school nurses, ideally one in each secondary school.
Drug prevention programmes not always effective.
No support for children who exhibit sexually abusive behaviour.
     GPCP32 CYPP                                                                    9
Planning for Real consultation top 6 suggestions with % selected by grouping:

„Condoms – free issue wanted‟ 12% of secondary
„Sex and relationships – lessons needed‟ 6% of secondary
„Family planning service‟ 4.5% of secondary

„Health information point‟ 35% of parents
„Well man / woman clinic‟ 33% of parents

„Condoms – free issue wanted‟
„Pregnancy testing facility‟
„Advice for unplanned pregnancies
„Emergency contraception‟
(Hard to reach group of children and young adults)


                            What do we already have in place?

Universal PSHE already in place in all schools
SRE delivered generically through PSHE and Science curriculum
TIE (Theatre in Education) for Yr 9 / 10 students in teenage pregnancy


                   Other plans / priorities which will impact upon this

Kent CYPP Priority 2
Kent Agreement
School plans                                Community Safety Strategy
Health plan                                 Housing
Connexions                                  Youth Service
Healthy Schools                             Early Years
Teenage conception rates                    STI rates
Breast feeding statistics                   Low birth weights
Educational achievement                     Child Safeguarding issues
Children‟s Centres
NEETS




     GPCP32 CYPP                                                          10
3 Promote safety and well being of children

   71 training sessions and 456 consultations were completed for schools in 06/07
    related to safeguarding of children and young people. All schools have a designated
    child protection officer.
●   62.5% of children on the Child Protection Register were on the register as a result of
    parental substance misuse, mental health problems or domestic violence.
●   Jan 08 PAF data shows 20.3% of registrations onto the Child Protection Register
    were re-registrations.
●   The Kent Pupil survey (2007) found that the majority of 5-11 year olds felt safe,
    outside in public places, when they were with their family or with adults they knew.
    Around three-quarters indicated they also felt cared for and safe at school.
●   West Kent BCU data shows that only 2.1% of victims of crime were aged under 19
    (All Kent 3.3%) Violence against the person is the most reported offence (50% of
    youth victim crime)
●   The Kent Pupil Survey (2007) found that 5.9% of children and young people in
    Tonbridge did not feel safe (Kent average 8.7%)
●   71 training sessions and 456 consultations were completed for schools in 06/07
    related to safeguarding of children and young people. All schools have a designated
    child protection officer.
●   The Kent Pupil Survey (2007) found that approximately two-thirds of 11-19 year olds
    were concerned about bullying and gangs. In terms of having someone to talk to,
    they commonly indicated they would talk to somebody they trust, their friends, and
    someone at home. However, the majority indicated that they might also talk to
    someone on the internet.
●   62.5% of children on the Child Protection Register were on the register as a result of
    parental substance misuse, mental health problems or domestic violence.

What is working well?

Children on the Child Protection Register here are allocated social worker.
Partnership based review system – Schools using increasing access to range of agencies
Staying safe – Young people identify own personal safety issues and using peer
education to educate.
Partnership based review system – Schools using increasing access to range of agencies.
Domestic Violence referrals increasing – If this means that victims are more willing to
come forward.

Areas for Improvement

Concerns about funding of Tier 2 services
Domestic Violence referrals increasing - If this means the number of actual incidents is
increasing.




     GPCP32 CYPP                                                                     11
Planning for Real consultation top 6 suggestions with % selected by grouping:

„I feel safe here‟ 50% of primary 10% of secondary and 30% of parents
„Someone to talk to if you don‟t feel safe‟ 49% of primary 3% of secondary
„Someone to talk to if you have a problem‟ - 54% of primary 3% of secondary and 43%
of parents
„Someone to talk to if you have a problem‟
„Mugging‟
– (Hard to reach group of children and young adults)


                            What do we already have in place?
Social work intervention
Lead Professional / CAF
Early intervention – health visitors / school nurses
Planned Children‟s Centres for Tonbridge
Tonbridge and Malling Community Safety partnership
Data – Crime and PCT data on Domestic abuse
Freedom programme
Domestic Violence Court Maidstone
Public Protection Unit for Violent and Sexual Offenders
Multi agency MAPP Level 1 / 2 / 3
Voluntary Sector input
Community Safety Partnerships and themed sub-group
P.A.C.T meetings
Female Victims of Domestic Violence helpline Maidstone
YOS intensive interventions for the most violent young offenders

                   Other plans / priorities which will impact upon this

Kent CYPP
Policing Plans
Parenting Strategy
Children‟s Centres
CAF roll out
Community Safety Strategy




     GPCP32 CYPP                                                               12
4 Raise the level of achievement and enjoyment of children in schools and
  early years settings



  ●    OFSTED Inspection data – Cluster Primary schools 80% good or better (Kent
       52.7%) with 33% outstanding and Secondary schools 100% good or better (Kent
       60.9%)
  ●    At Key Stage 1 the Cluster performs above the national average at Level 3+ reading
       and maths and level 2B+ maths
  ●    At Key Stage 2 the Cluster performs well above the national average at Level 5+
       English and maths
  ●    Value added score for KS1-2 is 100.2 (cluster rank 4)
  ●    At Key Stage 3 the Cluster remains one of the highest performing for achieving levels
       5+ and 6 in the 3 key subjects and is consistently above the national average. Data
       is also affected by some Tonbridge schools completing SATS a year early in Year 8)
  ●    Tonbridge is ranked 3rd with 82.9% achieving Level 5+ for English (National 74%)
  ●    Level 5+ ICT is the top ranking cluster result achieving 89% (Kent 73%)
  ●    At Key Stage 4 the Cluster is consistently ranked in the top 3 for attainment with
       81.3% achieving 5+ A*-C (Kent average 65%)
  ●    95.6% achieving 5+ A*-G (Kent average 92%)
  ●    68.3% achieving 5+ A*-C (inc. Eng & Maths) (Kent average 49%)
  ●    19.1% of students gifted and talented – (2nd highest in Kent).
  ●    Pupils attending secondary schools in the Tonbridge area are travelling from all over
       West Kent, some are even travelling from Ashford and Canterbury, and many are
       also travelling from outside Kent including Hastings.
  ●    Value added score for KS1-2 SEN status P and S is 100.3 (cluster rank =1)
  ●    West Kent College – Students with additional learning needs achieve at the same
       level as those without.
  ●    OFSTED Inspection data 2005-7 – Cluster EY Settings 68.8% good or better for
       Education standards
  ●    At Key Stage 1 the Cluster performs at the national average for Level 2B+ writing and
       Level 2+ maths
  ●    Although at Key Stage 1 the Cluster performs above the national average at Level 3+
       reading and maths these scores have dropped significantly in the 06/07 year with
       reading dropping from 34.9% in 04/05 to 28.7% in 06/07 and writing dropping from
       16.6% to 11.6% in the same period.
  ●    At Key Stage 2 the Cluster performs at the national average for Level 4+ English and
       science
  ●    2007 ECERS scores for Cluster EY Settings are slightly below Kent average scores
       across all Education standards with Cluster rankings down to 11th and 12th for literacy
       and maths and 15th for science.
  ●    At Key Stage 1 the Cluster performs below the national average for Level 2+ reading
       and writing; Level 2B+ reading and Level 3+ writing.
  ●    At Key Stage 2 the Cluster performs below the national average for Level 4+ maths
       (73% – National 77%) and Level 5+ science (44.9 – National 46%)
  ●    At Key Stage 2 the Cluster gender gap in achievement of English at Level 4+ at 15.4
       percentage points is higher than the national and Kent average



      GPCP32 CYPP                                                                   13
What is working well?

Training available to support schools in English as a second language.
Many ethnic minority children achieving well at school.
Groups for parents to attend such as art/craft, parenting which have raised confidence
and esteem – moved onto other learning/employment.
No school currently in Ofsted category.
Available dual language materials available in school.
Interaction between EWOs and agencies, schools ensure regular attendance.
Good schools that enable learning.
Working towards inclusion of all children in PVI settings.

Areas for Improvement

Engagement of parents who may have learning difficulties of their own in the education
of their pupils.
Understanding of what is available in the area.

Planning for Real consultation top 6 suggestions with % selected by grouping

„Play / games‟ 65% of primary
„Indoor play area‟ 63% of primary
„I learn well here‟ 54% of primary
„Time to play‟ 51% of primary
„Outdoor play area‟ 44% of primary
„Extra help club needed‟ 31% of primary
„Revision club needed‟ 20.5% of primary

„Lessons are uninteresting‟ 10% of secondary
„Support for non attenders‟ 8% of secondary
„Chill out place for after school‟ 5% of secondary
„Catch up club needed‟ 4.5% of secondary
„Adult role models – more needed‟ 4% of secondary
„Free study time – more needed‟ 4% of secondary

„Booster classes needed‟ 39% of parents
„Chill out place for pupils after school‟ 36% of parents
„School clubs (after hours)‟ 35% of parents
„Indoor play area‟ 33% of parents
„Personalised learning – more wanted‟ 32% of parents
„Family learning‟ 31% of parents




     GPCP32 CYPP                                                                   14
                           What do we already have in place?

School plans – primary secondary and special schools
Good primary provision
Performance at KS4 well above average
Some extended services provision in place
Parental support in place in most schools
Tonbridge Parents‟ Forum
Children‟s Centre



                   Other plans / priorities which will impact upon this

Kent CYPP
Kent Agreement
School plans – primary secondary and special schools
Healthy Schools
Extended Schools




     GPCP32 CYPP                                                          15
5 Improve stability in placements and educational outcomes for Looked
    After Children



●    100% of LAC in District Special school are not Kent children but are placed by other
     local authority, causes huge issues with communication
●    30% of looked after children have local foster parents

Areas for Improvement

50% OF Tonbridge L.A.C. children meeting key stage targets at key stage 2.
Jan 08 PAF data shows 50% of LAC were in same placement for 2 years or more.
Kent average is 64%.




                             What do we already have in place?

Tonbridge & Malling Looked After Children Local Implementation Group
LAC coordinator



                     Other plans / priorities which will impact upon this

Kent Children and Young Peoples Plan
Tonbridge and Malling LAC Strategy




       GPCP32 CYPP                                                                   16
6 Encourage young people to make a positive contribution to their
    community and have things to do and safe places to go in their leisure
    time



●    All of our Cluster schools have a school council or equivalent
●    14% of 11-16 year olds in Kent already do voluntary work, and 41% said they would
     like to. (CYPP Monitoring report 2007)
●    The Kent Schools Survey showed that 79.3% of primary pupils stated that they
     helped other people (Kent 80.4%); and only 2.5% stated „no‟ to this question (Kent
     2.9%)
●    Approx. 35 young people regularly attend Youth Forum meetings to express their
     views to the Borough Council (every 6 weeks). However only 3 are from a socially
     deprived area.
     Hospital admissions for injury increased, slightly above Kent average (445
     admissions - intentional self harm 35)

What is working well?

Schools anti bullying strategy and policy
Seeking the views of children with statements of SEN who have recently transferred to
Secondary school
School councils (pupil participation) (children) being involved in school improvement and
development.
Schools delivering peer mentoring and youth action programmes improving self-esteem
participation.
Opportunities for D of E – Duke of Edinburgh awards
Summer play scheme – „Activate‟

Areas for Improvement

Increase representation from areas of social deprivation of young people on the youth
forum.
Not enough for young people to do / places to go
YOS clients are often marginalised and cannot access mainstream services
Engage and empower more young people to be able to make changes and choices for
their local community
Ensure the needs of children & young people and their families are taken into account in
proposals for deprived communities and regeneration of Tonbridge
To ensure young people have access to activities covering all interests and delivered at
times and places convenient for young people

Planning for Real consultation top 6 suggestions with % selected by grouping

„Trampolining‟ 59% of primary
„Age 6 – 12 adventure playground‟ 56% of primary
„Youth theatre‟ 49% of primary
„Fitness trail – outdoors‟ 48% of primary
„Astro turf‟ 48% of primary
„Badminton court‟ 48% of primary
„Activity clubs needed‟ 9% of secondary
„Arts and crafts club‟ 7% of secondary
„Changing rooms needed‟ 6% of secondary
„Keep fit classes‟ 6% of secondary
„Internet / cyber café‟ 5.5% of secondary



                           What do we already have in place?

Tonbridge & Malling Youth Forum
School Councils and Pupil Voice
VSU projects – Hillview and Tonbridge Grammar School for Girls
Schools – various after school programmes
Specialist Schools Community Programmes
YWCA
Tonbridge and Malling Youth Forum web-site
Y2Crew and Angel centre activities
Community Youth Worker at Ridge View School

                   Other plans / priorities which will impact upon this

Kent CYPP Priority 6
Tonbridge and Malling Borough Council Youth Plan
Specialist Schools status ((SSAT) Plans
School plans and SEFs – primary secondary and special schools
Extended Schools




                                                                          18
7 Increase opportunities for employment through work and core skills
  training



● 81.1% of 16 year olds remain in education post-16 across Kent.
● Tonbridge has only 2.06% of 16-18 year olds classified as NEETS (Kent 5.52% and
  National 7.5%)
● Tonbridge has only 2.7% of 18-24 year olds claiming Job Seekers Allowance (Kent
  4.4% and National 5%)
● Tonbridge is the 2nd least deprived cluster in the county as measured by the index for
  multiple deprivation of all pupils in its schools scoring 8.94 (Kent 16.85)
● 84% of young people feel that work experience whilst at school is helpful.

What is working well?

„Care to Learn‟ programme 16-19 yrs.
Curriculum focus on gaining employment – employers involved with curriculum.
16+ students access to work related learning opportunities with cluster
West Kent College
Hadlow College
Links with local businesses – Farm Shops / Sainsbury‟s
Vocational pathways for school students aged 14-16 including young apprenticeships.
Securing a Yr9 vocational placement for disaffected pupil.
An increasing proportion of young people (16/19) in EET.

Areas for Improvement

Deliver permanent, ongoing, pre-entry level motivational training provision for those
young people identified as NEETS
Work with employer / training providers to provide more supported and accessible
opportunities for young people

Planning for Real consultation top 6 suggestions with % selected by grouping

„Debt counselling needed‟ 9% of secondary
„Business start up support needed‟ 7% of secondary
„Work experience – more opportunities needed‟ 5% of secondary
„Career – I don‟t know what I want‟ 4.5% of secondary
„People seeking work – more support needed‟ 27% of parents
„Re-training opportunities – information needed‟ 23% of parents
„Childcare training – needed‟
„Job search club‟
„Apprentice information – more needed‟
„Money and budgeting – advice needed‟
„Careers advice needed‟
„People seeking work – more support needed‟
                             What do we already have in place?
Connexions Kent
Vacancy service
Careers / IAG
Job matching
Community JCP
e2e – YWCA, Horizon Project, TBG
Apprenticeships
Work based learning
Alternative Curriculum Project

                    Other plans / priorities which will impact upon this

Kent CYPP Priority 7
LSC
Business plans in locality
Valuing People




                                                                           20
8 Increase provision of supported housing for young people



● The average length of stay in B&B accommodation in Tonbridge for pregnant mothers
  and families with dependent children (who have not made themselves intentionally
  homeless) is 5.4 weeks (Kent 4.1 weeks and National 3 weeks). Tonbridge does not
  use hostel accommodation.
● There is a lack of supported housing in the Tonbridge area.
● Mosaic analysis shows that at primary level there is some over representation of the
  grouping „Municipal Dependency‟. This grouping is characterised by low incomes, high
  incidence of single parent families and relatively high levels of unemployment but this
  only accounts for a very small proportion of the Tonbridge area.
● The three West Kent LAs have recognised about 200 vulnerable young people who
  were accepted as homeless. No figures are known for the „hidden‟ homeless.
● Young people have to go outside of area to gain housing support – to Tunbridge
  Wells area, YMCA Ryder house (cater for vulnerable and women aged 16-30) or CAHA
  (Christian Alliance Housing Association)
● Young offenders are more likely to require attention

Areas for Improvement

Supply of housing for young people / homeless.
Housing – MAPPP – Not child centred or friendly
No local provision for 16-18 year olds

Planning for Real consultation top 6 suggestions with % selected by grouping:
„Flats for younger people‟ 9% of secondary and 32% of parents
„Respite housing – more required‟ 27% of parents
„Housing for young mothers / families required‟ 26% of parents

                           What do we already have in place?

Supporting People Floating Support (KCC SPFS) but no continuity


                   Other plans / priorities which will impact upon this

Kent CYPP Priority 4
Kent Children‟s Trust Board agreed housing as a high priority
West Kent Housing Strategy
West Kent Homelessness Strategy
GOSE Regional Housing Strategy
9 Provide information, advice, guidance and support for parents, children
  and young people



What is working well?

West Kent PCT - Focusing on and funding Solihull training for all health visitors, school
nurses and skill mix staff
Groups for parents to attend such as art/craft, parenting which have raised confidence
and esteem – moved onto other learning/employment.
Parents‟ Forum.
SSKY family support service
Secondary schools engaging parents in children‟s experience in school.
FLOs (Family Liaison Officers) and PSAs (Parent Support Advisers) in schools
Children‟s Centre Long Mead

Areas for Improvement

Y2 Crew engage „at risk‟ young people from identified community in the borough
Engagement of parents who may have learning difficulties of their own in the education
of their pupils
Improve information on what‟s available in area
Develop provision for the most disadvantaged and disaffected young people
Parenting support
Awareness of services delivered by voluntary sector
Communication regarding services available through schools
Raising awareness of available services to students
Provide a multi-agency response to support for families in crisis

Planning for Real consultation top 6 suggestions with % selected by grouping

„Someone to talk to if you have a problem‟ - 54% of primary 3% of secondary and 43%
of parents
„Advice and information shop‟ 37% of parents
„Health information point‟ 35% of parents
„Community centre‟ 36% of parents
„Community café‟ 35% of parents
„Childminder information (local) 29% of parents
„Support and counselling – families‟ 6% of parents




                                                                                      22
„Support and counselling – mental health‟
„Community café‟
 „Drop in centre‟
„Legal advice‟
„Childcare training – needed‟
„Job search club‟
„Apprentice information – more needed‟
„Money and budgeting – advice needed‟
„Careers advice needed‟
„People seeking work – more support needed‟
„Support and counselling – families‟
„Parenting classes wanted‟



                          What do we already have in place?

Connexions – Personal Advisers, Access Point in Tonbridge and „Connexions Resource
Centre‟
Schools – FLOs (Family Liaison Officers) and PSAs (Parent Support Advisers) – more
needed?
Community Youth Tutor at Ridge View
Pastoral support systems in schools
Children‟s Centre Long Mead
Citizen‟s Advice Bureau
Youth Services – TMBC and KCC
Early Years and childcare information database (web-based and telephone hotline)
YWCA and YMCA
Churches and Faith Groups eg Tonbridge Baptist Church
ARC – Adolescent Resource Centre
Y2Crew
BEAT project
Extended Services developing in schools
Tonbridge Parents‟ Forum

                  Other plans / priorities which will impact upon this

Kent CYPP Priority 3
TMBC Community Plan : Gateway in Tonbridge
Extended Schools
Connexions




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10 Reduce the effects of poverty on the lives of Children, young people and
  families in Tonbridge



10.1   Provide a multi agency response top support for families in crisis through
       support of existing services


10.2    Ensure effective use of emergency fund (£1000) to support families and young
       people in financial crisis

      Use voluntary sector to identify families and young people




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