2000 THUNDERBIRDS

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					THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIR DEMONSTRATION SQUADRON




2000 THUNDERBIRDS
  Through the years, the Thunderbirds have reflect-
ed the history of American air power in the jet age.
Aircraft have changed, crewmembers have come
and gone, but the focus remains on flying with an
emphasis on excellence.
  From our first aircraft, the F-84G, with its distinc-
tive red, white and blue markings, to the power
performance of today's F-16C, the Thunderbirds
have showcased America's front line fighters and
demonstrated the skills of every U.S. Air Force
fighter pilot.
  We are proud of the part we play in supporting Air
Force recruiting, retention and community relations
programs. As America's Ambassadors in Blue, the
Thunderbirds have represented the United States
and our armed forces around the world in 59 for-
eign countries before audiences totaling more than
310 million people.
  This book is dedicated to the men and women
who have given their lives in service to our country,
to the aviation pioneers whose vision made possible
today's Air Force, and to those who wear and have
worn our country's uniforms.
  Our hope is that our team inspires young people to
reach for their dreams and renews a sense of patrio-
tism in all who watch our show. So as you read
through the pages, you'll see a story of America at
its best. This is a story that makes all of us proud …
a story both friends and neighbors have come to
share. It is an inspiring story; it is the
Thunderbird story.




JOHN VENABLE, Lt. Col., USAF
Thunderbird Commander/Leader
  In 1947, while the jet age was still in its infancy,
military aviation was hurtled into the future with
the creation of the U.S. Air Force as a separate service.
Just six years later, on May 25, 1953, the Air Force's
official air demonstration team, designated the 3600th
Air Demonstration Unit, was activated at Luke Air
Force Base, Ariz.
  The name "Thunderbirds" was soon adopted by
the unit; influenced in part by the strong, Indian cul-
ture and folklore of the Southwestern United States
where Luke is located. Indian legend speaks of the
Thunderbird with great fear and respect. To some it
was a giant eagle...others envisioned a hawk. When
it took to the skies, the earth trembled from the
thunder of its great wings. From its eyes shot bolts
of lightning. Nothing in nature could challenge the
bird of thunder, the story said, and no man could
stand against its might. The story of the
Thunderbird was repeated, voice by voice, across
the generations, until at last, it assumed the immortal-
ity of legend.
  Seven officers and 22 enlisted were selected for this
first demonstration team. Most were hand-picked             Front Row (right to left): The first Thunderbird ‘flyers’ - Maj. Dick Catledge, Capt. Bob Kanaga, 1st Lt. Bob McCormick
from the cadre at Luke Air Force Base.                      Back Row (left to right): Twin brothers Buck and Bill Patillo.

  Major Dick Catledge, a training squadron com-
mander at Luke, was chosen as the team's leader. For
wingmen, twins Bill and Buck Patillo were selected and would                having flown right wing with the 'Sabre Dancers,' a predecessor
fly left and right wing, respectively. The Patillos, both captains,         to the Thunderbirds. Lt. Aubre Brown would serve as main-
were ideal choices as both had been with the 'SkyBlazers', a                tenance officer for the team. He, with his senior enlisted man,
USAF/Europe demonstration team, for the past 3 1⁄2 years. For               MSgt. Earl Young, selected 21 enlisted men to help maintain the
the difficult position of Slot, the position sandwiched between             team's aircraft. Capt. Bill Brock was the final officer selected for
both wingmen and behind the leader, Capt. Bob Kanaga was                    the team serving as the information services officer and
selected, an instructor at Luke. The spare and solo pilot, when             team narrator.
it was added later, would be 1st Lt. Bob McCormick. Like the                       From these humble beginnings and this group of men, the Air
Patillo brothers, he also had demonstration team experience,                Force Thunderbirds legend was born.




                                                                                                                                                                               History   3
                     How it all began...
                       The first aircraft selected for the new demonstration team was                            formation aerobatics lasting 15 minutes. The spare pilot took off a
                     the straight wing F-84G “Thunderjet” built by Republic                                      few minutes in advance of the diamond to run a weather check, advise
                    Aviation. Their straight wing configuration was considered well                              of any encroaching traffic, reiterate the location of obstructions and
                   suited for aerobatic maneuvers, and although the aircraft could not                           then landed to be used as a spare aircraft. As the season progressed,
                  exceed the speed of sound, like some military aircraft, it easily met                          the opportunity was utilized to perform ‘solo’ maneuvers with the
                 the needs of a demonstration aircraft.                                                          spare aircraft while the diamond burned off fuel and
                  The original demonstration sequence consisted of a series of                                   repositioned out of sight of the crowd.




                                             Top Left: The pilots and ground crew pause for this group photograph while shooting an Air Force
                                             documentary. Top Center: The Fairchild C-119F "Flying Boxcar" was the team’s first support aircraft.
                                             Top Right: The team's first aircraft, the F-84G "Thunderjet" flies over the teams' Arizona desert prac-
                                             tice range. Bottom Left: The F-84G stayed with the team for two years, flying a total of 132 airshows.
                                             Bottom Right: Capt. Bill Patillo, with his crew chief, inspects his F-84 before an airshow.




4 Thunderbirds
                                                                                                         Mindful of their mission to show the Air Force’s best aircraft, the Air Force
                                                                                                        selected the swept wing F-84F “Thunderstreak” as their second aircraft in
                                                                                                        1956. The Thunderstreak was modified for the team by adding smoke tanks
                                                                                                        for the first time, and red, white and blue drag chutes.
                                                                                                         With the move from the F-84F to the F-100 “Super Sabre” in 1956, the
                                                                                                        Thunderbirds became the world’s first supersonic aerial demonstration
                                                                                                        team. That same Year, the Thunderbirds moved to Nellis Air Force Base,
                                                                                                        Nev., simplifying logistics and maintenance for the aircraft.
                                                                                                         Although never a routine part of the Thunderbird show in 1956, the solo
                                                                                                        would fly supersonic at the request of the air show sponsor. Eventually,
Top Left: In 1954, Capt. Jack Broughton, became the youngest commander/leader in the team’s history.    the Federal Aviation Authority, a precursor to the Federal Aviation
Top Center: The F-84F "Thunderstreak” was the first aircraft to deploy a smoke system. Top Right:       Administration, banned all supersonic flight at air shows and conse-
Gentlemen's Quarterly Magazine ranked the Thunderbirds among America's "Best Dressed" in 1959.
Middle Left: An F-84F deploys its landing chute following a demonstration. Middle Right: The F-100C
                                                                                                        quently, today’s sequence is entirely subsonic.
"Super Sabres" perform a cartridge start. Bottom Left: Pictured here is the 1959 Thunderbird team.
Note the two C-123B "Providers" that were used as support aircraft and the T-33A "Shooting Star" that
was used for public relations flights.

                                                                                                                                                                                         History   5
                 Top Left: On Aug. 11, 1965, the team performed its 1000th show at Waukegan, Ill. Top Center: A crew
                 chief cleans the hangar floor near an F-100 undergoing inspection. Top Right: The team performed its first
                 Far East tour in 1959. Center Left: A relatively rare photograph of the team with the F-105 "Thunderchief."
                 Bottom Right: President John F. Kennedy watched the team perform at Eglin AFB, Fla. on May 4, 1962.




                     Almost a footnote in the history of Thunderbird aviation, the Republic-built F-105B
                     “Thunderchief” performed only six shows between April 26 and May 9, 1964. The
                      Thunderbirds returned to the “Super Sabre” following an unfortunate accident in
                      the 105, which grounded the team. Rather than cancel the remainder of the show
                       season, the team responded quickly, transitioning back to the F-100D. While the
                        switch to the F-100 was supposed to be temporary, the F-105 never returned to
                         the Thunderbird hangar. The F-100 ended up staying with the team for nearly
                          13 years.
6 Thunderbirds
                                                                             The Thunderbirds started the 1969 training season still
                                                                           in the F-100Ds but in the spring of 1969 the team received
                                                                           the first of the new McDonnell Douglas F-4E “Phantom
                                                                           IIs” and began the team's conversion.
                                                                             The F-4's conversion was the most extensive in the
Top Left: The F-100 Super Sabre performed a total of 1,111 airshows
while wearing Thunderbird colors. Top Right: Capt. Doug Roach signs        team's history. Among other modifications, paints that
autographs for fans in 1973. Center Left: While the team’s aircraft were   had worked on the F-100 made the F-4 look patchy
undergoing semi-annual inspections during the 1969-70 training sea-
sons, the team borrowed jets, affectionately know as Lizards, from units
                                                                           because of multicolored alloys used in the F-4 to resist
across Tactical Air Command. Center Right: An F-4E performs the wing       heat and friction at Mach 2 speeds. As a result, a
walk maneuver. Bottom: In 1974, Administration Specialist Sgt. Sarah       polyurethane paint base was developed and used to
Johnson became the first female assigned to the team.
                                                                           cover the problem. The white paint base remains a
                                                                           part of today's Thunderbird aircraft.


                                                                                                                                        History   7
                                      Top Left: Crew chiefs perform an end of runway check on an F-4 prior to takeoff. Top
                                      Right: An F-4 flies low across the desert at the team’s Indian Springs training range.
                                      Middle Left: Two F-4 wingmen rejoin with the rest of the diamond formation. Middle
                                      Right: Maj. Rip Blaisdell, right wing 1971-73, is mobbed for autographs following a perfor-
                                      mance. Bottom Right: The first T-38A "Talon" to wear Thunderbird colors rolls out of the
                                      paint barn at Nellis AFB, Nev.



                  The F-4 was immense compared with its predecessors. It was big. It was heavy.
                 It was powerful. With the earth shaking roar of eight J-79s from the four
                  diamond aircraft, no demonstration aircraft accomplished the mission of
                  representing American airpower more impressively than the Phantom.
                     1974 brought with it a fuel crisis and as a result a new aircraft for the
                    team, the sleek, swift and highly maneuverable Northrop T-38A “Talon,”
                     the Air Force's first supersonic trainer. Economically, the T-38 was
                      unmatched. Five T-38s used the same amount of fuel needed for one
                       F-4 Phantom, and fewer people and less equipment were required to
                        maintain the aircraft.
8 Thunderbirds
                                                                                                               Although the Talon did not fulfill the Thunderbird tradition of flying front-
                                                                                                             line jet fighters, it did meet the criteria of demonstrating the capabilities of a
                                                                                                             prominent Air Force aircraft.
                                                                                                               The T-38A was used throughout the Air Force during this time period in a
                                                                                                             variety of roles because of its design, economy of operation, ease of main-
                                                                                                             tenance, high performance and exceptional safety record. In fact, Air Force
                                                                                                             fighter pilots use this aircraft during undergraduate pilot training today.
                                                                                                               In honor of the nation's 200th birthday in 1976, the Thunderbirds were
                                                                                                             designated as the official United States Bicentennial Organization. For the
                                                                                                             Bicentennial year only, the aircraft numbers were moved to the fuselage
                                                                                                             and the Bicentennial symbol replaced the numbers on the tail.

Top Left: T-38s in trail formation, appeared on the cover of Airman magazine in 1976. Top Right: On May 8,
1976, the 2000th air show was performed at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Middle: Two crew chiefs
gas up a T-38. Middle Right: The Thunderbirds were designated as the United States' official Bicentennial
organization in 1976. Bottom Left: The oil embargo of 1973 prompted the Thunderbirds to switch to the more
economical T-38. Here, crew chiefs tow a T-38.
                                                                                                                                                                                                  History   9
                   In 1983 the team returned to the tradition of flying a
                  premier fighter aircraft, transitioning to the General
                  Dynamics, later Lockheed Martin, F-16A Fighting
                   Falcon. To ready the F-16 involved removing the
                    radar and internally mounted 20mm cannon, and
                    installing a smoke-generating system.                                                   Top Left: The T-38 was the only aircraft the team has
                       Remaining true to its character to showcase the latest advancement in America’s      flown that wasn't a front-line fighter. Top Right: The first
                      fighter technology, in 1996 the team transitioned to Lockheed Martin’s advanced       F-16A, piloted by Maj. Larry Stellmon, rolls down the taxi-
                                                                                                            way. Bottom Left: Maj. Jim Latham, commander/leader
                       F-16C, the team’s ninth aircraft. With the team’s last demonstration in the F-16A,   1982-84, presents an F-16 model to President Ronald
                        the Thunderbirds were the last active duty unit to use the A model.                 Reagan. Vice President George Bush looks on. Bottom
                                                                                                            Right: After 676 airshows in the F-16A, the team transi-
                          The C model looks similar to its predecessor, but has upgraded avionics and       tioned to the F-16C in 1992.
                          radar systems, making it superior to the A model. A true multirole fighter, the
10 Thunderbirds
  Top Left: The team flies in its signature Delta formation past the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Mo. Top Right:
  Thunderbird F-16s can be turned combat capable in a matter of days. Here, one F-16 is converted to combat ready
  status - except for the paint - in 27 hours. Middle Left: The Thunderbirds represent America's front-line fighter
  aircraft. Here, an Aviano based F-16 flies in support of the base's latest air operation, over Bosnia-Herzegovina.
  Middle Right: A rare sight for the desert based team, snow blankets the F-16s at Langley AFB, Va. Bottom
  Right: Aircraft from North America's three demonstration teams; the Thunderbirds, U.S. Navy Blue Angels, and the
  Canadian Snowbirds fly in formation above Nellis AFB, Nev. in 1999.


F-16C has an unequaled record in actual air-to-air combat. Additionally, it is the only
fighter to win both of the Air Force’s premier competitions - Gunsmoke, air-to-ground
and William Tell, air superiority.
  With its power and agility, the F-16 has remained the choice of the Thunderbirds for
the last 18 years, the longest performance era of any one aircraft. It is a stellar per-
former for the Thunderbirds, the U.S. Air Force and the 20 other nations whose
boundaries it patrols and defends.
                                                                                                                       History   11
                                           Training Season
                     Training begins at Indian Springs Air Force Auxiliary Field, approxi-   more complex maneuvers. Each level is begun only after a high
                   mately 40 miles northwest of Nellis Air Force Base.                       degree of knowledge, skill and judgment has been demonstrated.
                    A period of overlap occurs between the arrival of new pilots and the      Consistent practice is the key to success in an aerial demon-
                  departure of the old, so each pilot receives extensive training and the    stration. Practice does not stop with the end of training season;
                 benefit of experience from his predecessor. The initial training mis-
                sions are designed to build confidence in the leader and
               the aircraft.
                The pivotal factor in successful formation aerobatics for the diamond
              pilots is to overcome the natural tendency to look at the ground and
              devote total, absolute concen-
             tration to the leader's
             aircraft.
              The emphasis throughout
            the training program is on
            flying safety. Training is con-
           ducted in graduated steps
           beginning with basic maneu-
           vers and two ship formations
          at relatively high altitudes, then
          progressing steadily to larger
          formations, lower altitudes and




12 Thunderbirds
it continues all year long. Like any other
skill, proficiency suffers if not continually
exercised. To ensure those skills are main-
tained, every takeoff is a diamond takeoff and
every landing is from the pitch up so that they
become second nature.
  Pilots fly in formation everywhere, including
en route show sites. When at Nellis between
deployments, mid-week practices are scheduled
to maintain the fine edge of precision. Arrival
maneuvers are flown at every site possible, not
only to familiarize the team with the area and
advertise their arrival, but also to provide addi-
tional practice for the diamond and solo pilots.




                                                     Training   13
                                The Preparation
                    The Thunderbirds fly an air demonstration almost every weekend
                  from mid-March to mid-November.
                    A typical week begins on Thursday when the team deploys to its
                  show site. Pilots fly their respective aircraft and support person-
                  nel typically use a C-141. As soon as the jets touch down, techni-
                  cians recover their respective aircraft and perform post-flight tasks.
                  Meanwhile, public affairs prepares for enlistment and re-enlistment
                  ceremonies, media interviews and orientation flights. Communications
                  specialists videotape the arrival and landing. The advance pilot, having
                  arrived the day before, briefs the team on everything from transporta-
                  tion to the weather.
                    Friday is usually a practice day, giving the Thunderbird pilots an
                  opportunity to become familiar with the terrain and landmarks of the
                  area. Crew chiefs and their assistants attend to pre-flight tasks, then
                  give their gleaming red, white and blue jets the traditional one last bit
                  of polish. After the practice flight, the team enjoys meeting members of
                  the community whose special needs might preclude them from attend-
                  ing a crowded show. The rest of the day is set aside for visiting schools
                  and hospitals, as well as other community and public relations events.
                    Prior to each demonstration, Thunderbird pilots go over geographi-
                  cal features of the local area, weather and flight maneuvers. The
                                                     Thunderbird support team sets up
                                                     and tests the sound system, identifies
                                                     opportunities for local media, arranges
                                                     post-performance events and tends to
                                                     last-minute details before giving their
                                                     boots a final polish.




14 Thunderbirds
Training   15
16 Thunderbirds
Thunderbirds   17
                           The     And now its time to begin the demonstration. The maintenance crews have done
                                  their jobs. The Thunderbird pilots and aircraft are all in position as they run their
                                  engines and begin the takeoff roll. With more than 100,000 pounds of jet thrust, the

                  Demonstration   four Pratt & Whitney engines will generate more pure power than 500 high-perfor-
                                  mance cars.
                                   As the planes lift off and
                                  begin their climb, watch
                                  for our slot pilot,




                                                   Lead Solo Takeoff                                                    Opposing Solo Takeoff




18 Thunderbirds                                                                                       Diamond Takeoff
                                              Half Cuban-Eight                                                              Clover Loop Opener


Maj. Scott Bowen. He'll move quickly
from the right wing position to form
the famous Thunderbird diamond.
Maj. Kevin Mastin, the team's oppos-
ing solo, is next, clearing the runway
and executing an immediate
360-degree aileron roll.
  Maj. Dean Wright, the team’s lead
solo, enters the demonstration climb-
ing nearly straight up; reversing his
direction to fly back past the crowd,
all within the length of the runway in
a maneuver called the Split-S.
  The four Diamond jets reposition
behind the line while the solos per-
form their takeoff maneuvers. By the                                                                           Opposing Knife-Edge Pass
time the solos clear the area the
Diamond flies overhead with smoke                                Mastin, inbound for show center at a closing speed of
on in the Clover Loop Opener.                                    nearly 1,200 miles per hour. Meeting they bank sharply,
  From the left, Maj. Wright ... from the right, Maj. Kevin      passing canopy to canopy, in the opposing knife-edge pass.

                                                                                                                                                 High Show   19
                                                      Approaching show center, the Thunderbirds
                                                    are in trail formation with each wingman flying
                                                    directly behind the aircraft in front of him. As
                                                    they enter the turn, each pilot will transition back
                                                    into the Thunderbird Diamond.
                                                     Next, the opposing solo maneuvers in front of
                                                    the crowd flying upside down in a high-speed
                                                    inverted pass.
                                                      Also upside down, here comes
                                                    Thunderbird 5. Watch as Dean rolls
                                                    360 degrees right at show center with the
                                                    Inverted-to-Inverted pass.
                                    Inverted Pass




                  Trail Formation

                                                                                  Knife-Edge Pass


20 Thunderbirds
                                            Diamond Pass-in-Review



  Formation flying at its finest, from behind
the crowd, the diamond approaches show
center for the Diamond Pass-in-Review.
 Following this, the opposing solo shows off the
Thunderbird symbol painted on the underside                                         Slow Roll

of the F-16, in the challenging Knife-Edge pass.
  Watch as Maj. Wright uses precise con-
trol inputs to demonstrate the F-16’s slow
speed agility with the Slow Roll.




                                                                     Inverted-to-Inverted Pass


                                                                                                 HighShow   21
                                   In the next maneuver, the Diamond passes overhead
                                 demonstrating the graceful Diamond Roll.
                                   Approaching the crowd line in Thunderbird 6, Maj. Mastin
                                 will perform a precision 8-point roll.
                                   Next, Maj. Wright performs four maximum performance
                                 aileron rolls. You can check your watch as Dean rolls four
                                 times in just six seconds.



                  8-Point Roll




                                   Diamond Roll                              Maximum Performance Aileron Rolls




22 Thunderbirds
  Now its time for the Arrowhead
formation, with our wingmen, Capt.
Rick Boutwell and Maj. Jon Greene,
dropping back to fly off of our slot
pilot, Maj. Scott Bowen, in the
Arrowhead Loop.




                                       Arrowhead Loop



                                                        HighShow   23
                                    Our two solo pilots are teamed up for the
                                   Calypso Pass. Watch for the mirror image as
                                   Thunderbird 5 rolls on his back to fly inverted
                                   next to Thunderbird 6.
                                    The Diamond is now approaching. Watch
                                   as all four pilots perform simultaneous aileron
                                   rolls right at show center.




                    Calypso Pass




                  Bon-Ton Roulle                                            Calypso Pass




24 Thunderbirds
                   Look straight ahead and hold on to
                  your hats. Coming directly toward
                  you, are our two solo pilots with the
                  breathtaking crossover break.
                   Your Thunderbirds are now in Trail
                  Formation, with each pilot flying off
                  the aircraft in front of him. As they
                  pull up into the vertical, you'll see
                  them smoothly transition back into
                  the Thunderbird Diamond in the
                  Trail-to-Diamond Cloverloop.




Trail Formation                                           Crossover Break
                                                                            HighShow   25
                                                                                          Opposing 4-Point Roll




                                                                                                Trail Formation


                                        Look to your left and to your right. Here comes Thunderbird
                                       5 and 6, our solo pilots. Watch as each pilot performs a crisp
                                       4-Point Roll while crossing exactly at show center.
                                        With our diamond pilots flying in trail formation, watch as
                                       they smoothly transition back into the diamond formation
                                       while rolling 360 degrees.



26 Thunderbirds   Diamond Cloverloop
 Now, Thunderbird 5 slows his aircraft to mini-     Thunderbird Sneak Pass. Using speed and agility
mum airspeed. With gear and flaps extended. You     in maneuvers like this allows U.S. Air Force pilots
will see the excellent slow speed maneuverability   the opportunity to reach their target undetected, hit
of the F-16 with the Wing Walk.                     it hard, and return to fight another day.
 A classic example of tactical surprise is the




                        Trail-to-Diamond Roll                                                      Wing Walk




                                                                                                                            HighShow   27
                                                                                                               Sneak Pass
                   Inbound for show center, the Diamond
                 approaches with its gear and flaps down.
                 Above them in hot pursuit is Thunderbird 6,
                closing in on the Diamond at more than 500
               miles per hour. His job is to overtake the forma-
              tion right in front of the crowd.
                Our opposing solo pilot Maj. Mastin has joined
             the Diamond to create the Thunderbird Five-Card
             formation to fly the Five-Card loop. Stacked in the
             center of the Five-Card is our slot pilot, Maj. Scott
             Bowen. This is precision flying at its finest, there's
             no room for error here in the center of the Five-Card.




                                                                                    Solo dives to Line Break Rejoin




                                                                      Hi-Low Pass

                                                                                             Hi-Low Pass




28 Thunderbirds
 The Thunderbirds pass the crowd in the line abreast formation
keeping their eyes trained on the aircraft beside them. They
pass the crowd and pull up into the vertical to execute the
Line Break loop. As Thunderbird 6 pulls away into his own
loop, the remaining pilots will form the Diamond, then meet
Maj. Mastin at show center in a head-on-pass.




                                                                          Five-Card Loop




                                                   Five-Card Formation




                                                                                           Line-Break Loop




                                                   Line-Break Loop Pass




                                                                                                             HighShow   29
                   In air combat, if you can't turn tight, you can’t fight. The           formation with the Diamond 360. While flying this formation
                  F-16 can do both. Maj. Wright performs a full afterburner,              the pilots will experience more than 6 times the force of
                  “9-G," high performance turn directly in front of the crowd.            gravity on their bodies.
                   More high "G" performance, this time in the Diamond




                                                                            Maximum 360                                                                 Diamond 360
30 Thunderbirds
                                                    Delta Pass


                    As Lt. Col. Venable rolls 360 degrees, watch as all five
                  wingmen maintain their precise formation positions.
                    Lt. Col. Venable is once again repositioning the Delta.
                  As they approach directly in front of you, watch as
                  they pull up to the vertical.
                    Thunderbird 5 and 6 have broken away from forma-
                  tion and in just a moment will reverse direction and
                  pull through to meet at show center.



Delta Formation




 Delta Blue-Out                                                  Delta Loop    HighShow   31
                   Perhaps no single maneuver is more closely identified with the Thunderbirds
                  than the High Bomb Burst.
                   After the pilots break formation, the lead solo penetrates the column of smoke,
                  performing vertical roles to the top of the maneuver.
                   Each wingman then reverses direction in a high-speed dive and races to the spot
                  where the bomb burst began. With closure rates approaching 1,200 miles per
                  hour, the challenge now is for each Thunderbird to get to that point at exactly the
                  same time.




                                                                                                                         High Bomb Burst




                                                                                                        Diamond Rejoin




32 Thunderbirds
 As the jets land, so ends another demonstration.        the team says their final good-byes as the process begins
 The maintenance crews recover the jets, “load teams”    anew and the Thunderbirds prepare to fly into
carefully repack equipment on the support aircraft and   another town.




                                                                                                                     HighShow   33
                                                                                          Ambassadors in Blue




                   To aid in recruiting the next generation of airmen, the team
               often solicits the help of celebrities easily recognized by a
                variety of audiences. These celebrities are chosen because of
                their popularity and because they are good role models for            to audiences in North America and Europe. As they showcase the
                 today’s youth to emulate. The media interest following these         technological advancements in fighter aviation and the skills of every
                  celebrities enable them to help tell the Air Force story to large   USAF fighter pilot, they do so with the same pride and professional-
                   audiences, not only across the country but around the world.       ism demonstrated by the 360,000 men and women who serve in
                     Some of the most recent celebrities to fly with the              today’s Air Force.
                    Thunderbirds include actor Brendan Fraser and Super Bowl            When you look skyward and see the breathtaking performance of
                    XXXI MVP Terrell Davis.                                           six red, white and blue F-16 jet fighters, hear the powerful roar of
                         This year, as the world enters the second millennium, the    their engines, and feel the emotional pull inspired by patriotism, you
34 Thunderbirds       team is honored to represent the United States of America       are watching the Thunderbirds…America’s Ambassadors in Blue.
  The 2000 Thunderbird Officers




  Selection as a Thunderbird officer is an honor afforded few.     applications. Each officer must submit career records, letters of
In 46 years, the 246 officers who wear or have worn the distin-    recommendation and personal reasons for seeking a position on
guished emblem of America’s Ambassadors in Blue have               the Thunderbird team. All officer candidates (support officer
proven themselves dedicated professionals. They have chan-         finalists; pilot semi-finalists) accompany the team on a deploy-
neled their training, natural talents and strong desire to excel   ment for familiarization and first-hand evaluation by the team.
into making the Thunderbirds what they are.                        Prospective pilots are also screened for flying experience
  Eight of the 12 officers assigned to the team are highly expe-   and ability.
rienced fighter pilots. Six fly demonstration jets (Thunderbirds     Following pilot semi-finalist interviews and deployment with
Nos. 1-6), while the operations officer (No. 7) and narrator       the team, the Thunderbird commander/leader selects five to
(No. 8) fly a single-seat Lockheed Martin F-16C and a twin-seat    eight finalists to travel to Nellis Air Force Base, where each
F-16D, respectively, which serve as spare aircraft at each show    candidate-pilot flies an evaluation flight in the back seat of an
site. Medical, executive, maintenance and public affairs           F-16D. These check flights consist of formation flying and
functions are performed by support officers (Nos. 9-12).           some basic fighter maneuvers.
  Thunderbird officers serve two-year tours of duty. To ensure       The commander/leader evaluates the finalists and sends his
continuity and a smooth transition, three of the six demonstra-    recommendations through the chain of command to the
tion pilots change each year.                                      commander of Air Combat Command, who is responsible for
  The Thunderbird commander screens all officer candidate          the final selection.


                                                                                                                                       Officers   35
                             Lt. Col. John R. Venable
                                                Commander/Leader
                           Lt. Col. John Venable, 40, in his first season
                  as the commander/leader of the U.S. Air Force Air
                  Demonstration Squadron, “Thunderbirds,” flies the
                 No. 1 jet, leading all air demonstrations and com-
                 manding the 120-person squadron.
                  Colonel Venable entered the Air Force in 1981 from
                the Ohio University Reserve Officer Training Corps.
               Before his assignment to the team, Colonel Venable
               served as operations officer with the 549th Combat
              Training Squadron, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. He is
              a Fighter Weapons School graduate with more than 2,800
              hours in the OV-10 and F-16C/D.
               Colonel Venable calls Marietta, Ga. home. He is married
             to the former Lillian Gonzales of San Diego, Calif. They
             have two sons, Harrison and Walker.




36 Thunderbirds
Capt. Rick Boutwell
Left Wing
    Captain Rick Boutwell, 33, in his first season
  with the U. S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron,
  “Thunderbirds,” flies the No. 2 jet as left wing in the
  diamond formation.
    Captain Boutwell entered the Air Force in 1991 from
  the Troy State University Reserve Officer Training
  Corps. Before his assignment to the team, Captain
  Boutwell was an F-15C flight commander, instructor
  pilot and flight examiner for the F-15C Formal Training
  Unit, 1st Fighter Squadron, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.
  During several deployments to the Middle East, he has
  flown numerous missions enforcing the no-fly zone over
  southern Iraq. He has logged more than 1,600 hours in
  the F-15 A/B/C/D and F-16 C/D.
    Captain Boutwell calls Greenville, Ala., home. He is
  married to the former Leslie Fuller of Montgomery, Ala.
  They have a daughter, Brooke.




                                                             Officers   37
                             Maj. Jonathan J. Greene
                                                            Right Wing
                      Maj. Jon Greene, 34, in his first season with
                   the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron,
                  “Thunderbirds,” flies the No. 3 jet as right wing in the
                 diamond formation.
                  Major Greene entered the Air Force in 1988 from the
                University of Florida Reserve Officer Training Corps.
                Before his assignment to the team, he was an instruc-
               tor pilot and wing weapons officer for the 56th Fighter
               Wing, Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. During Operation
              Southern Watch, he deployed to the Middle East where
              he flew more than 70 missions enforcing the no-fly zone
              over southern Iraq. A graduate of the Fighter Weapons
              School, Major Greene has logged more then 2,200 hours
             in the F-16 A/C.
               Major Greene calls Tampa, Florida, home. He is married
             to the former Marilee Ashe of Coral Springs, Fla. They
             have two sons, Kyle and Cole.




38 Thunderbirds
Maj. Scott C. Bowen
Slot
     Maj. Scott Bowen, 34, in his second season with
  the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron,
  “Thunderbirds,” flies the No. 4 jet, known as the slot,
  in the diamond formation.
    Major Bowen entered the Air Force in 1988 from the
  Clemson University Reserve Officer Training Corps.
  Before his assignment to the team, he served as flight
  commander, instructor pilot and flight examiner for
  the F-16 Formal Training Unit, 61st Fighter Squadron,
  Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. During Operation Provide
  Comfort, he deployed to the Middle East where he
  served as flight leader and package commander for
  numerous missions over northern Iraq enforcing the no-
  fly zone. He has logged more than 2,400 hours in the
  F-16A/C.
    Major Bowen calls Kingsport, Tenn., home, and is mar-
  ried to the former Sonja Hienz of Dudeldorf, Germany.




                                                            Officers   39
                                  Maj. Dean N. Wright
                                                            Lead Solo
                     Maj. Dean Wright, 34, in his second season with
                   the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron,
                   “Thunderbirds,” flies the No. 5 jet as the lead
                  solo pilot.
                    Major Wright entered the Air Force in 1987 upon
                 graduation from the U.S. Air Force Academy. Before
                his assignment to the team, he was an F-117A pilot and
                chief of wing tactics, 9th Fighter Squadron, Holloman
               Air Force Base, N.M. From 1993 to 1995, Major Wright
               was a Royal Air Force exchange officer, flying the GR.7
               Harrier with No. 1 Fighter Squadron, RAF Wittering,
               U.K. He has logged more than 2,900 hours in the
              A/OA-10, Hawk T1A, GR.7 Harrier, AT-38B, F-117A,
              T-38 and F-16C.
               Major Wright calls Sheridan, Ark., home. He is married
              to the former Andrea Hammond of Yorkshire, England.
              They have a son, Jack.




40 Thunderbirds
Maj. Kevin P. Mastin
Opposing Solo
    Maj. Kevin Mastin, 36, in his first season with the
  U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron,
  “Thunderbirds,” flies the No. 6 jet as the opposing
  solo pilot.
     Major Mastin enlisted in the Air Force in 1982
  as a missile electronic equipment specialist and
  was assigned to the 92nd Munitions Maintenance
  Squadron, Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash. In 1988, he
  received his commission through Washington State
  University Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps.
  Before his assignment to the team, Major Mastin was
  an F-15C flight commander, instructor pilot and flight
  examiner with the 95th Fighter Squadron, Tyndall Air
  Force Base, Fla. During Operations Provide Comfort and
  Southern Watch, he flew 46 combat missions enforcing
  the no-fly zone over Iraq. Major Mastin has logged more
  than 3,000 hours in the T-37, T/AT-38, F-15A/B/C/D
  and F-16C/D.
   Major Mastin calls Dansville, N.Y., home. He is married
  to the former Joni Thompson of Spokane, Wash. They
  have a daughter, Ashley.




                                                             Officers   41
                                  Maj. Michael T. Byrne
                                                   Operations Officer
                       Maj. Mike Byrne, 38, in his second season with
                    the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron
                   “Thunderbirds,” flies the No. 7 jet as the team’s opera-
                  tions officer. He also serves as safety observer and
                 evaluator for each air demonstration and flies orienta-
                tion flights. The No. 7 jet is used as the primary spare for
                all air demonstrations.
                  Major Byrne entered the Air Force in 1984 from the
               Bowling Green State University Reserve Officer Training
               Corps. Before his assignment to the team, he was an AT-38
              instructor pilot and chief of the wing commander’s action
              group at Columbus Air Force Base, Miss. He began his
              career as a B-52 navigator at Loring Air Force Base, Maine.
             After completion of pilot training, he was an F-15 instruc-
             tor pilot at Langley Air Force Base, Va., where he deployed
             in support of Operation Southern Watch and flew 28 com-
             bat missions over southern Iraq. He has logged more than
              3,000 hours in the B-52G, F-15C, AT-38B, and F-16C/D.
               Major Byrne calls Fostoria, Ohio, home. He is married to
              the former Carol Caskey of Gibsonburg, Ohio. They have
              a daughter, Julie and a son, Chris.




42 Thunderbirds
Maj. Kenneth A. Edwards
Advance Pilot/Narrator
     Maj. Ken Edwards, 40, in his first season with
  the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron
  “Thunderbirds,” flies the No. 8 jet as the team’s
  advance pilot and narrator. Arriving at each air dem-
  onstration site in advance of the main contingent, Major
  Edwards ensures all arrangements for the performance
  are complete, he then narrates each demonstration. He
  also flies orientation flights in his No. 8 jet, a two-seat
  F-16D, which the team uses as a secondary spare for all air
  demonstrations.
    Major Edwards entered the Air Force in 1985 through
  Officer Training School at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas.
  Before his assignment to the team, Major Edwards was a
  U.S. Navy exchange pilot flying the EA-6B Prowler with
  Electronic Attack Squadron 128, Naval Air Station Whidbey
  Island, Wash. He deployed to the Middle East in support of
  Operations Southern Watch and Desert Fox and flew
  43 combat missions over southern Iraq. He has logged more
  than 3,600 hours in the T-37, A/OA-10, EA-6B and F-16C/D.
    Major Edwards calls Potomac, Md., home. He is married
  to the former Jody Hejhall of Lexington Park, Md.




                                                                Officers   43
                     Capt. (Dr.) Jay T. Flottmann
                                                         Flight Surgeon
                      Capt. (Dr.) Jay T. Flottmann, 29, in his first season
                    with the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron,
                   “Thunderbirds,” is the team’s flight surgeon. He pro-
                  vides medical care for the entire 120-member team,
                  with specialized knowledge of the unique demands
                 of flying high-performance aircraft.
                    Captain Flottmann participated in the Air Force
                 Health Professions Scholarship Program and entered
                the Air Force in 1997 as a graduate of the University of
                Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. Before his assign-
               ment to the team, he served as a flight surgeon support-
               ing the 91st Air Refueling Squadron, MacDill Air Force
              Base, Fla. In March 1999, he deployed to France, partici-
              pating in Operation Joint Forge, a vital refueling mission
              at the initiation of the Kosovo crisis.
                Captain Flottmann calls Conroe, Texas, home.




44 Thunderbirds
Capt. Charlie Underhill
Executive Officer
    Capt. Charlie Underhill, 31, in his second sea-
  son with the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration
  Squadron, “Thunderbirds,” is the team’s executive
  officer. He supervises executive support, information
  management, budget, training and personnel selec-
  tion. He also manages the overall squadron operations
  and serves as the squadron commander during the
  commander’s frequent deployments.
    Captain Underhill entered the Air Force in 1991 from
  the Oregon State University Reserve Officer Training
  Corps. Before his assignment to the team, he served as
  executive officer for the 92nd Support Group and chief
  of military equal opportunity for the 92nd Air Refueling
  Wing, Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash.
    Captain Underhill calls The Dalles, Ore., home. He is
  married to the former Kristina Wilson of Eugene, Ore.
  They have two sons, Tanner and Chase.




                                                             Officers   45
                             Capt. Stacey T. Hawkins
                                               Maintenance Officer
                     Capt. Stacey Hawkins, 31, in his first season with
                   the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron,
                  “Thunderbirds,” is the team’s maintenance officer. He
                  oversees more than 70 aircraft maintenance personnel
                 and is responsible for keeping the squadron’s fleet of 12
                F-16s mission ready.
                  Captain Hawkins entered the Air Force in 1991 upon
               his graduation from the U.S. Air Force Academy. Before
               his assignment to the team, he served as the commander,
              F-15 Aircraft Maintenance Flight, 57th Aircraft
              Generation Squadron, Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. From
              1996 to 1998 he served as a maintenance policy staff offi-
              cer in the Pentagon while a participant in the Air Force
             Intern Program. During Operation Southern Watch, he
             led a deployment of 75 maintainers to Southwest Asia.
               Captain Hawkins calls Bastrop, La., home. He is married
             to the former Natalie Coleman of Bastrop, La. They have
             a son, Trey.




46 Thunderbirds
Capt. Guy E. Hunneyman
Public Affairs Officer
   Capt. Guy Hunneyman, 27, in his second year with
  the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron,
  “Thunderbirds,” is the team’s public affairs officer.
  Captain Hunneyman oversees the Thunderbirds’
  publicity programs through his direction of specialists
  in public affairs, photography, graphic arts and video
  productions.
    Captain Hunneyman entered the Air Force in 1995
  from The Citadel, The Military College of South
  Carolina, Reserve Officer Training Corps. Before his
  assignment to the team, he served as the chief of public
  affairs for the 319th Air Refueling Wing, Grand Forks Air
  Force Base, N.D.
    Captain Hunneyman calls Montgomery, Ala., home.




                                                              Officers   47
                             2000
                       Thunderbird
                          Enlisted
                 More than 100 of the 120 people assigned
             to the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration
             Squadron are enlisted members, serving in
             more than 27 career fields. All have been in
             the Air Force at least three years before com-
             ing to Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., where
             their skills are integrated into the Thunder-
             bird mission.
               An enlisted tour of duty is a minimum of
             three and a maximum of four years. Selec-
             tion requirements vary in each career field;
             however, all applicants must show they
             have extensive job knowledge and have
             their commander’s recommendation.
               Each new member goes through a 21-day
             orientation program upon arrival.




48 Thunderbirds
  This period is designed for meeting the
entire team and becoming familiar with each
person's function and how they contribute
to the Thunderbird mission. New Thunder-
birds also learn the squadron's history, daily
operations and brush up on their commu-
nications skills. At the end of the 21 days,
they are tested on their knowledge and
must score 80 percent or higher before
receiving the Thunderbird patch.
  This tight-knit team believes no mem-
ber is more important than another.
Each contributes directly to the success
of the Thunderbird mission because it
is only through teamwork that the
squadron can meet its objectives.
                                                 Enlisted   49
                           Leadership
                        Two senior noncommissioned officers are responsible for the entire squadron. Both strive to
                       improve the quality of life by enhancing the health, morale and welfare of enlisted person-
                      nel. The maintenance superintendent is the highest-ranking enlisted person in the squadron.
                      He is also responsible for overseeing all maintenance performed on the team's 12 F-16s. The
                     first sergeant acts as a liaison between the commander and all unit personnel, frequently
                     working special issues with local agencies and base organizations.


                                                                                                                                                 CMSgt. Michael Mlodzik        SMSgt. Mary Kochel
                                                                                                                                                 Maintenance Superintendent      First Sergeant
                                                                                                                                                      Milwaukee, Wis.            Tarentum, Pa.




                   Maintenance
                  More than 70 of the 100 enlisted Thunderbird members are aircraft maintainers, work-
                  ing in 11 different career fields. It is their job to ensure each aircraft is mission ready. In
                  1999, they averaged a 86.1 percent mission capable rate. The Thunderbird maintenance
                  organization is divided into seven major areas, but each is interrelated.




                    Sortie Generation Superintendent/Line Chief/Production Superintendent
                   The sortie generation superintendent, line chief and production superin-
                   tendent, or “pro-supers” direct, coordinate and manage all maintenance
                    actions performed on Thunderbird aircraft. The line chief is directly
                    responsible for all showline maintenance activities and drill. The pro-super
                     oversees maintenance efforts performed by the team’s other aircraft main-
                     tainers and specialists.



                                                                                                                    SMSgt. James Wood              MSgt. Charles Miller         MSgt. Mike Noska
                                                                                                              Sortie Generation Superintendent          Line Chief            Production Superintendent
                                                                                                                       Columbia, S.C.                 Tallasse, Ala.            North Ridgeville, Ohio




50 Thunderbirds
Showline
  The showline consists of 22 highly
motivated and dedicated professionals in vari-
ous aircraft maintenance specialties.
  They are selected at the end of each demon-
stration season based on their drive and initia-
tive to keep the 12 Thunderbird F-16s mission                                                          TSgt. Sean Carraway            TSgt. Paul Vergeldt             TSgt. Steven Spencer            TSgt. Steven Loy
ready. A crew chief and an assistant crew chief                                                            Crew Chief #1             Assistant Crew Chief #1             Crew Chief #2              Assistant Crew Chief #2
                                                                                                        Salt Lake City, Utah             Aberdeen, S.D.                    Bel Air, Md.               Apple Valley, Calif.
are assigned to travel with each aircraft for the
entire season to ensure the jets are ready to fly
on a daily basis.




                                                                                   SSgt. Eric Wheeler              SSgt. Jason Tiek              SSgt. Gorge Mujica             SSgt. Anthony Hayes              SSgt. Ken Eveland
                                                                                     Crew Chief #3               Assistant Crew Chief #3            Crew Chief #4               Assistant Crew Chief #4            Crew Chief #5
                                                                                    Bourbonnais, Ill.               High Ridge, Mo.               Garden City, Kan.                 St. Paul, Minn.               Zanesville, Ohio




                                              TSgt. Patrick Mock                SSgt. Michael Fisher           SSgt. Timothy Smith             TSgt. Kimberly Long             TSgt. Eric Simmons               SSgt. Kyle Krug
                                             Assistant Crew Chief #5               Crew Chief #6               Assistant Crew Chief #6            Crew Chief #7               Assistant Crew Chief #7            Crew Chief #7
                                                 Las Vegas, Nev.                    Tucson, Ariz.                   Detroit, Mich.              Klamath Falls, Ore.                Niceville, Fla.               Carrolton, Ohio




           SSgt. Cameron St. Amand    SSgt. Juan Williams               SrA. Jason Owens           SSgt. Fenton Fukushima             TSgt. Douglas Spaltro             SSgt. Scott Hooks            SSgt. Michael Phillips
            Assistant Crew Chief #7      Crew Chief #7                 Assistant Crew Chief #7           Crew Chief #8                Assistant Crew Chief #8             Crew Chief #8              Assistant Crew Chief #8
                  Derry, N.H.           Springfield, Va.                     Lizton, Ind.                Kona, Hawaii                  South Portland, Maine               Norfolk, Va.                Jacksonville, N.C.



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Enlisted   51
                               Plans, Scheduling and Documentation
                         Plans, Scheduling and Documentation report to the maintenance superintendent,
                        and are responsible for coordinating and publishing daily, weekly and monthly
                        maintenance flying schedules. They also load and update time compliance tech-
                       nical orders and forecast time-change item requirements into the core automated
                       maintenance system for all assigned F-16 aircraft.

                                                                                                                                                                     SSgt. William Kerr              SSgt. Bruce Kmiec
                                                                                                                                                                   Plans, Scheduling & Doc.        Plans, Scheduling & Doc.
                                                                                                                                                                         Seattle, Wash                Gilbertville, Mass.




                  Aircraft Generation Flight
                  Aircraft maintainers, commonly referred to as crew chiefs, are ultimately responsible
                  for all maintenance performed on an aircraft. Similar to an airframe and powerplant
                  technician in the civilian sector, this includes everything from servicing the aircraft with
                  fuel, to routine inspections and major maintenance. They also identify and ensure all
                  aircraft discrepancies are annotated and fixed.

                                                                                                                                                                     MSgt. Danny Smith             TSgt. Matthew Gadziala
                                                                                                                                                                Aircraft Generation Flight Super     Aircraft Maintenance
                                                                                                                                                                         Manchester, Ky.                 Atlanta, Ga.




                   TSgt. James Hagar      TSgt. Shaun Hardwrick    SSgt. Steven Allen     SSgt. Larry Herrera     SSgt. Chris Gaspard      SSgt. Ken Stull           SSgt. Blaine Edinger             SrA. Scott Harris
                   Aircraft Maintenance     Aircraft Maintenance   Aircraft Maintenance   Aircraft Maintenance    Aircraft Maintenance   Aircraft Maintenance         Aircraft Maintenance           Aircraft Maintenance
                        Albany, Ga.         Highland Park, Mich.     Waynesboro, Va.       Albuquerque, N.M.        Bossier City, La.        Horsham, Pa.                Yakima, Wash.                Coral Springs, Fla.



                  Specialist Flight
                   Unlike crew chiefs, specialists work on specific aircraft systems.                            and canopy operation in the event of ejection, while structures
                   This flight consists of eight elements, ranging from avionics to                              technicians maintain the red, white and blue paint scheme and
                    fuels specialists. Avionics specialists are responsible for the                              integrity of the airframes. Aerospace ground equipment (AGE)
                     radar, radio and flight control systems. Electricians navigate                              specialists maintain all support equipment required for the
                      through a maze of wires and maintain aircraft environmental                                Thunderbird mission, while non-destructive inspection (NDI)
                       systems while an engine specialist ensures the entire propul-                             technicians use high-tech, state of the art equipment to analyze
                        sion system is fully maintained. Members from five other                                 oil samples and inspect composite structures. Fuels specialists
                         maintenance specialties perform their daily tasks away                                  oversee maintenance of internal and external fuel tanks and
                         from the aircraft. Egress technicians ensure safe seat                                  ensure all pumps and valves operate correctly.

52 Thunderbirds
      MSgt. Rick Hines              TSgt. Patrick Tustin             SSgt. Neal Barton             SSgt. Troy Blanchard           SSgt. Glen Caron           SSgt. Matthew Dahlin           SSgt. Ron Eckman            SSgt. Philip Groenewald
Specialist Flight Superintendent   Structural Maintenance          Structural Maintenance                 Avionics                      Egress               Electrical/Envir. Systems    Electrical/Envir. Systems           Fuels Systems
        Tallahassee, Fla.             Burgettstown, Pa.                  Oates, Mo.                  Grand Island, Neb.           Madawaska, Maine                 Anoka, Minn.             New Kensington, Pa.              St. Paul, Minn.




                 SSgt. Darin Mauzy            SSgt. Timothy Miles              SSgt. Chad Scholl              SSgt. Mark Schultz             SSgt. Gene White             SrA. Eric Ashbaugh            SrA. Ted Byerly              SrA. April Seymour
                       Avionics               Structural Maintenance        Non-Destructive Inspection       Structural Maintenance               Avionics                   Fuels Systems           Aerospace Ground Equip.       Non-Destructive Inspection
                    Boswell, Pa.                   Tucson, Ariz.                 Garretson, S.D.                 Strafford, Mo.              Huntington, W.Va.                Latrobe, Pa.                Belfair, Wash.               Kansas City, Kan.




                                                                                                                                                                                               Sortie Support Flight
                The support flight, consisting of aircraft support and inspection                                                               maintain equipment for use by flightline personnel, while a
                elements, reports to the maintenance superintendent ensuring the                                                                small group of crew chiefs and specialists ensure each aircraft
                Thunderbird team has everything necessary for mission accom-                                                                    undergoes an extensive inspection every 300 flying hours.
                plishment. Supply specialists are responsible for ordering parts                                                                This involves pulling virtually every panel off the aircraft
                and equipment, and use all means available to get the items to the                                                              and checking parts, looking for frayed wires and inspecting
                people who need them as quickly as possible. Supply specialists are                                                             the airframe for stress fractures or any other anomalies. Each
                augmented by a group of aircraft maintainers who issue tools and                                                                inspection takes about five days.




                                                                    MSgt. Greg Taylor              TSgt. Chad Becker             SSgt. Rachel Castro         SSgt. Dee Gullickson          SSgt. Melodie Haas            SSgt. Pablo Romero
                                                            Sortie Support Flight Superintendent     Sortie Support                 Sortie Support               Sortie Support               Sortie Support                 Sortie Support
                                                                   Colorado Springs, Colo.           Glenwood, Iowa                Livermore, Calif.            Paulding, Ohio               Southwick, Mass.           Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Enlisted   53
                                  Inspection Flight




                                 MSgt. James Juntunen            TSgt. Gary Painter             SSgt. Jamie Johnson           SSgt. Neil Kellahan       SSgt. Chad Knudson   SSgt. Craig Reuter
                                       Inspection                    Inspection                       Inspection                   Inspection                 Inspection         Inspection
                                     Nisula, Mich.               Huntington, W.Va.                 St. Louis, Mo.               Rapid City, S.D.           Wolf Point, Mt.    Sugar Creek, Iowa



                   Quality Flight
                  This flight consists of five elements, each responsible for providing and developing a quality environment within the mainte-
                  nance complex. The maintenance quality element coordinates and analyzes inspection data gathered by the flights and evalu-
                  ates the maintenance performed. Maintenance operations monitor flightline maintenance and coordinate support from outside
                  agencies. In addition, the training section provides all enlisted members assigned to the team the classes and courses needed to
                  accomplish their mission.


                  Quality Assurance




                   MSgt. Donald McCracken             TSgt. Mike Pepper               TSgt. Joe Richard             SSgt. Mike Kaveny
                   Quality Flight Superintendent       Quality Assurance              Quality Assurance              Quality Assurance
                     Jacksonville Beach, Fla.          Grand Island, Neb.             Montoursville, Pa.               Austin, Texas


                     Maintenance Operations/Analysis                                                                                                Training/Quality




                                 TSgt. Michael Devenere          SSgt. Pete Bushnell            SrA. Marlon Fuentes                                 TSgt. Susan Rainone
                                 Maint. Operations/Analysis    Maint. Operations/Analysis      Maint. Operations/Analysis                             Training Manager
54 Thunderbirds                       San Diego, Calif.             Rochester, N.Y.                   Miami, Fla.                                      Waukesha, Wis.
                                                                                                                                                  Support
Approximately 30 enlisted members are assigned to various functions that directly support the Thunderbird mission.
These include administration, communication, operations and public affairs.


                                                                                                                                   Communications
The communications flight consists of radio and video technicians. Working from a communications trailer located at show
center, a video technician records each air demonstration for debrief, critique, safety and historical record; while ground
radio maintains a vital link between the operations officer, pilots and control tower.




                                                                                                      TSgt. Robert K. Brown         SSgt. Jopet Manseguiao         SrA. Michael Brooks
                                                                                                     Communications Flight Chief          Ground Radio                 Ground Radio
                                                                                                        Williamsport, Ind.                Seattle, Wash.              Little Rock, Ark.




                                                                                                             Administration
Eight people are assigned to administrative support in the Thunderbird squadron. Working in informa-
tion, personnel and financial services, these Thunderbirds are responsible for maintaining squadron
records, tracking squadron correspondence, processing assignment actions for new and departing
members and overseeing the squadron’s budget. During deployments, they arrange lodging and
annotate demonstration performance for the operations officer to use in pilot debriefs.
                                                                                                                                                               TSgt. DeAnne Denzer
                                                                                                                                                             Administration Superintendent
                                                                                                                                                                   Winona, Minn.




  SSgt. Lee Bonds    SSgt. Jimmy Bradley   SSgt. Fernando Miller    SSgt. Betsy Philbrook   SSgt. Shellie Vaught           SSgt. Michele Yates          SrA. Jeff Fisher
      Finance           LAN Manager        Information Management          Personnel              Personnel              Information Management             Personnel
   Alexandria, Va.      Las Vegas, Nev.         Madrid, Spain           Bangor, Maine           Elberfeld, In.                Crestview, Fla.            Johnstown, Pa.
                                                                                                                                                                                             Enlisted   55
                               Operations and Life Support
                          Five enlisted members work in operations. The logistics coordinator builds squadron load plans and
                         arranges airlift support for the team. Operations specialists ensure pilot publications are updated, build
                        pilot itineraries and schedule air space for practices. Life support is responsible for the upkeep of all flying
                       equipment, such as helmets, masks, harnesses and G-suits. They also inspect parachutes and survival kits in
                      ejection seats and provide extensive briefings to incentive, media and orientation fliers.




                     TSgt. Casey Brown               TSgt. Michael Cortez    SSgt. Ryan Dudgeon       SSgt. Michael Sewell       SSgt. Miguel Tafoya
                         Operations                       Life Support        Logistics Coordinator         Operations               Life Support
                        Flint, Mich.                  San Antonio, Texas       San Dimas, Calif.          Sheldon, Mo.               Belen, N.M.




                  Public Affairs
                  This section is responsible for all Thunderbird publicity and consists of eight enlisted specialists in graphic arts,
                  photography, public affairs and video production. Graphics is ultimately responsible for the design of the
                  squadron’s promotional materials. They design and produce stickers, posters, brochures and other promotional
                  products. Photographers provide still documentation of squadron activities, providing images for products
                   and assisting in the production of promotional materials. Public affairs is responsible for media relations,
                   publicity and an extensive community relations program. Video productions create and distribute a wide variety
                    of products for use in various mediums.




                        MSgt. Joe Kubistek              MSgt. Thomas Smith       MSgt. Mike Wheeler      TSgt. Timothy Freese      SSgt. Kevin Gruenwald    SSgt. Jason Haag     SSgt. Bob Purtiman   SSgt. Justin Pyle
                     Public Affairs Superintendent          Art Director          Video Productions        Graphic Illustrator           Photographer      Community Relations     Media Relations     Photojournalist
                             Latrobe, Pa.                  Brevort, Mich.         Vancouver, Wash.            Badger, S.D.             Milwaukee, Wis.      Warrensburg, Mo.        Tempe, Ariz.        Eugene, Ore.




56 Thunderbirds
                                                                                                                                Civilian Support
Four civilians support the Thunderbirds. The airshow coordinator builds the show schedule, then works with
each showsite to build an itinerary of events. Representatives from Lockheed Martin and Pratt & Whitney provide
Thunderbird maintainers with technical assistance on the F-16 airframe and engines. The commander’s secretary
assists the commander and executive officer with their administrative duties.




                                                                          Ms. Joyce Langston              Ms. Kinda Eastwood                Mr. Bruce Pruitt            Ms. Maureen Walker
                                                                          Airshow Coordinator               Pratt & Whitney                 Lockheed Martin             Commander's Secretary
                                                                             Baltimore, Md.                  La Grand, Ore.                  Lebanon, Mo.           Wellingborough, United Kingdon


                                                                                                                                     Newly Assigned Members
                    TSgt. David Nettlow   SSgt. Lyle Allen       SSgt. John Anderson            SSgt. Terrance Baker     SSgt. Jamie Cornelia        SSgt. Darnell Cox          SSgt. Joseph Delafuente
                    SSgt. Brandy Erven    SSgt. Matthew Fisher   SSgt. Paul Gelderloos          SSgt. Jamie Leach        SSgt. Derek Mays            SSgt. Dave Owen            SSgt. Daniel Tachick
                                           SrA. Bradford Bowen   SrA. Ronald Feldhausen         SrA. Christoper Harner   SrA. Charles Phillips       SrA. Kyle Puntney          SrA. Mark Smith




                                                                                                                                                                                                          Enlisted   57
                       1999 Fitzgerald Trophy

                  SSgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald
                  Fitzgerald Award
                  recipient for 1999
                 The Fitzgerald Trophy is given annually in honor of
               Maj. Robert Fitzgerald, who died in a Thunderbird
              aircraft accident April 6, 1961. Major Fitzgerald, the
              commander/leader at the time of his death, was
              responsible for initiating the Thunderbird Airman of
              the Year program in 1960. This program recognizes
              the Thunderbird enlisted member who contributes the
              most to the team’s mission.
                Fitzgerald honorees are nominated and selected
              through secret ballot among enlisted squadron
              members. Each award winner is distinguished as
              the team’s most respected and admired
              noncommissioned officer.
                The 1999 winner was SSgt. Kevin Gruenwald, one of
              the team’s photographers. In his three years on the                        Former Fitzgerald Trophy Winners
              team, he has elevated the photo section to a level of     1998	   SSgt.	Frank	Howe                   1978	   MSgt.	William	Andrews
              respect not seen before. When the team’s other pho-       1997	   Entire	Thunderbird	Enlisted	Team   1977	   TSgt.	Jerry	Petrick
              tographer broke his leg, Kevin stepped up and trav-       1996	   SSgt.	Bruce	Johnsonbaugh           1976	   TSgt.	Dale	Sutter
                                                                        1995	   SSgt.	Terrell	Murray               1975	   TSgt.	Bob	Kendall
               eled on all of the trips. He printed the photos from     1994	   SrA.	Jason	Young                   1974	   TSgt.	Lewis	Smith
               the trips on Monday and Tuesday and then worked          1993	   SSgt.	Mark	McGowan                 1973	   MSgt.	Bob	Walling
                on his scheduled off day. As busy as Kevin is, he       1992	   SSgt.	Michael	Z.	Moore             1972	   TSgt.	Mike	Hess
                still finds time for his physical workouts by being a   1991	   MSgt.	Jimmy	McCraney               1971	   SSgt.	Ed	Jernigan
                                                                        1990	   SMSgt.	Dennis	Tucker               1970	   Sgt.	Frank	Reyes
                 part of the Thunderbird upload crew.                   1989	   SMSgt.	Terry	Lacaillade            1969	   TSgt.	Jerry	Williams
                                                                        1988	   Entire	Thunderbird	Enlisted	Team   1968	   TSgt.	Jim	Payne
                                                                        1987	   SSgt.	Jeff	Schenkelberg            1967	   TSgt.	Bernie	Mudd
                                                                        1986	   MSgt.	George	Hicks                 1966	   TSgt.	Nick	Nishino
                                                                        1985	   SSgt.	James	Olschlager             1965	   SSgt.	Gil	Marquez
                                                                        1984	   SSgt.	John	Fitzgerald              1964	   A1C	Francis	Pianalto
                                                                        1983	   Entire	Thunderbird	Enlisted	Team   1963	   SSgt.	Richard	Donahue
                                                                        1982	   SSgt.	Al	Samerkand                 1962	   TSgt.	Chalmer	Walters
                                                                        1981	   TSgt.	Brock	McMahon                1961	   A1C	Richard	Rennie
                                                                        1980	   SSgt.	Bob	McCall                   1960	   TSgt.	Benny	Davenport
                                                                        1979	   SSgt.	Gary	Holland
58 Thunderbirds
 Maj.
                           Thunderbird Officer Alumni
             Dick Catledge, Memphis, Tenn., Leader ....................5/53-10/54                   Capt.      Charlie Hamm, Little Rock, Ark., LW ......................... 4/64- 2/66                    Capt.      “Scar” Scarbrough, Grover Hill, Ohio, Nar./Solo.7/77-11/80                             Maj.       Johnny Weida, Litchfield, Minn., Slot .......................12/88-12/90
 Capt.       Buck Pattillo, Atlanta, Ga.,Wing ..................................... 5/53- 3/54      Capt.      Robert Morgan, Pendleton, S.C., Solo ........................1/65-10/66                     Maj.       Fred Erickson, Albany, Ga., Nar./Log.Off. .............9/77-11/80                      Maj.       Chuck Greenwood, Grand Blanc, Mich., Solo ..........12/88-12/90
 Capt.       Bill Pattillo, Atlanta, Ga., Wing ....................................... 5/53- 3/54   Capt.      Hank Canterbury, Huntsville, Ala., Slot ...................... 1/65- 2/67                   Capt.      Ron Maness, Carthage, N.C., LW ..............................10/77-11/80               Maj.       Dave Janik, Daytona Beach, Fla., Log.Off. .............12/88-12/90
 Capt.       Bob Kanaga, Phoenix, Ariz., Slot.................................... 5/53- 3/54        Capt.      Buster McGee, La Jolla, Calif., RW .................................1-65- 2/67              Maj.       Jim Coziahr, Orion, Ill., Slot ..........................................10/77-11/80   Maj.       Tim Hoy, Falls City, Neb., Nar. ....................................12/88-12/90
 Capt.       Bob McCormick, Oshkosh, Wis., Spare/Slot ...........5/53-10/54                         Capt.      Glen Scoggins, Atlanta, Ga., Admin.Off. ................... 3/65- 7/67                      Capt.      Dan McCoy, Lake City, S.C., Slot ................................10/77-12/78           Capt.      John Posner, Alexandria, Va., RW ..............................12/88-12/90
 Capt.       Bill Brock, Phoenix, Ariz., Nar. ....................................... 6/53- 5/54    Lt. Col. Ralph Maglione, Akron, Ohio, C/L ...............................7-65- 7/67                    Maj.       Lloyd “Fig” Newton, Ridgeland, S.C., Nar./Slot10/74-11/78                              Capt.      Paul Bowman, Appleton, Wis., Maint.Off. .............12/88-12/90
 Capt.       Bill Creech, Emmetsburg, Iowa, LW/RW ..................2/54-11/55                      Maj.       Robert Haney, Champaign, Ill., Matl.Off. ................... 8/65- 1/68                                                                                    RW................5/78-11/78       Lt. Col. Chuck Simpson, San Antonio, Texas, C/L .............11/89-11/92
 Capt.       John “Bert” Spalding, Downers Grove, Ill., LW............. 3/54- 3/55                  Maj.       Frank Liethen, Appleton, Wis., Ex.Off. .....................11/65-10/66                     Capt.      Bob Biehl, Marion, Ind., Maint.Off. .............................. 6/78- 4/80          Capt.      Steve Henderson, St. Louis, Mo., LW .......................11/89-12/91
 1st Lt.     Aubrey Brown, Dyersburg, Tenn., Solo .....................3/54-10/55                   Capt.      Hal Dortch, Nashville, Tenn., Nar..............................11/65-12/66                  Lt. Col. Dan Taylor, Monroe, Mich., Ex.Off. .............................8/78-12/78               Capt.      Michael O. “Mo” Beale, Franklin, Va., Solo ............11/89-12/91
 Capt.       H. A. Davis, White Plains, N.Y., Nar. .......................... 5/54- 9/55            Capt.      Bob Beckel, Walla Walla, Wash., Solo .......................12/65-12/67                     Capt.      Jim Jiggens, Northville, Mich., Nar. .............................9/78-12/81           Capt.      Tom Foley, West Palm Beach, Fla., Ex.Off. ............... 11/90- 5/92
 Capt.       George Kevil (hometown unknown), Solo .............10/54-12/54                         Capt.      Steve Murata, Mountain View, Calif., Info.Off. ........ 3/66- 4/69                          Maj.       Jim Latham, Shawnee Mission, Kan., RW ...............11/78-11/81                       Capt.      Joe LaMarca, Jr., Port Charlotte, Fla., PAO ................. 7/90- 6/92
 Lt.         Bob McCutchen, (hometown unknown), Solo..........10/54- 7/55                           Maj.       Mike Miller, Columbia, S.C., Nar./Solo .................... 11/66- 1/69                                                                                  C/L................4/82-12/84        Capt.      Marc Paquette, Montreal, Canada, Maint.Off. .......11/90-11/92
 Capt.       Jacksel Broughton, Rochester, N.Y., Leader . ............10/54- 3/57                   Maj.       Tony McPeak, Grants Pass, Ore., Solo ......................12/66-12/68                      Capt.      R. D. Evans, Osceola, Ark., Solo ................................. 11/78-11/81         Maj.       Scott Anderson, Brooklyn Park, Minn., Log.Off. .11/90-12/92
 Capt.       Billy Ellis, DeQuincy, La., Solo/Wing .......................... 5/55- 2/57            Capt.      Jack Dickey, Minneapolis, Minn., Slot ........................12/66- 1/69                   Maj.       Jim Jannette, Mentor, Ohio, PAO ................................12/78- 5/82            Capt.      Lennie Coleman, Savannah, Ga., RW ......................11/90-11/93
 Capt.       Paul Ross, Fourmile, Ky., Spare/Solo .......................... 7/55- 6/56             Maj.       Stan Musser, Gettysburg, Pa., RW/Slot ...................12/66-12/69                        Lt. Col. D. L. Smith, Rossville, Ga, C/L. ..................................... 3/79- 9/81        Capt.      Paul Strickland, Trabuco Canyon, Calif., Slot .............11/90-11/93
 Capt.       Don Ferris, Tacoma, Wash., Nar.. ..................................7/55-11/56          Maj.       Neil Eddins, Afton, Wyo., Slot ....................................... 4/59- 3/61           Maj.       Jim Epting, High Point, N.C., Ex.Off. .......................... 7/79- 6/81            Capt.      Dave Coffman, Jacksonville, Fla., Solo .....................11/90-11/93
 1st Lt.     Bob Anderson, Tulsa, Okla., Solo/Wing ..................... 7/55- 3/57                                                                 C/L ......................................1/67-12/68   Maj.       Bob Fleer, Fort Worth, Texas, Log.Off. ........................ 9/79- 4/83             Capt.      Chris Chambliss, Overland Park, Kan., Nar. ...........1/90-12/93
 1st Lt.     Bill Pogue, San Springs, Okla., Solo/Slot ..................10/55- 9/57                Capt.      Clyde Labell, San Francisco, Calif., Admin.Off. ....... 6/67- 4/70                          Capt.      Sonny Childers, Hartselle, Ala., Solo ........................10/79-12/81              Lt. Col. Dan Darnell, Vinton, Va., C/L .....................................11/91-11/94
 Capt.       Bart Bartley, Apple Valley, Calif., Solo/Wing ............ 6/56- 2/58                  Maj.       Mark Angel, Harrison, Ark., LW ................................11/67-12/69                  Capt.      “Pete” Peterson, Tuskegee, Ala., Nar. .......................10/79-11/82               Capt.      Jeff Rochelle, Las Vegas, Nev., LW .............................11/91-11/94
 Capt.       Douglas Brenner, Falls City, Neb., Spare/Wing ....... 8/56- 2/58                       Maj.       Hal Shelton, Wichita, Kan., Matl.Off. ......................... 11/67- 1/70                 Capt.      Dale Cooke, Somerset, Ky., Slot ....................................10/79- 6/82        Capt.      Eric W. Schnaible, Hewlett, N.Y., PAO ........................ 6/92- 6/94
 Capt.       Bill Scott, St. Petersburg, Fla., Nar................................ 11/56- 4/58      Maj.       Doyle Ruff, Orlando, Fla., Nar./RW .......................... 11/67- 1/71                   Capt.      Monty Montgomery, Vincennes, Ind., Maint.Off. ... 5/80- 5/82                           Capt.      Paul K. Reagan, Orlando, Fla., Ex.Off. ........................5/92-11/94
 Capt.       Bob McIntosh, Hollywood, Calif., Solo/Wing ......... 3/57- 8/58                        Lt. Col. Joe Moore, Spartanburg, S.C., C/L ............................... 5/68- 7/70                  Capt.      Nick Hauck, Mingo Junction, Ohio, Solo .................10/80- 5/81                    Capt.      Walt J. Sarafin, Herkimer, N.Y., Maint.Off. ...............11/92-11/94
 Capt.       Sam Johnson, Dallas, Texas, Slot....................................3/57-10/58         Capt.      Jack Thurman, Altus, Okla., Solo ................................ 11/68- 1/69               Capt.      Willie Mays, Ripley, Tenn., Nar./LW ........................10/80-11/82                Lt. Col. Michael D. Major, Phoenix, Ariz., Log.Off. ............12/92-11/95
 Maj.        Robby Robinson, Fort Wayne, Ind., Leader .............. 3/57- 3/59                     Capt.      Tom Gibbs, Loveland, Colo., Nar./Slot...................... 11/68- 1/72                     Maj.       Kevin Collins, Tacoma, Wash., Ex.Off. ........................ 6/81- 6/83              Capt.      Clark T. Rogers, Tampa, Fla., Solo ..............................11/91-11/95
 CWO         Lloyd Pulley, Bartlesville, Okla, Maint.Off.................6/57-10/58                 Maj.       Mike Kerby, New York, N.Y., Solo ................................ 1/69- 1/71                Maj.       Norman L. Lowry, III, Radford, Va., C/L .................9/81-11/82                    Capt.      Thomas H. Lewis III, Dunwoody, Ga., Solo ...........11/93-12/94
 Capt.       Bob Rutte, (hometown unknown), Solo...................... 8/57- 9/57                   Capt.      Denny Weddle, Coon Rapids, Iowa, Info.Off. .......... 2/69- 1/72                            Capt.      Mark Melancon, Dayton, Ohio, Slot ............................9/81-11/82               Capt.      Peter M. McCaffrey, Ft. Collins, Colo., Slot .............11/92-11/95
 Capt.       Homer Whitlow, Kress, Texas, Slot/Wing.................. 2/57- 5/59                    Maj.       Bill Elander, Atlanta, Ga., Matl.Off. .............................. 1/69- 1/72             Capt.      Wayne Holum, Twin Valley, Minn., RW ...................8/82-11/83                      Maj.       James J. Evanko, Nazareth, Pa., Slot .............................11/92-1/95
 Capt.       C. D. “Fish” Salmon, Port Jervis, N.Y., Solo/Slot...... 1/58- 3/59                     Maj.       Bob Jackson, Tacoma, Wash., LW ................................ 11/69- 1/72                 Capt.      Dan Cooley, Albertville, Ala, Maint.Off.. .................... 7/82- 8/84              Capt.      Matthew E. Byrd, San Francisco, Calif., RW ..........11/92-11/95
 Capt.       Dick Crane, Salt Lake City, Utah, Nar. ........................ 1/58- 7/60             Capt.      Art Ivins, Leo, Ind., Nar. ................................................... 1/70- 1/71   Capt.      Jerry Thomas, Marion, N.C., PAO ................................ 7/82- 7/84            Lt. Col. Stephen J. Andersen, Stony Brook, N.Y., C/L ..........11/93-2/96
 Capt.       Gayle Williams, Medford, Ore., LW ............................4/58-10/59               Capt.      Gary Younglove, Dayton, Ohio, Admin.Off. ............ 4/70- 5/72                            Maj.       A. R. Minkel, Boulder, Colo., Nar.................................1/83-12/84           Maj.       Darryl L. Roberson, Houston, Texas, LW ...................11/93-1/96
 Capt.       Herman Griffin, Sumter, S.C., Solo ............................... 8/58- 9/60          Lt. Col. Tom Swalm, San Diego, Calif, C/L. ............................. 5/70- 1/73                    Capt.      John Bostick, Water Valley, Ky., Solo ...........................8/82-11/85            Maj.       John Keith Switzer, Baton Rouge, La., Nar./Solo...11/92-1/96
 Capt.       Chuck Maultsby, Norfolk, Va., RW ............................10/58- 8/60               Maj.       Joe Howard, Ahoskie, N.C., RW ..................................10/70- 6/72                 Capt.      Steve Chealander, Bakersfield, Calif., Nar./LW ....9/81-11/85                          Capt.      Anthony J. Seely, Meeker, Colo., Nar./Solo ...............11/94-1/97
 Maj.        Bob Fitzgerald, New York, N.Y., Leader ..................... 3/59- 4/61                Maj.       Steve Dwelle, Visalia, Calif., Solo ................................ 11/70- 1/73            Capt.      Howard Attarian, Fairview, Kan., RW .......................1/83-11/85                  Maj.       Jeffrey W. Fiebig, Warner Robins, Ga., Slot .................11/94-1/97
 Capt.       Robert Janca, Cleveland, Ohio, RW............................... 4/59- 3/61            Capt.      Jerry Bolt, Lubbock, Texas, Nar./Slot.........................1/71-12/72                    Maj.       James Bailey, Pen Yan, N.Y., Log.Off. .......................... 4/83- 4/85            Capt.      Russell J. Quinn, Salt Lake City, Utah, Solo ...............11/94-1/97
 CWO         Myron France, Lincoln, Neb., Maint.Off. ................... 5/59- 6/61                 Capt.      Bill Gregory, Stockton, Calif, Info.Off.. ......................10/71-12/73                 Maj.       Brian Haugen, Seattle, Wash., Ex.Off. .......................... 6/83- 6/85            Maj.       James A. Harder, Huron, S.D., Ops.Off. ...................11/94-12/96
 Capt.       Robert Cass, Colorado Springs, Colo., RW ................ 2/60- 2/62                   Maj.       Rip Blaisdell, Topeka, Kan., Nar./RW .....................11/71-12/73                       Lt. Col. Larry Stellmon, Hot Springs, Mont., S/C/L ............6/82-12/86                         Capt.      Daniel R. Torweihe, Sussex, Wis., Nar. ........................11/94-3/96
 Capt.       Ronald Everett, Palm Springs, Calif., Nar. ................. 5/60- 5/62                Maj.       Nels Running, Frenchtown, Mont., LW ..................11/71-12/73                           Lt. Col. “Hoss” Jones, Ruston, La., Solo/Slot ..........................9/81-11/86                Capt.      Dr. James T. Callaghan III, Indianapolis, Ind., Flt.Sg. ..........6/95-6/96
 Capt.       Gerald Larson, Jamestown, N.Y., Solo ......................12/60- 8/62                 Capt.      Tim Roels, Crystal Lake, Ill., Matl.Off./Slot ............11/71-12/74                       Maj.       Pat Corrigan, Kokomo, Ind., Solo ................................9/83-11/86            Capt.      Patricia E. Thomas, Roanoke, Texas, Ex.Off. .............11/94-9/96
 Capt.       William Hosmer, Dunseith, N.D., LW ......................... 2/61- 3/63                Capt.      Jorge Reinoso, Quito, Ecuador, SA, Admin./Ex.Off. 4/72- 7/74                                Maj.       Bill Pritchett, Demopolis, Ala., Log.Off. ....................3/85-11/87               Capt.      John C. Tobin, Crystal Lake, Ill., Maint.Off. ...............11/94-1/97
 Capt.       George Nial, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., Nar. ........................ 3/61- 4/61            Capt.      Jim Bash, Dickinson, Texas, Maint.Off. ....................... 5/72- 2/76                   Maj.       Dave Commons, Oxon Hills, Md. .............................11/84-11/87                 Capt.      Colleen M. Wise, Greentown, Ohio, PAO .................6/94-12/96
 Capt.       Robert Bell, Houston, Texas, Slot ...................................3/61-11/62        Lt. Col. Roger Parrish, Carbondale, Ill., C/L ............................ 7/72- 1/75                  Maj.       Buzz Masters, Springfield, Mo., RW .........................10/84-11/87                Capt.      Dr. Lamont E. Cavanagh, Broken Arrow, Okla., Flt.Sg. ..........6/96-1/97
 Maj.        Ralph “Hoot” Gibson, Mt. Carmel, Ill, Leader. ......... 4/61- 3/63                     Maj.       Al McArtor, Webster Groves, Mo., Nar./LW......... 11/72- 2/74                               Maj.       Jake Thorn, Pascagoula, Miss., Nar. ............................9/84-12/86             Lt. Col. Ronald A. Mumm, Birmingham, Ala., C/L...............11/95-1/98
 Capt.       Cameron Husdale, Sheridan, Wyo., Maint.Off. ....... 6/61- 7/63                         Capt.      Kirk Brimmer, Marshalltown, Iowa, Solo ...............11/72-12/74                           Capt.      John Robinson, Goliad, Texas, LW ............................11/84-11/87               Maj.       Scott E. Cerilli, Scituate, Mass., LW................................11/95-2/98
 Capt.       Bobbie Gardiner, Tampa, Fla., Nar................................ 7/61- 7/62           Capt.      Doug Roach, Romulus, Mich., Log.Off./RW/Slot . 1/73- 1/76                                   Capt.      Terry Williamson, Sumter, S.C., Maint.Off. ...............7/84-12/86                   Maj.       Matthew M. Modleski, West Seneca, N.Y, Solo. ..........11/95-1/98
 Col.        John Groom, Rochester, N.Y., C/L ............................... 1/62- 4/62            Capt.      Gil Mook, Charlestown, R.I., LW ................................10/73- 1/76                 Capt.      Ron Lovas, Corona, Calif., PAO .................................... 7/84- 7/86         Maj.       Robert P. givens, Louisville, Ky., RW ............................11/97-1/99
 Capt.       Ralph Brooks, El Paso, Texas, RW ................................2/62-11/62            Capt.      Bob Gore, Fairmont, W.Va., Info.Off. .........................10/73- 5/77                   Capt.      Lance Undhjem, Twin Falls, Idaho, Slot ...................11/85-11/88                  Maj.       Paul E. Krause, San Antonio, Tx., Slot..........................11/97-2/99
 Capt.       Robert Moore, Miami, Fla., Solo .................................... 3/62- 9/63        Maj.       Ray White, Dallas, Texas, Log.Off. .............................11/73-12/75                 Capt.      Tom Weiler, Corvallis, Ore., Solo ................................11/85-11/88          Maj.       Mark R. Arlinghaus, Houston, Tx., Solo......................11/97-1/99
 Lt. Col. W. Alden, Ellenton, Fla., C/L ......................................... 4/62- 4/64        Capt.      Steve Mish, South Boston, Va., Nar./RW .................. 3/74- 3/77                        Lt. Col. Roger Riggs, Louisville, Ky., C/L ...............................11/85-12/88             Maj.       Randal A. Lane, Martinez, Calif., Ops.Off. .................11/97-1/99
 Capt.       Leonard Czarnecki, Chicago, Ill., Nar.......................... 4/62- 4/64             Capt.      George “Matt” Mattingley, Tulsa, Okla., Ex.Off. ..... 5/74- 7/77                            Capt.      Richard Savko, Arroyo Grande, Calif., Ex.Off. ......... 6/85- 6/88                     Capt.      Anne P. Duke, Aurora, Ill., Ex.Off. ..............................11/97-12/98
 Capt.       Ron Catton, Waukegan, Ill., Solo ..................................8/62-12/64          Maj.       Chris Patterakis, Modesto, Calif., LW .......................12/65-12/67                    Capt.      James Benson, Oak Park, Ill., PAO ............................... 7/86- 6/88           Capt.      Carl A. Buhler, Valdosta, Ga., Maint.Off. .....................11/97-1/99
 Maj.        Paul Kauttu, Ilwaco, Wash, Slot/Leader. ................... 9/62- 2/66                                                                           C/L.........................9/74-11/77       Capt.      Bert Nelson, West Hartford, Conn. , Nar. ..................9/86-12/88                  Capt.      Wesley P. Miller IV, Seattle, Wa., PAO...........................11/97-1/99
 Capt.       Bill Higginbotham, Baton Rouge, La. LW .................1/63-12/64                     Capt.      Jim Simons, Grass Range, Mont., Solo .....................10/74-10/76                       Maj.       Joe Bulmer, Clifton Park, N.Y., RW ............................11/86-12/88             Capt.      Russel Mack, Keene, N.H., RW ........................................1/99-5/99
 Maj.        Edwin Palmgren, Winston-Salem, N.C., Slot ............10/54- 9/56                      Capt.      John Lapointe, South Pasadena, Calif., LW ............11/75-11/78                           Maj.       Dave Robinson, Fairfield, Conn., LW/Slot .............11/86-12/88                      Lt. Col. Brian T. Bishop, Colorado Springs, Colo., C/L.............11/98-1/00
                                                           C/L........................ 3/63- 1/64   Capt.      Lacy Veach, Honolulu, Hawaii, Solo ........................11/75-11/78                      Capt.      K. C. Schow, Wilmar, Minn., Solo ..............................11/86-12/88             Maj.       Bradley D. Bartels, Woodland Hills, Calif., LW.........11/98-1/00
 1st Lt.     Stanley Sasaki, Honolulu, Hawaii, Admin.Off. ....... 3/63- 2/65                        Maj.       Joe Prater, Atlanta, Ga., Log.Off. ................................11/75-11/78              Maj.       Walt Williams, Uniontown, Ala., Maint.Off. ..........11/86-11/89                       Maj.       Dennis J. Malfer, St. Louis, Mo., Solo ............................11/98-2/00
 Capt.       Jerry Schockley, Lafayette, La., LW/Slot ....................4/63-10/65                Maj.       Walt Parker, Quincy, Fla., Nar./RW .........................11/75-11/79                     Maj.       Bruce J. Java, Frederic, Wis., Log.Off. .......................12/86-12/88             Maj.       Mark R. Arlinghaus, Houston, Tx., RW ........................5/99-1/00
 Capt.       Alan Schreihofer, Orange, N.J., Info.Off. ..................... 4/63- 5/66             Capt.      Mike Thomsic, Ft. Collins, Colo., Maint.Off. ............8/76-12/78                         Maj.       Dana Atkins, Portland, Ore., LW ...............................11/87-12/89             Maj.       Constantine Tzavaras, Essex Junction, Vt., Nar. .......11/98-1/99
 Maj.        Lloyd Reder, Broadus, Mont., Matl.Off. ...................... 8/63- 8/65               Lt. Col    Dan Cherry, Marietta, Ga., C/L .................................... 9/76- 4/79              Maj.       Jeff Remington, Portland, Ore., Solo ...........................8/87-12/89                                                                         Ops.Off........11/99-1/00
 Capt.       Clarence Langerud, Lake Bay, Wash., Solo ................ 8/63- 2/66                   Capt.      Rudy Miller, Hope, Ind., Info.Off. ..............................11/76-12/78                Capt.      Jeff Mielke, Racine, Wis., PAO .......................................6/88-11/90       Maj.       (Dr.) David C. Adams, Villanova, Pa., Flt.Sg. ..............11/98-1/00
 Capt.       Gene Devlin, San Diego, Calif., LW ............................. 2/64- 5/64            Capt.      Steve Hyle, Lancaster, Ohio, Ex.Off. ............................. 6/77- 7/79               Lt. Col. Steve Trent, Tampa, Fla., C/L ......................................11/87-11/90          Capt.      James M. Humes, Whitesboro, Texas, Maint.Off........1/99-1/00
 Capt.       Russell Goodman, Salt Lake City, Utah, Nar. ...........3/64-12/65                      Capt.      Charlie Carter, San Antonio, Texas, Nar. ..................12/76- 7/77                      Capt.      Gerilyn Lentine, Herndon, Va., Ex.Off. ......................6/88-10/90
Legend: Admin.Off.-Administration Officer; C/L-Commander/Leader; Ex.Off.-Executive Officer; Flt.Sg.-Flight Surgeon; Info.Off.-Information Officer; Log.Off.-Logistics Officer; LW-Left Wing; Maint.Off.-Maintenance Officer; Matl.Off.-Materiel Officer; Nar.-Narrator;                                                                                                                                   Alumni   59
                                                                         Ops.Off.-Operations Officer; PAO-Public Affairs Officer; RW-Right Wing; S/C/L-Slot/Commander/Leader
                                                          Honorary Thunderbirds & Crew Chiefs
                    The far-reaching and complex Thunderbird mission requires assistance from hundreds of Americans                                                                                                                                 The Honorary Crew Chief title is
                  across the nation. The team believes its success depends directly on the time and effort contributed by                                                                                                                          awarded by the Thunderbird enlisted
                  its friends and supporters throughout the years. For that reason, the Thunderbirds pay tribute each                                                                                                                              members to those individuals who have
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   performed above and beyond “the call
                  season to those exceptional people who have contributed most to the team’s mission.                                                                                                                                              of duty,” who have a dedicated sense of
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   responsibility to the team and who have
                   The Honorary Thunderbird title is awarded by the Thunderbird commissioned officers to those individuals
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   sacrificed time and personal gain to
                  who truly understand the intrinsic value of the team — those who help to ensure the successful completion of                                                                                                                     support the Thunderbird mission.
                  the team’s continued existence through their genuine concern and extensive personal and professional efforts.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mr. Bennie Goffstein ......................................... 1953-60
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mr. & Mrs. Al Proctor ............................................. 1963
                  Mr. J.L. Atwood ...................................................................President, NAA (1953-60)        Brig. Gen. Charles J. Cunningham .................................. Cmdr, 57th FWW (1980)                     Mr. James Stuart ...................................................... 1964
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mr. John Carey ......................................................... 1965
                  Mr. Alex Burton ......................................................... Vice President, NAA (1953-60)            Mr. Gregory Kolligian ..........................Managing Dir, Selame Design Assoc (1980)                      Mr. Dan Martinetto ................................................. 1967
                  The Honorable Howard W. Cannon .....................U.S. Senator, Nevada (1953-60)                                 Chaplain (Maj.) Ben Perez ................................................Air Force Chaplain (1981)           Mr. James M. Ford ................................................... 1969
                  Mr. Kenneth Ellington..........................Vice President, Republic Aviation (1953-60)                         Maj. Gen. Robert E. Kelley.............................. Cmdr, TAC Ftr Wpns Center (1981)                     Mr. Jack D. Gleason ................................................ 1969
                  Col. James B. Henson ........................ Director of Information, TAC (Ret) (1953-60)                         Maj. Gen. Jack I. Gregory ............................... Cmdr, TAC Ftr Wpns Center (1982)                    Mr. Glenn Neely ...................................................... 1969
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mr. Connie Voight ................................................... 1970
                  Mr. J. Kindelberger ......................................Chairman of the Board, NAA (1953-60)                     Lt . Col. William E. McCarron...................... Special Asst, 57th FWW Cmdr (1982)                        Mr. Robert W. Voss.................................................. 1970
                  Col. Joseph L. Laughlin ..................................... Cmdr, 4520th CCT Wing (1953-60)                      Mr. Ace Gribble ............................................Vice President, Western Airlines (1982)           Mrs. Donna Hawks ................................................. 1970
                  Lt. Gen. Thomas J. McGehee ........................... Cmdr, 4520th CCT Wing (1953-60)                             Mr. Herb Rogers ............................................... Vice President and General Manager,           Mrs. Katie Ford ........................................................ 1971
                  Mr. Munday I. Peale .....................................President, Republic Aviation (1953-60)                                                                      Fort Worth Division, General Dynamics (1983)                Mr. Ken Hackman ................................................... 1971
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mr. Chuck Benham ................................................. 1972
                  Mr. R. Rice ................................................................................. LAD/NAA (1953-60)    Mr. Bernie Geier ....................General Manager, Aviation and Commercial Division,                       Mr. Ted Helsten........................................................ 1972
                  Mr. William P. Gwinn ................................... President, United Aircraft Corp (1961)                                                                                                 FAA Flight Operations (1983)     Ms. Hallie Post ......................................................... 1973
                  Mr. Henry W. Harding.......................... President, Laboratory for Electronics (1961)                        The Honorable Verne Orr ...................................... Secretary of the Air Force (1983)              Maj. Audrey J. Thompson Jr. ................................ 1973
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Maj. Len Moon......................................................... 1974
                  Maj. Gen. A. H. Luehman ................ Dir, Sec AF Office of Information (Ret) (1961)                            Maj. Gen. Gene Fischer .................................... Cmdr, TAC Ftr Wpns Center (1984)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mr. Joe Brown .......................................................... 1975
                  Mr. Ralph Ruud ............................................................. President, LAD/NAA (1961)             Brig. Gen. Harry Wald ...............................................Nevada Army National Guard,              Mr. John F. Weeks .................................................... 1975
                  Mr. John W. Casey ................................................. Vice President, LAD/NAA (1962)                                                                 Assistant Adjutant General for the Army (1984)                Mrs. Dottie Goffstein ............................................. 1976
                  Maj. Gen. B.D. Foulois ................................................................. USAF (Ret) (1963)         The Honorable Barry Goldwater ............................... U.S. Senator, Arizona (1985)                    Mrs. Mary Snyder.................................................... 1976
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Dr. (Col.) William H. Walter III ............................ 1977
                  Maj. Gen. Boyd Hubbard Jr. ........................ Cmdr, 4520th CCT Wing (Ret) (1963)                             Brig. Gen. Joseph W. Ashy ................................................ Cmdr, 57th FWW (1985)              Mrs. Betty Bouthillier ............................................. 1978
                  Gen. C.E. LeMay ......................................................USAF Chief of Staff (Ret) (1964)             Sister Judy “Jay” Franz .................................. St. Michael’s School, Arizona (1986)               Mrs. Connie Kulikowski ....................................... 1978
                  Gen. W.C. Sweeney Jr.......................................Cmdr, Tactical Air Command (1964)                       Gen. Robert D. Russ .........................................Cmdr, Tactical Air Command (1986)                SrA. Nick Pearson ................................................... 1979
                  Brig. Gen. G.B. Simler ............................................ Cmdr, 4520th CCT Wing (1965)                   The Honorable Edward C. “Pete” Aldridge Jr. .............................. SECAF (1987)                       MSgt. William “Thorny” Thornberg ................... 1980
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Capt. John Hefner.................................................... 1980
                  Col. Thomas B. Joyce ........................................... Cmdr, Det 1, AC&I Center (1965)                   Maj. Gen. Peter T. Kempf ................................ Cmdr, TAC Ftr Wpns Center (1987)                    Mr. Bill Sisti.............................................................. 1981
                  Brig. Gen. Frank K. Everest Jr. .............................. Cmdr, 4520th CCT Wing (1966)                        Brig. Gen. Joel T. Hall......................................................... Cmdr, 57th FWW (1987)        Mr. Johnny Gomez .................................................. 1982
                  Maj. Gen. R.G. Taylor ..............................Cmdr, TAC Ftr Wpns Center (Ret) (1967)                         Brig. Gen. John P. Jumper .................................................. Cmdr, 57th FWW (1988)            Mrs. Bebe Steelman ................................................ 1982
                  Mr. Bob Hoover.............................................. North American Rockwell Corp (1967)                   Mr. Jim Poindexter ............................... Waccamaw Corp, Myrtle Beach, S.C. (1988)                   Mr. Chris Griffin ..................................................... 1983
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Chaplain (Capt.) Charles Locklin ........................ 1984
                  Mr. Larry F. Farrell ......................................... Int’l Telephone & Telegraph Inc (1967)              Mr. Lee Greenwood .................................... Country Music Recording Artist (1989)                  Mr. Jim Beaver.......................................................... 1985
                  Gen. G.P. Disosway ..................................Cmdr, Tactical Air Command (Ret) (1968)                       Maj. Gen. Billy McCoy...............................................................Cmdr, TFWC (1989)         Mr. Dennis Lasater .................................................. 1985
                  Col. M.G. Long........................... Dir, Test Operations, TAC Ftr Wpns Center (1968)                         Brig. Gen. Thomas W. “Tiny” West ................................. Cmdr, 57th FWW (1990)                      Col. Johnny D. Duckworth .................................... 1986
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   CMSgt. Kerry L. “Lucky” Stewart ....................... 1986
                  Gen. J.P. McConnell ................................................USAF Chief of Staff (Ret) (1969)               Gen. John M. Loh ..............................................Cmdr, Tactical Air Command (1991)              Falcon AMU.............................................................. 1987
                  Mr. Keith Ferris ............................................................................ USAF Artist (1969)   Brig. Gen. Tony Tolin ............................................................. Cmdr, 57th FW (1992)      Mr. Robert Ashby .................................................... 1987
                  Maj. Gen. Homer K. Hansen ........................... Cmdr, TAC Ftr Wpns Center (1970)                             Mr. Bill Bordeleau ......................................Continental Airshow Productions (1992)               SSgt. Clarence L. Skipworth ................................. 1988
                  Col. Richard L. Ayersman ........................ Vice Cmdr, TAC Ftr Wpns Center (1971)                            Maj. Gen. Thomas Griffith.....................Cmdr, Weapons and Tactics Center (1993)                         Mr. Larry Sprague.................................................... 1988
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mrs. Myra Sprague.................................................. 1988
                  Maj. Gen. William S. Chairsell..............Cmdr, TAC Ftr Wpns Center (Ret) (1972)                                 Mr. Brian Shul ................Maj. (Ret), USAF and Author, “Summer Thunder” (1993)                           Mr. Marty Lueders .................................................. 1989
                  Mr. Rich Burnite .........................................................Manager R. Goldwaters (1972)             Mr. Mike Cooney......................................................................Aviation Artist (1993)   Col. Tommy Richardson......................................... 1989
                  Col. Cesar J. Martinez ......................Vice Cmdr, TAC Ftr Wpns Center (Ret) (1973)                           Lt. Col. Bill Towle .............................................. Thunderbirds Flight Surgeon (1994)         Mr. Jeff Brookshire.................................................. 1990
                  Mr. Arnold T. Phillips................... F-4C/D/E, Prg Mgr, McDonnell Douglas (1973)                              Steve Wynn .................................Chief Executive Officer Mirage Resorts, Inc. (1994)               Mr. Gerry Cunningham.......................................... 1991
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mr. Richard Wagner ................................................ 1991
                  Col. Wilford E. Deming III ................................................ Cmdr, 57th FWW (1974)                  Brig. Gen. John Welde ......................................................... 57th Wing Cmdr. (1994)        Mr. Kevin Harper .................................................... 1992
                  Mr. Thomas V. Jones ..........................Chairman of the Board, Northrop Corp (1974)                          Maj. Gen. Richard C. Bethurem .......................... Cmdr, Air Warfare Center (1995)                      Mr. Bill Howard ....................................................... 1992
                  Col. William L. Strand ........................................................ Cmdr, 57th FWW (1975)              Mr. Dan Reichartz .................................................President of Caesars Palace (1995)         Mr. Jay Radabaugh .................................................. 1993
                  Gen. Robert J. Dixon........................................ Cmdr, Tactical Air Command (1975)                     Mr. A. Dean Castillo .................... Chairman-CEO, Bottom Line Images, Inc. (1996)                       Mr. Jurgen Odlum ................................................... 1993
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mrs. Claudine Kelley.............................................. 1994
                  Maj. Gen. James A. Knight Jr. ........................ Cmdr, TAC Ftr Wpns Center (1976)                            Mrs. Barbara Haluszka ...................... Executive Director, Battle Creek International                   SMSgt. Bill Anderews ............................................ 1994
                  Mr. Al Bishop ................................ Director of Public Relations, Sahara Hotel (1976)                                                                            Balloon Championship and Airshow (1996)              Mr. Greg Sealy ......................................................... 1995
                  Maj. Gen. James R. Hildreth ........................... Cmdr, TAC Ftr Wpns Center (1977)                           Brig. Gen. Michael T. Moseley ................................ 57th Wing Commander (1997)                     Mr. Dave Kinnisten................................................. 1995
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mrs. Liz Kinnisten .................................................. 1995
                  Mr. Fred Lewis .............................Manager of Public Relations, Summa Corp (1977)                         Mr. Arnold Palmer ............................................................. Professional Golfer (1997)    Chaplain (Capt.) Bruce Glover ............................. 1996
                  Col. Ronald M. Clements........................Cmdr, 57th Tactical Training Wing (1978)                            Maj. Gen. Marvin R. Esmond .................... Air Warfare Center Commander (1998)                           Mrs. Shane Meider .................................................. 1996
                  Mr. Lou Edgar..................................................Restaurateur, Slugs Restaurant (1978)               Brig. Gen. Theodore W. Lay II ................................. 57th Wing Commander (1998)                    Mr. Ed Silveira ......................................................... 1996
                  Mr. John Long .......................... Logistics Specialist, General Dynamics Corp (1979)                        Mr. Sean Tucker .................................................................. Airshow performer (1998)   Mr. Ted Plana............................................................ 1997
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mr. Jim Ransbotham ............................................... 1997
                  Mr. Doc Stewart ...........................................President, Doc Stewart Chevrolet (1979)                 Brig. Gen. David L. Moody ...................................... 57th Wing Commander (1999)                   Mr. Jim Kelly ............................................................ 1997
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mr. Brian Baker ........................................................ 1998
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mr. Laurence “Nipper” Roberts ........................... 1999
60 Thunderbirds
                Lockheed Martin Support Staff                                                                  Thunderbird Public Affairs Staff

Executive Director                       Greg Hubbard                                            Managing Editor                  Capt. Guy E. Hunneyman
Consultant                               Stan Baggett                                            Art Director                     MSgt. Thomas A. Smith
Graphic Artist/Production                Barbara Golden                                          Graphic Illustrator              TSgt. Timothy P. Freese
Editors                                  Julie Sourjohn                                          Photographers                    SSgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald
Quality Assurance                        Becky Maddux                                                                             SSgt. Justin Pyle
                                                                                                 Copywriters                      MSgt. Joe Kubistek
Graphics and media support provided by                                                                                            SSgt. Bob Purtiman
                                                                                                                                  SSgt. Jason Haag

                                                                                                 Special thanks to Joe Jara and Motheral Printing



                                         U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron
                                                  4445 Tyndall Avenue O Nellis AFB O Nevada 89191-6079
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