ISSC GGD Progress Report November 2006

Document Sample
ISSC GGD Progress Report November 2006 Powered By Docstoc
					                 International Social Science Council Scientific Programme on
                          Gender, Globalization, and Democratization
                                 Annual Report October 2007
                               Submitted by Jane Bayes, Director

The first part of this report reviews the objectives and projects of the ISSC-GGD and lists the
activities of 2007 (pages 1-3) . The second part explains these activities in more detail (pages 4-
8). The third part discusses the progress being made in each of the project areas (pages 8-11), the
fourth part lists the activities planned for 2008 ( page 11). The final fifth part is a summary of
expenditures for 2007 (pages 11-12). A detailed listing of expenditures accompanies this report
as a separate excel file.

PART I : Objectives and Projects of the ISSC-GGD

In 2004 when the GGD was recognized as an ISSC Scientific Research Programme, the GGD set
forth five objectives:
    1) To offer a global organizational structure for scholars from different areas of the world
        and from different disciplines in the social sciences to perform collaborative research on
        the intersectionality of themes of gender, globalization and democratization.
    2) To develop joint research projects to generate knowledge that can be used as a foundation
        for policy initiatives to improve the lives of women.
    3) To provide an output of scholarly publications, workshop materials, syllabi, training
        manuals and course materials that can be shared globally on the internet or in other ways
        to address problems generated for women by globalization.
    4) To establish an inclusive network of researchers working in the field of globalization and
        gender, one that reaches out to include young scholars and scholars from the majority
        world.
    5) To collaborate with international, national, and local organizations, including other ISSC
        member organizations, to foster a long term research and training program on
        globalization, gender and democratization.


   To accomplish these objectives, the ISSC-GGD in 2004 identified six projects or
            special areas of concern:

   1)   Sexual Trafficking and Human Security
   2)   Women and Leadership Around the World
   3)   Migration and Gender
   4)   Globalization and the Changing Structure of the Family
   5)   Gender in the Global Political Economy
   6)   Education, Outreach, Capacity Building


   List of Activities in 2007:

   Publications, and Workshop Products associated with ISSC Projects



                                                 1
     1    Nimalka Fernando, Setsuko Arai, Malaya Ileto eds. Human Trafficking
         and Racism: Exploring the Links Between Marginalization and Exploitative
         Migration, IMADR, 2007.

    2 Bang-Soon L. Yoon & Bok Hee Chun, "Migration of North Korean Women to China
      and Human Security," The Korean Journal of Area Studies, Vol 24, No. 2 (2006), pp.
       73-92

    3    Mary Hawkesworth, ed. “Comparative Perspectives Symposium: Challenges to
         Women’s Leadership” accepted for publication by the journal, Signs, for publication
         in 2008. These are papers presented at the ISSC-GGD conference in Umea, Sweden
         on women and leadership around the world in August 2007.

    4    Video CDs have been made of the talks and papers delivered at the Conference on
         Globalization, Migration and Sex Trafficking at California State University,
         Northridge for class use .

    5    Video and audio recordings were made of the talks and papers delivered at the
         Conference on Globalization, Gender, Migration and Sex Trafficking in Lima, Peru
         for class use. (These are in Spanish.)


 Conference and Workshop Activities

1) March 2007 Joint Conference with International Studies Association, Chicago, Ill. USA
           (two panels)

2) May 2007: Two day Conference on Globalization, Migration and Sex Trafficking at California
          State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA. USA

3) July 19-21, 2007: Two day conference on Gender in International Pollitical Economy (IPE),
            “Gender Knowledge and Knowledge Networks” in Budapest, Hungary.

4) August 2007: Two day Conference on Women and Leadership. Umea, Sweden organized by
           Gunnel Gustafsson.

5) 23-25 August 2007. Conference presentation: Bang-Soon L. Yoon, "State, Sexual
       Violence, and Women's Civil Society Movement for Policy Development" presented at
       the World Congress for Korean Studies 2007 organized by the Korean Political Science
       Association, Busan, Rep. of Korea, August 23-25, 2007.

6) 30-31 August 2007: Chubu University in Japan co-sponsored with the Institute of Social
       Studies of the Hague an International Conference on “International Migration,
       Multilocal Livelihoods and Human Security: Perspectives from Europe, Asia, and
       Africa” on, where Seiko Hanochi presented a paper on “Neoliberal Globalization and



                                            2
       the Insecurity of Women Migrants made Invisible: Case Studies in Human Security as
       a ‘War of Position’ Strategy” which was based on her interviews with the Filipinas.

  7) 29 September 2007. Presentation on Women Leaders Project, American Political Science
       Association Chicago, Ill. by Judith Palier, Irene Ortiz, and Jane Bayes.

  8) 19 October 2007 .Workshop with 10 Peruvian teachers of Women’s Studies from different parts
     of Perú with Breny Mendoza, Jane Bayes and Gaby Cevasco to discuss women’s studies
     curricula, course syllabi, bibliography, and strategies for the survival of women’s studies in the
     university, held at Flora Tristán Centre de la Mujer.

 9) October 2007: Seminario Internacional: Nueves formas de resistencia frente a la exclusión
     global: reflexiones sobre migración y trata. Lima, Perú. organized by Flora Tristán
     Centre de la Mujer

10) The Centre for Asia Pacific Partnership, Osaka University of Economics and Law
     (Director, Mushakoji), on the occasion of an international symposium
     with Chulalongkorn University (Bangkok) organized a conference on “Mainstreaming
     Human Security: the Asian Contribution” including a panel on “Displacement and
     Exploitative Migration” which focused on trafficking in women and children..


  Other Activities

  1) The Centre for Asia Pacific Parnership, Osaka University of Economics and Law
  (Director, Mushakoji)is currently developing a comparative project on “marriage migrants
  from the Philippines and Vietnam to Korea and Japan with Songonghwe (Anglican)
  University of Seoul, the University of the Philippines and Hanoi University.


  2) Those interested in women and leadership began a new project on women and leadership
  which involves interviewing women activists around the world. Jane Bayes and Judith Palier
  of San Juan College in New Mexico interviewed women leaders in Cuernavaca, MX in July
  2007. Jane Bayes also interviewed in Canada in August 2007. Georgia Durst Lahti of Beloit
  College is interviewing women leaders in Albania in October and November 2007. Women
  in Peru have expressed interest. The purpose is to archive these interviews in a digital
  archive.

  3) Jane Bayes and Breny Mendoza of California State University, Northridge met with ten
  women in the social sciences from various universities around Peru to discuss women
  studies programs as well as syllabi and curricula for gender courses and how to create and
  distribute them in Lima, Peru on 17 October 2007.

 4) Another series of activities have been developed at the Centre for Asia Pacific
 Partnership, at Osaka University of Economics and Law (Director, Mushakoji), by its
 Research Committee On Human Security, Human Trafficking and Exploitative Migration.



                                              3
    The Centre developed activities in cooperation with IMADR (International Movement
    Against All Forms of Discrimination and Racism) and helped publish Nimalka Fernando,
    Setsuko Arai, Malaya Ileto eds IMADR ed., Human Trafficking and Racism: Exploring the
    Links Between Marginalization and Exploitative Migration, IMADR,2007.


PART II: Explanation of Activities

 Conference Activities

1) March 2007 Joint Conference of ISSC-GGD with International Studies Association,
Chicago, Ill. USA (two panels were on the program)

 Policies toward Migratory Flows: Their Gendered Effects

Marian Simms, Otaga University, Dunedin, New Zealand. Of Middle Eastern Appearance": Gender and Anti-
                   Immigrant Attitudes in the "West"
Jane Bayes and Laura Gonzales “Mexican Policy Responses to the North American Labor Market: The Case of the
                   Consejo Consultivo del Instituto de los Mexicanos – California State University Northridge
Savitri Bisnath , Geneva, Switzerland. The WTO's Services Agreement: Facilitating the Cross-Border Movement
                   of Women and Men?
Breny Mendoza, Central American Migration and the Economic Integration to the US and the European Union: A
                   Gendered Analysis – California State University Northridge

The Politics of Gendered Diasporas

Awa Ba , Senegal “These women who wear trousers: Challenging gender relations among Senegalese in New York
                City”
Ethel Brooks , Rutgers University. “Missing Pakistanis: Gender, Citizenship and New
                International Alignments”
Laden Affi, University of Wisconsin “Gendered Politics of the Somalian Diaspora in the United
                States”
Nayereh Tohidi, California State University, Northridge. “The Role and Impact of Diaspora Feminists on Iranian
                Politics”

This joint meeting of the ISSC-GGD with the International Studies Association was particularly satisfactory because
we were able to bring a graduate student, Awa Ba of Senegal – currently finishing here PhD at the University of
Upsala in Sweden - to participate.


2) 2-3 May 2007: Two day conference on Globalization, Migration and Sex Trafficking at
       California State University, Northridge

Sponsors:
International Social Science Council’s Scientific Programme on Gender, Globalization and Democratization CSUN Women’s Resource
and Research Center, The Institute of Gender Globalization and Democracy (IGGD), Coalition to Abolish Slavery & Trafficking
(CAST), , CSUN College of Humanities, CSUN College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, CSUN Women’s Studies Department,
CSUN Graduate Studies, Research and International Programs, CSUN Political Science Department

Speakers:




                                                              4
Human Trafficking in the United States: An Overview
Imelda Buncab, Coalition to Abolish Slavery & Trafficking Los Angeles

Responding Locally to the Global Crime of Human Trafficking: A Law Enforcement
Perspective
Kimberly Agbonkpolor, LA Metro Task Force on Human Trafficking
Lt. Carlos Velez, LAPD Robbery Homicide Division
Dan Gallagher, Special Agent Federal Bureau of Investigations, LA Office

Sex Trafficking in Asia
Dr. Vidyamali Samarasinghe, American University

Sex Trafficking in Russia
Dr. Janet Johnson, Brooklyn College CUNY

Sex Trafficking in Eastern Europe
Dr.Anna M. Agathangelou, York University

Sex Trafficking in Africa –
Dr. Jennifer De Maio, California State University, Northridge

Child Trafficking in Albania –
Dr. Adriana Baban, University of California, Los Angeles / Babes Bolyai University, Romania

Sex Trafficking in the Middle East
Dr. Ali Akbar Mahdi, Wesleyan Ohio University

Immigrant Industrial Complex: Immigrant Workers in the Global Economy
Dr. Grace Chang, University of California Santa Barbara
Mily Trevino-Saucedo, Lideres Campesinas

Film: CARGO
Q&A with Film Director Michael Cory Davis

This conference had broad support from a variety of departments and administrators at State
University Northridge. Approximately 800 students and members of the community attended
one or more of the presentations. The speakers were video-taped and their presentations are
available for classroom use or for use in course syllabi. The GGD is pleased that this conference
brought together the perspectives of academics, community non-governmental organizations
concerned with the topic, and local and federal law enforcement to discuss the problems and
possible ways to address those problems.
     “Gender Knowledge and Knowledge Networks in IPE” organized by Brigitte Young

3) 19-20 July 2007: Gender in International Political Economy, Conference, Budapest,
Hungary. “Gender Knowledge and Knowledge Networks in IPE” organized by Brigitte
Young.


                                                5
GARNET’s aim is to develop a world-class multidisciplinary network of researchers. At the
conference in Budapest we took this concept seriously: We actively strengthened our network
and also deepened “Gender Knowledge and Knowledge Networks in IPE” as a research subject.
The insightful inputs, the knowledgeable comments and moderations made this conference work
so successfully and allowed for motivating discussions. The good atmosphere enriched the
meeting and made possible some personal exchanges.

4) 19-20 August 2007: Two day conference on Women and Leadership in Umea, Sweden
organized by Gunnel Gustafsson.

Sponsored by the ISSC-GGD and Umea University, this conference brought together Swedish
women parliamentary leaders and scholars who study women’s leadership around the world.

Speakers:
Anita Gradin, Former Swedish minister and Swedish EU minister
Brita Bjelle, Former Parliamentary Member and former Director General for the Crime
                Victim Compensation and Support Authority
Achola Pala Okeyo, Kenya. Former senior gender advisor of the UNDP
Marian Simms, University of Otago, New Zealand
Monique Leyenaar, University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
Laura Gonzalez, University of Texas at Dallas
Victor Garcia - Indiana University, PA
Mary Hawkesworth, Rutgers University, New Jersey
Jane Bayes, California State University, Northridge
Truong Thuy Hang, Vietnam

The papers presented at this conference have been accepted for publication by
Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society for a “Comparative Perspectives Symposium:
Challenges to Women’s Leadership” edited by Mary Hawkesworth,to be published in 2008.

5) 29 August 2007 . Paper presentation on GGD Women’s Leadership Archival Project
Judith Palier ( San Juan Community College, N.M. Irene Ortiz (Cuernavaca, MX) and
Jane Bayes (California State University Northridge) at American Political Science
Association Women’s Caucus Meetings at Loyola University in Chicago, Illinois.

 This paper reported on video taped and audio taped interviews with done by Palier, Ortiz, and
Bayes as a pilot study for a larger GGD global archive project. The purpose of the project it to
document a) how women leaders are experiencing globalization in their lives and in their
communities; b) what kinds of organizations and activities they have engaged in, their successes
and failures; c) how each of these women have come to be leaders - their personal histories; and
d) how the lives of these leaders differ in gender relations from those of their mothers or
grandmothers. Dr. Georgia Durst-Lahti is currently continuing the project in Albania this
October 2007. Women in Peru have also expressed interest in joining the project. Rutgers
University Library has expressed interest in archiving these digital materials. California State
University Northridge Library is another possible archival location.



                                               6
6) 17 October 2007. Breny Mendoza and Jane Bayes met with 10 Peruvian women who
teach courses about women from various parts of Peru.

This encounter involved the exchange of information about syllabi, courses, curriculum and the
organization women’s studies departments. Not only was this an opportunity for an
international exchange of information, but it was one of very few opportunities these Peruvian
women who teach women’s studies have had to get together with one another to exchange
information, syllabi, and strategies with one another for teaching women’s studies courses. The
two day conference beginning the next day was what enabled this meeting to occur.

7) 18-19 October 2007. Two day conference: “Seminario Internacional: Nueves formas de
resistencia frente a la exclusión global: reflexiones sobre migración y trata.” Lima, Perú

 This conference was sponsored by the ISSC-GGD, by Flora Tristán Centro de la Mujer
Peruana, by the Programa Democracia y Transformación Global Facultad de Ciencias Sociales
UNMSM, and by the Institute of Gender, Globalization, and Democracy at California State
University, Northridge. The conference was organized by Gaby Cavasco of Flora Tristán
Centro de la Mujer Peruana who invited speakers and participants from Uruguay, Chile and all
parts of Peru and organized the program.

Roxana Castillo , Arequipa, Peru
Carmen Zavalaga, Huanuco, Peru
Carmen Torres, Santiago, Chile
Delmia Valencia, Cuzco, Peru
Gumercinda Reynaga, Ayacucho, Peru
Noemi Lopez, Cajamarca, Peru
Maria De La Luz Garrido, Montevideo, Uruguay
Francisca Huaman Perez, Huancayo, Peru
Liz Melendez, Lima, Peru

Conference Schedule

Jane Bayes, Director of the ISSC-GGD opened the conference by explaining the history,
organization, and work of the GGD

First Session: “Debates feministas: Las disputas sobre el proceso de globalización”
Virginia Vargas of Centro Flora Tristán and Breny Mendoza of Honduras and California State
University Northridge opened the conference with a debate about the pros and cons of
globalization.

Second Session: “Nuevas luchas, nuevas estrategias de resistencia. El feminism frente a la
globalización.” In this session, Lucy Garrido (Uruguay), Diana Miloslavich (Marcha Mundial
de Mujeres,) and Christina Hee (former development worker in Peru now professor of women’s
studies in Denmark) discussed women’s networks in Latin America and among southern nations,
the feminist resistence movements associated with the social global forum, and different



                                               7
transnational initiatives from the global south and the mobilization of women against the
negative impact of neoliberal globalization on women.

Third Session: “Las nuevas rutas de la migración de las mujeres en América latina. ¿Nuevas
libertdes o nuevos muros subjectivos e ideológicos? In this session, Carmen Torres (Instituto de
la Mujer in Chile) gave a powerpoint presentation about recent migration patterns in Chile and
Raphael Hoetmer (Programa Democracia y Transformación Global NUM San Marcos) spoke
about the globalization resistence movements among the indigenous in Chiapas, Bolivia and
Peru.

Fourth Session: “Migración y trata: Dentro y más allá de las fronteras latinamericanas.”
Silvia Loli (Instituto Promoviendo Desarrolo Social , Iprodes, Perú) and Dolores Cortés
(Organización Internacional para las Migraciones) spoke about sex trafficking in Peru and in
Latin America.

Fifth Session: “Prostitución: Nuevas formas de mercantilización del cuerpo y medicalización del
texto.” Tamy Quintanilla (Movimiento El Pozo , Perú and Angela Villón (Asociación de
Trabajadoras Sexuales Miluska Vida y Dignidad) explored different perspectives and problems
related to prostitution in Perú.

Sixth Session: “Neoliberalismo y sujeción del cuerpo: identidad, pobreza, politicas alimentarias
( transgénicos). Rocio Muñoz (Campaña por la Convención por los Derechos Sexuales y
Derechos Reproductivos). Relinda Sosa (Confederación Nacional de Mujeres organizadas por la
vida y el Desarrollo-Conamovidi). Lourdes Huanca (Federación Nacional de Mujeres
Campesinas, Artesanas, Indigenas, Nativas y Asalariadas del Perú (Femucarinap).

Final Conclusions: Gaby Cavasco of Flora Tristán and Breny Mendoza led an open discussion
with the audience identifying and discussing major points raised by the conference that will set
the agenda for the future. This meeting was particularly important for ISSC-GGD as it
represented a successful outreach to South America, a place where our Research Programme has
not been represented. Another notable feature of the conference was that we were able to invite
Melissa Amezcua, a Mexican graduate student in sociology at the New School in New York to
attend the Peru conference and to help with the translation of the conference materials.

PART III: Progress Report on Six Projects

1) Sex Trafficking and Human Security

Two universities in Japan have developed projects looking at the questions of trafficking in
women and children within the larger context of “exploitative migration”. One is the Chubu
University Project on “Human Security in the Context of Human Security” within which the
Research Team on “Multi-culturalism and Gender Equality” has been organized. This Research
Team (Executive Secretary is Seiko Hanochi) is composed by researchers and citizens in Nagoya
and neighboring cities of the Chubu (Cenral) Region of Japan. The Research Team sent in April
2007 an Open Letter to Dr. Doudou Dienne, UN Special Rapporteur on Racism about
“Education of the Foreign Children in the Chubu Region”, and currently studies the human



                                               8
insecurity experienced by Filipina “entertainers” and of their children. The Chubu University co-
sponsored with the Institute of Social Studies of the Hague an International Conference on
“International Migration, Multilocal Livelihoods and Human Security: Perspectives from
Europe, Asia, and Africa” on 30-31 August 2007, where Seiko Hanochi presented a paper
on “Neoliberal Globalization and the Insecurity of Women Migrants made Invisible: Case
Studies in Human Security as a ‘War of Position’ Strategy” which was based on her interviews
with the Filipinas. Another series of activities have been developed at the Centre for Asia Pacific
Parnership, Osaka Universioty of Economics and Law(Director, Mushakoji), by its Research
Committee On Human Security, Human Trafficking and Exploitative Migration. The Centre
developed activities in cooperation with IMADR (International Movement Against All Forms of
Discrimination and Racism) and helped publish Nimalka Fernando, Setsuko Arai, Malaya Ileto
eds IMADR ed., Human Trafficking and Racism: Exploring the Links Between Marginlization
and Exploitative Migration, IMADR,2007. TheCentre organized on the occasion of an
international symposium organized by the Chulalongkorn University (Bangkok) on
“Maintreaming Human Security: the Asian Contribution” a Panel on “Displacement and
Exploitative Migration” focused on trafficking in women and children. The Centre is currently
developing a comparative project on “marriage migants” from the Philippines and Vietnam to
Korea and Japan with Songonghwe (Anglican) University of Seoul, the University of the
phiippines and Hanoi University.

Adding to the 2006 work done by two of our ISSC-GGD members (Mushakoji and Hanochi) in
the Human Security in the Global City Networks (HSCN) project at Chuba University, the ISSC-
GGD sponsored research in 2006 about the topic in Vietnam and China ( Han, Quy) in Central
America (Aguilar, Miller at January 2006 conference in Costa Rica), and in North Korea
(Yoon). ISSC-GGD held a conference on sex trafficking at California State University,
Northridge in March 2007 which brought together practitioners and academics to discuss what is
happening in different parts of the world and to identify best practices with regard to what can be
done to combat sex trafficking. The GGD made videotapes of all the presentations at the CSUN
conference which are available for teaching purposes. In addition, at the October 2007
conference in Peru, Silvia Loli (Instituto Promoviendo Desarrolo Social, Iprodes, Perú) and
Dolores Cortés (Organización Internacional para las Migraciones) made presentations about sex
trafficking in South America and in Peru. Bang Soon Yoon and Bok Hee Chun have a book
project underway on the migration of North Korean women to China.

2) Women and Leadership Around the World
*Gunnel Gustafsson of Sweden organized a conference focusing on women in public office and
in other leadership positions in August 2007. This was a very successful event bringing together
women from Vietnam, Africa, Holland, Mexico, Sweden, New Zealand, and the United States to
produce a series of papers on Comparative Perspectives; Women and Leadership which will be
published in the journal Signs in 2008.

* In 2007 Jane Bayes was joined by Judith Palier, Irene Ortiz, and Georgia Durst-Lahti in
continuing the Women Leaders Digital Archive Project which focusing on new forms of
women’s leadership in the age of globalization. In conducting a pilot project in Cuernavaca,
Mexico and Mexico City in June 2007, Palier, Ortiz, and Bayes developed and tested an
interview schedule, experimented with recording equipment and presented the results at the



                                                 9
Women’s Caucus meetings at the American Political Science Association meetings in Chicago,
Ill in August 2007. Using this research template, Georgia Durst-Lahti of Beloit College in
Minnesota is currently conducting interviews in Albania with women leaders. Women scholars
in Perú have also expressed interest in joining the project. The plan is to encourage people from
around the world to identify women leaders who are confronting the problems generated by
globalization and to highlight their activities and actions, especially their best practices in
addressing specific problems such as the selling of brides, sex trafficking, improvement in
working conditions, HIV AIDS, environmental degradation and women, women’s economic
development, education for migrant women, especially girls. In addition to using these accounts
as qualitative research data, we also intend to put them in a digital archive in a library, possibly
Rutgers University Library or California State University, Northridge Library.

3) Migration and Gender

Migration and gender is a topic that the ISSC-GGD Scientific Programme continues to
address in almost all of its activities in one way or another. The panel on the politics of
gendered diasporas at the joint meeting of the International Studies Association and the ISSC-
GGD in March 2007 introduced a somewhat new approach to this subject for the ISSC-GGD.
This meeting allowed us to include a young scholar from Senegal who presented her dissertation
at our meeting. Her presence, financed by ISSC-GGD funds, was a part of our continuing efforts
to reach out to new, young scholars, particularly those from the majority world and to include
them in our research activities. The ISSC-GGD conferences at California State University,
Northridge in May 2007 and in Perú in October 2007 also had several presentations concerned
with migration. These were video-taped and have become a part of our video-taped materials for
classroom and archival purposes. The up-coming conferences in 2008 in San Francisco in
March and in Madrid, Spain in 2008 promise to add to these materials and perhaps form the basis
of a publication.

4) Globalization and the Changing Structure of the Family

This project is one the ISSC-GGD added in 2005 due to intense interest in the subject especially
from our Asian members. The interest of new members, Han Jailing from China and Han Giang
Tran from Vietnam encouraged us to hold panels on the topic at our joint meeting with the
International Studies Association in March 2006 and with the International Political Science
Association meetings in Japan in July 2006. In 2007, the focus of this research has taken place
in the Women’s Leadership archival interviews. As a part of that research design, we have
included a major question asking respondents to describe and compare a typical day in the lives
of their mothers or grandmothers in comparison with a typical day in their own lives. This
question has produced a wealth of interesting qualitative data reflecting major changes in family
structures in different parts of the world. We are particularly interested to learn from a variety of
women in different parts of the world and in different segments of society in one place, how
globalization has changed family gender relations and family structures.

5) Gender in the Global Political Economy

Brigitte Young has been the primary researcher involved in this project which is part of a much
larger grant awarded to a number of European universities referred to as GARNET. Prof. Young


                                                 10
represents the GARNET Network in a standing committee on promoting the policy debate on
gender issues on national, regional and EU research of the European Platform of Women
Scientists. In July 2007, Dr. Young organized a conference on Gender Knowledge and
Knowledge Networks in International Political Economy in Budapest Hungary.


6) Education, Outreach, and Capacity Building

* A major part of the ISSC-GGD program involves reaching out to involve scholars from the
majority world – especially those that are not normally well represented in global
conferences on gender and globalization. This year, the ISSC-GGD spent its funds on
reaching out to scholars from Vietnam, Mexico, Kenya, South Africa, Senegal, Perú,
Uruguay, Chile.

*A second objective of the ISSC-GGD program is to recruit and involve younger scholars in our
activities. Two of the scholars we brought to meetings were graduate students – one from
Mexico and one from Senegal – helping us fulfill our goal of involving new and younger as well
as established scholars in our activities. A third young scholar was prepared to come to our
meeting in Sweden from Bangladesh but unfortunately at the last minute became too ill to make
the trip.

* As a part of our plan to distribute our workshop materials, research papers, leadership and best
practices profiles, conference activities, we have been experimenting with recording our
proceedings and interviews on audio digital recorders and on video tapes wherever possible.
This year we have also been engaged in translating materials from Spanish to English as we have
attempted to expand into Spanish speaking countries where we are woefully underrepresented.

* The ISSC-GGD continues its project to develop a network of centers – both university centers
and community service centers concerned with the problems of globalization and gender.
Currently, we are linked with centers in Germany, Surinam, Israel, Costa Rica, India,
Bangladesh, and the United States (Rutgers and California State University, Northridge).


PART IV. Partial List of Plans for 2008

1) March 2008:ISSC-GGD joint meeting with the International Studies Association. Following
up on the May 2007 conference on globalization, migration and trafficking at California State
University, Northridge, the ISSC-GGD is scheduled to hold a joint meeting on migration and
trafficking with the International Studies Association in San Francisco. Scholars from Japan,
Costa Rica, Sri Lanka will join scholars and activists concerned with trafficking in California
and the United States. At this meeting we intend to expand our video tape collection of speakers
describing the characteristics of migratory flows and sex trafficking in different parts of the
world as well as identify and evaluate “best practices” interventions that are being implemented
in different places.

2) June 2008: ISSC-GGD joint meeting with the International Interdisciplinary Conference



                                               11
on Women. Madrid, Spain. We plan to have two or three panels, one on trafficking, one on
migration and gender, and one on women and leadership.

3) Different publications are being put together from these conferences. Bang Soon Yoon is
planning to write a book with Bok-hee Chun on trafficking in North Korea and China. Brigitte
Young has two book projects “The Production and Governance of Gender Knowledge in IPE”
with Professor Scherrer, and “The Political Economy of Macroeconomic Governance and
Gender Orders,” with Professors Isa Bakker and Diane Elson. The ISSC-GGD is working on
two other volumes that will grow out of our conference activities; one is on gender and
migration. The other is on migration and trafficking.

PART V. Report on Expenditures for 2006.

The ISSC-GGD was granted $20,000 by the ISSC Executive Council for its activities for 2006-
2007. In 2006, we spent $10,130.20. Of that, $4955.59 was for the Costa Rica conference in
January 2006, and $5174.66 was for the Japan conference in July 2006. In March 2007, we
spent $1983.81 to bring Awa Ba from Senegal to Chicago for the APSA Women’s Caucus
meetings. This means that prior to the October 2007 Perú conference we had spent a total of
$12,114.01 during 2006- September 2007. The Perú conference in October 2007 cost $9026.87
This makes our total ISSC-GGD expenditure for 2006-2007 equal $21,140.88. To date, ISSC
has sent $18,000 of the $20,000 budget allocation to Jane Bayes.

This expenditure summary concerns only ISSC funds. All the conferences and other activities of
the ISSC-GGD have had monetary support from a variety of other sources: educational
institutions, grants, non-governmental organizations, and individuals. The ISSC money has
served as seed money for many of our projects, enabling GGD and its members to raise
additional support from a variety of other sources.




                                             12

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:6
posted:12/9/2011
language:English
pages:12